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The Ubyssey Oct 15, 1958

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THE UBYSSEY
THE
UBYSSEY
VOL. XLI
VANCOUVER, BC, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1958
No. 11
RUSSELL BRINK
JAIRUS MUTAMBIKWA
CHUCK CONNAGHAN
Photos by Brian Johnston
Major Purposes Of WUSC
Outlined At UBC Conference
World University Service has a large part to play in bringing stability and peace to the
underprivileged and underdeveloped nations of the world, according to Lewis Perinbam, general
secretary of W.US.
In an address Friday to the 13th National WUSC Assembly here, Perinbam said, "WUS
can be an instrument to better living standards  in these countries."
Answer To
Communism
World University Service
could help retard the progress
of Communism in South America, according to a Canadian
official.
Lewis Perinbam, executive
secretary of World University
Service of Canada stated,
"WUSC interest in South America links the universities ol'
Canada wit.1* those in South
America, and will inevitably
lead to a greater appreciation
of the Canadian attitude and
government," stated Lewis Perinbam,  WUSC secretary.
'This will be greatly helped by a stimulating exchange
of persons and ideas between
us and South America.
Perinbam, at UBC for the national assembly of WUS of
Canada, said the major development in this year's conference
was "a tremendously increased
faculty participation. Nearly
every Canadian University is
represented by a student and
a  faculty member."
He attributed the heightened
interest to a greatly expanded
programme in WUSC, and a
"good deal" of growth of the
educational programme, especially   on   the   campus   level.
Asked to explain the unusual
amount of interest and enthusiasm shown by all the delegates,
he attributed it to the stand-
ins committee personnel who
have been "working throughout
the year, and thereby coming
to the Assembly having given
the problems a lot of thought."
Mr.   Perinbam   congratulated
the UBC committee on what he
termed  "a  splendid  assembly",
(Continued  on Page 4)
See ANSWER TO
"Two-thirds of the world's
population lives in utter human
depravity," said Perinbam. He
stated the major troubles in the
world today are attributable to
this.
EDUCATED LEADERSHIP
"It is out of educated leadership that any change will come,
he said. The role of WUSC, he
maintained, is lo provide books,
health plans and other student
needs.
Perinbam outlined the three
major functions of WUS; to provide material aid to needy universities; to conduct a program
of international education; and
to conduct a program of research undertakings pertaining
to university problems.
AGE OF CHANGE
"We live in an age of tremendous social, economic and
political change," Perinbam
stated. "This makes us more
aware of  national  differences."
"But one of the things that
holds the world together is the
university community, and WUS
is an instrument of that community," he said.
Canadians, Perinbam said, [
must reject the idea that Canada !
is a "donor" country and that j
in aiding poorer countries she!
is being noble.
HELP THEMSELVES
"We are not doing things for
other countries, but helping
them to help themselves," he
said. "They in turn will be able
to help others. It is mutual aid,
rather than material aid."
Speaking of Canada's role in
WUS, Perinbam pointed out that
Canada has been a leader in
international affairs,
Her universities, he said, are
"even more uniquely fitted" for
leadership in WUS.
NFCUS Gives
Quebecers
Full Support
The National Federation of Canadian Universities has given
its complete support to Quebec students in their bid for financial
aid and student autonomy.
USC MEMBERS MEET
AT NOON TODAY
All U.S.C. members are
asked to attend a meeting in
the Boardroom today at
noon.
Duplessis
May Lose
Election
Maurice Duplessis will lose
the next provincial election.
This opinion was voiced by
Marvin Jay, president of Sir
George William's College, a
member of the Quebec Association of Universities, when interviewed by a Ubyssey editor
Friday.
The QUA* is trying to get a
hearing with Duplessis to present a brief on University financing and student assistance.
"If he (Duplessis) loses this
and has to see us' he has lost
the next electtion?" stated Jay.
Duplessis has continually refused to see representatives of
the QUA although he granted
a hearing to the University Ac-!
tion League which many claim!
is backed by the Union National,]
Duplessis' parly. |
"The University Action Lea-1
gue is made up of individuals
who claim that while they don't
represent students they do represent student wishes," said
Jay.
"This is debatable since the
organization was formed during
the university vacation and they
have no members from within
English speaking universities in
(Continued on Page 4)
See DUPLESSIS
NFCUS support of the UBC
motion to declare the student's
fight to criticize was "surprisingly good", according to AMS
president Charlie Connaghan,
Connaghan, who has just returned from the NFCUS conference at Ottawa University,
called the motion which he
sparked, "double-barreled",
Other UBC delegates were
Russell Brink and Jairus Mutambikwa.
The motion covers both the
present problem in Quebec,
where student editors have been
expelled for criticisizing the Duplessis government, and "those
schools anywhere which have
censorship of the student's right
to criticise", Connaghan stated.
The motion received support
from all Canada including some
"very surprising quarters", according to Connaghan.
The sole dissenter was University of Toronto. They felt that
although they agree with it in
principle, they could not vote
yes  in  fact,  Connaghan  stated.
Marvin Jay, president of a
Quebec University termed the
resolution a vote of confidence
for the Quebec Association of
Universities   which   is   fighting
Blood Drive
Results Out
The Red Cross' week-long
blood drive in the University
has been termed a success.
Col. W. A. Freeman, blood
donor panel organizer for Vancouver, said, "We are very
pleased and satisfied with the
results of the drive, and especially with the number of students that turned out for the
first time:  (47'6)."
He went on to say that the
Red Cross objective was 1400
pints per week, and that the
student body met this figure and
then some.
The total number of pints
given was 1503, with 398 rejections, making a total clinic attendance   of   1901.   students.
Faculty standings are:
Forestry a way out in front
vvith 223% of their quota, or
74% ol: the faculty donated.
Next in. line are Theology, 188%
of quota, Nurses, lf>3%, agriculture, .112%. and engineering,
97'';.. At the Dottom of the list
are Architecture, 18%, Grad,
Studies, 19%, and Law with
20%,
for financial aid and student au>
tonomy in Quebec.
"The resolution condemns all
such groups as the University
Action League (a Duplessis supported group which claims to
represent students) for attempting to subvert the legal authority of he Quebec Associaion" he
said.
"The resolution supports the
struggle of the six presidents for
student autonomy," he said.
The UBC motion was passed
at the student council meeting
here one week before Connaghan left for the conference.
Support of the plan had been
pledged previously wfhen Manitoba Student Union president
told  Connaghan:
"I am in complete agreement
with you that Quebec students
should receive the support of
students from other universities."
'Tween Classes
Canada and Far East
Topic of Debate
DEBATING UNION — Members and anyone interested are
asked to attend an Open Debate on Thursday noon in Arts
100. Topic: Resolved that Canada supports the United States
policy toward Quemoy and Mat-
sui. Everyone welcome.
PRE-MED SOC — Present a
film on Cancer today at 12.30
in Buchanan 100. Door charge
of 25c for non-members. Members please attend. Everyone
welcome.
PARAPSCHOLOGY SOCIETY
— General meeting Wednesday
noon in Buchanan 216. Report
on the recent E.S.P. contest and
presentation of the prize, also
election of executive. All welcome.
PRE-SOCIAL WORK — Presents Pat Blankenbach speaking
on the opportunities available
for volunteer workers in the
field of Social Work.
RUGBY CLUB — Rugby films
will be shown in Room 214,
Memorial Gym  12.30 today.
UNITED NATIONS CLUB —
Delegates for model General Assembly and anyone else interested in taking part will meet today at  12.30 in Buchanan 214.
NEWMAN — Mass will be
said at 4.30 today in St. Mark's
College Chapel.
(Continued on Page  5)
See 'TWEEN CLASSES
The UBC Thunderbirds Win One At Last PAGE TWO
THE   UBYSSEY
Wednesday, October 15, 1958
THE UBYSSEY
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Student subscriptions $1.20 per year (included in AMS fees). Mail
subscriptions $2.50 per year. Published three times a week
in Vancouver throughout the University year by the Student
Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society, University of
Britisii Columbia. Editorial opinions expressed herein are those
of the editorial staff of the Ubyssey, and not necessarily those of
the Alma Mater Society or the University. Letters to the Editor
shou.u not be more than 150 words. The Ubyssey reserves the
righ' to cut letters, and cannot guarantee publication of all letters
recr'ved. ..._ _...*>.
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF,   DAVE ROBERTSON
Managing Editor, Barrie Cook       City   Editor,   Barbara   Butirne
Chief Photographer, Mike Sone       Features Editor, Mary Wilkins
Editor, Special Editions —Rosemary Kent-Barber
Assistant City Editor, Kerry Feltham
SENIOR EDITOR,  JUDY HARKER
Reporters and Desk: Kerry   White, Mike Raynor.
Duty
World University Service of Canada Lewis Perinbam
made a very good point during his address Friday to the
I3th National Assembly of WUSC, which convened at UBC
Thanksgiving weekend.
Mr, Perinbam remarked on the attitude of Canadians
toward the giving of material aid to needy countries. He
said we regard our participation in such projects as the
Colombo Plan with somewhat more pride than i.s justifiable.
We consider ourselves a "donor" country — a rich
people nobly sharing the wealth with those who are not as
well off.
Mr. Perinbam points out that, for a number of reasons,
this is not the proper attitude.
For one thing, those countries who receive aid resent
a condescending attitude on the part of the donor. This
resentment is only to be expected, but it will develop into
international ill will.
Further, it is not the fault of the inhabitants of that
two-thirds of the world which lives in ''utter human depravity," as Mr. Perinbam puis it, that ihey are in such a
state.
They are doing their best to better their own living-
standards, and we are only helping to speed up that process — ''Helping others to help themselves," in Mr. Perin-
bam's words.
But by far the most important flaw in the thinking that.
leads Canadians to pat themselves on the back because they
participate in mutual programmes of aid is this:
The people of Canada have no right to the wealth they
enjoy,
It is purely by chance that any native Canadian wa.s
born here. He did not determine where he wa.s to be born.
The mere fact of his place of birth is no indication that he
is any more or any less deserving of prosperity than anyone else.
And even those Canadians who came here by their own
choice and through their own efforts — they brought only
themselves. Canada's wealth of natural resources was here
waiting to be developed.
Canadians certainly have a right to be proud of their
achievements in developing the wealth that is here.
We'll overlook the fact that the prosperity Canada now
enjoys could not yet have been realized had it not been for
an abundance of foreign capital and foreign personnel.
But we can't overlook the fact while man may be born
free, he can not expect to be born rich,
ONE MAN'S VIEW:
U
How Sputnik
Affected Me
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
Before starting to write this
article I had an argument with
myself telling me that:
"You should not put down
your poor ideas, especially not
for publication in a paper.
What do you think?
Would anyone read them?
You are    a    D.P. without a
country that you may call your
own. And in whose name are
you speaking?
Well, "he" would not listen
to my warnings, so here are
"his" poor ideas: All the world
was surprised a year ago.
Sputnik was everything on
broadcasts, on TV's and in the
newspapers,
"Russia beat the States!
Man's first step towards space!
We are in danger, the Red
moon is spying!" — were the
first statements.
Questions like: "From where
did Sputnik arise? What is
the reason of our poor scientific development" were asked
later. There were discussions
everywhere.
I heard many of them, and,
finally, I had one with me.
Well, what do you think. Is
it not surprising the hated Communist empire came up with a
scientific wonder. Where is
your beloved West? I asked
myself.
"Do not be cynical" was his
answer. You must not forget
other facts. Don't you see the
lives of murdered hundreds
and thousands of Ukranians,
Estonians, Polish and Hungarians? These are following the
Red moon, orbiting with it.
And the designers of that other
— one can not shoot them down
even if they try the newest
ICBM's.
"Do not get excited." I said.
"If you consider that there is
a revolution going on in our
times, a revolution for Socialism, for Communism, which
will do good for everyone. And
the individual will have his
own rights. If you consider
these, then you won't say that
a little waste in human lives
is really a waste.
"Yeah, but tell me what kind
of democracy is that where the
II
people have only one choice,
the Communist party? Or can
we trust reports which tell us
about power dams, but will not
say anything of those war prisoners who built them? What
can we think of students who
can not choose their philosophy
and are forbidden to discus3
political problems with their
visitor western colleagues," 'he'
replied, and continued:
"Sputnik has opened many
eyes and guided them to the
right direction. Those who
live behind the Iron Curtain
also hope that if the West does
not hear them, at least, will see
the Sputnik and the innocent
lives of those whom had been
murdered and are following the
Red moon," "he" told me.
Then a friend of mine came
in and called me to movies. I
could not finish the discussion
with myself, But is there a
conclusion that would convince
which one of "us" was right?
Future will prove it, I think.
Yours truly,
J. B. — (Fourth Year
Hungarian Forestry
Student).
SCM Defends Principle
Of Red China Recognition
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
After reporting in the September 30th issue of The Ubyssey one of the resolutions of
the Student Christian Movement National Council which
asks the Canadian Government
to recognize the political reality
of Communst China, you printed in the issue of October 7th
an unsigned letter which infers
that this action was not Christian-like.
As a member of the 1958
S.C.M. National Council, I
would like to defend the position of the S.C.M. and all other
groups or individuals who hold
a similar view.
In the first place, diplomatic
recognition of Communist
China does not imply approval
of the Communist regime or the
abandonment of an independent Formosa. If only those
governments of which the Western democracies approved were
recognized and allowed into 1he
U.N., that organization would
be little more than a western
alliance, unable to fulfil its
function in settling disputes affecting the two world power
blocs.
Thc author of the letter
printed in The Ubyssey points
out that Communist China
should not be allowed into the
U.N, because her people do not
have democratic elections as
we know them.
In addition to other communist countries and some Arab
and South American countries,
Nationalist China does not have
free elections herself.
No one asked the Formosans
whether or not they wanted
Chiang and the U.S. to turn
their land into a military base
in the hope of someday recapturing the mainland.
It is also pointed out in the
anonymous letter that it would
not be right to replace the representative of Nationalist China
with one of Communist China
in the Security Council, because it was Nationalist China
that helped the Allies win
World War II. Surely this argument needs no more comment
than that governments change
in all countries and whether it
Ls by peaceful or revolutionary
means, this change has to be
recognized sometime, or organizations such as the United
Nations would fast become obsolete and totally ineffectual.
Surely ignoring a country because we don't happen to approve of its form of government
is not a Christian-like attitude.
By recognizing Communist
China and by admitting her into the U.N., we may be able to
understand each other's position more clearly and eliminate
many of the causes of friction
which threaten to bring about
the extinction of both Communist and non-Communist nations.
Yours truly,
BRUCE CAMERON
Dis mo y
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
It was with a considerable
amount of dismay that I noticed
a poster prominently displayed
on the campus urging freshmen
to "Follow the Pack" in supporting a particular candidate
for Frosh Council.
Although I wish to cast no
aspersions on the character of
this candidate -— I'm sure lie
has the lushest qualifications.
I feel that his campaign should
appeal to the intelligencia of
this institute of higher education rather than to a homogeneous mass of humanity lacking
the initiative to think for themselves. . - ■     .
I was incensed with the feeling that this slogan was an insult to the intelligence of 1400
individuals — and I stress individuals — who should have
the presence of mind to avoid
mass conformity at all costs.
Yours sincerely,
MIKE COOPER,
Arts 4,
Shock Too Much?
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
Congratulations t o coach
Gnup and his boys on their improvement. One outstanding
point of weakness is, however,
converts.
A team which can convert
only one TD out of six shows
something     lacking.     Perhaps
the shock of crossing the goal
line is too much.
If they could have converted,
four for four, instead of only
one, we could have won Saturday's game against Seattle.
What a feather in our caps
that would have been.
Better luck next time.
Yours sincerely,
d. Mcdonald,
Science II. Wednesday, October 15, 1958
THE   UBYSSEY
PAGE THREE
UBC's FINANCES  - PART ONE
Where Does It Come From?
UBC  Income
Explained
By MARY  WILKINS
The University of British
Columbia operates on a yearly
budget of nearly nine million
dollars.
Where does this money come
from?
Where does it go?
These are questions which
are being asked this year, when
both student fees and professional salaries face posible increases.
The university has two main
budgets. One, for capital expenditures, is made up of monies collected in the Development Fund, and funds given by
the Provincial Government.
The other is a current account budget.
At the present time, UBC has
about eight and a half million
dollars from the Development
Fund, a matching eight and a
half million promised from the
provincial government, and an
additional len million from the
provincial government to be
given over a period of len
years.
This money is for capital expenditures, such as new build-
Federal Government. It was
initiated on the recommendation of thc Massey Commission
Report, and has been in operation for four years.
Dr. Norman A. McKenzie,
President of UBC, was a member of this commission and
played an important part in
obtaining the grant.
When the grant was first instituted, the government provided fifty cents per capita. In
March, 1957, this was increased
to one dollar per capita, and a
further increase was made in
September, 1958, raising the
amount to $1.50 per capita.
This money is distributed
among all degree granting institutions in Canada, on the
basis of registration of students
proceeding to degrees in regular courses, on November 30 of
each year.
In British Columbia, the
$1,950,000 dollars now available through this grant are
divided among UBC, Victoria
College, and the Theological
Colleges.
TABLE 1
Summary of Revenue of the University
of British Columbia
April 1, 1956 to March 31, 1957
REVENUE TOTAL
Government of Canada Grant  $1,286,833.01
Provincial Government Grant   3,500,000.00
Student Fees    1,927,037.95
University Extension    115,139.08
Services and Rentals  63,289.54
Other Income  42,334.20
Gifts, Grants, Bequests and Income.- 1,587,138.96
$8,521,772.74
Ancillary Enterprises (Net) _..  56,046.33
15.0
40,8
22.5
1.3
.7
.5
18.5
$8,577,819.07      100.0
ings and expensive equipment.
The Buchanan Building, the
men's dormitories, the additions
to the Chemistry Building and
other plans for expansion on
the campus are financed from
these capital funds.
The student levy, of five dollars per year for a period of
three years, also goes into the
capital budget.
It i.s, however, the current
accounts which provide money
ior the  actual  running  of the
university.
The revenue is made up from
seven :nain sources, and the ex-
iienciitures can be broken down
into six general divisions.
Tiie following' is a detailed
explanation of the revenue
sources which make up the current budget of the university.
All figures quoted are from
the President's Report for 1956-
1957, the latest published financial report.
ITEM 1:
Government of Canada Grant,
$1,286,833.01  — 15%
^     This grant comes from the
ITEM 2
STUDENT FEES
$1,927,037.95—22.5%
Student fees are the monies
paid by all students to take
courses offered by the University.
At UBC, the fees vary from
$246 per year for students in
the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, to $451. per year for students in the Faculty of Medicine.
In 1954-55, student fees provided 24.01 per cent of UBC's
income. The following year,
Ihis     decreased     to     23.43%,
ol.
the
income  was
brought in by student fees in
1956-57, and at present, the percentage  has fallen  to   17.2'"< .
This percentage is low, when
it is compared lo other Universities across Canada,
On ihe basis of lhe 19S6-57
budget of six Canadian universities picked at random, only
one, ihe University of Alberta,
contributed a lower percentage
lo current income from student
fees.
THE FEDERAL DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS has awarded a contract for the construction of this new Science Service Laboratory at the University of B.C. Campus. Specified
date for completion is June, 1960. It will provide income for UBC under Services and Rentals, when it starts purchasing power, steam and light from the University.
Alberta students paid for
only 20% of their universities
expenses through fees.
The highest percentage came
from Carleton College, where
37.8% of the University's revenue comes from student fees.
Other figures were: Toronto,
25%; McGill, 34.4%; Manitoba,
24.8% and Queen's, 36%.
To provide 30% of the total
revenue, UBC students, would
on the basis of 1956-57 figures,
each have to pay $71 more a
year.
ITEM 3
UNIVERSITY   EXTENSION
$115,139.08 — 1.3%
This is the gross amount
brought in from Extension lectures, against which costs are
charged.
In 1956-57, 106,756 persons
took part in the lecture services
offered by the Extension Department; 4,034 were registered
in non-credit evening classes;
2,178 took part in short courses
on campus, and 1,311 attended
Summer School.
The Extension Department
also maintained an extension
library, and record loan library
and offered correspondence credit courses.
ITEM 4
SERVICES and RENTALS
$63,289.54 — .5%
The money in this category
come from charges levied by
the University to affiliated colleges, to the Government Research Council, at.d other buildings on campus, for steam, light
and power, provided by the
University,
The University maintains ils
own plants for these operations
and sells the steam, light and
power to these outside organizations.
ITEM 5
GIFTS, GRANTS, BEQUESTS
and OTHER INCOME
$1,629,473.16
19%
This money comes, for lhe
most part, from government
and private industry, and is
earmarked for research grants,
scholarships, bursaries and
prizes.
amount is then submitted to the
Legislative Assembly for approval.
Usually the government provides all additional money
needed for the operation of the
university, which cannot be obtained from other sources.
ITEM 7
ANCILLARY ENTERPRISES
(Net)   $56,046.33 — .7%
The final item of revenue is
TABLE 2
% Contributed by Student Fees to
Current Revenue
UNIVERSITY %
UBC    (Present)  17.2
UBC 1956-57   22.5
University of Alberta 1956-57   20.0
University of Manitoba 1956-57   24.8
University of Toronto 1956-57 -.- ---   -- 25.0
McGill University 1956-57   34.4
Queen's University 1956-57   36.0
Carleton College 1956-57   37.8
Also   included   are   gifts   of the net amount of money ob-
equipment,   which   are   evalu- tained from    the    Universities
ated and added in as income. ancillary enterprises.
Income  from University  in- These   enterprises   are   such
vestments   also   comes   under things as the Book Store, the
this heading, Food Services, the Farms, the
Faculty Club, the Housing Ser-
ITEM 6 vices, and other academic acti-
PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT     vlt^ tfltal rcvenue frQm thege
„„ „„,....  .„„„, sources constitutes all the mo-
$3,500,000.00 — 40.8% ., . ,   .   t,    TT  .        ..
nIes ayartabie to the University
The  provincial  grant is  dc- for a year's operation,
cidecl  upon each  year  by  the
Board  of  Governors,  and  the '
Legislature. (Ed. Note:—Tomorrow    part
The Board of Governors sub- two of the University's money
mils a budget to the Cabinet, will be presented.   The current
which  decides how  much   the expenditures of the university
university   should     get.     This will be discussed).
AGRICULTURE   ARCHITECTURE   FORESTRY   GRADS
Contact. Our Mobile Studio now by the  Fredrick   Wood   Theatre   regarding   your
Graduation   Photograph. PAGE FOUR
THE   UBYSSEY
Wednesday, October 15, 1958
WUSC Panel to Discuss
Today's Modern Japan
THERE IS NO DANGER of swimming in polluted water at UBC as long as you choose your
bathing spot wisely. The right hand pix shows a unpolluted area, The lily pond is to be
avoided. _ Photos by Brian Johnston
Breach of Academic Freedom
Charged In Firing Of Prof.
of   United   College,; marks   about   the   reugion
Ed note: The following is reprinted from the Queens Journal, University of Queens student newspaper,
QUEENS UNIVERSITY —
(CUP)—A breech of academic
freedom has been charged in
connection with the recent firing of a faculty member of the
University
Winnipeg.
Professor Harry Crowe, former sessional lecturer at Queens
University was fired because of
views expressed by him in a
private letter to another faculty
member at Union College.
The letter was not delivered
to the intended recipient but instead was handed over to Union
College principal, W, C. Lock-
hart.
Lockharl received the letter
in an envelope postmarked
April  1.
The letter was dated March
14.
Attached to the letter was a
note saying:
"Found in college hall. We
think  you  should  read  it."
The letter predicted a Conservative sweep in the last election, and according to a
statement issued by the Board of
Regents   made    "facetious    re-
of
of
to
certain   ordained   members
the faculty."
The   letter   also   objected
the  using of professors  in  university fund raising campaigns.
The Board of Regents decided to terminate Crowe's contract
immediately and offered a year's
salary as compenstation.
The Board's explanatory statement said in part:
"Institutions of higher education which have religious affiliations of any kind must be permitted to expect from members
of their faculties restraints in
expression of opinions which
may not appear to be necessary
in purely secular institutions."
The case is now under investigation by the Canadian Association of University Teachers.
Request for investigation was
made by the Queens University
Faculty Association.
An investigation by the United Church of Canada has been
completed.    '
The investigation committee
expressed "complete satisfaction in the principal and the
Board of Regents" of Union College, Winnipeg.
"How Japanese is Japan?" is
the title of the W.U.S.C. panel
to be held Thursday in Buchanan  100. i
How well have national cultures survived in our modern
civilzation? How "westernized"
has Japan become? Is she now
a contributor to as well as a
borrower from  the West?
These are among the questions the panel moderator, Professor on Dore of the Asian
Studies Department, will consider Thursday.
The well-qualified panelists
will be Dr. Seiichi Sueoka, Professor Shigeto Tsuru, Professor
B. C. Binning, and student Tsu-
tomu Takeda.
Professor Tsuru, of Hitotsu-
bashi University, Tokyo, is well-
kown for his publication in
the field of Japanese economic
theory.
He is at UBC for three months
as a visiting professor in the
Department of Asian Studies.
Tsutomu "Tom" Takeda, a
World University Service scholarship student from Keio University, is in his fourth year of
International Studies.
Dr. Sueoka, a professor of
theoretical physics and applied
mathematics at the University
of Tokyo, is at present on a
W.U.S.C. tour of Canadian universities.
He will spend one week at
UBC under the sponsorship of
the  campus W.U.S.  Committee.
"How Japanese is Japan?" is
the first of a monthly series of
discussions to be presented by
W.U.S.C.
DUPLESSIS
(Continued from Page 1)
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plan  to take
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the province and a nominal representation from French-speaking universities."
Its membership is mainly
made up, if not toally by members of the Union National
Youth Movement," said Jay.       !
j "They are in reality subvert-
I ing the constitutional authority
j of the duly elected and appoint-
I ed representatives of the stu-
| dents," he maintained. |
Jay  feels   the  plight  of  stu-
j dents in Quebec is gaining fav-
i orable   public  opinion   through- ■
I out the province.
j SEEKING SUPPORT |
"Even the premier's own pa-
I per   in   Montreal   has   given   us
favorable coverage," he said.
i i
During    the   summer     many
members of the QAU travelled
throughout rural Quebec seeking support for the students who
are not allowed by Duplessis to
receive federal aid of any kind..
"Public   opinion   is    building,
up, even in confirmed Duplessis
strongholds,   for support  of the
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association's stand," said Jay.
"We are using radio and TV
to make people throughout the
province aware of the problem,"
\ he said.
"The Quebec Association has
i been offered all forms of political financial assistance and on
each occasion we have refused
any aid within the province,
political or otherwise," said Jay.
|REFUSED SUPPORT
! "It was refused on the grounds
that this is a non-political issue
1 and   is  an   issue    of   education
'• alone.
j     "It   appears  paradoxical  that I
I the provincial government while I
continuing to stress the constitu-
I tional rights of government re-
| fuses to recognize a duly and
constitutionally elected representative of the students."
CONSTITUTIONAL RIGHTS
(Duplessis maintains that un- :
dor the BNA act all matters of'
' education are a constitutional '
■ right of the province and therefore will accept no federal aid J
for educational institutions within  his province.
He welcomed the support given the French-Canadian universities by NFCUS at their convention in Ottawa  last week.
"It supports the struggle of
the six presidents of Quebec universities in their efforts", said
Jay.
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UK Politician
To Speak On
Middle East
Anthony Nutting, former
British politician, will speak on
campus Friday in the Auditorium.
The subject of his address,
second in a series sponsored by
the Special Events Committee,
is "Muddle in the Middle East".
FRENCH CANADA PLAYERS
The Montreal company
"Theatre du Nouveau Monde"
will present two plays near the
end of October. One of these
plays will be presented in
French, the other in English.
The company, specialists in
moliere, has made two European
tours. This is its first visit to
Western Canada.
12-STRING GUITAR
On November 6th, Pete Seeger will again be present with
his 12-string guitar, long necked banjo, tenor recorder and his
never-ending repetoire of songs.
Seeger has been called "our
best all-round folk singer". He
has a vast research knowledge
of both American and world
folk music, with its styles and
instruments.
MORE SPECIAL EVENTS
Other special events will include Langston Hughes, American poet; Karlheintz Stock-
hausen, European composer;
and others. They are under the
sponsorship of the Student
Special Events and Fine Arts
Committee.
ANSWER TO
(Continued from Page  1)
"The UBC committee enojys
an international reputation, as
well as a national one, for the
vitality of their programme,
and the leadership it gives",
As an example of that reputation he cited the election of
Gordon Armstrong to the national commitee as a "sign of
the UBC committee standing."
Mr. Perinbam stressed that
WUS is trying to improve their
publicity and public relations.
"One difficulty we find is that
newspapers are more interested
in covering dramatic events than
slow progress — another is that
there is more interest in purely
localized activities rather than
those which have more international implications," he said,
RAVEN SCREAMING
FOR   MANUSCRIPTS
UBC's literary magazine,
Raven, has issued a plea for
manuscripts,
Editor, Desmond Fitzgerald,
said in an interview Tuesday,
"We need manuscripts."
Manuscripts are being received in the Raven office,
Room C, on the second floor of
the South Brock. Wednesday, October 15, 1958
THE   UBYSSEY
PAGE FIVE
Reid Reports On Life
Of Communist Students
Students in Communist areas do not need aid from other
coi-ntries, according to Dr. Cyril Reid, UBC chemistry department.
Dr. Reid, recently returned from a visit of the educational
institutions in Russia and Communist China, made the statement in an address to the WUS assembly, Saturday.
"If a student is good enough
food, room and money will be
found for him. Ninety-seven per
cent of the students in Russia
are supported by the Government." said Reid.
Living standard of the lowest
student is above that of a laborer, amounting to about $90 per
month.
Reason for only 97 per cent of
the students receiving aid is that
about 3 per cent have been "penalized" for poor grades in the
past year.
Reason universities are becoming more and more the strongholds of the "pure" subjects,
said Dr. Reid.
"They have removed Engineering from the University of
Moscow — and of course they
never had things like Home
Economics."
Physics, mathematics, biology,
geology and geography are the
major subjects.
Journalism is also taught at
the University. "A journalist is
much higher up the social scale
there, he said. "It might be so
because the government wants
them to have a good grounding
in dialectic materialism," he
smiled.
Every student must take ai
least two years of history of the
USSR. In China, the indoctrination goes on until the final
year of school, with five lectures a week, Dr. Reid said.
Planning has a great effect on
university life, according to Dr.
Reid.
The whole communist system
runs according to plan, so that
a limitation is set on the freedom of choice of subjects to
specialize in.
Two to three time as many
successful students are rejected
in physics than in other fields.
The people who are rejected are
thereby forced to take a second
choice for specialization.
Allocations are decided on the
basis of the best student getting
into the best job fields, Dr. Reicl
stated.
'•If you are a good student,
you will have a choice of spec
ialize, and of a job after graduation," he said.
Forcing into unpoplar jobs is
done by economic means, Dr.
Reid revealed. Pay rate is so
much higher in Siberia that
there are always "plenty" of
volunteers.
There is a great deal more
pressure on the Russian student.
Reid made an analogy with
a businessman who puts all his
capital into one concern, and
must make it pay.
Residential universities are used much more in the communist
countries than here.
"This may be because indoctrination is easier when the student is away from home," doctor
Reid said.
'TWEEN CLASSES
(Continued from Page 1)
SOCIAL   CREDIT   CLUB   —
General meeting today 12.30 in
Buchanan 221, Please make an
effort to be present.
* *    *
PHRATHERES — Executive
dinner meeting on October 15th
at 6:15 p.m. at 4884 Narvaez
Drive. Dress: Campus clothes.
* *     *
CHESS CLUB — Club tournament to start tonight at 7.30
p.m. in Brock Card Room. All
members taking part or wishing
to join please attend. Officers
elected at last meeting: Barrie
Cohen, president; Mike Hag-
gerty, secretary-treasurer; Koit
Teng, PRO.
SLAVONIC CIRCLE — Presents Miss Mary Pike and her
colour slides of Yugoslavia and
Czechoslovakia in Buchanan 204
tonight at 8.00 p.m. Admission
free and public welcome.
COMMONWEALTH CLUB —
Will present two short films on
Pakistan at 7.30 p.m. tonight
in Room 354 Brock Extension.
PLAYERS CLUB — General
meeting today in Green Room.
Bring your lunch. News about
parties!
Humanist Authority
To Speak On Campus
One of the  world's leading H/umanistic  authorities  will
address UBC students on Friday, October 17.
His lecture in Room 106 of
the Buchanan Building at 8:30
p.m, Friday is sponsored by
U.B.C,'s Humanist Association.
Admission 50 cents.
Humanism is a philosophy
and mode of thought centering
on distinctive human attitudes
and ideas, an official of the Humanist Association explained.
Completely "non-deterministic" it acknowledges a maximum of free will and is against
all racial and religious prejudice, she said,
Dr, Dodd served as a Lieut.
Col. with the Psychological Warfare Branch with the Allied
Forces in Sicily in World War
Two.
He served as Secretary-Treasurer of the World Association
for Public Opinion esearch from
1950-54.
Dr. Dodd is an authority on
Social Relations in the Middle
Dr. Stuart Carter Dodd
— null. ■< ' ■■       i——— i   ii ■■ ii ii»
East and has been decorated by
the Lebanese Republic for his
work in Public Instruction.
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Q. What Is Canadian Chemical?
A. A young, progressive and fast-growing Canadian
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at Edmonton, Alberta, consists of 3 plants — a
petrochemical unit, a cellulose acetate manufacturing
unit, and a filament yarn plant. It has its own power
plant and water treating facilities to supply steam,
electricity, water and compressed air. The Company
also has technical facilities necessary to provide for
control of the quality of its products and for the
development of new processes and products.
Q. What do we make at Edmonton?
A. Canadian Chemical's three integrated plants at
Edmonton use the products of Canada's forests and
vast oil fields.,. producing for world markets high-
quality supplies of
ORGANIC CHIMICALS
CEUUIOSI ACITATI N.AKI
ACITATI YARN AND STAPH MRS
Q. What are my job opportunities?
A. Our Engineering Department is one of the largest
and most diversified in Canada. Our instrument
engineers are responsible for the control of all the
varied processes throughout the plant. As one of them
you would be utilizing your training in such practical
problems as:
1. Applying the fundamentals of physics, chemistry
and electronics, and the latest process control techniques, to interesting phases of instrument design
and application.
2. Developing new instruments to meet the special
requirements of new processes.
3. Controlling product quality within rigid specification limits.
Challenging job opportunities also exist for mechanical engineers, chemical engineers, chemistry
graduates and electrical engineers — as discussed
in other ads of this series.
Part of —
CANADIAN CHEMICAL COMPANY, LIMITED
Montreal    •    Toronto    •    Edmonton     •     Vancouver
CANADIAN CHfiMlCAl, ■*. CEl.lUt.03g COMPANY, LTp PAGE SIX
THE   UBYSSEY
Wednesday, October 15, 1958
SPORTS EDITOR,  BOB BUSH
Dcskmen and Reporters: Irene Frazer, Elaine Spurrill, Audrey Ede, Flora MacLeod, Mike Sone, Tony Morrison, Ted Smith,
John Barker and Alan Dafoe, _^____—
UBC Sports Car Club Members
Enter In Cariboo Car Rally
CROSS-COUNTRY  TEAM
LOOK  GOOD  IN  MEET
Thunderbird Cross-country members showed up very well in
local competition held at Brockton Point on Saturday.
The athletes were not affected
to any great extent by the
steady rainfall encountered
throughout the races.
Two senior events were held.
One race was ran over a six
and a half miles, while the other
was held over a four point two
mile distance.
UBC's Jack Burnett placed
third in the longer run, placing behind Paul Hendon and
Richie Nicholls of the Vancouver Olympic Club. Hendon
and Nicholls tied for first place.
Jim Moore, another strong
UBC runner was not able to
compete because of illness.
In the shorter four point two
mile course, UBC's Doug Van
Ness took first place honors,
closely followed by Bob Bush,
second and John Moncreiff,
third, both of UBC.
JV's Trimmed
33-0 by WW
A hard fast crew from Western Washington walloped the
tired UBC Jayvee squad 33-0 at
UBC Stadium Saturday before
a grandstand crowd of six enthusiastic supporters.
With their reserve strength
depleted to a mere five men and
only two after the first half, the
Jayvees faded against the well-
conditioned Washington team
after holding the visitors scoreless in the first quarter. Before
the clock ran out, Western Washington had run up five touchdowns, converting three of
them.
Women's  Intramurals
Swimming Results
The semi-finals for the Women's Intramural Swim Meet were
held at the Empire Pool on Thursday, October 9. Results were as
follows:
Individual Breastroke: Linda
Sheir, P. E.; Virginia Willis,
Education;   Val  McLean,   Delta
Jayvees put up a stout defence in the first half, playing a
loose five-four which gave them
more pass defenders. This strategy paid off for UBC when they
intercepted four passes, two of
them by stand-out George
Home, who played despite a
broken beak.
Also contributing to a good
defence against WW's single
wing were linebacker John Sage,
centre Barry Stewart and
tackles Wayne Lehman and
Harry Prout.
Most of UBC's yardage was
gained up the middle while
Western clicked on their screen
passes, the Jayvee umbrella defence preventing any long completions.
Gamma; M. McRitchie, Education; M. Murray, Education; G.
Stott, Grad, Studies.
Freestyle Relay: Education;
Frosh; Alpha Gamma Delta;
Alpha Delta Pi (I); Delta Gamma; Kappa Kappa Gamma,
Medley Relay: Education; P.E.;
Gamma Phi Beta; Frosh; Delta
Ganuma; Alpha Delta Pi.
Two events are to be re-run;
the time and date have yet to
be announced. The two events
are:
Heat No. 2, Individual Freestyle: Judy Todd, Jean Silvock,
Judy Bisson, Mary Ann Duncan, Pat Power, Katherine
Noble.
Heat No. 4, Individual
Breastroke: Jeri Wilson, Sally
Lyle, Ann Brunson, D. McColl.
Finals for all events will be
held at the Empire Pool on
Thursday, October 16.
Kyyyy
ANNOUNCEMENT
by the
ROYAL  CANADIAN   NAVY
OFFICER   CAREERS   FOR   UNIVERSITY   MEN - IMMEDIATE  OPENINGS
You can complete your present University course with subsidization, summer employment
and other benefits—and begin your career as a professional naval officer NOW!
The naval officer is a member of a challenging
and highly progressive profession. A wide
range of opportunity is open to university
undergraduates who can qualify for naval
cadetships today. There are two plans leading
to commissioned rank in the Navy about which
every undergraduate should knov/,
ROTP
The Regular Officer Training Plan, as it applies
in the Navy, is now open not only to those in
science and engineering faculties, but also to
those in other baccalaureate courses with at
least two years physics, and mathematics including calculus. It leads to a permanent commission in the regular force. Those accepted
receive basic naval training; pay and allow-
Fuil information on officer careers
in the Royal Canadian Navy, and
service in the Royal Canadian
Navy (Re-serve) can be obtained
irorn the tri-service Resident Staff
Officer on the campus, or by forwarding ihe coupon fo Officer Careers, Naval Headquarters, Ottawa.
OYAL   CA
ances during the university year of $128
monthly plus tuition fees, and a further allowance for books and instruments. Uniforms are
furnished by the Navy. Full-time annual training includes foreign cruises. Thirty days annual
leave is granted with full pay.
UNTD
The University Naval Training Divisions (open
to students in any faculty) provide basic naval
training, including assured summer employment, and lead to commissions in the Royal
Canadian Navy (Reserve).
Cadets in the UNTD in acceptable courses may
transfer NOW to ROTP. Former coder's now
holding commissions in the RCN(R) are also
eligible for transfer to ROTP.
H
by  Bruce  Taylor
While most people passed a
fairly uneventful       holiday
weekend, fifty-odd hearty drivers with their navigators suffered heartbreak and tolerated
im'ucl in lhe annual Cariboo
Rally sponorsed by the B.C.
Sports   Car   Club.
Thc three day affair, run
over some of the worst roads
in southern B.C. proved to be
an excellent test of machinery
and a trying one for participants.
The UBCSCC was very ably
represented by Jim McKenna
in a 1953 Zephyr. Performing
as McKenna's navigator was
Gaille  Fletcher.
THROUGH VALLEY
The rally began early Saturday morning and took the
cars through the valley to
Laidlaw, then up the Canyon
as far as Lytton where the
drivers spent the night. Next
day the chase led across to Lil-
looet, Bralorne and back to
Clinton. Monday the cavalcade
returned to Vancouver via Sa-
vona, Merritt, Princeton and
Hope.
Speeds on the whole route
ranged from an average of 20
mph through Vancouver to a
high of 45 mph in the Canyon. Perhaps the most difficult
stretch was encountered along
the Moha between Lillooet and
the Pioneer Mines. The average speed was quite high on
this section and mud was
everywhere.
The fatality rate was quite
high for the weekend. Less
than 35 of the original starters
found the route to their liking
and officially finished. Final
results will not be available for
a few clays but the McKenna-
Fletcher team should place
well up  in the standings.
Sunday's Totem  Rally,  sponsored   by   the   local   club,   will
not  be  nearly  as  difficult for.
the drivers or as rough on thel
cars.   Restricted  to   the  Fraser j
Valley, it will be completed in
about six hours. Total  mileage
will   b   around   125   miles.   No|
extra gear will be needed except  a   navigator   and   a   map.
Anyone   interested   can   obtain I
details at the clubroom in the j
Brock  Extension.
UBC Defeated
in Soccer Actionl
In soccer action over the week-l
ond, the Varsity Ckib of thel
second dsvt-sion, lost, to A1 peril
"A" Club, 2-0. This ,«aine \vas|
played Sunday afternoon,
The l.'t'C S'k'c-m- tmmn in i!ie|
third divs-inn lost, lo An.len Bros,
in  Liii1 o'liov  league i;:ime.
Matz and Wozny
548 Howe St.       ML'.lMTl.")
Custom   Tailored   Suits
for   Ladies   and   Gentlemen
Gowns and Hoods
Uniforms
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modernized in the new
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Special   Student   Rates Wednesday, October 15, 1958
THE   UBYSSEY
PAGE SEVEN
UBC Birds Win One At Last
Birds First Victory
Beat Puget Sound 13-7
^ifli:ii%€;s||ii^:^l|s:|S;|ss:|?|i
PLUNGING TO A WIN, UBC Thunderbirds came up with win number one in current
league play Saturday, the Birds downed the College of Puget Sound, 13-7.
MEN'S NOTICE
Swim Finals
The finals in the Men's Intermural Swim Meet will be
held on Thursday afternoon,
starting at 12.30 p.m. All
events will be held in the Empire Pool. Individuals concerned should be ready for
their event early, Results of
previous events are posted in
the change room in the Gym.
CONFERENCE STANDINGS
STANDINGS IN THE EVERGREEN CONFERENCE
TEAM
Western Washington 	
Central Washington  .._
Eastern Washington  ___
College of Puget Sound
Pacific Lutheran	
Won
2
2
1
0
0
Lost
0
0
1
2
1
Points
4
4
2
0
0
NOTE:—If UBC was still in the Conference, they would
be in third place.
JV YARDSTICK
IYardstick JVs W.W.
First   downs 7          9
Yds. Rushing     129      160
Yds.  Passing  82      163
Passes attempted    ... 13         16
Passes  completed   ~.. 5          5
Passes Intercepted 2          4
Fumbles  3          1
Fumbles lost  3          1
Basketball Practices
The following is a schedule of
the basketball practices:
Monday 4.30 to 6 p.m.
Tuesday 4.30 to 6 p.m.
Wednesday       4.30 to 6 p.m.
Thursday   12.30 to 2 p.m.
Saturday 12.30 to 2 p.m.
Practices have started, but for
conditioning only. Team selections will not be made until next
week.
By BOB BUSH
UBC Thunderbirds won in
football action over the weekend. They downed the College
of Puget Sound   13-7.
The win was the first for the
Birds in current season play,
and the first in thirteen tries
with C.P.S.
The win was the first in
three years for the Birds.
The win was the second
ever for the Birds while playing across the border.
The win gave C.P.S. their
thirteenth loss in ten years
SLOW  START
Saturday, the Birds got off
a slow and poorly played first
quarter. CPS took a 7-0 lead
after picking up a UBC kick
on the 45 yd. line and driving
down field for the initial touchdown of the game. The convert
was  made.
The first UBC touchdown
came after the Birds had been
pushed back to their own back-
field. On a CPS pass, Ray Towers stepped in, knocked down
the ball, caught it on the fall
and ran until he was stopped
on   CPS's   ten   yard   marker.
NO GOOD
On UBC's second-down
seven-to-go, Vassos went over
for a T.D. but the Birds were
penalized five yards and the
T.D. disallowed because their
backfield  was  in  motion.
Henwood threw to Vassos-
who was held on the one yard
line. Henwood scored the first
major on a  quarterback  sneak
Henwood converted to tit
the   score.
Wayne Aiken intercepted
another CPS pass and ran the
ball back to mid-field. Hen
wood tried to run the ball over
the goal line but was stopped
on the two yard line. Time
ran out before UBC could
make  another  play,
KEY PLAY
A key play in the first quarter was the result of an interception by Roy Bianco,
CPS threw a pass intended
for a player in UBC's end
zone but Blanco literally picked the ball out of the opponents hand resulting in a touch-
back for UBC.
In the second half, the Birds
dominated most of the play.
It  was  only  a   matter  of  time
TOTEM
NOTICES
Positions are open on the
Sports Section of the Totem.
Positions include photography,
writing, and layout. No experience is necessary'- Attend the
general meeting on Wednesday
in Rm. 16« of the Brock Extension.
before   UBC   scored   their   second major.
HENWOOD
It came on a CPS fumble on
their own eight yard line. Henwood again went over for the
touchdown on a sneak.
UBC's work horse in Satur-
YARDSTICK
UBC CPS
Passes            7 6
Completed        2 1
Interceptions       3 1
Ground gained passing    20 0
Rushed   320 217
Lost   _..- ...       3 25
Net     317 192
Total Yards Gained.- 337 192
First Downs      24 20
Punts _      2 3
Average     33 39
JACK HENWOOD
. . . two T.D.'s
day's game was in the person
of Roy Bianco. Bianco came
up with terrific blocks and
showed great faking ability in
his spirited drives up the field.
The backfield of Wayne Aiken, Jack Henwood, and Don
Vassos played well on UBC
offensive.
For UBC's defensive chores,
second stringers Paul Donald,
George Turpin, and Gary
Bruce  did  very  well.
WOMEN'S
SPORTS
NOTICES
CURLING — Girls interested in trying out for the Women's Curling team be at the
Women's Gym on Thursday,
October 16 at 12:30. Contact
manager Margot McQueen at
Alma 9819 for any further information.
SKIING — Dry Ski practices
will be held each Tuesday and
Thursday at 4:30 in HG 4.
Next practice will be Thursday,
October 16. Coach will be Sandra Fraser,
TRACK AND FIELD — Practice will be held on Thursday,
October 16 at 3:30 in the Field
House.
VOLLEYBALL — Regular
practices of the Women's Volleyball team, will be held at
the Women's Gym each Thursday evening, from 6:30 till 8
p.m.
GOLF — Anyone interested
is invited to attend the first
practice on Wednesday, October 15 at 4:30 in the Field
House. PAGE EIGHT
THE   UBYSSEY
Wednesday, October 15, 1958
CLUB NOTES
Controversial Film "Birth Of A Nation" To Be Shown
FILM SOC.
Thursday, and Friday, Film
Soc will present the first film
of a special series. The film
will be the controversial
"Birth of a Nation", the movie
which has caused so many riots
and disturbances wherever it
has been shown.
Two dollars entitles you to
see the four films in this series. The first one tomorrow and
Friday, the next one, "Intolerance", on October 30 and 31,
and the last two in January.
The films have been imported directly from New York.
They cannot be seen separately, but a $2 pass must be
bought for the whole series.
FALL  PLAYS
Players Club, the oldest permanent theatrical organization
on campus (42 years) is presenting its annual fall collection of plays this year on Nov
ember   13   to   15  in   the  University Auditorium.
The first play will be "The
Lesson", a controversial French
play written by Eugene Ion-
esco, and directed by Joan
ead.
The second will be "Gam-
mergurton's Needle", an Elizabethan farce, directed by Michael Rothery of CBUT.
The final play is to be "Blue
Duck's Feather and Etgle
Down", written by Rona Murray of Victoria. This play was
the winner of the B.C. Centennial Playwriting Competition, and is to be directed by
Peter Mannering.
SLAVONIC LECTURE
The campus Slavonic Club
■which tries to promote international understanding between
the West and the USSR, is
sponsoring a lecture and slides
tonight at 8:00 in Bu 205,
The slides are to be shown
by Mary Pike, a graduate student in Slavonics. Miss Pike
was in Europe for two months
this summer, and will show
slides on Czechoslavia and
Yugoslavia.
w * *
CORBETT TO SPEAK
The U.N. Club is sponsoring
Dr. David Corbett on Friday
at 12:30 in Bu 100. Dr. Corbett will speak on "World
Population Problems".
Dr. Corbett is known to CBC
radio audiences for his international news commentaries.
He is also well-known to
TV audiences as the chairman
of "B.C. Roundtable", which
he chaired on October 10, and
will chair again this week in
the absence of the regular
chairman.
KNOWN AS AUTHOR
Dr. Corbett is known to stu-
FABRIC SALE
HBC GIVES YOU THE BUTTON-HOLE ATTACHMENT
WHEN YOU BUY REGENT DELUXE STRAIGHT SEW
Normally you pay several dollars extra for a button hole
attachment . . . but HBC hands it to you FREE when you
buy this streamlined REGENT. The machine includes 7-
speed foot control, built-in sewing lamp, automatic bobbin
rewind, built-in darner, plus "snap-out" race, IT's modern,
and fully equipped . . . H.BC supplies you vvith free instruction, and guarantees your machine for 2'0 years . . .
When it comes to sewing, you can't make a better buy !
PORTABLE
69.50
$7 down, $6 monthly
Imported Wool
Tweeds
54" wide
2-99
yd.
Warm and soft. Imported
from England. Choose
navy, brown, beige, grey
or blue. Plain or millti-
flecked.
Printed
Corduroy
36" wide
1.33
Crease Resistant
Cotton
36" wide
69c
yd.
Vast quantity of border
and "all-over" patterns.
All the new Fall colors.
Washable and drip-dry.
Cotton   Print
36" wide
39c
yd.
Use this colorful array for
your dresses, blouses or
aprons. Washable and
colorfast.
yd.
Ideal for your new Fall
dresses. Choose from the
colorful array of patterns.
Very hard-wearing, washable, too.
Material
Remnants
77* 149 1"
d.
Buy these remaining
pieces of yardage for less
than half-price. Cotton,
rayon, Nylon, wool or acetate,
Rayon Suiting
56" wide
1.84
yd.
Use this material for
skirts, jumpers, suits or
children's clothing. It's
grease resistant. Blue,
grey, black, brown, navy,
pink or charcoal.
HBC Yard Goods, 4th Floor
\ INCORPORATED   2"°    MAY    1670-
dents of political affairs as the
author of many books including "Canadian Forum", "International Journal", and the "International   Labour   Review".
He is also the author of the
famous book "Canada's Immigration policy: A Critique".
His father (Percy) was the
Chairman of the Social Studies
and Commerce group at McGill
University. His uncle (E.A.)
was the founder of the Banff
School of Fine Arts in 1933
and the founder of the Canadian Association for Adult
Education in 1934.
NOTE: All material for this
column is to be submitted to
Brock Room 306, office D.
YOU CAN STILL BUY
YOUR 58 TOTEM $4
Copies of the 1958 TOTEM
are available at the Publication Office, Room 201, Brock,
at a cost of $4.00 each. Money
should be paid in at the
A M.S. office and the receipt
presented at the Publications
Office.
AUTOMOBILES
Call FRANK FRAZER at Collier's Ltd., MU 1-2311 or residence BA. 8089. New CheV"
rolets and used cars of all
makes.
•ItOHTININO NOOKir*
Crty Siwfe
•loch Swtf*
ft«l Svarf*
White $«•*•
fltlpplt CrtM ••'•*
7.95
Whether
You
HOOK IT
LACE IT
"DATS BAIT
Block Sued*
Brown Sued*
7.95
are
cuter...
let's
face
it!
Both styles in AA and B widths 4-10
STACY'S ltd
770 GRANVILLE

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