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The Ubyssey Oct 3, 1958

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 Thou
san
View  Displays
»t ya YSSEY
VOL. XLI
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, OCTOBER 3 ,1958
No. 7
Treasurer Makes AMS
Budget  Public Today
Council treasurer, John Helliwell, makes public the new budget today.
AMS constitution states that the budget must appear in The Ubyssey one week before
it is brought to council, "In order that everybody has time to complain," smiled Helliwell in an
interview Thursday.
'I  don't expect  any trouble,-^^^^^^^r^-^^-
Grants Will
Be Matched
though," he stated.
"To be approved, the budget
must first be passed by a %
majority of Students' Council.
Then, a % majority of the combined forces of WAD, MAD,
UCC and USC discuss it. Then
and 400 part-fee-paying stu.
dents, making total expenditure
for the year $374,000.
This is the first year that students are paying their $5.00 for
student housing. Total income
for the three-year plan will be
' „   $150,000
goes to a committee made up of |
four   delegates   from   each    of
WAD,   MAD,   UCC,   and   USC.
Here it must be passed by a %
majority.
Then it goes back to council
for a final vote (also a 2a majority vote) and is then the final
budget.
This year's budget will for the
first time incorporate the five
per cent "constitutional margin" which totals $11,000. This
money is for emergencies only.
Basis for the budget is a total
The   Provincial   Government
has  not altered  its  position  on
the matter of matching grants,
Other   major   innovations   in ; Ambry Roberts, head of the UBC
the    budget    include    granting i Development Fund slated Thurs-
Special  events  committee  50% < day.
more money for this year. j     (A downlown newspaper in a
Helliwell, in summing up the j report yesterday stated that the
budget,  said that  the  emphasis j grant would not be matched by
on   the   budget  this  year   is  to, the Government),
provide    every    student     with
more services, such as the Special Events committee and the
Art Fund.
''Every student, having invested this much money in the
Society should take advantage
of this investment," he slated.
CLUB  NOTES
VOC Display
Wins First Prize
(Ed. Note: — This column is written by a reporter appointed by UCC. Her views are not necessarily those ol
The Ubyssey. Only changes in style and puncuation are
made by The Ubyssey staff).
The bands played, the cheerleaders shouted, little Sputniks
fluttered, and Frosh wandered hand-in-hand through the
crowded colorful Clubs' Day presentation Thursday in the
Armouries.
More than 60 clubs signed up approximately 4,000 members
during the two hours.
The winning displays were:—
First prize, Varsity Outdoor
Club; Second prize, Varsity
Christian Fellowship; and Third
prize, Aqua Society.
VOC, last year's winner, with
Salgos, born in Hungary and
educated in Paris, has travelled
extensively throughout t h e
world, and has made Mexico his
adopted homeland.
His paintings all have a true
presentation of a Sasquatch in a : Mexican flavor, and combine
Sasquatch cave, displayed a log; typical Mexican folk scenes vvith
cabin this year. ! a personal expression  which  is
The   judges   felt   this   display ] completely international,
best demonstrated    the    Club's'     Salgos has had over forty ex-
purpose and was also  the  most i hibils,   and   is   at   present   on   a
striking. ! cross-Canada tour.
"The confusion that has
arisen," he said, 'is probably
due to the fact that the government is not going to match any
money until next year on account of previous public works
commitments."
Roberts was not concerned
about this, however, as thc cash
on hand—3 million—is sufficient to start all projects planned.
He added the fund is still
open to pledges and will stay
open al least until the end of
Ihis year. Currently, pledges
and donation have reached
S3,438,619, while the cash on
hand amounts to S3 million.
There iy a previous grant of
Sf'l million per year for ten years
of which $2 million has been
spent on thc Buchanan Builling.
"In my opinion," said Registrar J. E. A. Parnall, "there is
no serious problem, as the Government won't back down on
its promise, bul we will probably have to wait until next
year before they can start
matching the donations."
Representative of the public
spirit towards the Fund is a
donation raised by 38 Japanese
fishermen from Port Edwards
amounting to 150 dollars, ac-
according to a Development
official.
K. WHITE
SPONSORING ARTIST j
Today  at   12.30  in  Buchanan
205, El Circulo Latino America-;
no, the campus organization primarily  for Spanish  students,  i.s.
sponsoring   the   famous   artist, j
Andreas Salgo, who will be lecturing   (in   English)   on   modern
art,   with   specific   reference   to
his own work,
The lecture will also include
coloured slides and some of Sal-
go's most famous paintings,
NATIONAL ASSEMBLY |
The World University Service '
of   Canada   is   holding   its   thirteenth   National   Assembly   next
week-end   al   the   University   of
British Columbia.
Delegates from seventy-five j
world universities will attend, I
including such people as Dean >
Gibson, the WUSC National,
Chairman, and Doctor Seiichi I
Sueoka, the Professor of Phy-'
(Continued on Page 4) , j
See CLUB NOTES '
Frosh Meet
Noon Today
Only ten nominations have
been received to date for the
six positions on the Frosh
Council,
There is a meeting today at
12.30 in Physics 200, for all
Frosh, lo receive final nominations.
Campaigning today at 5 p.m.
and ends Thursday, October 7,
with the campaign speeches.
Voting takes place Friday,
October 8, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Hard Sell Dominates
Frosh and Money Part
Thousands thronged to the Armouries, Thursday noon, to
view the attractions of the numerous clubs on campus.
They jammed  the  aisles  be-1 "    " "
tween the exhibits and gazed
over or between their fellows
at the various displays.
Those at the edges were beset
by upper-classmen club members with a receipt book in one
hand and a blank cheque m the
other, according to an Arts I
Ubyssey observer.
SWARM RISES
Rising from the swarm was
the road of conversation against
a background of brass provided
by the UBC Boosters Club
Band.
Of the exhibits those of the
Spanish Club were most striking.
The native handicrafts of the
Spanish Club, the modernistic
pictures of the Art Group and
the students in national dress of
the Slavonic Association added
colour to the background.
MONEY DEPARTS
In the words of one Frosh,
"Club's Day is like registration,
where the Frosh and his money
are soon, parted."
"It   introduces   the   Frosh   to
the various activities which are
carried   on  outside  the   lecture
halls and gives them an oppor-
| tunity to choose what they will
I do in this second and most im-
; portant facet of university life,"
commented Kary Fatham, Arts 3.
DISPLAYS BETTER
UN   Club   members  felt   that
the   displays   were   better   this
year   and   that  the   use  of  the
. loudspeaker to announce events
; helped to organize it better.
:     They   also   felt   that   the   day
I had   been   quite   successful   for
them as they had signed about
' eighty new members.
Icon^n
!
i ^^
Requests
Support
AMS president Chuck Connaghan has received no reply to
his letter to all Western Canadian Universities requesting
their support of Quebec students' bid for autonomy.
The letter was sent following
the Student Council's ratification of a proposal to lend all
possible support to French Canadian students through NFCUS.
Connaghan leaves for the NFCUS convention Saturday.
"I expect a reply from these
people Saturday or Monday,"
he said.
The UBC motion passed Monday urged all members of NFCUS to voice disapproval of
present provincial policy governing university financing in
Quebec.
Connaghan, Jairus Mutambikwa
and Russell Brink will be the
UBC delegates.
Tween Classes
Mexican Art j
Show Today
EL CIRCULO—Andres Salgo,
Mexican painter to discuss "Ancient Mexican Art" (illustrated
with slides) today, noon in Buchanan 205.
 ii mi'	
DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE
—Try-outs for the University
Workshop Production "The
Birds" by Aristophanes will be
held today from 3.30 to 5.30
p.m. in Hut M22. There are parts
for 24 men and 17 women.
Casting is open to all students.
PHRATERES—All-Phi meeting today at 12.30 in Buchanan
106. Old and uew members welcome to meet executive and
presidents.
PRE-SOCIAL WORK SOCIE-
TY—Monday, 6 October at 12.30
in Buchanan 205: All interested
students welcome.
STUDENT CHRISTIAN
MOVEMENT—There will be a
student reception in the Mildred
Brock Room from 3.30 to 5.00
this afternoon. Everyone welcome.
WOMEN'S UNDER GRADUATE SOCIETY — Presents
"Football for Ferns". Speakers:
Jack Henwood (Thunderbirds)
and Frank Gnup. Friday noon
in Physics 201.
CREATIVE DANCE Fof R o
CREATIVE DANCE
THEATRE—Wanted, young artists. Organizational meeting
Friday, October 3rd, 12.30 to
1.30 in Hut G4. Musicians, designers and dancers invited to
attend.
JAZZ SOCIETY — Presents
Vancouver's first lady of song—
Eleanor Collins—with the Doug
Parker Trio. 12.30 Friday in
Auditorium. M e m bers free,
others 25c.
PHARMACY UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY—Brock Dance
Friday, 3 October 9.00 to 12.00
p.m. Admission $1.25 couple,
75c stag. John Frederickson's
Orchestra.
PSYCHOLOGY    CLUB     —
Meeting of new members Friday at 12.30 in HM2 (Psychology building alongside the armouries). There will 'be a social
get-together and refreshments
after the meeting.
UBC MEN'S GRASS HOCKEY—First practice men's grass
hockey Ihis Saturday 2.00 on
playing'    fields    behind    Brock.
New players welcome.
s  .
UNIVERSITY  BAPTIST  rso-
UNIVERSITY   BAPTIST
CLUB—General  meeting   today
(Continued on  Page  5)
See 'TWEEN  CLASSES PAGE TWO
THE   UBYSSEY
Friday, October 3, 1958
TB£ UBYSSEY
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Student subscriptions $1.20 per year (included in AMS fees). Mail
subscript ons S2.50 per year. Published three times a week
in Vancouver throughout the University year by the Student
Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society, University of
Britisu. Columbia. Editorial opinions expressed herein are those
of the editorial staff of the Ubyssey, and not necessarily those of
the Alma Mater Society or the University. Letters to the Editor
shoe j not be more than 150 words. The Ubyssey reserves the
ngh to cut letters, and cannot guarantee publication of all letters
recr,ved.  «**..*** J
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF,   DAVE ROBERTSON
Managing Editor, Barrie Cook       City   Editor,   Barbara   Bourne
Chief Photographer, Mike Sone       -Features Editor, Mary Wilkins
Editor, Special Editions — Rosemary Kent-Barber
Assistant City Editor, Kerry Feltham
SENIOR EDITOR,   JOHN WRINCH
Reporters and Desk:— Bruce Richer, Olive Rhodes, Kerry
White, Bryan Carson, Judy Harker, Judy Coppenthorn, Sharon
Francis, Merv Magus, Madeline Bronsdun, Mitzi, Averbuch, and
Jerry Waldman.
Charm? Dignity?
There seems to be an inordinate amount of interest taken
lately in Canadian university coeds.
Tuesday we had The Vancouver Sun devote a good part
of its front page to a condemnation of UBC coeds' carelessness in dress.
The article made clear how UBC girls rate in the fashion
■ world — they don't. Our girls are slobs, we're told. They
need a course in charm. "It will get them a lot farther in
life than a working knowledge of nuclear fission," says The
Vancouver Sun.
Girls at McMaster University in Hamilton are told a
■ different story. They're told they'll be expelled if they enter
beauty contests.
"It isn't dignified," McMaster's board of governors said
in making the edict.
Well, it's always nice to see people taking an interest in
us university students.
But if the nature of their interest in us is merely to
ensure that we are charming and dignified, they have missed
the point ol why we are at university.
We're not at universily to learn charm and dignity. If
we haven't achieved a measure ui charm and dignity by the
time we got  to universily, wo ve:y probably won't ever be
ciiai rning and digmi'ied.
In the meantime, what we ch) with our spaio tune and
what we 1-jok like are no one's concern, but our own,
We came to university to set an education.
Poll "Unjustified"
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
I would like strongly to protest the publication of your
Thursday article concerning
the UCC's new Clubs' Column.
As a long-time student poll
writer myself, I suspect your
article of being biased, inaccurate and possibly invented.
More than 50 students may
have offered their opinions on
the new column, but exactly
nine of their comments were
printed, seven against and only
two in favour. Why the discrepancy?
Item:—If the campus' literary magazine's editor had not
read the first column then his
comment on it — by all journalism ethics — should not
have been printed.
Item:—The column was criticized for "lack of newsworthy
items." Clubs' Day, the column's subject, is the most
newsworthy item of the year
for UBC's 4,000 clubs' members.
Item:—"The story didn't say
anything." In my opinion, the
story said all there was to say
about Clubs' Day — and then
some.
Item:—"The story was far
too long," The story was 30
inches — the exact column
length the Ubyssey had previously requested.
Item:— "The story was not
fit for a University newspaper."
Would Miss Fraser, the named
quotcr of that statement care
to write a better and more accurate story? I for one would
like to see it.
Item:—"The third year student who having attended
Clubs' Day before, "wasn't interested" in a new story. There
are other people on campus besides yourself, young lady, and
some of I hem. namely the Frosh
-— haven't seen a Clubs' Day
bet sire.
Thank you. Harold Rirheland
for savins.1, the column is a very
"good idea". You're right. —
II  is.
In conclusion, I'd like to
state that running a campus opinion poll on a column that has
HAVING
A
ARTY?
RENT A
EBBURG
JUKE BOX
appeared exactly once is the
most unjustified, stupidest,
poorly-timed idea I have ever
heard.
Yours very sincerely,
ROSEMARY KENT-BARBER,
Arts 4.
(Ed. Note: — The Ubyssey
polled 50 students, 42 of whom
disliked the Clubs' Day column.
We didn't print all lhe quotes,
because we didn't have space
for them; but those we printed
were representative. Miss
Kent-Barber, however, is entitled to her opinions).
Hideous
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
The different forms of male
attire seen on the Campus
range from the hideous to the
amusing, and it is a great pity
that the authorities of the Arts
and Education faculties, especially have issued no ruling on
this important matter. After
all, the University is a seat of
learning, and students should
do everything in their power to
uphold the dignity of such an
institution.
However, at present, I cannot
see any dignity in the appalling
garments worn by the majority
of undergraduates, and with
the recent influx of Freshmen,
the wearing apparel seems to
be even more dreadful and
bilious-looking.
In the majority of European
Universities academic dress is
worn, and ties and jackets are
compulsory in all educational
establishments, with the exception of those catering for the
very young. I am pleased to
say that our Faculty of Law
follows the European way and
has a set standard of dress: they
at least give an impression of
being gentlemen.
By attempting to impose furlher restrictions upon our poor
down-trodden youth, I will no
doubt incur lhe wrath of the
higeer ranks of educational
psychologists, but I feel very
strongly on this subject, as also
clo many of my friends, and I
hope that some ruling is imposed within the very near future.
Yours truly,
C. B. MEERES,
Arts IV.
Drawing of Illustrations —
(Charts, Graphs, etc.). For all
Photographic assignments —
Contact. JOHN WORST, licen-'
sed Photographer, 3250 Heather Street. Phone DI. 3331
or U.B.C. Local 266.
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He Fooled Them
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
With regard to the article by
Wayne Lamb concerning the
spirit of the Frosh, I would
recommend that the senior editor look below the surface before he pronounces judgment
upon us.
I don't think he, nor any of
the omniscient upperclassmen
realized that this year's frosh,
at least some of them, are superior to previous generations.
This year's crop does not
have to stoop to physical violence in order to defend themselves, particularly when the
Aggies seem to have the idea
tho* all who wear the blue and
gold are one of them.
Due to the fact that a number of schools in the vicinity
have blue and gold as their pennant, I was disgusted at the
ease with which I was accented
into (the upperclassmen's) 4
ranks.
Even the slide-rule-wielding
Engineers were unable to concoct a formula with which to
distinguish between upperclassmen and frosh. Is it possible
that there is so little difference?
Indeed, when I was able to
haze my fellow frosh with a
gang of redshirts, aid in the
operation of the dunking barrel
— and even be chosen as a '
representative of the Aggies to
appear on CBUT T-V news, I
wonder where the blame for
lack of initiative and spirit
should be placed.
If the Engineers were disappointed with the frosh, how
much more do you suppose I
was disappointed and disgusted
with them for being so naive!
Yours sincerely,
W. H. LINDENBACH
Diploma Course
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Course consists of 56 lectures
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General Semantics
This course consists of 12
Saturday evening Lectures beginning October 4, 8.30 p.m.,
and deals with that phase of
linguistics concerned with
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changes of speech forms.
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THE   UBYSSEY
PAGE THREE
SPUTNIKS ANNIVERSARY ■ ■ PART It
How Has Sputnik Affected Us?
Student Opinion Echoes
Concern About Education
(Ed. Note:—This is ihe second
of a two-part article commemorating the first anniversary
of the launching of Sputnik.
In Thursday's Ubyssey, the
professional view was given.
Today we present the student
opinion).
By MARY WILKINS
An increased concern about
science, education and the
humanities — these are the
effects of Sputnik on UBC
students.
The   same   answers   which
professors gave on Wednesday, were echoed by the students yesterday.
NO DEFINITE OPINIONS
Although many students
when first approached, seemed to have no definite opinions, once they started talking they began to realize just
how many changes have resulted from the scientific advances
during the past year.
Perhaps the most direct
retort came from Madelaine
Nelson,  a  second  year  Home
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Economics student, who, when
asked "Has Sputnik had any
personal effect on you?" replied, "Yeah, FEAR!"
She clarified this remark
by adding, "Spunik has made
us conscious of the technological advances that Russia has
made, and which we have not,
which could mean our anihila-
tion in a very short time."
MORE   CONSCIOUS
Five coeds caught at lunch
in Brock agreed that Sputnik
had certainly made the Western World more conscious of
its failures.
One of the girls, Carol Sinclair, Ed. 4, pointed out that
the public was no longer
taking public schools for gant-
ed.
"Well, it's about time they
smartened up" put in Sally
Lyle, Ed. 2.
"And it's lime the States
stopped giving credit for such
things as underwater basket
weaving" added Barb Keailey.
Arts II.
The Russians have a better
attitude towards education
agreed the girls.
The Americans think too
much along the line of the
average, remarked Tanni
Campbell, Arts 2.
GIVES, NEEDED. IMPETUS
"Yes, there is too great a
tendency to push the brainy
child into other activities, to
make him "all round" remarked Sally.
All the girls thought that
this was one of the reasons
for the Slates' failure to
measure up to Russia in scientific achievement.
Down in the stacks of the
library, Phil Tingley, Commerce 3, and Al Rimer, Arts
4, were asked their opinion on
Sputnik.
The furor over Sputnik has
given education the impetus
it needed, according to Al.
"A good thing? Certainly!
Because education is the ans-
ExportA
F'ilflR TIP
CIGARETTES
SPUTNIK IS DISCUSSED over coffee in the Brock Cafeteria by four UBC students. From left to right: Tony Pan-
tages, Law; Joe Thomas, Arts 3; Mary Murphy, Arts 3;
and Lome Topham, Law.
wer to everything. It is the
means lo a well-informed and
thinking public."
"Al felt, however, that there
had been an overemphasis on
science during the past year.
Phil agreed that the fuss
over education was a good
thing, and said he felt that
the US had lost face over its
showing in the Sputnik race.
"It's certainly taken the
wind out of their sails," added
Al.
And finally, the boys agreed
that Sputnik had made the
public begin to realize the vast
potential in the opening up o£
space.
SCIENCE PREFERRED
Over in the Chemistry Building, three future scientists took
time out from a Chem Lab,
and spoke of their reactions to
Sputnik.
Anne Richards, a fourth-year
Chemistry Honours student,
commented:
"Well, Sputnik has stimulated scientific study and has
inspired more people to go
into science."
"This is probably most
noticeable at a High School
level, thougn," interjected Colin Godfrey, Math and Physics
Honour student, "for it is there
that students usually decide on
a career in Science. By the
time they get to University,
they've made up their minds."
"Sputnik," continued Colin,
has woken up the man on the
street. It has indicated that
science should be stressed
more, but it has also stimulated lhe Arts."
HURT PRESTIGE
Gerry .Pruden, Geology III,
remarked thai, the scientific
advances had made people
think more, and want to study.
"lias Sputnik hurt, tho prestige of the States?"
"In nvv mind, it's never had
much prestige anyway." re-
tori eel Colin.
The last group to ho interviewed was found once a.;ain
back in Brock Cafeteria.
Their response was much
the same as tiie other students'.
Joe Thomas, Arts 3, reasserted the now familiar opin
ion that Sputnik had made us
aware of Russia's achievements in the educational field.
"It has ejected us out of
our false sense of security and
made us accept a realistic idea
of Russia's potential," he said.
The Russian advance over
the West is primarily due to
Soviet's more direct attitude
to Science, continued Lome
Topham, a Law student.
"It's made the world smaller," said Joe.
"But it's opened new visions"
counteracted Mary Murphy,
another member of the group.
Not all our representatives
were serious.
A number of students were
asked just the one question,
whether Sputnik had had any
personal effect on them, and
amiong the retorts were these:
Doug Rive, Arts I—"To me
it's just another moon in the
sky. Romantic, eh?" Gary
Strom, Arts I—"No, but I feel
awfully sorry for those poor
little dogs." Engineering student—-"II set tets all going in
circles."
Joe War, Arts I, "Very little
effect, except that it's launched new jokes."
And, of course, the inevitable, which might be all too
representative—Harold Prout,
a first year Artsman, who replied: "Sputnik? What's—? Oh
yeah, Sputnik. No, I don't
think so."
These then, were the students' opinions.
There was among them perhaps a greater concern, and,
in part, fear about Russia than
iii lhe professional  viewpoint.
On tho other hand there was
almost a vehement response to
qum-stions about our educational standards,
Almost all of t'se students
interviewed expressed the de-
sir thai we should mil fall behind in our educational system.
On the whole though, Sputnik seemed to have little personal effect on the students.
There were many sludents,
who had given little thought
to t'oe subject. And, of course,
there were a few who were
deeply interested and concerned. PAGE FOUR
THE   UBYSSEY
Friday, October 3, 1958
CLUB NOTES
(Continued from Page 1)
sics and Mathematics from the
University of Tokyo.
The delegates will be transported to the various functions
in chartered buses. Next Saturday afternoon, they will have a
luncheon at the Royal Vancouver Yacht Club where Dean Soward will preside.
Saturday evening, there will
foe a buffet dinner and social evening at the home of Ronald
Graham.
"" Monday, coffee will be served
to the delegates in the Dance
Club Lounge, while a coast-to-
coast CBC music programs is in
progress. The delegates will
serve as an audience, and some
will be interviewed during the
programme.
This WUSC Assembly has
been planned by Gordon Armstrong.
FILM SERIES
Film Soc, the campus society
which provides films for the
students and staff of UBC is beginning their weekly afternoon
film series Tuesday afternoon at
12.30 in the Auditorium.
Tuesday's program will include:
Five-minute film made up of
some of the funniest 30-second
T-V commercials; Jazz films, including Jazz Dance and Introduction to the Dance, both very
excellent films; and UPA cartoons including Magoo's Masterpiece and Robin Hoodlum.
At 3.30 and 8.15 Tuesday,
Film Soc is presenting Gina Lollobrigida in "Bread, Love and
Dreams."
Film Soc has recommended
that you buy a series pass for
$1.00, because for some films a
pass is ncessary for you to be
accepted at the door.
Film Soc has recently purchased two Charlie Chaplin comedies: "The Pawn Shop" and
"His Night Out."
The films are being donated
to the University Extension Department for distribution to
schools and other film societies,
and will be formally presented
to the Extension Department.
Film Soc will also present a
special series of films, open to
down-town audiences.
Films including "The Birth of
a Nation", one of the most controversial movies of all time, a
movie which has caused riots
wherever it has been shown, and
"Ten   Days   That     Shook     the
FALL SESSION
Commencing First and Second
Week in October
u
YOGA
n
Classe.s in all phases of Yoga
for Beginners and Advanced
Students,
# Pranayma      •  Hatha
# Giuuia      #  Raja
# Mudra      •  Mantra
# Laya (with Kriya Tech
nique)
Canada's Leading East - West
Cultural Institute presents
Public Lectures each Sunday
at 8 p.m.
YOGA JIVANA
(Yoga Life Foundation)
1(544 W. Broadway
Vancouver 9, B.C.
BAyview 9522
Write or Call for Free
Class Schedule,
World," the movie of the last
days of the Russian revolution,
produced by Serge Eisenstein,
will be shown.
These films will be brought
directly from San Francisco and
New York, and admission will be
by a subscription series pass.
No tickets for individual performances will be sold.
Film Soc will shortly increase
their power from 30 amps to 70
amps.- This will mean a clearer,
brighter picture, no change of
reels, and no flickkering, according to officials.
Their program for this year
includes; Nazi Propaganda films;
Laurel and Hardy comedies;
Henry the Fifth; and the Blue
Angel.
-!II:IH-
FOOTBALL DANCE
The first    event    on    VOC's
crowded schedule is the annual
football dance, to be held on
Saturday, October 4, in Brock
Hall, music by Brick Henderson's Orchestra.
All proceeds from this dance
are to be used to help furnish
the Club's Cabin on Mount Seymour,
This VOC cabin is modelled
along the lines of a chalet — it
has three stories, can sleep 125
people comfortably, and, in the
words of a club executive, "is at
present worth twenty-five thousand dollars."
"The Cabin is in the centre of
the club's winter activities, for
members can go up the mountain
on Saturday, ski, have a party
Saturday night, and ski again on
Sunday," said a VOC representative.
NEW MAS.. NEW PRICES
Fresh from the fabulous wardrobes of the nation's best
dressed women, we bring you . . .
models bl carnegie, dior, etc.
at Pin-money prices
The model Madam X bought in Paris this summer might
suit you . . . and the price certainly will.
Ask MONA at...
THE CLOTHES HORSE
4609 W. 10th
First store East of U.B.C. Gates
MARIANNE MOORE, American Poetess
Reading her own poetry, 12:30 next Wednesday,
October 8th in the Auditorium.
PROFFESSOR P. M. S. BLACKETT
Winner of Nobel Prize for Physics in 1958, under
hte auspices of The Royal Society of London,
speaking on:
"ATOMIC WEAPONS AND
EAST-WEST RELATIONS"
12:30 next Friday, October 10th ni the Auditorium
. . . cafe dan
enounces the new
BOHEMIAN ROOM
opening
THIS FRI. and SAT.
make reservations early by phoning
MU. 4-4034
352 Water St. Opposite Eaton's Parking Lot
4450 West 10th     -     A L 9826
WELCOMES   YOU
BILLIARDS
- and -
Exquisite East Indian Cuisine
He says he does it by Steady Saving
at the Bank of Montreal*
*The Bank where Students' accounts are warmly welcomed
Your Campus Branch in the Administration Building
MERLE C, KIRBY, Manager
PITMAN OPTICAL
LTD.
Complete Optical Services
• NEW IVY LEAGUE HORN RIMS
• CONTACT LENSES
• OPTICAL REPAIRS WHILE YOU WAIT
• IMMEDIATE APOINTMENT
734 GRANVILLE ST .
Main floor Vancouver Block
MU.   5-0928 Friday, October 3, 1958
Alma Mafer Society Budget 1958-59
NET COST OF ACTIVITIES
Per Student Total    % of Budget
* Development fund (for student
residences      $5.00 $47,300 21%
* Brock Extension Payments     $5,2.50 46,000 20%
* Men's Athletics         4.30 39,100 17%
Administration (Schedule 1)       2.45 22,000 10%
Publications         140 12,500 5%
* World University Service .-      $1,     .50 9,200 4%
* Accident Benefit Fund         .65 6,200 2.7%
Undergraduate Societies          .72 6,200 2.7%
Women's Athletics             .62 5,500 2.5%
Clubs           .56 5,000 2.2%
* Brock Management          .50 4,550 2.0%
NFCUS   .--          .35 3,150 1.4%
Conferences (inc. WUSC Assembly)          .34 3,100 1.4%
Campus Events (Schedule 2)         .31 2,750 1.2%
Registration Photos and Cards         .23 2,100 .9%
* Art Fund  _        .15 1,400 .6%
Radio Society            .10 950 .4%
Margin  -       1.25 11,000 5.0%
$24.00 $228,000 100.0%
# Allotments governed by constitution or general meeting vote.
The amounts given to the various student activities are not
a measurement of the relative merit or importance of the activities,
but rather are an indication of the financial assistance required to
maintain a desirable level of operations.
JOHN HELLIWELL, Treasurer.
Statement of Proposed Income & Expenditure
for the Year Ending May 31, 1959
Income:
DIRECT INCOME:
Alma Mater Society Fees     $222,900.00
Rental Income --.. -   1,700.00
Interest Income  1,300.00
Sundries    200.00
INCOME FROM SUBSIDIARY ORGANIZATIONS:
College Shop  $9,000.00
Publications  Sales      14,400.00
Publications Advertising    22.200.00
Men's Athletics       13,300.00
Undergraduate Societies ..     19.000.00
Clubs     ...       57,500,00
Campus Activities . _    1:3.000.00 148,400.00
$374,500.00
EXPENDITURES:
College Shop   _ $ 7.000.00
Publications Board     49,100.00
Men's Athletics     52,400.00
Undergraduate Societies   25,200.00
Women's Athletics        5,500.00
Clubs      63,500.00
Campus  Activities       18,900.00
Administration    _.. 22,000.00
Development Fund   47,300.00
Brock Extension      46,000.00
World University Service      9,200.00
 Accident Benefit Fund       6,200.00
Brock Management       4,550.00
NFCUS     3,150.00
Registration Photos  ...         2,100.00
Art  Fund        1,400.00
Margin    . . „ _ _      11,000.00
$1374,500.00
START YOUR YEAR RIGHT
COME TO CHURCH
on the Campus
The Chapel of St. Andrew's Hall
(Beside the Law Building)
A FRIENDLY PLACE TO WORSHIP
Sunday Mornings,   11.00 a.m.
Chaplain. Rev. John A, Ross, M.A., B.D., PhD..
THE   UBYSSEY
Schedule 1 -
Administration Budget
1958-59
Expenditure
Office Salaries   $13,150.00
Students' Council Expenses ,     1,500.00
Stationery and Office Expenses  ._    1,100.00
Honoraria, Gifts and Donations       1,800.00
Insurance           425.00
Telephone and Telegraph  _      2,000.00
Postage  -_   _..     300.00
Audit and Legal       800.00
Bank Charges        100.00
Public Relations Expenses      375.00
Depreciation           350.00
Repairs and Maintenance ._        100.00
$22,000.00
PAGE FIVE
Schedule 2-
Compus Events
Expenditure
or (Revenue)
Special Events $2,500.00
Student Executive Programme       150.00
Academic Symposium  ___     400.00
Leadership Conference _ _ _         800.00
High School Conference       100.00
Frosh  Orientation         (j 500.00)
Homecoming    '	
Pep Band   -"."."""""_     300.00
-w •  _   -     ,. .       $2,750.00
'TWEEN CLASSES
(Continued from Page 1)
at   12.30   in   Phy  301   to   elect
members at large.
THEATRE APPRENTICE
GROUP — Meeting at Scenery
Shop for all interested in participating 12.30 today.
RAMBLERS a!c — General
meeting.   All    members    please
MODERN
JAZZ
attend so fall sports programme
can be arranged.
N.E.C.U.S. —- Committee will
hold Meeting Monday, 6 October
at 3.30 p.m. in Men's Club room j
Brock Hall. Anyone else inter- j
ested invited to attend. !
CHINESE   VARSITY    CLUB,
—First general meeting of the j
year will be held today in HL
1 at 12.30 p.m. All members invited to attend and those wish-
ins' to join. Frosh nomination
will take place on Saturday,
October 4, in HL-4 at 1.00 p.m.
OLD TOTEM STAFF—Today
11.30 meet in Totem office.
Tuesday, 12.30 in Totem office
for anyone else interested in
working on Totem staff.
2-PANT SUITS
$75.00
TAILORED TO MEASURE
UNITED  TAILORS
549 Granville     MU. 1-4649
Do Your Thirst
A King-Size Favor
Taste That Natural
Orange Flavor
Q
drive the
smart new
A-5S
GORDON
BROS.
10th and Alma
DOUG'S
O0ZO0
BOBBY the BABOON
Who Says:
You may not know it but we
animals love publicity. We
get so used to people staring
at us all the time in the zoo,
we just want to be in the
limelight every minute.
Well, Shirt 'n Tie-Bar is going to run the pictures of a
lot of us zoo animals in their
ads and since Im the handsomest, I start tilings off today. Every (clay of week)
you'll meet another of us
publicity hounds and each
one will have a wise crack
or two and maybe a little
elope on Shirt 'n Tie-Bar because, after all, they're footing the bill. Watch for us
— won't you?
By the way, ask about
those shawl collar T-
shirt Sweaters now at
the . . .
shirt 'n
tie bar
fojtu. in. and. tin.
jone. on. PAGE SIX
THE  UBYSSEY
Friday, October 3, 1939"
WOMEN'S
SPORTS
NOTICES
Deadline for entries for the
Women's Intramural Swim Meet
is Monday, October 6. Eliminations will take place on Thursday, October 9, and the finals on
October 16. Contact your sports
representatives concerning the
following events: —• Individual:
25-yard freestyle; 25-yard breast-
stroke; 25-yard backstroke.
Three member relays —165-yard
freestyle; 165-yard medaly.
EXTRAMURALS
Oct. 3 — Golf. The organizational meeting of women's golf
will be held at noon today in the
Women's Gym.
Oct. 6 — Badminton, The first
women's Badminton practice
will take place in the Women's
Gym from 6.00 till 7.30 p.m.—
Tennis. All girls interested in
tennis be at the Field House at
3.30 p.m,
Oct. 9 — Speed Swimming.
Practice will be at 12.30 at the
Empire Pool—Volleyball. Practice to take place at the
Women's Gym at 6.30. This will,
be an organizational meeting
and first practice. Please bring,
strip,
SPORTS EDITOR, BOB BUSH
Alan  Dafoe,   Tony  Morrison, Irene   Frazer,   Elaine   Spurrill,
Flora    MacLeod,    Auclry    Ede, John Hugh Baker.
EXTENSIVE LIST
OF RUGBY COACHES
The Rugby Club will welcome all prospective players and
managers to organizational meetings: — October 8 and 9, at 12,30,
Room 211, Memorial Gymnasium.
With    an   extensive    list    of
an
coaches, Aussi John Moncrieff,
Dr. White from Commerce, returning Dave Frost and Wales
Vickery, and regulars Lai-
and Howell, every
player can expect to
a    properly   managed
Officials Require J
Officials for High School Football are required. Any student
interested and is available 3.00
p.m. Thursday and Friday,
please contact Bob Hindmarch at
the Gym.
thwaite
aspiring
get on
team.
First field practice is set for
3.30 Tuesday, October 14.
Fixtures arranged so far for
the Chiefs include Navy, James
Bay, and Oak Bay in Victoria,
and exhibition matches with the
bye-clubs in the Millar competition.
Prospective players should
have sport working out with
the likes of returning ex-Bird
Captain Bobby Morford and
new-on-Campus B.C. All-Star
full back Neil Henderson.
Experienced, backfielders Ted
Hunt, Paddy Sloan, Phil Willis
and Merl Hawes will be around.
A new scrum machine and returning regulars Gerry McGavin
and Dick Macintosh, and many
more promising players, new
and returning, will provide the
material for a fine first fifteen,
MEN'S
SPORTS
NOTICES
SOCCER — UBC soccer coach
Frank Kurucs reports that the
Varsity team of the Second Division and the UBC squad of the
Third Division have had 30 players show up for practice. Practices are on Tuesday at 4.30
p.m. and Thursday at 12.30 p.m.
— as well as Saturday at 2.30 at
the Gym Field. Teams manager
\ is Jack Morris.
I VOLLEYBALL — Coach Kurucs has scheduled practices for
the UBC volleyball teams at
4.30 on Fridays in the Gym. All
potential players are urged to
turn out.
SWIMMING — The Empire
Pool will be open for free swimming to students between the
times of 12.30 to 1.30 and 4.30
to 6 o'clock.
GOLF — First rounds of the
University Golf Team trials will
be held Thursday, October 9, at
the University Golf Course. Ail
interested please phone KErr.
5229-R or ALma 0386.
SKIING — Workouts for the
Men's Ski Team will be held on
Tuesday and Thursday at 6.30
p.m. and on Saturday at 1.00
p.m. behind the Gym. Selection
of a team will be made after a
training period at Rossland, B.C.
during tiie Christmas vacation.
SQUASH — All those interested in playing squash are invited to meet in Room 202, Buchanan Building. Friday, October
3, at 12.30.
SPORTS 'N VIEWS
By   BOB   BUSH
On the eve )f another football game on campus a question of
school spirit towards athletics arises.
It is a good question. In fact, it is a question not asked around
UBC of late — the main reason being that there is no school spirit
in athletics to question. UBC's spirit is simply degenerating and
being left to do so,
Admittedly, UBC has seldom led in football or basketball lea?
gues, but UBC teams have done very well in other fields oE
athletics. Nevertheless, just because the boys are not winning
does not mean that fellow students should not come out to encourage the team on, The players themselves have not given up, so
why should you — the spectators?
The fact that a student is on a school learn at UBC has
very little significance value lo his fellow studenl and onlookers. He is accepted as an athlete, but no full-hearted
support, interest, or admiration is displayed towards him and
his team-males.
At UBC, students do not give a damn as to how their teams
do.    Most students couldn't even tell you when or where their
teams are playing.   To UBC students the Thunderbirds, the Jay-
j vees or the Braves are just names.   The teams are not theirs.
The attitude of not actively supporting school teams will not
help team members or the reputation of UBC in the athletic
world.
This attitude must rapidly change — the sooner, the
belter. Let's hope it is overnight — in time for UBC students
to fully support their team in tomorrow's action, whether it
be a win or a loss.
A reminder to athletes interested in basketball,
start shortly and the first game will be November 14.
Practices
PHARMACY
UPORreR
By J.& M. BURCHILL
UBC Thunderbirds must have been very unlucky last Saturday in the football game with Oregon, especially when the Oregon
squad went over Cor a touchdown with only eight seconds remaining in the quarter. Just prior lo the final plays, UBC coaches
noticed that the clock had been stopped for at least twenty seconds,
giving Oregon the needed time to complete their touchdown move.
An item missed by this page Tuesday was the fact that the
Varsity Cricket Team won the Fyfe-Smlth Shield. In cricket circle
— this shield is the "big one" in local district competition,
A product of the UBC School of Physical Education, and a
member of the Vancouver Mounties Baseball team, Wally Russell
ended the '58 season with a Class "B" ball team in North Carolina.
Russell at present appears to bc looking for a likely place for
post-graduate work.
Ram Avis
It's a rare bird indeed who doesn't
care for the Rood tusie of Coke!
In fact, you mii;ht even call him an
odd hull. After all, 5H million Limes
a day somebody, somewhere, enjoys
Coea-Colsi. AU these people
just can't be wrong!
SIGN OF GOOD TASTE
AY 'COKE' OR 'COCA-COtA'—BOTH TRADEMARKS MEAN THE PRODUCT
OH   COCA-COLA   LTD.—THE   WORLD'S   BEST-LOVED   SPARKLING   DRINK,
QUESTION: How did they
perfume bat I is in ancient
days?
ANSWER: Ladies ol' ancient
Rome often used 20 lbs. of
crushed strawberries, and
two lbs. of crushed rasp-
ernes to perfume their
baths.
UNIVERSITY
PHARMACY
lVa Blocks East of Pool
AL. 0339
APPLICATIONS FOR CHAIRMAN
W.A.D. is requesting the sub-1 dressed to Secretary Marg
mission of applications for thej Baker should be left on the
position of Chairman of the! W.A.D. bulletin board in the
Girls'    High   School   Basketball   Women's Gym.
Tournament    to    be    held    this'.      - __._ _. _
spring.   Applications   should   be
iii the hands of W.A.D. prcv.idenl.
Theo Carroll by October 14. .
A Fencing Manager is needed |
Applications are now being ae-j
copied   by   W.A.D.    LoUer-s   ad- I
AUTOMOBILES
Call FRANK FRAZER at Collier's Lid., MU 1.-2311 or residence BA. 8089. New Chevrolet:-; and used cars of all
makes. Friday, October 3,1958   *
THE   UBYSSEY
PAGE SEVEN
Birds, Give 'em Hell
RAY  TOWERS
BILL CRAWFORD
JACK HENWOOD
GEORGE TURPIN
RAY JOKNOVICH
■   M    -:.M .. _ w ■    m, ■
Meet Here
DON VASSOS and fellow Thunderbirds meet the powerful
Seattle Ramblers Saturday.   Game time is l..°»0 p.m.
Engineers And Frosh
To Meet At Halftime
The Annual Frosh versus Engineers Cheering Contest will be
held   during   the   half-time   intermission   of   tomorrow's   football
game.
Tiie Annual Frosh versus En-	
Lueers   Cheering   Contest   v/ili /tfff.ffiMJI/'d' MWO^BrS
tc    held   during   the    half-time The   f0[jowing   are   the   man- r done   well   with   the   materials
intermission of tomorrow's foot- agers   of   the   various   Women's ; presented them,
bail game. Intramural teams:                            ,     With some luck and a lot of
Tiie   con!csta:Us   will   sit    in Acadia:    Doreen Evan,'    Wo- : hard    Pla>'in-    Saturday    nfier-
ymms.l   Mvta.ns  and   tho  Cheer- men's Residences: Sharon Camn    1100n'    t!,e   thunrienr..e   and   net
leaders   mils   be   Um   judges.   ,\ bell;   International   House:  Sallv ' sn  1'lt.irictoring-  Birds  from  UBC
sen:  Chinese  Varsity,   Har-   ju'4  mi-il1   show  niall>" ^P'-'^-
the   true   strength   of a   fighting
Game Time
One Thirty
USC Thtinderbirdx meet the
Seattle Ramblers at UBC Stadium tomorrow afternoon in
Inter-Collegiate Football action.
Game time is 1:30 p.m.
The  strong  and   experienced
Ramblers are perhaps the most
»1Ss*w*  s^i|.ii   outstanding    squads    that    the
* fe «5 -    * /     >   Thunderbirds    will   meet    this
season.
The Birds are ready for the
Ramblers but are going into the
i contest as the underdogs. The
powerful Ramblers beat out the
College of Puget Sound last
weekend and are hopeful of
doing the same to the Birds.
Coach Frank Gnup's team
will he in trouble with reserve
strength but if the university
squad keeps playing as they
have in their last two enomn-
ler.s, Ihe breaks and pla\ reus;
just go liieir way.
Captain Jack Henwood is still]
somewhat favoring his injure" I
leg muscle but for him the UBC j
outfit is free of disabled player-
The  Ramblers,  a  team spon-,'
sored solely by Seattle business- j
men,   has  an   impressive  roster 1
including the likes of Don Allen. !
. All Conference End at Everett j
Jr.  College  and  Halfback Paul
Adams   who  was   nominated   \o
the   All-American   High   School
Team.
On the other side of the line.
UBC has this year a new and !
completely different, brand of '■
.— (playing compared to the pasts
few seasons, Gnup and his as-1
sistane    Bob    Hincimach    have
HALFBACK  WAYNE AIKEN will have hi.s work cut out
fur him w.ien .trying to break through Rambler's lines.
UBC STARTING ELEVEN
IM! '.'.-iii
.- ec'. mr.s.
..i  .0 isle i,CsS
I mFmU mis-sie
.:■.•■' during ; m
The    I: em ■;   ;i re
m in-i:: • ,. ,,
tht  men.
CLUB
.:. d     hv     \'
iimiderbmd
n; !  Tuey: 'FVIueal ion: Doris  Fir
isse-d: Kin-sing: Saudi Seed: VOC: ' t('am-
t-i me  Bailey     Nmvmsm     Chsb
fa ■(■;..   lf:ie|my    Aloha    Delet   Pi
D'ssrkm   Idled:     DeiUi     Ganunn
;Mmm   iV.lmr:  Gamma   Phi   Pcbi;        Wl>;!<!
' r''ve'en ivfeK"iiS'ie; Kanusi Aloha    Slin",v ;'
'•"■'• • is C srm  "U i ller: K '.pea  Kan
■■ M ; mensis Psilli Da-din,.;: Ab.i'u
'■■ '■ a nma   'Dim:  Nnrria  Gntiorm
BRIGHT MB StOBlY
GEORGE HOAR ._.
JIM  BECK   	
DON McNAMEE 	
ROY JOKANOVICH _.
BILL CRAWFORD .....
JOHN BARBERIE
DAVE BARKER 	
JACK HENWOOD ...
ROY BIANCO   	
DOW VASSOS -   	
WAYNE AIKEN	
Pleri-mrl, privmo bed-sitting
room v,m:a kitchen privilceo.-?
in mooo-m home. Available
im "e im: se. Fonrle Dstaesi*
!'""ierm ■■:.    Pirnee Mtm Peder-
sc     1       '':'■'   ■■■'   !     1 -TK,.V
        Centre
- _   Left  Guard
-. Right Guard
  Right Tackle
__. Left Tackle
Right End
  Left End
Quarterback
   Fullback
Right Halfback
Left  Halfback
Double-Breaste
5-:.ii    Granville      MU.    1-4S49
ms
res: Diane 'A'a'.sou.
arne .<•> sai;
i lires  i. ;.;oc •-.-'
fdeassm: ri:
mmlamm ; :-,<-( ic,-."---.
sm .■■■- Dm fee.'b.a
■■■■vw. . Wi:h (ems e
d in  ■'• - mid-saxe
;r
be   s:.,o
.Dmist ar
Tht.   TPiP lias also cheer card
a   '.*.■ ill   bt-   distributed   to   tit
Plaasard, privalo, o o r! - < i«J iry
s'eem with kitchen privileges
i>: namlern home. Available
smnvmdiatety. Female .--indent
mad'erred. Phone .Mr,-. Pcder-
■oii, ALma 1290-Y,
Fam ■ i v     w ii h      < '-.
:-.•       ,,|
schonl     ;:<:-.-     ch:]--
ri n   wousd I
like   ;.'ir!   ?'or  !:r,e
Dm,j   smvi-
ees and babv-sp' :n
for room  and  boa
,"'   D
•d.    Prune
ALma 3;'5DL.
It v? v
THEATRE  BACKSTAGE  GROUP
-.^i   Ivviv-  \;:v.*   vm.'vm :.;   snan.menienl    under
INTiU'Dl'f. T«.M.JV  .""ir.f.-'iTLWG
,.:v, UrfsdKT :: •— <<.v:w shun,  V2:lli) ■■ V.'M
Open To A!i Tf.ur>?'.' InferesterS PAGE EIGHT
THE   UBYSSEY
Friday, October 3, 1953
INCO METALS AT WORK IN CANADA
CHOOSE CANADIAN
PRELUDE BY
THE INTERNATIONAL SILVER
COMPANY OF CANADA,
LIMITED
LAURENTIAN BY
HENRY BIRKS & SONS LIMITED
Lovely, lustrous Canadian originals that capture the enchanting
delicacy of formal traditions... in precious silverware, the hallmark
of gracious living. How richly silver reflects your own sense of style
and good taste. Choose the everlasting charm of fine sterling or
the enduring grace of silverplate. Your table will be far lovelier.
Much of the silver used by silversmiths for sterling and silverplate
comes from Inco. Copper and nickel are also supplied by Inco
in the strong nickel-silver foundation metal used in silverplate.
Although Inco is the world's largest producer of nickel, 13 other
elements are also produced from the Sudbury ores—such as copper
and relatively small quantities of precious metals like silver, gold,
platinum and palladium. All of them have important uses in industry.
That's how Inco metals serve the Canadian industries that serve you.
From October 6th to October 11th, Canadians will celebrate Silver Week
when dealers everywhere will display their finest sterling and silverplate*
/k
INCO THE  INTERNATIONAL NICKEL COMPANY OF CANADA, LIMITS
..... ...? 55 YONGE STREET, TORONTO
PRODUCER OF INCO NICKEL, NICKEL ALLOYS; ORC BRAND COPPER, TELLURIUM, SELENIUM, SULPHUR, PLATINUM, PALLADIUM AND OTHER PRECIOUS METALS; COBAll ANt »„<*  j»»

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