UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Nov 29, 1960

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0124761.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0124761.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0124761-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0124761-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0124761-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0124761-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0124761-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0124761-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0124761-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0124761.ris

Full Text

 ONLY ONE
MORE
Vol. XLIII
THE UBYSSEY
b1^ CYy.,0*^. : — 	
" "^o        \ VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 1960
NO ADMITTANCE TO
.PERSONSTJNDER 18
No, 32
scraps USAC
USC motion ends
Haskins' proposal
USAC is no longer.
Student Council voted Monday night to call a halt to the
experiment in student government started last year by the
Haskins Commission report.
Council approved a motion
from a special Undergraduate
Societies Committee meeting
which reads: "That the proposal
of USAC (University Students
Activities Committee) as set
down in the Haskins Report be
abolished."
The motion was approved by
Council by a vote of 10 in favor
to one against with one abstention.
WISE DECISION
USC Chairman Chris Davies
said: "I feel that this is a wise
— credit Byron Hender
UBC RADIO DISGUISEDTHIS VOLKSWAGON for their entry irv the classic?! Grey Cup Parade
Sarur_ay morning. "Mike" College was really ready for action although not many Other UBC
typ«swere. • ■*""'■'"
Strachan predict?
victory
Bf COLEMAN  ROMALIS
"The major sectors of Cana-
diari society'-must come under
some direction and control by
fche government, CCF Jeader
Robert Strachan told a large
crowd ia the.. Brock :lounge,
noon Friday.
Hhe leader of the official B.C.
Opposition, Strachan said that
the Tory, Liberal, and Social
Credit parties are psychologically and temperamentally incapable of making tile decisions
which  we need today.
■Strachan pictured the family
as. the cornerstone of society,
and said that it was being destroyed toy our present industrial way of life.
- "It is for this reason that I
welcome automation,"  he said.
Strachan said that we are living-in a rapidly changing world,
but our society is still squandering time, man-power and ability.
"This is the way our society is going, because we have
not realized that we've won
the battle against scarcity,"
he said.
Turning to the last B.C. provincial election, Strachan quoted a Vancouver newspaper,
wfcich analyzed the results as
a complete rejection of the CCF.
"All I have to say is this,"
said Strachan, "One more rejection like that, and the CCF
will be the next government
of; British   Columbia."
(Brandishing     a     newspaper,
Strachan told the audience, "I
was never so ashamed of living
in British Columbia, as when I
saw this Toronto Daily Star."
The paper contained the story
of Frank McMahon's ultimatum
to the voters, which ran in the
Vancouver Province on: the day-
of the election. '•
When Strachan said that he
had been born and educated in
Scotland, and somebody hissed,
he said, "I don't know if that's
steam escaping, or the traditional dyed-in-the-wool snake
in  the grass.'':,
In the question period, somebody in the audience took, exception to Strachan's remarks
that Huckleberry Hound toys
(with interchangeable heads)
in corn flake boxes were unnecessary, but was ; finally
jeered, into sitting down.
Strachan spent an informal
2 hours in the Men's Common
Room. About 60 people asked
him questions. '
UBC receives grant
from U.S. goy'r.
UBC has received a grant of
813,000 from"the U.S. Department of Health, Education, and
Welfare for research related to
Biochemistry.
UBC is the only Canadian
University to receive this grant
Dr. Guy Dutton, UBC Associate
Professor, will direct the research into the Structure of
Synthetic Polysaccharides.
BOMBSHELL
WEBSTER
TO SPEAK
Vancouver radio commentator
Jack Webster will speak to students on "Integrity in Government" in the Auditorium at
noon today.
He will be sponsored by the
Allied Integrity Front, the new
campus political club.
Webster spoke at UBC two
years ago and filled the Auditorium. He is interested in promoting Integrity in all levels of
Canadian Government.
Dean Andrew to
moderate frat.
panel discussion
Bean Geoffrey Andrew will
moderate a Ubyssey sponsored
panel discussion" oh fraternities
Thursday in Brock Lounge.
The discussion was arranged
following a mock debate earlier
in Kovember at which fraternities were not represented.
Panel members at Thursday's
discussion will include Fourth
year honors student Lorrene
Gordon, Fourth year arts student Ken Hodkinson, and two
Inter Fraternity Council speakers.
Discussion will be limited to
:those on the panel.
Each panel member will have
five uninterrupted .minutes to
air his views, followed by a
discussion period during which
each side may question the
other on the statements they
have made, as well as probe the
issues surrounding Greek-letter
societies  on campus.
Each will then give five-
minute summary.
move on the part of USC, I don't
feel  that it is  the spur  of  the
moment decision that it may appear."
DISSATISFACTION
"If people don't want it, you
can't ram it down their throats,"
he said. Davies was a member
of the committee empowered to
set up USAC on an experimental.
basis.
Growing dissatisfaction with
the progress of the experiment
has been apparent in the attitude
of Council in recent weeks.
"No m/atter how good it looked in theory, it just hasn't worked," said AMS Treasurer, Russ
Robinson. "We're better off
without it."
The USC motion was moved
by Law and seconded by Forestry. An amendment proposed, by
Nursing that USAC be retained
to discuss and criticize Student
Council recommendations was
defeated in tiSC. ■ ■.'."'"'
Studettt Couficii is. • holding
weekly special meetings in an
attempt to find an alternative
for   USAC.
rjsc i^rioir
The Haskins Commission recommended last year that the
group be set up to make student
government more representative'
and af'ective and to combat
apathy.
Student Council was authorized to experiment with the proposals by last year's spring general meeting.
The first meeting in early October  was well attended,  UCC
delegate Malcolm Scott told The -
Ubyssey Monday.
"From the first the meetings
lacked direction," he said. "As
a result, atendance at subsequent
meetings fell to practically nothing. USC delegates made up the
t bulk of the attendance from the
third meeting on."
"I feel that USAC is not the
answer to our student government problem, and never was,"
said AMC Co-ordinator Russ
Brink.
'-JP   V
THE UBC THUNDERBIRD entry
small sensation in the parade
— credit Byron Hender
, lead by four representatives  of the   cheerleaders,    caused   a
A model of a T'Bird graced the float following. Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 29,   I960
UBYSSEY
Authorized as second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Published three times weeKly throughout the University year
In Vancouver by the Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society,
University of B.C. Editorial opinions expressed are those of the
Editorial Board of the Ubysey and not necessarily those of the Alma
Mater   Society   or   the   University   of   B C.
TELEPHONES: CA 4-3242, locals 12 (news desk), 13 (critics-
sports),  14 (Editor-mChief).  15. 6 (business offices).
Editor-in-Chief: Fred Fletcher
Managing Editor Roger McAfee
Hf: News Editor Denis   Stanley
• Features Editor Ed Lavalle
>[i Photography Editor .....    Byron Hender
Senior Editor Ann Pickard
Sports Editor Mike Hunter
r Critics Editor Dave Bromige
CUP Editor Bob Hendrickson _
Layout: Nick Close
STAFF:   —   Sharon   McKinnon,   Edward   Home,   Coleman
Romalis,   George Railton,  Sharon   Rodney,  Fred   Jones,
Derek Allen, Dick Arkley, Joe Bolduc, Maureen Covell.
SPORTS:  —  Bert   MacKinnon,   Chris   Fahrni,   udy   Sewell,
Dieter Urban, Norm Christie.
f
The parallel between UBC's Homecoming fiasco and
Saturday's Grey Cup game is unmistakable — the home
team was beaten, and the home fans looked bad.
| Exuberance was displayed at the wrong time, thus be
coming rowdiness.   And drinking again played its loatfr-
some part.
| It   seems that some people lose all sense of balance
after a few drinks.
j This is regrettable, because, as the old saw says, there
is a time and a place for everything.    Tearing down the
-    goalposts is an accepted way of celebrating—but not until
the game is over.
As for stealing the football — that is nothing more than
petty larceny. A thing which most people abhor.
But the most disgusting part of it all is the realization that the guy who stole the ball, and the hoods who tore
• down the goalposts were not over-exuberant visitors. No
they were our own black-leather-jacket crowd.
Because of this display, Vancouver may have difficulty
in obtaining the Grey Cup Game in future.
A Reminder
The following article is a reminder that Communists
are not always all they seem. They still follow the Leninist
idea of world conquest by any means.
The most frightening thing happening in Communist
China today is the Party's all-out effort to convert the
younger generation, from nursery onward, to its ideology
and practices. In general, the following is the code incessantly presented in every form and from every direction
to the young Chinese, all of whom have little or no non-
Communist past to remember:
Youth must "unconditionally obey" the leadership and
carry out the policies of the Party and state. They must put
before everything the cause of the revolution and the determination quickly to build China into a great, strong "Socialist" country. They must overcome "individualism" and
collectivize every phase of life, thinking and existing in
terms only of the "big new family" of the commune and the
Party. And, very important, they must never cease studying Mao Tse-tung's writings and speeches — and never stop
remolding their own thinking.
Of course, this "new Communist morality," Chinese-
style, is supposed to apply to the entire population of 650
million. But the Party's main effort is currently concentrated on the young.
, In September, graduates of colleges were told to emulate the hard-working ox to advance the interests of the
peasants and the Party.
"Airl Communists, revolutionaries, revolutionary artists,
and writers should be oxen for the proletariat and the
broad masses of the people, bending their backs to the tasks
unto death."
"An ox is a submissive tool for the peasants," the article continued. "It works laboriously in agricultural production in the four seasons of the year. It can be led by the
nose and made to do whatever work is required. It serves
the peasants year in and year out." The paper dedicated the
article to graduating students who,it said, "must also establish the thought of devoting their lives to the service of
laboring people, to be the ox for the proletariat and the
people."
Finally, the article remarked that some youthful leaders seemed unwilling to be oxen for the proletariat and instead wanted the laboring peoole to be their ox. These were
, selfish people, the article concluded.
Another Peking publication, Chung-kuo Tsin-nien
(China Youth) has been making a special effort in recent
issues to counter spreading discontent among young workers over continuing austerity, heavy work programs, and
lack of leisure. "It is our enemy, imraerialism, which forces
us to work like this . . , If we should lose our vigilance, remain unarmed ... it would be a criminal act . . .
—News Features
letters Tu
The Editor
What's Mutter?
LITTLE MAN ON. CAMPUS
Ed. Note:
The following is AMS Treasurer Russ Robinson's reply to
the accusations contained in
Mr. D. Trott'S letter which appeared in Friday's Ubyssey.
Attention Mr. D. Trott,
President, Alliance Francaise.
Dear Mr. Trott:  -
In your letter which appeared in last Friday's Ubyssey, you accused me of casting doubts upon the integrity
of the members of "foreign
language" clubs on this campus. Your indignation was
prompted by a remark I made
at a recent Council meeting
and which was subsequently
quoted in this paper.
I suggest that you have fc.
len prey to a danger common
to many critics, that of plucking a remark from a secondhand source and interpreting
it out of context.
If you had enquired about
the circumstances surrounding
my comment, you would have
realized that none of the inferences which you drew from
it were valid. We had been
talking at some length about
such matters as editorial responsibility for the paper's
contents, problems of proofreaders iand, linotype operators reading a language other
than English, and related topics. My remark was nothing
more than an attempt to inject a note of levity into a
somewhat prolonged discussion. To read anything else
into  it   is a  mistake.
Yours  sincerely,
.— Russell   Robinson
P.S.—Since when is French
a "foreign language"?
Thimking Man
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
I commend you on a rational and mature evaluation
of the parking problem. Your
observation "a too efficient
administration of an imperfect
system", as the root of the problem is perhaps true of a number of the administrators.
However, we have some administrators with a good deal
of public spirit who refuse
to let themselves get entirely
rapt up in red tape; who will
go out of their way in order
to help (at times undeserving)
students.
I had my car impounded at
the beginning of the term. I
didn't find put until after B.
and G. was closed; however,
I got my ear out. A B. and G.
administrator went out of his
way to be of service
We're acting irrationally in
our attack on Buster's and
B. and G. They impound cars
so as to control those who do
not give a hang for anybody's
rights but their own. I figure
if you break a law you're
gambling; and if you can't
stand losing, you shouldn't
be   in   the   game.
— Clarence Buhr,
Arts
^e-rreiz. ogT a fuA&nuTg an eee what's goin© cm
0ACV  *l THE sSTACK$i 'I
By DEREK ALLEN
Veteran campus observers have been startled this year
to observe the strange attitude with which that red hairy
mass hiding behind the bookstore has deigned to acknow-
ledge the existence of non-science students at this university.
Redshirts, justly feared over the years  as advocates
of compulsory swimming lessons for Brock inhabitants, have
blossomed forth as champions of the nonviolent imaginative
stunt. Cunning, not baptism, has characterized engineering
activity under the Noble regime.
This is good.
Unfortunately it puts the Engineering Undergraduate
Society in competition with the Intellectual Stunt Committee, and in such a situation there is the inevitable possibility
of open conflict.
This would be most detrimental to the continued happiness and prosperity of ISC members. ISC is outnumbered.
While the boys in red have shown a willingness to lead
the campus in adroit demonstrations of spirit, they have
also served notice that they are in no way overlooking the
strength of numbers. One hates to recall the debacle of &e
bricks, when a group of incompetent civil engineers tried
to wall up the Brock and saw their clumsy handiwork topple resoundingly down the steps, but it is a sobering reminder of the organizational ability inherent in the EUS
system. This concept of mob action could be well applied
to, say, ISC.
Bob Noble is in charge of the EUS and under him the
redshirts are civilized, or at least have pretensions to civility. In the ranks of his organization, however, hide dissident leftovers of past administrations. This rowdy lot could
make their dampening presence felt on any real or imagined opponents of the virile hegemony which dominates this
campus. They could particularly nasty to any Artsman upstarts.  ISC please note.  You have been warned.
Memo to all those as disappointed with the Soviet student delegation as I was: We have a chance to get revenge.
The National Federation of Canadian University Students
brought four over to visit us, and in exchange Canada gets
to send four NFCUS bureaucrats over to investigate the
various student bodies of the USSR. Trouble is we will
have a tough time finding specimens to top the lot they sent
us. Is this yet another example of the triumph of communism.
Speaking of Engineers, the kidnapping of EUS prexy
Noble last week may .not have been quite the "arranged"
publicity stunt it appeared to some. Mary Shakespeare,
4th Nursing and donator of the Jabberwockycycle, reports
that she has never held hands so forcibly with anyone. The
Nurses were charged with the care and safe keeping of the
captive during his detention.
* * * ■'.;
The Grey Cup tide has receded and Ottawa's cup
runneth over. We remark that a baseball team represent-
ing the federal capital of our neighbour to the south has ,:
had less success over the years than a football team sta- •'
tioned in Canada's capital, but please don't think we say
that this comments on the two systems of government. Lets
just say the best man won. Tuesday,  November 29,   1960
THE    UBYSSEY
Students
protection
Few    students   realize   that;
every  year  65c of their A.M.S. j
fee is set aside in a student administered Accident   Benefit
Fund. |
Each fall approximately
$7000.00 is deposited in the fund
and in the course of the year,
upwards of $4000.00 is paid out
to seventy or eighty students
Who have legitimate claims on \
the fund. j
These payments are made  in |
respect of expenses incurred as
a   direct   result   of    accidental |
physical injury suffered by bona-!
fide members of the Alma Mater j
Society  while  partaking in   official  student   activities   during
tbe school term.
In order to be reimbursed for
all or part of such expenses a
student must fill out an accident
Benefit laim at the A.MjS. office
as soon as possible after the injury in question.
At the end of the year (in
April) all claims submitted during the term are then considered
fcy the Asident Benefit Commit-
lee o fthe Students' Council and
Claimants are awarded payments
fgainst their expenses at the
fomplete discretion of the committee according to the particu-
fer nature of the claim and the
•mount of money available in
fhe fund at the year-end. No
payments are made in excess of
|ive hundred dollars.
PAYMENTS MADE
Practically, speaking, most of
•uch payments are made in respect of injuries sustained by
athletes during official university games or practices. No
money is available to cover ser-
own
plan
vices etc. which injured student :
has   paid for   and   which   might
have been made available to him
free or at nominal cost.
It is therefore incumbent on
the student to insure that he is
properly registered under the
BCHIS, and that he has taken
maximum possible advantage of
the facilities provided by the
University Health service.
For example: if a student is
not transferred from private
care to the University Hospital
a ssoon as reasonably possible,
then he can receive no consideration in respect of the extra expense incurred thereby.
USE OF FUNDS
In general, Accident Benefit
Fund moneys may be used to
pay for ambulance service, general hospital care, and medical
attention under the appropriate
circumstances. In addition payments, subject to a five-dollar
deduction, may also be made to
cover damage of personal property (e.g. contact lenses, false
teeth) the use of which is absolutely necessary to the students'
efficient participation in the
event concerned.
It must be amphasized that
this fund is in no way to be considered as a form of insurance
or as a contract of any kind between the AMBS and the general student body but rather that,
while a limited amount of
money is available for the purposes outlined above, its disbursement will be administered
completely at the discretion of
the Accident Benefit Committee.
John Butterfield —
the Finance Committee.
Page 3
Armoury crowds
No relief in sight
By CHRISTINE CHESTER
Although the Armoury is
crowded, no plans for expansion
have been made and won't be
made until students show they
want more, said Miss J. Neame,
assistant director of the Armoury eating project.
"About 600 people eat in the
Armoury every day," said Miss
J. Neame. "Most of these are
students  who  formerly   ate   in
their cars.
We do not plan to expand
the number of tables unless
there is a greater demand for
more room."
In answer to the question
'How great is the demand for
soup, milk, coffee, or soft
drinks?" Miss Neame replied
that the demand had not been
very  large.
EUROPEAN TRAINED
BARBERS
Individually Styled Haircuts
UPPER TENTH
BARBER & TOILETTKIES
4674 W. 10th
Trv
BEAUTY CLIN I
By Zsa Zsa
4395 West 10th
CA 4-1231
HAIR FOR
CHRISTMAS
ITS POSSIBLE
ANYONE HAVING A
TREATMENT AT THE
NUVIA CLINIC ON OR BEFORE DEC 10 WILL HAVE
NEW HAIR GROWTH BY
CHRISTMAS. BRISTLY
STRONG AND PERMANENT
—NOTHING COULD BE A
BIGGER THRILL FOR THE
THIN—BUT HAIR! TREAT
YOURSELF TO THIS 20TH
CENTURY MIRACLE.
618 Davie St. MU 1-5650
Dr.  A.   DAVIDSON   DUNTON,
president of Carleton University, Ottawa, will be the
speaker at Vancouver Institute Saturday at 8:15 p.m. in
Bu. 106. He will speak on
"Who should go to college
and why?"
CNR bills McGill
for football frolic
MONTREAL (CUP)—A CNR bill to the amount of $613.39
was presented to the Student Executive Council at last night's
meeting for damages incurred in last week's excursion to
Queen's. After a lengthy discussion on the legal and blamatory
aspects of the case, Council voted to allocate a sufficient amount
to cover the bill.
PUBSTERS!
Ubyssey staff pictures for the
Totem will be taken today
noon in the Pub" offices. ""■
Irwin Cotler, B.A. 4, objected
to Council's paying the bill since
it could be interpreted that the
Students' Society was accepting
blame for the incident.
IRRESPONSIBLE   PERSONS
Cotler moved a motion stating
the CNR bill be paid with the
following reservations: that the
SEC state that the damaging action was committed by a group
of certain irresponsible persons
an ddoes not affect the student
body as a whole; and that Council make every attempt to recover as much as possible or all
of the expense incurred in the
damaging action. The motion
was passed.
UBC choir to
present concert
UBC Choir, under the direction of Dr. Robert Morris,
will present a Christmas con*
cert in Brock Hall on December
2, at 8:00 p.m.
Featured works on this pno?-
gram will be Giovanni Gabri-
ell's "Jubilate Deo," and J. S.
Bach's Christmas Cantata 142?.
"To Us A Child Is Given" (Uns
1st  Ein  Kind  Geboren").
The public is cordially inVt.
ted to this free concert.
omn_
TODAY:
12:30-A.I.F.     presents    M€K    AWKHR,
speoking  on 'INTEGRITY IN GOVERN/WENT" - Auditorium.
3:30 Filmsoc   presents   "DEATH   OF   A
& 8r00-SAtESMAN* Recommended for Eng.
100 — Auditorium.
WEDNESDAY:
12:30-Spee|_t Fine Arts cancel* Marew-
ette KjeBbergv Swedish; folksinger
and guitarist. In BU. 104.
THURSDAY:
12:30—Pterra* Discussion- in B*o*k taunge.
Topic is UBC Greek Letter Societies.
FRIDAY:
7:30—Totem  Tournament in Gymnasium.
8:00—Christmas Concert in Brock Lounge
by University: Chair/
SATURDAY:
2:30—League-Rugby Game at Stadium.
7:00 — Totem Tournament continues
in Gym.
the MILDEST BEST-TASTING cigarette
■C.r
N'AV y
SAii
fur
'«:*,
FILMSOC
nrocon+c
ATTENTION ENGLISH 100!
DEATH OF A SALESMAN
Starring   FREDRICK  MARCH
THE STORY OF A SALESMAN, OBSESSED Wffii PRETENSIONS OF BEING A "BIG MAN"
THOUGH HE IS REALLY A FAILURE"
TODAY
50c:             3:30, 6 & 8 PM Page 4
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 29,   1960
CUP Capers
Fans unite: Pogo to go
I     By BOB HENDRICKSON
Intellegentsia, En-Garde!!!
' Pogo is being deported. A confidential source informed the
Uibyssey that The Vancouver
Sun is planning to drop the
week-end color strip by Walt
Kelly.
I mean how sneaky can you
get? The last time Pogo was to
be dropped, UBC students staged
a protest march on the Sun,
Now, with fiendish cleverness,
anti-Pogos are making their
move while exams hover over
the heads of  true-believers.
Pogoists arise!! History majors, can you afford to lose source
material like Albert's history of
the' Russian Revolution? No!
English majors, can you afford
to lose a strip that gives you
such brilliant constructions as
"I is I and You is You and that's
the way life is." or such expressive words as Arrraghugh? No!
Bigger and better H and A-
toomtbs are being built to wipe
us out. So what? We are informed that we will have 15 minutes
warning before a missile with
an atomic warhead lands on us.
Time enough for a cigarette.
Our tuition fees have been
raised, unemployed is spreading,
Buster's is towing away more
people. Who cares?
But now that Pogo is threatened apathy must cease. They
are even discontinuing pogo-
stick sales in the downtown
stores. (Too much trouble with
peeping-toms I guess.)
Again I cry, Pogoists do,your
duty. Deluge the Sun with hysterical letters. Threaten a protest
march or, better, to raze the
Sun Tower to the ground. Good
grief, Linus, we cannot let this
happen.
Whew, I'm glad that's over.
I get so emotional.
This popular columnist has
been overwhelmed with letters
about my last column. They
both were complaining about my
lack of facts.
Both letters suggested that I
wished to be an impartial observer. Wrong, I am as biased as
hell. It is unfortunate that neither letter was signed by name.
For this reason neither letter
can be printed because of editorial policy. One letter said I
should check my facts with a
fraternity man. Drawing information from a responsible fraternity man on the topic of discrimination is like pulling hen's
teeth.
The letter further stated that
some UBC fraternities have integrated themselves. Very good.
It is much better to have real
intergration than an ostentatious
diesplay of one integrated member.
The fact that both letters were
apparently written by fraternity
members in support of fraternities is indicative of two points.
One shows one aspect o f t h e
good done by Greek organizations. Members are encouraged
and expected to take an interest
and a part in the activities of
the university and society instead of succumbing to the general apathy of the student body.
The other shows a loyalty to
the small group. All actions are
directed to enhance the fraternity, sometimes to the detriment
of the general student body and
public.
And please sign your name
to the letters you send so that
they may be printed pseudonyms will be used for publication of you so desire.
The Ryersonian reports that
the Ryerson Virgin Society's
membership is down over the
summer. Oh, those long hot summer  nights.
#       *       *
The Ubyssey's laurels are in
jeopardy.
Edmonton's student newspaper, The Gateway, was found
by debators to be the finest garbage written.
Affirmative debators argued
that The Gateway is a valuable
bathroom  accessory.
A negative debatbr disputed
this by claiming he had conducted a controlled experiment to
prove the paper's non-absorbent
qualities.. Apparently The Gateway's main claim to fame as fine
garbage is a column called
Scrabble which was scored for
profanity and the frequent use
of the ejaculation "Not bloody
likely".
Alberta senate rules
against fraternities
CALGARY (CUP)—The University of Alberta Senate has"
ruled against fraternity colonization, according to a report out
of   Edmonton   this  week. ~~
McGoun Cup debaters
Chosen Friday Night
The report is believed to concern mainly the group of some
40 men who are attempting to
form the first fraternity at
UAC
Fraternity President Alvin
Ulsrud however, in a written
statement to the  Gauntlet, said
UBC's I'/DcGoun Cup Debating
Team chosen by three faculty
members Friday night after ten
contestants had competed i*
three trial debates.
Chosen were Lorenne Gordoa
"Phi   Epsilon  is   not   a   colony ! and Dave Anderson, for the neg-
WEDNESDAY
NOVEMBER 30th
12:30
SONATA FOR TWO PIANOS AND
PERCUSSION by Bartok
BU106
Special Folksong Concert by Swedish Guitarist and Soprano, MARGURETTE
KJELLBERG
FREE — BU 104
University Shell Service
WE SPECIALIZE IN VOLKSWAGEN REPAIRS
FREE PICK-UP AND DELIVERY
CA 4-0828
TENTH AT DISCOVERY
CorNette
Beauty Salon
Personality Styling & Cutting
• Coloring    • Perm. Waving
• Manicuring
• Beauty Consultants
Miss Barbara  -  Miss Elenore
Miss Jeri
4532 West 10th Ave.
CA 4-7440
We Specialize in Long Hair
in connection with the D.U.
Frfe't^rn(ity in Edmonton. We
are forming a separate chapter
completely independent of Edmonton and we can't see how
anyone can make a ruling for
us to cease.
Another supporter of fraternities, shortly following the
Edmonton report, told Gauntlet
Editor Maurice Yacowar, "If
you would have kept your fat
trap shut we'd be home free
by now, you stupid ..."
ative team, and Derek Allen and
Mike Coleman for the affirmative team.
These four will participate in
a series of warm-up debates during January. The contest for the
McGoun Cup will take place
January 27.
The negative will be travelling to the University of Saskatchewan while the affirmative
hosts a University of Alberta
contingent here. McGoun Cup
winner last year was UBC.
NOW PLAYING
Debbie Reynolds - Paul Douglas - Tony Randall
in the Uproarious Best Seller in Color
"THE    MATING    GAME"
7 & 10:30
Plus
"THE    7    THIEVES"
Edward G. Robinson - Joan Collins - Rod Steiger
8:45
Hollywood Theatre
3123 WEST BROADWAY
lias a brilliant future behind him"
He just dropped in for a chat. I hadn't seen
him since we were undergraduates. He
had everything then: a bright, quick mind,
drive, imagination... big plans. He graduated with top honours in our class...
But when he talked to me, he seemed
dried up. No sparkle, no nothing—as
though that parchment was his certificate
of having learned everything there was to
be learned. I asked about his job—and
then I knew: It's steady, but it's dull.
It made me think. Perhaps I'm just
lucky, but aluminum is different. There's
no end to what you can do with it. I
haven't been with Alcan too long, but
half the things they're doing with aluminum now weren't even on the drawing
board when I started. If you'll pardon the
cliche: It's the metal of the future,
all right.
And yet, with Alcan you have the
benefits of being with a long-established
company. You know—good salary, pension plan, stock purchase plan, and so on.
It all adds up to much more than a job:
it's a career. And with aluminum, the
future isn't behind you, and it isn't way
out front. It's right here. It's what you
make of it—today.
That's why Alcan is always looking for
young graduates who want to keep on
growing.
ALUMINUM COMPANY
OF CANADA, LIMITED,
Personnel Department,
P.O. Box 6096, Montreal 3, P.O. • Tuesday,  November 29,   1960
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5_^
Madden defeated at ping pong
VISITORS SHOW
WIT. HUMOUR
By   FRED   FLETCHER
Boris Ponomarev, the ping
pong champion of the Soviet
delegation, is also the wit of
the group.
The sandy haired youth
organizer upheld Soviet
honor by defeating local
NFCUS chairman John Madden in an international table
tennx^ smtf f h held in the
games  room Thursday.
Ponomarev was by far the
most polished member of
the delegation. He chatted
good naturedly for several
hours with Student Councillors and other interested persons, some hostile, and some
friendly, without seeming to
tire.
Unlike other members of
the delegation, he let the conversation take its course. It
fwanidered through sports,
education, wine, women, and
jokes onto the student press
and other such interesting
topics..
Ponomarev, who is 33,
has one child. His wife works
as an interpreter in his Office.
He told of the comical experiences he had while
crossing Canada, laughing
uproariously as he recounted
the tale of the girl who asked
if one needed a visa to leave
Leningrad for Moscow.
But through all his jok-
a telltale uneasiness about
ing and laughing, there was
the slightly chubby profes'
sional   Communist.
He laughed, but not with
his eyes. He was constantly
watchful, lest someone find
a chink in his ideological
armor. He talked casual]v in
English with me for several
hours, before finding out 1
was connected with a newspaper. Then he refused to
converse, except through an
interpreter.
And if Ponomarev, the professional Who has visited
more than a dozen countries
representing Soviet youth
(at 33!) was wary, the rest
of the delegation was downright nervous.
All members of the group
hid behind their lack of
knowledge of the English
language (at one time or
another,) to escape embarrassing questions
It was clear too, that members of the delegation didn't
trust each other. It was most
difficult to separate them.
They worked a little too
hard at giving the impression
of relaxed, confident and
good-natured tourists to be
convincing.
Even Alia Tzutzarova, who
tried to be the epitome of
sweet, wholesome womanhood, didn't come over entirely. The 25-year-old medical student, like her older
: male companions, came to
Canada with her mind made
up, and nobody was going to
change  it.
SOVIET STUDENT
VISIT
NOVEMBER, 1960
E. Lavalle Features Editor
photo: Cliff Arrowsmith
COMRADE   EMMANOUIL   EQUIZAROV:   Personable,   sauve   interpretor   indoctrinates     Brock
Types on virtues of study.
Soviet delegation to campus
glorify communism on visit
By SANDRA SCOTT
"Communism is very good
for my country, but might be
very bad for your," admitted
one member of the visiting
Soviet students' delegation last
week.
The opinion was expressed
by Boris Ponomarev, 33-year-
old deputy executive secretary
of the Committee of Youth Organization.
ONLY OPINION
,But it was the only opinion
given during the eight hours I
spent with them that did not
glorify communism or the Soviet state.' The four-member
delegation persisted in reciting figures and percentages
to attempt to show that the
Soviet Union's educational,
political and. economic systems
were superior to those in the
West.
It was particularly distressing to hear the group's stereotyped statements on the Soviet
Union repeated again and
again in a press conference,
during the Brock panel discus
sion and even in private discussion.
As individuals, the Soviets
were paradoxical. During the
press conference they appeared' cold, aloof and disinterested. Over coffee and liqueurs they spoke congenially
with a small group of Students' Councilors and NFCUS
committee members. Later
they were only slightly annoyed at questions posed during
an informal reception at the
Zeta Psi fraternity house.
Leader of the delegation, 35-
year-old Alexiei Golubev, a
member of the Presidum of
the USSR Students' Council,
was the only delegate who did
not speak English. But his extraordinary memory for facts
and figures made him more
than a nominal head of the
group.
SOVIET WOMEN'S RIGHTS
The first time I listened to
Alia Tzutzarova's spech on
women's rights in the Soviet
Union I could not help but ad-,
mire her determination.
She stated that there is a
complete equaliy of the sexes
in the Soviet Union. Women
participate equally in all
facets of Soviet life, women
outnumber men both in Soviet
universities and in the humanities, teaching and medicine.
Married women work, regardless of family obligation.
On the second hearing of
this short speech, I could not
help but feel fortunate for our
concept of the "weaker sex."
Emmanuoi Equizarov, a
graduate of the Moscow Institute of Foreign Languages,
strongly criticized the "biased"
selections of Russian literature
in Canadian schools and universities. He also condemned
slanted writing in North
American newspapers.
Referring to an interview
with Miss Tzutzarova in the
morning paper, he declared,
"This is an example of your
freedom of the press. You,
print what you want to print;,
not what is true."
MANY RECEIVE SCHOLARSHIPS
Students work long, hard
Photo.   Cliff  Arrowsmith
COMRADE ALEXEI GOLUBEV: Lenin Fan Club Pins and S-p-p-
p-utniks!
By  DIANE   GREENALL
(Assistant   Features   Editor)
# Sixty percent of all
Russian 'university students
are women.
6 Ninety-five percent of
all students receive government   scholarships.
# Most students work for
two to three years to develop
the required maturity before
entering a higher educational
institution.
This ,is an example of the
factual statements which
were delivered at all social
and formal gatherings attended by the four visiting Soviet students who spent last
Wednesday to Friday at UBC.
STUDENTS TOUR
The students have spent
the last month touring nineteen Canadian Universities as
part of a cultural exchange
between the two countries.
Five Canadian students will
be making a return visit to
Russia in May. The Soviet
visit to Canada was sponsored
by the National Federation of
Canadian University Students.
The purpose of the visit
was for a mutual exchange of
information about the educational   systems   in   Canada
COMRADE ALLA TZUTZAROVA
and the Soviet. The Soviet
students did not forget this.
They were forbidden to discuss pelitics and they considered most other topics trivial.
STUDENTS   FRIENDLY
The students were, however, friendly, and not always
on guard. But, since UBC
was the last of the nineteen
universities which they visited, most of their remarks
naturally sounded very stereotyped.
The Soviet students can
also be commended for the
excellent way in which they
stood up under cross-examina-.
tion. For, contrary to their:
instructions at informal gatherings the Soviet students
did engage in some Communism vs.  Democracy  debates.
STUDENTS   CONCENTRATE
Concentrated academic effort is a part of the life of
the average Soviet student
by the time he has reached
university.
Every Soviet youth attends
high school where the curriculum includes physics, chemistry, biology, foreign languages, hi'stdry, geography,
literature etc. At the end of
three years, the equivalent of
our grades nine, ten and eleven, every student is required >
to write at least fifteen examinations, all of them on academic subjects.
This could be used as an
example by us, who consider
many Canadian student only
capable of mastering a wa-
terered down general program — surely this must
mean that we are suggesting
the ascendancy of a superior
race. ■ Page- 6-
TH. E    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 29,   1960
^'Vp, »
FOR THE EAST
By ROGER McAFEE
•fe*4fl»*/
CIRCUIT TRAINING
Gym in a fit over fitness
Br CHRIS FAHRNI
A physical fitness craze,
called circuit training has hit
( UBC and is spreading like
' Asian flu.
The  epidemic   started   this
fall as a required PE course.
Many students found they
liked it and.began sneaking
in at odd, hours to hoist
weights and put themselves in
shape. Some of these were drivers of car pools, and their
riders, rather than wait in the
car, decided to try j.t. They.
teld their friends and their
friends told?.. . etc., until now,
circuit trainers can boast a
population of 580, with many
mmwis-vehmteens than iorcees.
Tne eourse is laid out along
■ the triangular passageway _n-
'? der-„ie- angle formled by the
bleachers and the north gym
wall. It consists of a dozen
exercises, a sort of junior version of the 12 feats of Hercules, ranging from bench climbing tlo weight hoisting.
T_ere are six degrees of
toughness— Red 1 to 3, and-
Blue 1 to 3; and two programmes, standard and sports. The
sports circuit has an extra
. exercise, stair-running. The
idea is to run through the circuit three times in 25 minutes
(the target time) and this at-
tained, move up to a tougher
circuit;.
Walking through the corridor, you* see a real potpouri
4- of the human form, a medley
of flab, fat, muscle. But, a.
mongst the skin and bones,'
hew muscles are appearing,
and possibly for the first time
in his life, the guy is getting
in shape.
Bob Morford, who engineered the course, feels it is perhaps the only exercise which
combines endurance, muscular
conditioning, and stamina. It
is entirely an individual show;
you   go  at  your  own   speed,
STUDENTS!
Try our Daily Special for a
New Dining Pleasure!
We Cater to Stuctents at
STUDENTS'RATES
Dean's
4544 m. 10th
Open until 11:30
pick your . own weights, and
train at your own convenience.
It is a challenge, you are racing the clock, trying to better
your time each day.
The circuit's history began
at Leeds, England, in 1955.
There were a few half-hearted
attempts to establish it in
North America, but the creation of UBC's course marks
the first notable success. It
shows signs of spreading — a
UBC grad has set up a circuit
at UCLA, and Oregon is initiating one./
Perhaps part of the circuit's
charm is the occasional girl
who comes skipping through.
The "Ladies' Circuit" stresses
conditioning, not body-building or figure-developing. You
will, gain no Hammer-throwing muscles but no beautiful
balcony either. Anyway, the
ones that come through must
offer a refreshing contrast to
a barbell, and no doubt become more beautiful with
every hoist or situp.
Morford's office is located
half-way along the course, giving him a panoramic view of
the suffering. Not that he's a
sadist. The model skeletons
and fleshy drawings (of muscles) are directly in line with
his interest in body developr
ment, and reflect no morbid
delusions of being Count de
Sade.
In any case, he should be acclaimed for, making. UBC the
pioneer in North America circuit training.
SOCCER
UBC Jayvees held on to
first place in the Mainland
Leagjue fourth division toy
whipping•: Imperial Lumber.
3-1 Sunday at Mclnnes Field.
UBC scorers were Bob
Johnstone, Brian James, and-
Moses Luy.
mmwm mm mm
HOURS:   -   -
sMnmmxt
-   9 a.m. to Si p.m.
-   -   9 a.m. to Noon
" LOOSE LEAI11 NOTE BOOKS
EXERCISE BOOKS AND SCRIBBLERS
|jKA_»I_3C-EN0ENESE1NCJ PAPER, BIOLOGY PAPER,
LOOSE I_EAF REFILLS, FOUNTAIN PENS and INK
DRAWING PAPER
Owned and Operated by   .   .   .
THE UNIVERSITY OF B.C
Come, come Mr. Sports Editor, how can anyone v/ho predicted the   Eskimos by a converted touchdown, have the nerve
to show himself again, especially in print.
Then, when you do, it is merely to moan and "bluify". Shame,
shame, sir, let's give credit where it is deserved. The East obviously had the better team and even though they didn't play one of
their best games Ottawa showed the West just how the strategic game of football should be played.
Oh, I know what your excuses are. You and a number of
dyed-in-the-wool Western fans will moan that if Edmonton had had
their Bright star in orbit, there would have been a different color
on the horse.
Anyone taking this stand is merely searching for more excuses. It was obvious that the Esks were outplayed all the way
down the line. Another argument — or rather excuse — is that
Normie Kwong was a mite off form. It wasn't really that, it was
just that he couldn't lift his feet high enough to keep from tripping
over the line of scrimmage.
I must really voice a small objection to your slur on the gentlemen from the East to whom you refer as "Eastern City slick-
ersers," But then, on second thought, I guess I won't voice even
that slight objection. After all, the Easterners did put on a slick
show, both off and on the field. It was, perhaps, more noticeable
in the latter case.
Mr. Sports Editor, you just crashed from your last limb. Why
venture out again? Win the Grey Cup back next year?? Ah, well,
optimism is a great thing!
I'm sure, sir, that you don't mean it when you say that you
have no friends in Ottawa. After all, we all have at least one
friend there — Honest John. On that point I echo your sentiments
—Humbug!!
Finally, after wading through an account of the Good Guys
and Bad Guys involved in the Westerns, I was able to see that
you had some well deserved words of praise for the best football
team in Canada. I guess you know what the old saying "The truth
hurts" fully means.
Here, sir! Onee more I object to your terminology. In your
reference to Bobby Simpson and the rest of the fabulous Roughies,
with complete disregard for accuracy and estheticism, you throw
in the vile word "assassins." So what if they are the best hatchet
line in the country. You, sir, must have soaked that hankie in
tears.   "The injury-riddled Eskimos"! Ho hum.
There are a number of other, places around UBC other than in
the stadium press-box where it is possible to find examples of the
"eollege Draught." Like, For The Birds?
"SEKSITIVE'*
—N.Y. Times
"EXTRAORDINARY"
—Herald Tribune
"HAUNTING"
—Saturday Review
LYRICAL'   —Newsweek
"PROFOUND"     -Time
#    "PROVOCATIVE'
—N.Y. News
Photographs
for Christmas
To the discriminating student who knows and appreciates fine photography, we are pleased to
offer our personally created, expertly finished portraits at special student
prices.
Phone for an appointment
RE 1-8314
Atlas Studios
Photographers
3189 WKST BROADWAY
Vancouver 8, B.C.
ADULT
Entertainment
only
STUDIO
GRAN, at SMYTHE
MU 3-1511
ATTRACTIVE CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
as
NORTHERN SERVICE OFFICERS
with the
Department of Northern Affairs and National Resources
STARTING SALARY—$4440
PLUS NORTHERN ALLOWANCE OF UP TO $2100
Details and application forms are available from your
UNIVERSITY PLACEMENT OFFICE
OR THE
CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION, Ottawa Tuesday,  November 29,  1960
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
FOR THE WE
*.<..*
SPORTS SHORTS
By MiKE HUNTER
Vancouver has just survived its third Grey Cup spree—
I think. We're still here, and the barroom brawls, white stetsons, Eastern city slickers, hangovers, and police posses have
gone. A real wild west celebration. But the Good Guys didn't
win.
I have been watching Westerns for years, and never yet have
the Good Guys failed to come out on top.
I have been waiting for years for the Bad Guys to get away,
but always the Good Guys have triumphed in the end. For once
I was pulling for the Good Guys, but the Good Guys lost. I am
now a disillusioned football fan, a sort of sad west coast Eskimo.
Until we (we?) win the Grey Cup back next year, we will be
submerged with Eastern propaganda — everything from politics
to weather. And all because the Bad Guys won the Grey Cup.
Thank God I haven't any friends in Ottawa. Most people like
having friends in Ottawa, but no true-blue Western football
booster, whose team has just lost to the Rough Riders. Visions of
nasty asides on Eastern Christmas cards now haunt me: "Hat!
Merry Christmas."
Merry Christmas, humbug!
But "Fink" Clear's men did win, and we must give them
credit. Last Friday, after their practise in UBC stadium, everyone
was cooly confident and determined.
The ambitious Radsoc interviewer, bubbling with buttery
praise, collared Bobby Simpson, the "sensational great end of the
Ottawa Rough Riders."
"Whaddaya think about tomorrow?" he gulped.
"We're gonna win!"  snapped  Simpson, unhesitantly.
"Is   that   all you  can  say?"  queried   Radsoc unbelievingly.
'What about the odds of 6 points in favor of the Eskimos?"
'       Again  Simpson   responded  quickly   and  confidently.  "They
don't know much about football and I won't know ouch about
betting " he prophesied.
Simpson is the same fellow who scored the big touchdown
in the second game of the eastern finals.
Most coaches become furious when their players sit down on
the job, but "Fink" was jubilant when Simpson was sleeping on
the job.
Simpson and his fellow assassins weren't sleeping Saturday,
unfortunately for the injury-riddled Eskimos. From the opening
kickoff there was no doubt who was the stronger team. The murderous Ottawa line ground the Esk offence to a pulp.
And besides the crunching Ottawa machine, your agent noted
Several other unusual things. Like the abundance of good seats
available about an hour before game time. Like the lady outside
the stadium handing out free samples of Alka Seltzer.
And like the um . . . beautiful doll strolling around the stadium
proudly displaying . . her . . shapely legs and bearing a banner
labelled "Miss -Grey Cup."
We noted that it was the visitors to the coast who pulled off
the good stunts, and the local punks who did the damage. We
noticed the little black dog again, and the man behind who won
$260 on the g;me and lost $300 at the bar. And we still say wait
until next year.
* * *
GHEY CUP MORAL: Where there's a will, there's a lawsuit!
Birds handle ex-YMCA
LOST & FOUND
SALE
Continuing THJ
Friday
We Close Dec. 3
UBC Thunderbirds clobbered another city Senior
"A" team Friday, this time
the Ex-YMCA Juniors.
Led by the 23 points of
Mike Potkonjak, the Birds
whipped Lance Hudson's
boys 75-52 at UBC gym.
The game was a warmup
for the Totem Tournament,
an annual event held next
Friday and Saturday at UBC.
Other scorers for UBC
were, naturally, Ken Winslade with 14, and Dave Way
(sneering at right because
1961 pictures haven't been
taken yet) who got 11.
VARSITY OUTDOOR CLUB
General meeting Biiologi-
"cal Sciences 2000 Wed. noon.
INTRAMURALS
The Men's Intramural
. touch football final between
Fiji and Varsity Christian
Fellowship will be played
Thursday December 1 at noon
in UBC Stadium.
Fijis, led by quarterback
Tom English and end Rollie
Hawes are seven-point favorites to , defeat the Wally Eg-
gert-led V.C.F. squad. The
game starts it 12:45.
BADMINTON
The UBC "C" 1 team lost
a  closely  contested match  to
DAVE WAY
. . . aw, it was nuthin'
the   West   Point   Grey  squad
7-5 Thursday.
•The   deciding   factor   was
the   experience   of   the   West
Point Grey team.
INTRAMURALS
Intramural   tennis   doubles
champions are the Ramblers,
who  defeated Betas  Wednesday in two of three games.
EXCLUSIVE   POSTCRIPT
Ottawa   tRuffrider    head
gooch "Fink" Clear sent The
Ubyssey    a   block-long    tele- *
gram   of   congratulations   on
the recent expose of Ottawa's
secret plays.
Clear   said   the   ridiculous
trash    which    the   Ubyssey
printed  "threw   the  Eskimos
off the track".
"If you had not printed?
that garbage, we may not
have won the Grey Cup. Ed-.
monton thought we were com-'
placent, and took us too
lightly," he said.
'^You 'fellows are cards
who ought to be dealt with,"
he said in conclusion. Thai
telegram was signed by every
ctiizen of the fair ctiy of
Ottawa.
NEW!
If you happen to be an
inventor, or a boxer, you
may be interested to know
that a Finnish doctor has invented pneumatic boxing
gloves. The compressed-air
mitts are said to be tw—wand-
a-half times less damaging
•than conventional f-elWilled-
gloves. i
This could Finnish boxing!
—Imagine Patterson wins by
a blowout!
Varsity
Theatre
437* West 10th
CA 4-3730
HOLDOVER-WISE . . .
there has never been
anything like
THE APARTMENT    ;
2ND WEEK!!
'THf APARTMENT'
starring
Jack Lemmon, Shirley
|| MacLaine, Fred MacMurray
Adult Entertainment Only
FIRST MGH*FR<S   PREVIEW
MONDAY 8:15 P.*A.
COMING "SOON
B_ACK ORPHEUS'
SPECIAL STUDENT RATES
COMPLETE OPTICAL SERVICE
Glasses Fitted
24-Hour Service OPTICAL Repairs
VANCOUVER BLOCK
MU 5^0928 — MU 3-2948
Main Floor
734 GRANVILLE ST.
Immediate Appointment
NEW WESTMINSTER - 675 COLUMBIA STREET
-LA «-8665
WHY NOT
PURSUE EXCELLENCE
IN PLACE OF MEDIOCRITY?
The smallest piece of hi fidelity equipment in our store
must have intrinsic value before it is offered for sale to
our customers.
The largest must represent incomparable adventure in
sound.
If we fail to meet these twin challenges we forfeit the
confidence of the buyer who prefers to make a rtrrnicmg
choice.
This year we have initiated a 10% discount to University students because we believe that the pursuit of
excellence comes most naturally to the open and inquiring mind.
hi fi sales ltd
2714 W. Broadway
RE 3-8716
"Canada's most complete high fidelity centre" Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 29,   1960
TWEEN  CLASSES
Russian
techniques
to be revealed
C.I.C.
Russian FilrmExpexiirtents in
the Revival of Organisms,
©hem. _50, 12:30 jnoon, Friday.
* *       *
CINEMA 16
Presents "On the Bowery",
a candid camera examination
of Skid Row. Noon.  106.
* *       *
MjEN'S   INTRAMURAL
ATHLETIC   MANAGERS
Important   meeting   Monday,
Dec. 5, room 216, gym. Entries
. for football and basketball due
Dec. 5.
* *       *
PRE-MED   SOCIETY
Lecture   by   Dr.   Haliday   on
"'Narcotics"   tomorrow   in  Wes.
100 at noon.
S.C.M.
r "African Tensions" Evening
get-together, Sat., Dec. 3, 8:00
p.m. If interested, contact Doug
Carlin, Hut L-5.
CLASSIFIED
LOST: One Psi Upsilon Fraternity Sweetheart Pin on November 23rd. Please call AM
6-6954.
WILL THE girl who is wearing
brown fur-lined boots two
sizes two small please contact Ann at CA 4-0394. I
have yours and they're too
big! 	
^KrQULD l?OU care to do some
BatelliteTwatching this week-
• end on Seymour Mtn., J.M.?
,J -r-Will bring a large bag of
i    peanuts—S. Quinty.
"WANTED: One set good soci-
ology 200 notes. Phone
George, (RE 3-4280
CHRISTMAS IN Cuba:  Desire
i   two ;girls to  travel by V.W.
,h   and* share .expenses.
See  Garry sWatk&s  or Phil
Waddell c/o Political   Clutos
room, Brock 363.
3_»YONE FINDING a pair  of
cbrla rAmmed   glasses   in   a
*   brown   cowhide   case  please
\:.   phone Jim at CYpress 8-3495
after 8:00 p.m:
WOULD THE person who took
the wrong brief case from
»'" the entrance to the book-
., store between 12:45 and 1:15
;' on "Thursday, November 24th
\r please contact J. Stevenson,
"teiHR "f-3253 or place the brief-
'•  case in the Lost and Found.
'*Qni'r   '■    -      ■             -     —■ ■ -— ■**
$5 HEWARD for any information as to whereabouts of
,i grey overcoat taken from
j Westforook on Nov. 23, foe-
; tween 2:30 and 4:30 p.m.
Phone  CA 4J9953.
FOLK SONGS
Folk Song, Circle is meeting
at Alma Y Wed., Nov. 30th
at 8:00 p.m. Among the per-
Folk Masters Vera McKen-
others. No admission charge.
Anybody interested in listen-
iormers are High Riggers,
zie, Ray Hull and many
ing to or singing folk songs
are welcome.
Dependable Repair
Service
and
Shoes of Quality
are a specialty
at
Sasamat Shoes
4463 W. 10th Ave.
CA 4-1017
Federal loans have
strings attached
TORORNTO <CUP)—Federal
loans to universities for construction of student residences
will be of little importance, the
president of the University of
Toronto said.
"The loans won't have a great
deal of effect," said Dr. Claude
T. Bissel.
"They involve borrowing
money and the universities are
not too anxious to borrow."
Last week, he said the loans
for residences was the least important of the demands. "We
need direct grants", he said.
The Universities Foundation,
in a brief, demanded increased
per capita grants, subsidies for
medical, dental and graduate
students, matching capital
grants for science buildings
and finally loans for residences
and housing.
LAST CHANCE
News and announcements
lo appear in the Ubyssey
before Christmas must be
turned into the Pub offices
before   tomorrow  noon.
The Ubyssey's last issue
before Christmas will be published   Thursday.
"For Everything in
Drugs and
School Supplies"
University
Pharmacy
5754 University Blvd.
tin the Village)
ELVIRA'S
Palma de Mallorca
For an original Christmas
gift, iememb»r the Spanish
and European touch. See our
wide selection of imported
leather goods.
4479 W. 10th Ave.
CA 4-0848
RIDGE
THEATRE
16th and Arbutus
BE 8-6311
Now Playing!
ALL TIME.GREAT FILMS!
TONIGHT WE SING
: Color - 9:15
Ezio Pinza, Roberta Peters
Tamara Toumanova,
Isaac Stern
and at 7;00
THE RED SHOES
Color
Moira Shearer
Anton Walbrook
News
DOORS 6:45
This is the only reference to
the brief's specific demands  in
the Speech from the Throne:
"The housing legislation put
before you  will  contain provisions to authorize the corporation (Central Mortgage and
Housing Corp.) lo make loans
to universities for students' residences on  terms similar  to
those of loans made for limited dividend housing projects."
"The   new   legislation   won't
really fundamentally alter   our
plans," Dr. Bissell said. "It will
encourage us to move more rapidly with one of our own residences, but it will be of particular help to universities in other
cities."
•The Very Rev. Henry F. Le-
gare, OMI, Rector of the University of Ottawa and chairman of
the Canadian Universities Foundation termed the government's
intentions "the promise of a
magnificent step forward."
"It will go a long way," he
said to remedy a sad blight on
Canada's education scene.    -
"We are happy that the government has seen merit in one
of our proposals. It encourages
us to be sanguine for eventual
action oh the other three."
Matz & Wozny
548 Howe St     MU 3-4715
Custom Tailored Suits
for Ladies and Gentlemen
Gowns and Hoods
Uniforms
Double breasted suits
modernized in the new
single  breasted  styles.
Special Student Bates
Safe-driving
week begins
Canada's national campaign
for highway safety, Safe-Driving Week, is scheduled to begin
at midnight, Wednesday. It will
run for a week.
While the ideal goal would
be a solid week free of traf-j
fie deaths, the Canadian Highway Safety Council, national
sponsors of the campaign, fear
enough inattention to highway
safety will remain to result in
45 fatalities during Safe-Driving  Week.
Most of these deaths will
be unnecessary. Care and consideration, claims the Council's
executive Director, W. Arch
Bryce,  could  prevent them.
"Complacency," said Prime
Minister Diefenbaker, "has no
place among the peoples of a
nation such as Canada when
their very lives are threatened
by a relatively small core of
heedless   and   careless   persons.
Mr. Diefenbaker was writing
in support of Canada's national
Safe-Driving  Week.
WANTED
Girl to share fully furnished
large suite. Low rent, terrific
view one block from beach.
Phone RE 8-4658 after 6:00
p.m.
Perfect Campus
Coat for Men...
The weather proof
short length Loden
coat imported from
our side of Germany
in shades of Olive,
Tan, and Grey.—$35
The 711 Shop
"natural clothes for men"
783   GRANVILLE   STREET
TAKE IT TO
SPOTLESS
SHIRTS URL
5 or
More
THIS SUNDAY AFTERNOON AT 3 P.M.
The Vancouver Film Guild Presents
The 1956 Russian Production of Shakespeare's
"OTHELLO"
in Color and English
starring Sergei Bohdarchuck
HOLLYWOOD THEATRE
Tickets $1.00 at Owl Books, 4560 West 10tn Avenue or
admission by "donation" at the door
Coming Dec. 6 at 8:03 p.m.: Bolshoi Ballet in
"Ballet of Romeo & Juliet"
what would you like to be
ten years from
mm?
Imagine yourself well on the road to success... a
v.i.p. in your chosen eweer, enjoying your job
with an ever expanding company, being part of
an organization that is second to none in its field*
This picture could become a reality if you plaa
your career with IBM. Where you start work caa
count a lot.
At IBM there are opportunities for graduates ia
Engineering, Commerce and the Arts. No one need
stand still. The requirements are high, but the re-*
wards both personal and financial are exceptional.
If you would like
a career with IBM,
send for this booklet now.
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES COMPANY LIMITED
444-7th AvenueWest, Calgary, Alberta
Western District Manager—W. Dinsdale
IBM

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0124761/manifest

Comment

Related Items