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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Jan 5, 1961

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UBYSSEY
Vol.   XLIV.
THURSDAY, JANUARY 5,  1961
No. 34
UBC walks out of conference
JOHN MADDEN, UBC's 1961 Rhodes Scholar, combined
rowing, AMS service and honors Physics marks to cop this
scholarship.
wins Rhodes award
Despite the fact that he was thrown to the UBC wolves at
the tender age of 15, John Madden, this year's Rhodes Scholarship winner at UBC, managed to survive to claim one of the
highest honors to be awarded to a university student in the
British Commonwealth or the U.S.
a youthful graduate
Madden
of Shawnigan Lake high school
on Vancouver Island, came to
UBC when he was just 15 to begin Ms honors course in Math
atof Physics; He graduated in
1959.
The 21-year-old scholar is now
i_ his seeond year of post-graduate study in physics.
For his thesis he is working
two students' lives
Two UBC students, one from
Vancouver and one from Ladysmith, were killed in separate
accidents during the Christmas
holidays.
Rein Ersual, a first year Commerce student and holder of
four university scholarships,
- was killed Monday in a fall
from his toboggan on Mt. Seymour.
Earlier Barry Bourque, of
Ladysmith, was killed near his
heme in an automobile accident. Bourque, a Law. student,
was returning home from a wedding reception.
^During the New Year's weekend, three British Columbians
were killed in traffic accidents, one was killed in a fire,
and one  was drowned.
on a Gas Scintillation Chamber
for tracing certain nuclear particles so people can see them.
The scholarship, which requires applicants to be active
in athletics and other student
activities, in addition to having
a high scholastic r ec o r d, is
awarded to eleven Canadian
University students annually.
JOHN ROWED
In 1958 Madden was a member of UBC's four oar rowing
crew which won a Silver Medal
at the British Empire Games.
The following year he participated in the Pan American
games, with UBC's eight oar
crew which brought in another
Silver Meral.
While at Oxford he plans to
continue rowing. His other athletic interests are Rugby,
Squash, and Skiing.
SERVICE TOPS
This year Madden is chairman
of UBC's local NFCUS committee and is co-chairman of Academic Symposium. Last year he
■vfas executive member on the
Students Council.
Before going to Oxford, where
he will be working for his PhD.
in Physics, Madden plans to
vacation for a month in Spain.
While in "Europe he also plans
to do some skinng in Austria.
Strachan
views  Chant
Commission
CCF leader Robert Strachan
today urged future increases in
provincial revenues be channeled into education to implement Chant report recommendations.
In the time available to me to
examine it, it is my opinion that
to implement the Commission's
recommendations we must finance education from general
revenue while retaining local
autonomy.
EXPENSES RISING
In an expanding province we
have found that our provincial
revenues are rising year by year.
If in the next few years most
of this annual increase is allocated for educational operating costs, t h e'n the province
would find itself in a position
of accepting responsibility for
all school operational costs."
Strachan said, "The CCF constantly stressed the need for
kindergartens, and that the Department of Education has been
refusing school boards the authority   to   open  kindergartens.
"Generally speaking the report relects a middle ground in
the kind of educational system
our pepole desire. The recommendations, if carried out, will
give us a better educational return on each dollar spent, but
this will not mean a reduction
in overall costs.
"In order to reach the standards asked for by the Commission it ■will require even more
money than in the past, but I
feel sure that nothing less than
the best in education will satisfy the people of British Columbia."
Ubyssey disagrees
with CUP policy
The Ubyssey, with two other university pnewsapers,
walked out of the annual Canadian University. Press conference last week over what they called "an alteration of the original purposes of CUP."
The Ubyssey was joined by
the University of Toronto Var.-
sity and the Queen's Journal
in withdrawing from the conference to reconsider their membership in CUP.
The withdrawal was the result of a dispute arising from a
policy matter which developed
during debate on a motiton censuring the Laval administration
and Sturent Council regarding
the expulsion of three student
editors several weeks ago.
The Varsity proposed a motion stating that the conference
should agree unanimously before making statements of opinion on editorial matters. The
motion was seconded by The
Ubyssey.,
It- was,loriginally passed then
reconsidered and amended to
read, that- a two:thirds majority-
be required to approve editorial
pronouncements before they,
could be made in the name of
CUP.
RECONSIDER MEMBERSHIP
It was at this point that the
three delegations withdrew
from the conference to reconsider their membership in CUP.
Varsity editor Ed Roberts,
who spoke for the group, stated that CUP should make editorial statements with unanimous approval or not all.
The Ubyssey and The Queen's
Journal issued a joint statement asserting that the ammem
ded motion is in contradiction
with the original conception of
the purposes of CUP. The edi-
tors of the two papers expressed
the opinion that CUP is pririv
arily an organization to foster
co-operation in newsgathering
among the memebers, and-not
an organization for expressing
opinions.
"The basic issue is the right
of each and every member paper
to    decide    individually    what
opinions  it  wants  its name associated   with,"   said Ubyssey
Editor-in-chief Fred Fletcher.
REMAIN MEMBERS
After being assured by the
national president of CUP that
the resolution passed applied
only to: conferences, The Ubyssey and The Queen's Journal
stated their decision to remain
members of CUP, and to attempt
to have the unanimity rule
written into the constitution at
or before the next conference.
The Varsity has not yet announced : its final decision.
Ted Johnson, of McMaster
University was elected national
president of CUP on the last
day of the three day conference
held at the University of Western Ontario in London.
The Ubyssey was mandated
to investigate means of improving communication among member papers. «-        -
On behalf of NFCUS, Paul
Becker presented a trophy to be
awarded for general excellence
in features. Another NFCUS
proposal that CUP conduct a
cartoon contest, was turned
down.
The conference approved the
CUP Brief to be presented in
French and English to the Royal
Commission on Publications.
The CUP operating budget of
$6750 for the 1961 fiscal year
was approved. A detailed report on fund-raising was prepared and submitted for consideration.
MONEY-____D
Ubyssey Editor-in-Chief Fred
Fletcher said: "This was the
most important issue at the conference. I feel that a definite
national plan for raising funds
is essential. If the member papers cooperate we should have
no trouble." .
Bishop Neill:
UBC religious clubs failing
By SHARON MacKINNON
University Christian movements in many instances are
hot serving the. purpose for
which they are intended,
World Christian Books editor Bishop Stephen Neill said
at  UBC Wedesday.
He told 300 students in -
Buchanan 106 that the movements often fail because students gather together for
their own satisfaction and do
not try to mix with students
taking part in other activities.
"These organizations can be
dangerous and harmful when
this happens," he told the
students.    They're    members
shouldn't just  huddle together,
together.
"They ought to  be in all
University societies as Christians making their influence
felt, penetrating and infiltrating because they are interested," he said.
He stressed the fact that
although Christians should
be dynamic, they must not
bully people into making a
decision for Christ nor treat
"sinners" like "speckled
birds."
Bishop Neill, active in the
World Council of Churches in
Geneva, makes lecture tours,
and is a leader in the ecumenical movement.
He will deliver a lecture
on "Contemporary Christianity" in the Auditorium at
noon  today. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 5, 1961
THE UB YSSEY
Authorized as second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
i Published three times weekly throughout the University year
! in Vancouver by the Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society,
j University of B.C.  Editorial opinions  expressed are  those of  the
( Editorial Board of the Ubyssey and not necessarily those of the
! Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C.
TELEPHONES: CA 4-3242, locals 12 (news desk), 13 (critics-
| sports ), 14 (Editor-in-Chief), 15, 6 (business offices).
J Editor-in-Chief: Fred Fletcher
"[.■■-' * Managing  Editor Roger McAfee
[. News Editor Denis Stanley
Features Editor Ed Lavalle
Photography Editor Byron Hender
Senior Editor Ann  Pickard
Sports Editor Mike Hunter
Critics Editor Dave Bromige
I CUP Editor Bob Hendrickson
f Layout:  Ann   Pickard
]       Reporters and Desk: Sharon McKinnon, Suzanne Clarke,
Ian Brown, Fred Jones, Dianne Greenall
CUP vs. Autonomy?
;   '        The Ubyssey has traditionally taken a firm stand in
j   favor of the editorial autonomy of the studenty press.
; Over the years, The Ubyssey has stood ready to op-
;   pose any move by any body that would lessen its editorial
. .freedom or that of any member of the Canadian university student press.
\ The Ubyssey has consistently held the opinion that a
:   free press is one of the prime necessities of a free society.
■It has said many times that it believes that student life
!   should be as free as any life in a free society.
L^st week, The Ubyssey was faced with an anomaly
of the first order. Canadian University Press itself at the
'   annual conference  of  its 26 members  passed   a  motion
which has the effect of allowing the possibility of infringement of the editorial autonomy of its member papers.
Faced with this situation, The Ubyssey, along with the
'   Queen's Journal an£ the Toronto Varsity, withdrew from
the conference in order to consider its position in relation
to the CUP.
The situation developed this way. The Varsity proposed
a motion stating that CUP should not express opinions on
editorial issues without the unanimous agreement of all
:   member papers.
This is an eminently sensible suggestion. Since mem-
;   ber papers revere their autonomy so greatly, it is only
logical that each member should have veto power over the
editorial opinions of the organization as a whole.
At any rate, it is not the business of a press organization to express editorial opinions except in the case of very
grave issues. It is assumed, since CUP is a sensible body,
that unanimity would easily be achieved if the issue were
grave enough.
At this point, a motion was introduced censuring both
the administration and the Student Council at Laval University for actions surrounding the expulsion of three student editors from that university sevaral weeks ago. The
motion will be reported in full in Friday's Ubyssey.).
The Ubyssey has stated and still holds the opinion that
the Laval administration acted arbitrarily and unfairly in
expelling these student editors. It has not yet been able to
gather enough information to pass judgment on the actions
of the Student Council.
The Ubyssey and two other members of CUP abstained
from voting on the motion because it was felt that certain
statements in the motion were inaccurate and that the
clause condemning the Student Council for not giving the
editors financial aid, was to put it bluntly, dealing with a
subject that is none of CUP's business.
The chairman ruled that abstentions defeated the motion under the previously passed resolution calling for
unanimity. This pronouncement led to a flurry of passionate
speeches from the French-Canadian delegations, which resulted in the unanimity motion being reconsidered and
amended to read that CUP may express editorial opinion
if it is approved by a two-thirds majority at a national
conference.
This means in effect that two-thirds of CUP may make
editorial pronouncements in the name of all the members
of the group. This is an infringement of the editorial freedom of each member not agreeing with the motion.
When this motion was passed The Ubyssey, considering a strong protest necessary, and feeling that perhaps
membership in CUP might be a detriment rather than an
advantage under these conditions, withdrew from the conference.
The Ubyssey, along with the Queen's Journay, later decided to remain in CUP for the time being and to attempt
to have the principle of unanimous approvel written into
the constitution at or before the next conference.
The Ubyssey is unwilling to give up any of its editorial autonomy,, even to CUP.
Letters To
The Editor
Student Gov't.
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear  Sir:
I am pleased to see than an
number of students are becoming increasingly conscious
of certain inadequacies of our
student government system. It
has become a 'very controversial topic, and the newly established University Student
Activities Committee seems to
have been blown to pieces as
a result of it.
I would like to point out
some of the questions that we
have to ask ourselves to be
able to recognise the issues
involved in this controversy:—
What are the functions of
student government? Is its
role merely administrative? Or
is it also responsible for interpreting student opinion (if
there is any) in matters of
higher policy, e.g. budget, rendering advice to the university
administration, the case of the
South African Scholarship?
Is the present system adequate? If not, what are the
weaknesses? Is the system too
autocatic? Does it fail to communicate the plans and activities of the student government
to the student body? Does it
fail to provide opportunities
to participate in student government to all the students,
and no just the Brock types.
What remedies can be offered? Should more power be
given to the more representative parts of student government, such as the Undergraduate Societies Committee? Should a bicameral system be adopted? Should we
have a more representative
Students' Council, maintaining its present size? Or should
we have a large student legislature?
These are some of the issues involved in reviewing our
present system of student government. We should remember
that when we received our
cherished student autonomy,
we took upon ourselves the
responsibility of managing student affairs. If we leave it
to a few student leaders to
carry these responsibilities and
to work out the problems involved in it, we are not accepting the obligations accompanying student autonomy. I
think, therefore, that all of us
should give a little thought
to this matter.
Peter Penz,
U.S.C.  Rep for Arts
Puddle Mars?
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
Some of the puddles on the
sidewalks and roadways of
the campus are so large and
permanent I feel they should
be named and mapped for the
guidance of the upcoming
generations.
Yous sloshingly,
R. D. Irving,
Ed. Ill
LITTLE MAN OTNLCAMPUS
''••IN ADDITION TO PESUUAK TEACHING ALIGNMENT* — Al-L
FACULTY MSM0E-R$ a£E gXPECTHP TO $fVK$OR A ClU9.«
Vox Populi at UBC ?
Apathy, apathy. All we hear is apathy.
From all sides come complaints about the apparent lack
of interest in student government and campus elections.
Every year candidates for student offices marshall their
forces for the campaign. If they are fortunate enough to
live on Greek Row, there are always willing fraternity
brothers to help promote the cause. Other candidates have
a little harder time rounding up manpower, but eventually
all have their individual campaigns organized/Then there
is a stating of platforms which generally center around
promises for better unity, bigger and better activities and
better representation for the student body.
The few earnest candidates who do have definite objectives, once elected, face the prospect of single-handedly
convincing the rest of the Board of Control that their idea
is a good one.
With no real issues to vote on, the election degenerates
into a popularity vote that doesn't generate quite as much
interest as the Ugly Man contest.
What is the solution to the problem? We could include
student initiatives on the ballot. At least this would insure
that student opinion would be voiced. But we still have the
problem of securing backers for the projects.
At several universities political parties have drawn
students into campus politics. At the University of Kansas, the Vox Populi and the University Party have organized student coalitions, and win support by stating definite
platforms on issues.
A party which succeeds in getting a slate of officers
elected would stand some chance of getting their objectives
accomplished. Instead of rubber-stamping the few ideas
which are proposed, the governing bodies could indicate
strong action. And if the proposition wasn't feasible that
year,  a continuing party organ  could try again.
The time to begin organizing a campus party is now.
By the time Spring elections rolled around the party
machinery could be a going concern.
Any takers, ye of the coffee-cup bureaucracy?
—University  of  Washington  Daily.
Forest Research Officers Required By
Department of Forestry
Various Centres
$4740-$7140
CHALLENGING CAREERS
GOOD FRINGE BENEFITS
Opportunities Embrace the Fields of:
• Silviculture • Forest Fire Research
• Ecology • Logging
• Mensuration # Wood Utiiization
•s»e?crrdmsand    • ***-
• Forest Economics
If you are obtaining a Bachelors or Post-Graduate Degree
in Forestry, you are invited to visit the Federal Government's Selection Team which will be at your university on
JANUARY 9-15 inclusive.
Interview arrangement should be made through the Office
of the Dean of Forestry. Thursday, January 5,  1961
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
Students invited
to East Asian Week
Importance of China and Japan in today's international
picture will be illustrated by students in their first Far East
Week which will begin Monday at the University of British
Columbia.
The event, sponsored by the
Chinese Varsity Club, East
Asian Society, and Nisei Varsity Club, will also mark the
opening of the University's new
department of Asian Studies.
Patrons included university
president, Dr. N. A. M. MacKenzie, Dean S. N. F. Chant,
Dean F. H. Soward, Dr Vladimir
Krapina, Japanese consul general Mr. Muneo Tanabe, and
consul general for the Republic of China, Mr. Yin-shou Che.
NOON HOUR BUSY
Noon hour talks in 102 will
be given by Dr. William Holland, head of the new Asian
Studies department; Dr. Ping-ti
Ho of Asian Studies, Mr. B. C.
Binning, head of the fine arts
department, and the Chinese
consul general. The Japanese
award winning film "Ugitsu
Monagatari"   will be   shown,
A scholarship fund in connection with Asian Studies will
be created with proceeds from
Far East Night.
It will culminate in a colorful and dramatic program of
events and interests from 4:30
to 11 p.m. on Friday, January
9, in International House.
DISPLAYS OPEN
Demonstrations and exhibitions will include art and curio
displays, photographs of student life in Japan, Chinese
painting, Japanese flower arranging by Lorraine Miyagish-
ima, calligraphy writing by Dr.
Countrymen!
Your    Friends    Will   Meet
For Coffe, Steaks
and Other Treats
at
Dea n's
4544 W. 10th
Open until 11:30
ELVIRA'S
Pa I ma de Mallorca
For an original Christmas
gift, remember the Spanish
and European touch. See our
wide selection of imported
leather goods.
4479 W. 10th Ave.
CA 4-0848
EUROPEAN TRAINED
BARBERS
Individually Styled Haircuts
UPPER TENTH
BARBER & TOILETTRIES
4574 W. 10th
Single Sleeping Room.
House privileges. CA 4-3604
$10.00 per week.
6-room family house, 4
to 6 a d u It s. Comfortable,
fully furnished, lovely view,
extra suite in basement with
bath etc. Can be used as
study, sleeping etc. CA 4-
3604.
Y. T. Wang,  and a book exhibit.
The elegant cheongsam and
graceful kimona will be worn
by Chinese and Japanese girls
who will direct a sale of Chinese pastries and Japanese
Sushi, Manzu, and Senbe, and
who will serve tea to guests
without charge. Equally brilliant will be the Hapi coats of
the Japanese Canadian boys
who will act as guides.
Floor show attractions will
feature Japanese folk dancing,
Chinese male choir and classical orchestra, Japanese "Kendo," traditional sword fighting
in the manner of the feudal
Samurai, and the Chinese lion
dance. Admission for sturents
will be 25 cents and others
50   cents.
Pub invites you
to join the staff
The Ubyssey is expanding
and needs a vast quantity of
new reporters, editorial writers, layout artists, feature
and sports writers, critics,
and photographers. Past experience   is   not   a   necessity.
Ubyssey photographers will
meet next Tuesday noon in
the pub for an "organization
check-up". Anyone else who
has an interest in taking
photos for the campus paper
is invited to attend.
Experienced workers are
also needed for the desk.
PERMANENT AND SUMMER EMPLOYMENT
Pan American Petroleum Corporation
Calgary, Alberta
GEOPHYSICS—      Students in Physics; Mathematics; Mining,
Electrical or Geological Engineering —
Interviews January 5 and 6.
ENGINEERING—    All branches applicable to petroleum  production. — Inerviews January 9 and 10.
ACCOUNTING—   Students in   Commerce,   majoring   in   Accounting.—Interviews January 9, 10 and 11.
GEOLOGY— Postgrads and grads. in Geology or Geolo
gical   Engineering.   —  Interviews January
9 and  10.
See  University Placement Office
for  further particulars
TUXEDO
RENTAL & SALES
• Full Dress
• Morning Coats
• White and Blue Coats
• Shirts and Accessories
• $1.00 discount lo
UBC Students.
E. A. LEE LTD.
623 Howe    MU 3-2457
AUSTIN A55-2095
00
A fully equipped compact car with
room for 5 adults and their luggage
LOCATIONS
10th & Alma
Vancouver
Marine & Bowser
North Vancouver
DOLLARS
AND SCHOLARS
Better management of
educational dollars is possible
through regular use of a Canadian Bank of Commerce Savings Account ... an axiom
based upon our dealings with
many generations of students.
Take a positive step toward
better control of your money
. . . visit our branch nearest
your campus or school and
make use of our complete
banking service.
THE CANADIAN
BANK OF COMMERCE
Call us your bankers
THE PROCTOR & GAMBLE CO. OF CANADA
Hamilton,  Ontario
HAS MANAGEMENT POSITIONS OPEN IN
• INDUSTRIAL   ENGINEERING •  PRODUCTION •  DEVELOPMENT
• ENGINEERING     •  PRODUCT RESEARCH        •  TECHNICAL PACKAGING
FOR GRADUATES AND POSTGRADUATES IN
ENGINEERING AND HONOUR SCIENCE COURSES
r
!
COMPANY   REPRESENTATIVES f
will be present for
campus interviews
January 9, 10, 11, 12
PERSONAL   INTERVIEWS
j may be arranged
! through the
j     University Placement  Office
There are also summer employment opportunities for men from the 1962 Engineering
and Science classes. Page 4
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 5, 1961
Tween Classes
Bishop speaks on Christ
S.C.M. anr V.C.F.
Bishop Stephen Neill: editor,
renowed scholar, and world
traveller is. speaking today at
12:30 in the auditorium on Con-
temprory Christianity. Open
discussion to follow.
•P V V
NEWMAN CLUB
Dance   Friday,    Jan.    6,    in
Dance   Club   Lounge,   8   to   12
p.m. Casually      *      *
CHORAL SOCIETY
All members are reminded of
extra rehersals beginning today, Physics 202, 6 p.m.
WRITER'S SERVICE
Let us sell your story, article,
book, TV, songs and poems.
1065 East 19th Ave.,
TR  6-6362
upen   Evenings
FROSH COUNCIL
Frosh council general meeting on Friday at 12:30 in Bu.
102, for all frosh reps, and committee members concerning
frosh  week.
EAST ASIA SOCIETY
Urgent general meeting to
discuss final arrangements for
"Far East Week" Friday, Jan.
6,  Bu.  214,  12:30.
CLASSIFIED
TRANSPORTATION WANTED
— From 700 Block W. 19th
Ave.. Van. For 9:30 classes.
Any offer considered — Call
Phil, at TR  2-5801   evenings.
LOST — Reward for Zippo
lighter with initials "R.L.F.",
around Buchanan entrance on
last day of lectures in December. Call in to Pub Office
(Room   201).
RIDE WANTED — From Trafalgar & Broadway, 8:30 or
9:30 Mon.-Fri. Phone John
Mercer, RE  8-1798.
VOLKSWAGEN OWNERS!
We have over 250 satisfied V-W owners patronizing our
station. Qualified V-W mechanics make expert repairs and
service a specialty.
Why not give us a try!
UNIVERSITY SHELL SERVICE
10th Ave & Discovery CA 4-0828
FREE PICK UP AND DELIVERY
REQUIRES:
Engineers and Scientists of B.Sc, and Ph. D.
■training for Research, Development, Produc-
.',(. tion, Exploration.
Senior Undergraduates in certain Engineering and Honours Science courses for summer assignments in laboatoies and plant de-
velopmet goups.
Interviews With Representatives On
February 6, 7 and 8
Your University Placement Office can provide details
and literature about Cominco and arrange an interview.
THE CONSOLIDATED MINING AND
SMELTING COMPANY OF CANADA
LIMITED
1961 Graduates and Post-Graduates
Excellent Career Opportunities
In
Science anr Scientific Research
With
The Public Service of Canada
If you are obtaining a post-graduate or honours degree
in any of the following:
Chemistry
Pharmacology
Chemical Engineering
Physics
Geophysics
Engineering Physics
Biochemistry
Geology .all fields)
Geological Engineering
Metallurgical Engineering
Mathematics
Electronics.
Geochemistry
Astronomy
OBTAIN — Your copy of Information Circular 61-1500
from the University Placement Office.
CONSIDER, — The opportunities of interest to you. The
advantages of employment with the Public Service of Canada.
ARRANGE — Through your Placement Officer for your
Interview with the Scientific Selection
Team which will visit the University on
JANUARY 9, 10, 11 and 12, 1961.
TAKE IT TO
SPOTLESS
SHIRTS 19„
5 or
More
FOR SALE
1951 Meteor, $2fl0,00, Radio
and Heater, Turn Signals: Excellent Condition. ^V6
W.  A.   DOBIE
MO 1-1271 or CA 4-4553
NO MORE RAIDS
on your Savings Account
Fight off raids on your savings this
businesslike way. Use a Royal Bank
Personal Chequing Account to pay
bills; keep your Savings Account
strictly fhr saving! Ask about this new
Royal Two-Account Plan.
THE ROYAL BANK OP CANADA
University Branch
10th  and Sasamat
FRATERNITY
RUSHING
DON'T DELAY
REGISTER NOW
A. M. S. OFFICE
JANUARY 4 TO 30
INFORMATION BOOKLET NO CHARGE

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