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The Ubyssey Oct 27, 1960

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Full Text

 Homecoming
Edition
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. XLIH.
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27,  1960
No. ]Si
A.M.S. Honours Col. Logan
COL HARRY T. LOGAN, former head of the UBC Classics Dept. being presented with the Great
Trekker Award by AMS president Dave Edgar and Homecoming Chairman Alan Cornwall
at a press conference Wednesday.
P!io.-o  by  A.   Tanner
Former Classics  Head
1960 Great Trekker
By SUSANNE CLARKE
Colonel Harry T. Logan, Professor Emeritus and former
Head of the Department of Classics at UBC has been awarded
the 1960 Great Trekker Award.
Mexican Students
Freedom Restricted
A letter has been received at UBC written by a group of
Mexico City ^udents charging thatUexiean students are being
severely persecuted for expressing anti-government views.
The  group,  under  the  name
group,
"The Provisory Committee for
the Defence of Human Rights",
claimed that students have been
arrested, beaten or assassinated
in the streets, as the government puts restrictions on democratic ways of expression.
They requested that Canadians
present a petition for liberation
of Mexicans now in jail for political crimes.
IMPRISONED
Student officials said the letter,
addressed to the Rector of UBC,
was received by Dean Geoffrey
Andrew on Oct. 4. It was writ-.
ten in French on brown paper.
The Dean turned it over to International House for translation.
The Mexican group is not a
recognized student organization.
AMS plans to investigate the
origin of the letter.
This is the letter:
The Rector,
A group of students from the
Faculty of Philosophy and Letters of the University of Mexico,
preoccupied by the grave events
Must Renew Visas
Foreign Students
Foreign students must have
their temporary landing permits
renewed Friday.
Immigration department officials will be at the registrar's
office between 9:30 a.m. and
4:30   p.m.
Students must bring passports
and other relevant documents
in order to have the visas renewed.
lately taking place in our
country, address themselves to
you with the greatest respect to
acknowledge you of the following facts.
During the course of the two
past years of the government of
the actual president, the national
policy has been characterized by
a growing restriction of the
democratic ways of expression,
one has arrived in the past few
weeks to repressive methods that
are reminding of the dictatorial
practices of General Porfirio
Diaz.
One of the branches most affected has been the students.
During August, several hundred
of them have been arrested,
savagely beaten and even assassinated in the streets while manifesting their discontent.
The persecution of the freedom of thought has now become
the official attitude. The great
painter David Alforo Siqueriros,
the 74-year-old writer Filomeno
Mata, and several leaders of political and social organizations are
are still in prison for having expressed their ideas freely.
We have the honour to address
this request to you in order that
you may be able, in a most appropriate way, to transmit our
anguish to the free men of your
country, in order that they may
present a petition of amnesty for
all those that are still in jail for
political crime, in accordance
with the Declaration of Human
Rights, to which all countries of
the world are subscribed.
RESULTS OF
BLOOD  DRIVE
The UBC blood drive ended
180 pints short of its 2,300 quota,
teriod; s
Colin CameTon, co-chairman
of this year's drive stated that
the committee was pleased with
87% of the quota reached. Of
the 1,996 persons attending, 212
were found unfit to give blood.
Forestry won the ihter-faculty
competition with 245% of its
quota. The nurses placed second
with 180%. The Aggies third
with 165%. At the bottom were
Commerce   and   Medicine.
Serum donors turned out the
following week to bring the
total  over the  top.
Col Logan will be officially
presented the Cairn Trophy and
a replica by AMS President
Dave Edgar at the Homecoming
Pep Rally noon today in the
War  Memorial  Gymnasium.
At the unofficial ceremony
Wednesday, Colonel Logan said,
"I am delighted to know there's
no condition that I must do the
Great Trek again."
He recalled the original Great
Trek in which he participated
when students and faculty members, carrying stones marched
"over a log trail" from Sasamat
street, to the present Chemistry
Building and deposited the pile
of stones there. t
He remembered that the theii
president of AMS referred to
the pile of stones and said that
it would be the first complete
unit built on the campus.
"It was," Col. Logan concludes.
ANNUAL AWARD
The Great Trekker Award, instituted in 1960, is presented
annually by the Alma Mater Society to an alumnus of the university who has achieved eminence in his chosen field, made a
worthy contribution to his community, and has evidenced'keen
and continued interest in UBC.
"It's a  terrific honour to be
Classes Cancelled
There will be no lectures
or Labs this afternoon. Classes have been cancelled because   of   Fall   Congregation.
presented with the Great Trekker Award by the students,"
Col. Logan said, "and it gives
me great pleasure to receive it."
Said Alumni Association Director Art Sager of Col. Logan,
'He's the youngest old man I
know. No one has devoted himself so much to service both to
his community and the university."
ACTIVE LIFE
Colonel Logan was born in
Nova Scotia, received his public
schooling in British Columbia,
and obtained a B.A. from McGill. As a Rhodes Scholar, he
later earned his B.A. and M.A.
degrees from Oxford.
He has been an active member
of the UBC Alumni Association
since its founding, and became
editor of the Alumni Chronicle
in 1953. He also edited "Tuum
Est",, a history of UBC.
In 1915, as academic representative, he helped draft the
constitution of The Alma Mater
Society along with Sherwood
Lett and others, giving the AMS
complete self-government.
SERVED   OVERSEAS
Col. Logan left UBC as a
Classics Instructor to serve
ovesiseas as commander of a
machine-gun battalion during
World War I.
He returned after the war and
rose to the head of the Classics
department.
Last year's recipient of the
award was James Sinclair, provincial Minister of Fisheries and
an ex-editor Of The Ubyssey.
THE MILLS BROTHERS will headline the Homecoming Pep Rally at 12:30 to-day in the Memorial Gym. Admission will be 25c with all proce eels  going  to  Red  Feather.  See story page  5.
IN GYM AT NOON Page 2
THE UBYSSEY
Authorized as second class mail by Pbst Office Department, Ottawa
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Published three times weekly throughout the University year
in Vancouver by the Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society,
University of B.C. Editorial opinions expressed are those of the
Editorial Board of the Ubysey and not necessarily those of the Alma
Mater   Society  or   the  University   of   B.C.
TELEPHONES: CA 4-3242, locals 12 (news desk), 13 (critics-
sports), 14 (Editor-inChief). 15, 6 (business offices).
Editor-in-Chief: Fred Fletcher
Managing Editor Roger McAfee
Features Editor Ed Lavalle
Photography Editor    Ray Grigg
Senior Editor Ann Pickard
Sports Editor Mike Hunter
' Acting News Editor Denis Stanley
Critics Editor Dave Bromige
Layout Editor: Clarence Buhr
NEWS STAFF: Susanne Clarke, Joe Bolduc, Derek Allen,
Wendy   Barr,   Bob   Hendrickson,   Bill   Piket,   Ian
Brown,   Jerry   Pirie,   Margaret   Obana,   Coleman
Romalis, Kitty Watt, Fred Jones.
HOMECOMING EDITION: MIRIAM ROBERTS and
FRANK   FINDENIGG.    Others:   Fred   Jones,
Dave Dawson, plus student writers and alumni
Ron Robinson.
SPORTS—Bert   MacKinnon,   Herb   Walker,   Chris   Fahrni
Invective Out
It is indeed a shame when our precious right to freedom of expression is denied, but it is an even greater shame
and a crime when that freedom is abused.
It is on the latter charge, Mr. Clive Ansley, author of
"Searchlight", that you are indicted.
It was with some horror, and with an even greater
revulsion, that I read your column in The Ubyssey of
October 25.
To imagine that ai supposedly intelligent, broadminded
student of this university, (especially one whose inquiring
mind has penetrated many of the issues on this university
more than has the average student) would stoop so low as
to slander and insult an employee of the university is beyond my comprehension.
The Brock dietician, whom you childiishly termed
"Miss Grundy," was merely doing her duty, that is, complying with administration regulations which disallow commercial advertising in most university buildings.
But, as you say, "the principle involved . . .is more
important."
I agree with you, Mr. Ansley, the principle of a matter
is always more important, but what of your principles?
Even were it true that the dietician refused to allow
the "Sunny Trails" match folders to be placed in the vending machine on the grounds of "conservatism" and "depressing conformity," there would still be no need for you to
subject the object of your displeasure to the invective and
insulting inferences (examples: "hypocrisy," "ignorance",
"deceit", and "prejudice") that you used to freely in your
column.
The defender of principles and rights need never employ
innuendo, and direct insults as his chosen weapon.
Mr. Ansley, you must learn, and I truly hope you will
learn, that both fee -rights of freedom of expression and
the privilege of being a member of the student community
require  certain obligations.
Not until yqu,learn,tb^se obligations and practise them
will you achieve that maturity entitUng you to the rights
an?l ,priy$figes we are so fortunate to have in a democratic
SOuntEy.
I mu$t apologize for you, Mr. Ansley, not for your
right tP criticize, Tbut ,£or ,the discourteous and undignified
way in w-hich you attempted to accomplish it.
-,Ed Lavalle.
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 27,  1960
HN£ft£ MICK
Slick. That's what it was.
Not mob violence. Not destruction. Not impulsive or
"jstupid.
But slick. Clever. Like a good confidence man or an
artsman would do it.
They sliDped up on the two of them and spirited them
off to the Engineering Building. They had tough luck.
They missed one. ;His class had been moved.
But they had two. ,TTiey could show that they were
the strongest faculty on campus.
They had an attraction for their general meeting to
supplement their Homecoming Queen candidate.
They went over to scare the Brock-types. And they
came out on top, even though the Brock-types used a fire
hose.
<Hail ^engineers.
STIMULUS
By GARRY NIXON
I should have realized that
Mr. Peter Morris of Cinema 16
would not take my.remarks on
his last movie lying down.
The following is from his
reply: "You are under a sad
delusion if you consider that
you can cover up a pitiful lack
of critical faculties in your
"review" of "Le Sang d'un
Poete" by your turgid twitting
of Cinema 16 and its policy. As
an adult film Society we aim at
presenting cinematic art in all
its aspects.
I assure you that we make no
claims that "every well-known
foreign film is a work of art".
One would only have to see
The 41st or 12 Night to be
purged of this illusion. We only
claim the films we present are
examples of film art in its many
forms.
This point, however pales
into insignificance when it is
compared with the lack of
aesthetic judgement, sensibility, and critical ability which
yOu so patently demonstrated
in your review of Blood of a
Poet. It is obvious that you
have a prejudice against films
of this type, and, since you refuse to lower the barriers of
your mind you missed the
whole point, one should t:ke
into consideration that you
walked into the film when it
was half finished (I or.ly wished
this was true. G.N.) you would
probably   find   even   Pollyana ]
incomprehensible under these j
circumstances. Because Cocteau
did not give you his thoughts
and ideas in words of one syllable, and did not follow the
accepted film form but chose
to experiment with his medium,
you dismiss his work as "incoherent" and "lack continuity". Because he did not use a
literal, naturalistic .overworked
plot and cliched conventions
you sneer at his film as "lacking meaning".
In Blood of a Poet Cocteau
defines the poet as a hierophant
whose function is to initiate the
public to mysteries. His method
of presentation is like that of
the surrealists who, content
with expressing the language
and image of dreams and of
free association do not seek to
interpret the dreams or the
images    of    their     work.
Any poem, mystery or
fantasy (as is Blood of a Poet)
may appear at first too inaccessible, too personal or private in its symbols. You denounced the film as toeing incomprehensible to anyone but
Cocteau (I never said it was
comprehensible to . Cocteau!
G.N.) You apparently forget
(or do not know) that surrealism has taught that what is
often called a personal symbol
is really universal.
"It is no use simply saying
'surrealism is bosh' it is an art
movement which has had tremendous influence on our generation, and, as such, any critic
worthy of the name should
make an effort to understand
and appreciate its means of expression. To dismiss the film as
'incomprehensible' and 'lacking
meaning' is to demonstrate
your woeful lack of understanding of poetry, the poet's mind
and one of the most influential
art movements of the present
century. May I respectfully
suggest you limit yourself to
'criticizing' Pollyana, on which
flim the blankness of your
mind will prove no handicap."
There not being space, I
shall  reply  next  week.   G.N.)
Letters To The Editor
'Red Hairy Mass'
Editor,
The Uibyssey,
Dear  Sir, i
Please enclose this declaration in the Thursday edition of
your  paper.
WHEREAS it is common
knowledge that the Engineers
are the lowest form of life on
this campus, 'and
WHEREAS their competence, capabilities and capacity
are at their lowest ebb, and
WHEREAS the ignorant Red
hairy mass have, in the past,
relied on brawn rather than
brains, and quantity rather
than quality, in which they are
sorely lacking, and
WHEREAS apathy and inertia
reign supreme in the offices of
the EUS,
WE, the illustrious members
of the Law Undergraduate Society, the elite intelligentsia of
this campus, do hereby declare
ourselves to be the spirited,
energetic, imaginative, and in
fact, the ONLY LEADERS of
the student body.
The Law Undergraduate
Society.
Booster Position
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir,
I wish to clarify the position
of the Booster Club with regards to Tuesday's "Letters to
the Editor" in The Ubyssey.
The Booster Club's main objective is to promote student
spirit towards various athletic
events on campus. This problem, although not completely
the result of the students themselves, is the one which our
organization faces.
The Engineering and Agriculture Undergraduate Societies
have just cause for taking their
stand in Tuesday's edition.
They were correct in saying
that Friday's Pep Meet was
poorly planned and improperly
staged by impulsive members
of   the  Booster   Club   without
any executive authority to do
so.
The point in fact is this. Our
organization, although active
on campus for several years, is
in a state of complete reorganization. Anyone previously connected with the Booster Club
knows the magnitude of our
job. One only has to attend a
football game to realize how
people utterly become discouraged and attempt to break
down the present apathetic
situation by radical means.
These were the people who
caused last Friday's disturbance.
However, their intentions
were meant in the best interests of the student body as
a whole, and, despite what happened ,they accomplished something. They emphasized that
somewhere on this campus,
there IS spirit. We as Bird
Boosters are proud to be the
nucleus of that spirit. We are
learning a valuable lesson,
that it does pay to organize
things properly. For Friday, we
are sorry.
The students of UBC will be
hearing a great deal from the
Booster Club in the future. We
want people to know that we
exist ,and that our problem is
their problem. We want them
to know that it is very worthwhile to be a part of the spirit
which we represent.
Sincerly,
Ev  Phillips,
President,
Thunderbird Booster Club
Law I.
What, No Beatniks?
Editor,
The Uibyssey,
Dear Sir:.
I note in the Uibyssey of Oct.
18 that "Jazzsoc has no beatniks and wants none."
Are any steps being  taken
to ban this discriminatory  organization from campus?
Cooly yours,
Ian Brown. Thursday, October 27,  1960
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
FIVE-THIRTY CLUB
By IAN BROWN
'We're rolling—and that's for publication!"
Thus an exultant Dave Edgar welcomed a decision on the
proposed new Union Building that commits Council "right up
to their necks."
Council Monday night recommended that the student body
support the building on D parking lot of a combined Student
Union -Building, cafeterias and winter sports arena, providing
that details of finance can be arranged. This decision, in effect,
means that Council has chosen a definite path of action out of
the morass of alternatives bogging this project  down.
Administration has already indicated it might be prepared
to help finance a Union Building, if it were built in conjunction
with a winter sports arena. However, no definite commitment
was made, and it looks as though it's their move. Should they
decide not to participate, Council would probably go ahead
with plans for the Union Building alone.
So, all the Student Union Building Committee has to do
is draw up their plans and find a way to finance the project-
Mortgage, an 3'one?
In an interim report to Council on Frosh Orientation, FOC
Chairman Jim Meekison was somewhat less than encouraging
about the orientation program.
"The present program," he said, "has been about as successful as this type of program can be. The trouble is that it is
not the right type; it is only reaching one or two hundred
of the 2,500 Frosh on campus."
Meekison admitted that, even after two years on FOC
he just couldn't tell what the right program would be, and
said the problem would need extensive study. He suggested
that Council appoint a committee to investigate and report or
this matter.
He also pointed out that there was not as much co-operation as there cpuld be between Student and Administration
efforts. Several Councillors felt that much of the Admimstra-
iion program could be presented in writen form; this would
. give FOC more time to get to the Frosh in the first few days
of term.
Two weeks ago, a member of Players' Club came to Student
Council pleading for an increase in their budget allowance.
He said they reeded about $1,100 to operate, and it had been
whispered to him that UBC was giving" them a mere $200 —
a statement that astounded UCC Councillor Patience Ryan,
whose budget hadn't even been drawn up.
It turned out that this chappie wasn't even on Players'
Club executive, that UCC and the Finance Commietee weret
quite prepared to give the club sufficient operating funds, and
that the club's treasurer settled for a grant of $400, saying
they should make up the balance on English 100 play readings.
So everybody's happy—except, presumably, the guy who started the schemozzle.
The Discipline Committee has decided that Engineers
should pay for the removal of the bricks they used in their
recent Brock extention project. It has not yet been resolved
who will pay the bill for broken bricks.
The Lost and Found Office, formerly housed in the College
Shop, has been relocated in the Book Store (that's at the bus
stop, in case you happen to be lost). Sales of unclaimed items
will be held about once a month, at the College Shop.
Judy Jack reported a very successful University Day, with
a turnout of about 1,400 parents. Apparently a few tour leaders
managed to get themselves and their parties lost, but there is
reason to believe that they have all been recoverd.
KOUNCIL KWICKIES
AMS Budget was given final aproval by Council—congratulations Mr. Robinson!
An increase in A-Card sales was reported of almost
$1,000 over last year.
A meeting on Student Government Revision will be held
Friday noon in Bu. 212.
Executives
Should Run
ice
EDITOR CAGED Ubyssey Editor-in-chief, Fred Fletcher doesn't
seem the least bit worried as he peers through what the
engineers    considered    a    fitting    receptacle    for    anything
associated  with  the  pub. Photo  by A.  Tanner
Engineers Foiled
In Kidnapping
EUS was partially foiled in a kidnap attempt Wednesday.
Fate intervened and prevented Roger McAfee from being
caught and held with two other prominent students. McAfee
was to have had ,a class at the Frediric Wood Theater; however,
the class had been moved.
McAfee stated that he hoped
the Engineers sent to catch him
had not got vet waiting.
Ubyssey editor, Fred Fletcher,
ASUS ANNOUNCES
NEW PIX DEADLINE
and Frosh Orientation Chairman, Jim Meekison, were kidnapped thouffh. The incident
was described by EUS president Bob Noble as a normal kid-
mapping.
Fletcher wss taken completely by surprise upon leaving a
11:30 lecture by president Noble
and seven other Engineers. Fletcher and Meekison were detained in the Engineering building
and were taicen to the EUS general  meeting.
The Fr^inre-= had obtained
copies of the victim's timetables
from some unkewn source.
Apparently the Engineers
have been trying to ret Meekison into their clutches for some
oirrne. The kidnp.p^ing was a pro-
rest over ' Meehison's banning
Frosh hazing.
The Engineers claim that they
held Fletcher for printing the
Eooster Club letter in Tuesday's
paper.
Arts and Science Grad photos
^"Uit be taken before Tuesday,
the Undergrad Society warned
today.
It had been previously announced that the deadline would
be November 15.
Pictures will be taken between
^ a m. and 5 p.m. at Krass Photography Studio, 563 Granville St.
appointments c?n be made by
phoning MU 1-9340.
Gowns and "Personal History'
forms are at the studio. Boys
must wear shirts and ties and
sirls must wear white bonuses
UBC Flags Haifmasr
For Gerrnon Professor
Flags on the Main Mall and
the Faculty Club were at half-
mast Tuesday in remembrance
of  Dr.   Marianna  Jetter,   Dept.
: of   German,   who   passed   away
| Monday.
Corporations and businesses
must encourage their senior executives to run for public offices, John Haar told Liberal
Club members Wednesday at
noori.
He spoke on "The Relation
of Business to Politics", contending that, "Corporations, and the
people that make them up, have
every right to support their
opinions. To put them in perspective is the job of the rest of
;he country, and especially the
political parties."
Haar stated that the glorification of  industry  in our  soci-
y has bred lack of respect for
political institutions. Business
■xecutives would rather remain
'i private industry then lend
iheir talents, to public admini-
1 ration, he said.
The stratification of political
>ffices has contributed to this,
■e said. The most distinguished
office is the federal parliament,
,ust below that comes the provincial  legislature.
At the bottom, is some sucker
running for the school board,
he said.
Business needs a well run
country in which to function,
he stated, and it is to their
own advantage to see that the
talented people in private enterprise get out to help run and
preserve our form of government, i
He cited the case of'Bethlehem Steel in the United Sates
to support his contention. Instead of maintaining a lobby
Bethlehem has urged its executives to try to get into Congress as members.
This is a much more direct
form of influence, he said.
"Where you have an elective
system, you have influences being exerted.
"I have often heard it said,
particularly toy businessmen,
nat politics is a pig sty, that its
a dirty business. The only way
that I know of to clean out a
pig sty is to get in there and
-hovel," he stated.
All The News
On Monitor
UBC Radio has introduced a
program covering campus, national, and world activities each
Tuesday morning 11:30 to 12:30.
It is monitor including fifty-
five minutes of interviews,
special events, student council
highlights and good music.
Future programmes will feature a survey of the American
presidential election, an exclusive series on "The Rise of
Khrushchev",    and    interviews
Due to popular demand
'Works of the Masters." will return to the air 10r30 to 11:30
each week day morning.
Canadian Money For Olympic Site
Only Canadian capital is
wanted to develop Garibaldi
Park if it is chosen as the site
of the 1968 Olympic games,
a director of the Garibaldi
Olympic Development Association said he:e Tuesday.
The director, Dave
Matthews, spoke to about 250
students in UBC Auditorium.
Matthews said many United
States lirms are interested in
investing money in the project,
but that it is not wanted. Expected cost of developing the
area is about $10 million.
Most of the money required
would be supplied from the,
federal and provincial governments. Any private capital
that is required should come
from B.C., Matthews said.
A two-lane highway will definitely be built to the area,
said Matthews, and Highways
Minister Phil Gaglardi had
indicated a four-lane road will
be built if Garibaldi is chosen
for the games.
He said the road would put .
Vancouver only about an hour .
away   from   the   Games  area
and   Seattle   would   be   only
about four hours away.
"Garibaldi will be a greater
resort than either Sun Valley <
or Squaw Valley, if it is de- -
veloped,"   stated   Matthews,   j Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 27, 1960
CUP. Capers'"'
By BOB HENDRICKSGN
TORONTO (CUP)—A.B. Ga-
chinga, the third African student
to be brought here to U of T by
the African Students Foundation
arrived in Toronto Oct 20.
Over 280 African students
have been brought to Canadian
and American universities by
way of the Kennedy airlift. Of
these 19 have come to Canada.
* * *
' OTTAWA (CUP)—A Canadian
student representative attending an 'international student conference was charged last week
With bein g "a running dog of
American imperialism" and told
that Canadians were still "lackeys of the Queen".
. Walter Tarnopolsky, former
National Federation of Canadian
University Students president,
attended the Sixth Annual Congress of the communist dominated International Union of Students, held in Bagdad on Oct.
S-17.
Tarnopolsky said that Cuban
delegates from Latin America
called Canadians hypocrites because Canada never helped the
Latin American countries and
because she can not clear up her
own English imperialism.
NFCUS president Bruce Raw-
son said the incident "is an unfortunate confirmation of the intolerance and the dogmatic attitude of an assembly dominated
by a group of miltant Marxists."
NFCUS is not a member of
the IU1S but belongs to the 70-
nation International Student
Conference which was formed
in  1950.
*   *   *
. - SASKATOON ,(CUP)-^Prime
Miister Diefenbaker told The
Sheaf that he was in favor of
"the widest possible extension
of  university  scholarships".
"Only about 15% of Canadian
University students hold scholarships.
. This should be compared to
other , democratic countries
where the figure is as high as
7j5%," he said.
"I want to see Canadians
given the opportunity to obtain
the highest level of education,
according to ability, and that
poverty shall not be a bar to
the development of individual
capacities."
He described himself as "a
very strong advocate for the extension of  scholarship plans".
The Prime Minister said that
the government established
about 1000 exchange scholar
ships not available before and
which were given to the Commonwealth exchange  plan.
Diefenbaker did not say what
the next federal move would be
regarding    university    schplar-1
Ships.
He denied that he, or his party, had promised 10,000 $600
scholarships in 1957.
He did not comment on
NFCUS president Bruce Raw-
son's promise to inquire about
the fate "of campaign promises
regarding student assistance,
scholarships and taxation relief.
WUS Candidate
Standards Rise
KINGSTON* (CUP)—A more tightly defined me?ns of selecting candidates for the WUSC summer seminar was approved
here at the fifteenth National Assembly.
The action followed criticisms,
levelled by University of Montreal   professor   Jacques - Yvan
Morin   and   four   past   seminar
participants.
So I said to this most wretched Engineer . . . 'No Man My
Better, None My Worse, Liberty.
Banners Removed by
"Buildings and Grounds"
Building and  Grounds  removed  all outdoor homecoming
banners Wednesday morning but replaced them by mid-after
noon.
Alan Cornwall, homecoming
chairman, said that permission
had been granted for the banners
and that the B & G gave then?
very little information and poor
co-operation.
The banners were to be taken
down Wednesday night before
congregation and put back up on
Friday.
BUY A TOTEM
How Your Mind
Can Keep You Well
Are you among the 50% of all
patients with a disease you
yourself can cure ? Most doctors
agree t*at viuch physical illness
is caused by the patient's
mental attitude. Read this
valuable guide-to-living in
November Reader's Digest . . .
it could save you years of suffering, thousands of wasted
dollars! Get your copy of
Reader's Digest today — 38
articles of lasting interest and a
long book condensation.
A bloc resolution passed by
the assembly was concerned
mainly with the selection of candidates on each campus.
Part of the resolution with the
establishment and organization
of the selection board; the other
half stipulates the requirement;
of the applicants. The assembly
was told the definition of th
board was made because this hac
been a weak point on sonv
campuses. It was learned tha'
one university sent a candidate
without even bothering to ap
point a board or even to advertize the seminar to the studenl
body.
National      Chairman      Dear.
Tames   Gibson  of   Carleton   lef
he  chair  to   tell  the  assembly
hat  "the  whole   good  faith  of
VUSC is pledged to the seminar
. . and scrupulous care must be
used    in   selecting    candidates.
WUSC should not be exposed to
selfish  self - seeking  individuals
. . . that have no part in it.
The resolution also declares
that a certificate, indicating that
the proper requirements have
been fulfilled in selecting a candidate, must be forwarded to
the National Office with the application form .
No site has been chosen for
the 1961 seminar but Sweden has
first choice with Tunisa. Other
seminars considered: Poland,
1962; and Malaya or China, 1963.
Laff, Dam You!
There once was a writer who
dribbled on forever. His editor
commanded him to write no
more than three pages in his
next chapter. The writer got
through one and two pages all
right, but then creative genius
conquered him again, and he
filled fourteen more sheets. He
solves his problem by taping all
fourteen pages together and
labelling them "Page three." The
editor wen out and got drunk.
FIRST UNITED NATIONS FEATURE FILM
"POWER AMONG MEN"
Vogue Theatre: 7:00 and 9:00 p.m.
Sunday, October 23rd
COLLECTION FOR WORLD REFUGEE YEAR
Photographs
for Christmas
To the discriminating student who knows and appreciates fine photography, we are pleased to
offer our personally created, expertly finished portraits at special student
prices.
Phone for an appointment
RE 1-8314
Atlas Studios
Photographers
3189 WEST BROADWAY
Vancouver 8, B.C.
MSI Services
Will Continue
More than 2700 students have
signed up for the UBC-Medical
Services  Incorporated  plan,
UBC Health Service director
Dr. A.K. Young, said MSI will
probably continue to offer its
services to students in future
years because of the numoer
that   signed up.
Lost License
ow Restored
Hamsoc went off the air last
week when their license wes
suspended by the Department
of Transport.
The suspension occurred as
a result of Hamsoc operating on
a distress frequency ior ships.
Since Hamsoc had no phone the
DOT could not notify them when
the frequency was needed.
The difficulty w'as technical
and has been cleared up.
Hamsoc's license was restored
and they how have a phone.
TUX1ED6
RENTAL & ■ SALjfcS   •
• Full Diess
• Morning Coats
• White and Blue Coats
• Shirts eSnd Accessories
• $1.00 discount to
UBC  Students.
E. A. LEE LTD.
P23 Howe    MU 3-2-457
"Tke $twfe»<jb well equipped.
-(W architecture...
The student well equipped to
span the widest horizons of
opportunity uses a B of M     ty|Y 0/||^n
Savings Account as a dependable
ladder and uses it rung by rung.
Bank of Montreal
@a*uideCa. "pout S<u*& fan Student*.
Your campus branch in the Administration Building
MERLE C. KERBY, MANAGER, Thursday, October 27,  1960
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Classes
Off
Pep Rally At Noon Today
Mills Brothers Stage
Show In Memorial Gym
Come one, come all, to the
THE GATEWAY SINGERS headline homecoming bali.
DR. ALBERT LEPAWSKY
"Should Canadian University
Students Prepare Themselves
for University Service?" will
be the topic of a panel discussion to be held in Bu 106 at
noon tomorrow.
The four panelists are F. H
Soward, Dr. Albert Lepawsky.
Dean Neil Perry, and Chairman,
Warden Hugh Christie.
DEAN SOWARD TO SPEAK
Dean F.H. Soward, F.R.S.C.
is Professor and Associate Dean
of the Faculty of Graduate Studies at UBC. He received his B.A
at Toronto and his Bachelor cl
Literature  at  Oxford.
CHRISTIE ON PANEL
Warden Hugh Christie who
will chair this discussion, received his diploma in Social
Work from U.B.C, in 1942, and
his BA., with 2nd class honours
in Sociology and Economics in
1945.
DIRECTOR UN TRAINING
Dr.- Albert Lepawsky is director of the United Nations Training Centre at U.B.C. He received !
his Ph. B., and Ph. D. at the University of Chicago.
NEW COMMERCE DEAN j
Dr. Neil Perry is Dean of j
Commerce at UBC. Until he be-,
came Dean, he was Assistant Di-:
rector of the World Bank in
Washington, D.C. He was educa- \
ted in Victoria high schools, Victoria College  and  Harvard.
Hear these four men present
their views on this topical issue
— tomorrow.
Four Distinguished Speakers
Address Students Tomorrow
Greetings From
Our Chairman
To come here is always a
! time for though, a time for nostalgia, sentiment, and a little
sorrow. When a graduate returns to his alma mater, it
s-hould be a time of joy.
Think of the changes during
four short years at university,
the new buildings, the population increase, and even the
changed   parking   system.
Try to envision a grad "of forty
years ago returning to such an
environment. Impressive? Yes.
Confusing? Perhaps. Beneficial?
One sometimes wonders  ...
Homecoming is not named for
the students, but for the grads.
This is the student's chance to
show their hospitality, to be
friendly, helpful, and to show
the grads that in spite of the enrollment increase, the congenial
atmosphere of the University
still exists. This must be done
with dignity for people often remember bad impressions longer
than good ones.
The Alumni Homecoming
Committee has provided a program, for the grads. The Student Committee has attempted
to provide a schedule that will
please the varied tastes of the
students.
Happy Homecoming  1960!
—Alan Cornwall
WARDEN HUGH CHRISTIE
Homecoming Pep Rally at noon
today in the Memorial Gym.
For 25c you can see and hear
the Mills Bros., and all proceeds
will go to the Red Feather Campaign.
Feature Attractions are:
• The Mills Brothers with
a supporting cast from
the Cave Theatre Restaurant.
• Presentation of the Great
Trekker Award.
• Introduction of the
Homecoming Queen Candidates.
• Mr. J. Gordon Gibson on
behalf of the Red Feather
United Appeal.
• U.B.C. Thunderbird Foot
ball Team introduced by
coach Frank Gnup.
• Pep Band with U.B.C.
Majorettes and Cheerleaders.
The star feature of the Pep
Rally, courtesy of the Cave, is
the appearance of the Mills
Brothers. This well-known trio
has appeared in Europe as well
as US and Canada where they
have gained millions of friends
and fans.
The Mills Brothers, supported
by the Dave Robbins Orchestra,
have agreed to appear gratis at
this Pep Rally as it is in aid o£
the Red Feather United Appeal.
Don't miss this opportunity —
attend the Homecoming Pep
Rally ! ! ! ! !
This year there will be seats
for everyone.
Alumni Return To
Active Schedule
Homecoming Activities planned for graduates returning to
the hallowed halls of their
higher learning, this year combine new highlights in stimulating discussion, with ever-popular
traditional social and athletic
events.
The official "kick-off" of the
Alumni portion of the Homecoming Programme is the Keynote Address Friday night, by
Sir Frank C. Francis, Director
and Principal Librarian of the
British Museum in London, England.
During Homecoming registration a coffee hour will be held
in Brock Lounge at 9 a.m. Highlighting the event will be a wide
variety of faculty displays, arranged by undergraduate faculties and alumni.
At 10:00 Saturday morning
three panel discussions will get
underway simultaneously in the
Law Building.
THE FUTURE OF OUR UNIVERSITIES is the topic to be
discussed by a panel chaired by
Dr. J. L. Keays, BA. Sc. '41, of
the research division of Macmillan,  Bloedel and Powell River
Ltd. Opening the discussion will
be Eric Nicol.
Among the questions under
discussion will be these: Are we
trying to educate an elite group?
as important as quality in our
do we believe that quantity is
universities; have our universities a role to play i>, research,
both in humanities and the
sciences? and have junior colleges a role in British Colmbia?
The third panel topic is ATH-
LETICS A.S EDUCATION
Chairman is Charles M. Campbell, Jr., former chairman of the
AC A.
Opening discussion will be
presented by Dean A. W. Matthews (UBC Faculty of Pharmacy). Panelists will be Frank
Read, Dr. Max Howell, and Herb
Capozzi.
To be discussed: Is the amateur spirit dead? Is it true that
Canadians are better at spectator
sport than participant sport?
not be given as freely as academic scholarships? Do winning
Why should athletic scholarships
games promote better public re*
lations? Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 27,  1960Thi
1960 HOMECOMING
MISS ACADIA CAMP
JOAN HUDSON
ivuii AvirtiCULTURE . . . MARGARET LEROUX
MISS ARTS . . . P
*\».
&&<. -f   V*
MISS ENGINEERING . . . JANE SPRATT
MISS FORESTRY & HOME ECONOMICS .. . BONNIE WAUGH
MISS FORT CAMP . . . IR
MISS MEDICINE . . . ELAINE JEFFERY
MISS MEN'S RESIDENCES . . . SANDRA LEE HYMAS
MISS PHARMACY ... A October 27,  1960
THE    U BYSSEY
Page 7
3UEEN CANDIDATES
.NGLIN
MISS COMMERCE
CHRIS LESLIE
MISS EDUCATION . . . GLENN IS McLEOD
"4NACCHIOTTI
MISS FROSH . . . DIANE COOPERBAND
MISS LAW . . . KAREN YOUELL
'    1
CAMPBELL
.J
MISS PHYSICAL EDUCATION . . . JOANNE JACKSON
MISS SOCIAL WORK . . . MARY BROWN !
Photos by—Lloyd Spence  (Totem) Page 8.
THE    U.BYS-S.EY
Thursday, October 27, 1960
CALENDAR
Students
/
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27
12:30 P.M.—PEP RALLY — MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM
Featuring the Mills Brothers and a supporting cast from the Cave.
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28
12:30 P.M.—PANEL DISCUSSION — BUCHANAN 106
Panelists: Chairman Dean F. H. Soward, Dr.
Albert Lepawsky, Dr. Neil Perry and Warden
Hugh Christie.
7:30 P.M.—BASKETBALL   GAME   —   MEMORIAL
GYMNASIUM
Grads  vs.   'Birds.
Presentation of Homecoming Queen    candidates and the Great Trekker.
9:00 P.M.-^HOMEieOMING   DANCE —   ARMOURIES
Crowning of Homecoming Queen.
Gateway Singers
Music by the Orchestra of Brick Henderson.
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 29
2:00 P.M —HOMECOMING FOOTBALL GAME-
STADIUM
Thunderbirds vs. University of Saskatchewan
Appearance of the Homecoming Queen candidates and the Great Trekker. •
9.00 P.M.—HOMECOMING DANCE — ARMOURIES
Gateway Singers and Orchestra of Brick
Henderson.
Appearance of the Homecoming Queen and
her court.
Alumni
DR. HUGH KEENLEYSIDE
DR.  KEENLEYSIDE
CHAIRS DISCUSSION
Dr. Hugh L. Keenleyside will
chair an alumni discussion^ "Are
Canadian Standards in Education and Scholarship Too Low?"
Opening speaker will he Dr.
Wilder Penfield, UBC 1946, a
researcher with the Montreal
Neurological Institute.
He will be followed by Prof.
G. O. B. Davies, Dr. George Vol-
ko:i, and Dr. Nell Perry.
The chairman, Dr. Keenleyside, graduated in 1920.1 n 1928
hs began a distinjeirshed career
in government service and retired in 1959 as chief of the United Nations Technical Assistance
Administration. He is now chairman of the B.C. Power Commission.
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28
8:30 p.m.—KEYNOTE ADDRESS: Sir Frank C. Francis.,
Director and Principal Librarian, British Museum, London. Subject: "Libraries—The Great
International Network."
A coffee hour to follow.
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 29
9:00 a.m.—COFFEE HOUR & REGISTRATION — Brock
Lounge.
10.00 a.m.—PANEL DISCUSSIONS (held simultaneously)
1. Are Canadian standards in Education and
Scholarship too low?
2. The future of our Universities.
3. Athletics as   Education.
Law Building. Cost: no charge.
12:00 p.m.—BARBECUE LUNCHEON—The Field House.
2:15 p.m.—GUIDED CAMPUS TOUR, by bus, departing
from the Field House.
6:30   p.m.—CLASS REUNIONS—1920—Faculty Club.
1930—Buchanan Bulding.
1935—Mildred Brock Room, Brock Hall.
1940—Cafeteria, Auditorium building.
1945—International House.
1950—Brock Lounge.
9:00 p.m.—ALUMNI HOMECOMING BALL—Brock
Hall. Dress semi-formal. Music by George Cal-
angis Orch.
J
*  GATEWAY  SINGERS
Friday
October 28
$3.00 fmhooupk
•
i
i
''I
Saturday
October 29
$3.50 p&Ajcoupk
hmdlininq ths.
Homecoming  Ball
With Brick Henderson and His Orchestra
TICKETS ON SALE NOW AT AMS. OFFICE, BROCK HALL
HOMECOMING QUEEN WILL BE CROWNED FRIDAY NIGHT Thursday, October 27,  1960
TihWE M,BYiSS£<Y
rRage.,?
Homecoming
Queen picked
This Friday
A busy week ends Friday
night when one of fifteen
Queen andidates will be chosen
to reign over Homecoming.
They who have been selected
by their respective faculties as
Homecoming Queen candidates
have had a busy round of official duties leading up to their
first public appearance today at
noon in the Memorial Gym.
Voting for the Homecoming
Queen will continue today until
G p.m. at the South Brock and
also at the Pep Meet from 12:30
to 2:30 p.m. in the. War Memorial Gym, where the candidates
will be escorted down the aisle
by Student Councillors.
Student votes will account for
40% of the total points awarded.
Balloting will be in the form of
a preferential ballot, 1st, 2nd
and 3rd choice only.
Yesterday, the Queen's Tea
wias held in the Mildred Brock
Room from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m.
Nine judges scored the candidates on the basis of poise and
general presentation, beauty of
face and figure, and personality.
This accounted for 60% of the
points awarded.
Judges for this event were:
Mrs. Kathy Hassard, Vancouver
Sun; Mrs. Betty Runcie, The
Province; Mrs. Ethel Rose,
James Lovick and Co.; Mr.
WE. Ellis, Goodwin and Ellis
Advertising; Mr. Barry Baldwin:,
Alumni H.C. Chairman; Peter
Holborne, Extension Dept.; Prof.
C.W.J. Eliot, Classic Dept.; Prof.
John K. Stager, Geography
Dept.; Prof. W. Read, Psychology Dept.
The Queen candidates will receive corsages at the reception
in the Mildred Brock Room on
Friday, at 8:00 p.m. The reception is for all candidates, patrons, special guests, council, and
committees.
At 9.00 p.m. on Friday, the
candidates will toe introduced
during half time at the basketball game in the Memorial Gym.
The Homecoming, Ball will
follow on Friday and at 10:45
p.m. the candidates will be intro
duced on stage. The crowning
ceremony will follow.
On Saturday at 9:00 a.m.,
there will toe an Alum Coffee
Party in the Brock Lounge,
where all faculty Queens will
serve.
The faculty Queens, the
Homecoming Queen and the two
Princesses will ride around the
track at half time during the
football game.
At 10:25 p.m., there will toe a
presentation of the faculty
Queens, the Homecoming Queen
and the two Princesses at the
Alumni Dance. Later at 10:45
p.m., they will be introduced
St the Student Homecoming
Bali.
/^ - f '•R*4:>^ i^ps^^^r^ *<
FRATERNITY AND SORORITY pledges of 1960 conducted tours
of the campus for members of the Indoor Sports Club, a
group   of   physically   handicapped   people,   last   Saturday.
Photo by Atlas Studios
FOLKSY MUSIC
FOR HOMECOMING
Entertainment at Homecoming dances both Friday and
Saturday evening will feature the guest appearance of the
Gateway Singers.
THE ANSWER
TO BALDNESS
Sad but true, baldness has become more prevalent. There
is a reason for this but the
important thing is that we
have the answer! The Nuvia
Process guarantees new
growth from the very first
treatment. This new hair is
visible in exactly two weeks,
being 1/16" long at that time
and bristly. As it continues
t» grow, it retains its strong
texture. Your satisfaction and
confidence will increase as
each treatment produces a
new crop.
NUVIA CLINIC
618 Davie St.        MU  1-5650
This mixed foursome will entertain with "folk songs lor
moderns" gleaned from around
the world. Africa, Israel, Korea,
the Bahamas, Latin America and
North America are represented
in their repertoire.
Their informal between-
numbers banter amusing heckling ,aimed mainly at themselves,
and centered around banjo-
strumming Jerry Walters, provides refreshing wit and sparkle
to their performance.
Singer-guitarists Marc Rich:
ards and Adam Fredericks, and
contralto Elmerlee Thomas,  the
only woman in the group, complete the quartet.
Essay   Typing
Reasonable Rates—Accurate
Work — RE 3-3780 (evgs.)
"PERfEGT MILDNESS
IN YOUR PIPE"
irafia&t's
Furnished H.K.R. close to
everything. Private bathroom. Suit one or two
male students. CA 4-7224.
E L VI RA'S
Palma de Mallorca
Special selection in
IMPORTED  GIFTS
from Spain, French Morroco,
Italy, etc.
ful"And for the man who has
everything" there are colorful leather wine bags with
real bull-horn stoppers . . .
guaranteed to keep the wine
al its fragrant best for 50 yrs.
4479 W. 10th Ave.
CA 4-0848
.. . Brahadi's smoking
tobacco is a special
"Cavendish" blend of
Mild tobaccos. Comfortably, satisfying... a mild
smoking tobacco with a
delightful aroma.
Brahadi's is available
at select tobacco stores.
53$ for 2 ounces
Suggested price, all taxes Included
Last Miriute Club
Offers Top Bargains
One dollar, your name on a priority list and you might
jet to see such talent as Harry Belafonte Singers, Mort Sahl
<nd Van Cliburn through the efforts of the. Last Minute
Club.
Persons with their names on a
riority list will have a chance
>  pick  up   cancelled  seats  one
ili hour before curtain time at
*e Queen Elizabeth Theatre.
To get your name on the list
all you have to do is get there
first  and, pay  one  dollar.   The
cashier in the AMS office will
^ive you a  voucher which  en-
itles you to one seat.
With   this   voucher   you   car
tin entrance for  only  75c for
ckets   which   wculd   normally
m from $2.50-$10.
Some of the c~;ming attraction"
iclude: Mort Sahl; "The Plea-
ire of his Company" with Joar
U.B.C.  Aggie
Elected  as
N.W.   Chairman
A University of B.C. Agriculture students has been elected
chairman of the Pacific Northwest branch of the American
Society of Agricultural Engineers.
Gordon Timbers, Agriculture
>, was elected at the ASAE stu-
lent branch convention in Vic-
■oria  last   week.
Delegates from B.C., Washington, Oregon, and Idaho were
present at the  convention.
Bennett and Donald Cook; Van
Cliburn; Caladonia; Belafonte
Folk'Singers and.Mischa Elman.
Poster for these events will be
posted about the campus three
days prior to each event.
RIDGE
THEATRE
16th and Arbutus
FREE PARKING LOT
OCTOBER 25th to 29th
Tuesday to Saturday
An Outstanding Program
Paul Muni — David Wayne
"THE LAST ANGRY MAN"
Betsy Palmer"
"ONCE   MORE  WITH
FEELING"
Color
Kay Kendall — Yul Brenner
News
DOORS 6:45
STARTS MONDAY OCT 31
Peter Sellers in
"BATTLE OF THE SEXES"
Laurence Harvey in
"THE TRUTH ABOUT
WOMEN"
Tab Collar Shirts from $5.95
Ivy Button Down from $6.95
Foullard  and   Repp
Stripe Ties $2.50
Choosing interesting shirts and lively ties isn't <fiffi»
cult when you've only excellent ones to choose from.
Those being the only kind we admit to our selections,
they are bound to delight you, every one. Highlight*
are herewith presented.
the shirt 'n tie bar
658 SEYMOUR STREET
(In Bay Parkade)
"come in and tie one on" Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 27,  1960
ALUMNI TO HOLD
REUNION  DINNERS
By ANN HOWARTH
Six classes ranging from 1950-1925 will hold reuni
ons
■weekend- during the homecoming
Reunion dinners have become
an integral part of the Homecoming activities. Each year,
classes return to the campus for
a special get-together with the
old class-mates and professors.
These six follow at 5 year intervals, the most recent having
graduated 10 years prior to the
present date. This year the
classes are from the years '50,
'45, '40, '35, '30, and '25.
The arrangements lor each
class are looked after by the
class executive, elected each
year at graduation time.
This year the plans for dinners
are chaired by Class of '50 Mr.
Don Lanskail, Class of '45 co-
chaired by Mr. Jack Heathering-
ton and Mr. Bob Binnie, Class of
'40 Mrs. Helen Belkin, Class of
'35 Mrs. Marnie Steward, Class
of '30 Dr. Malcolm McGregor,
Class of '25 Mr. Bert Smith.
Each chairman is assisted by
Delta Sigma Pi
Members
UBC's honorary sorority will
initiate six new members,, October 30.
Memlbers of Delta Sigma Pi
are selected on the.tbasis of their
contributions to the campus
through scholarship, leadership
and service.
The initiates are:
Ruth Kidd,  WUSC chairman;   Sidney   Shakespeare,
';        WAA    president;     Marilyn
Peterson,  WAA and  Big
'I        Block;   Inge   Andreen,   Big
i       Block   president;    Patience
Ryan, UCC chairman; Marnie Rogers, Academic Symposium chairman.
Patient Loading Zone
For UBC Hospital
A new parking area has been
assigned behind the hospital for
cars transporting patients.
The new lot is a 30-minute
parking area and has room for
four cars.
This action was prontpted by
incidents where Buster's towed
away cars transporting patients
One of the ears was impounded by Band G and another was
rescued by the owner just as it
was being prepared for the trip
to the ©propound.     /.,;,_.„",,,-
An Engineer Defined
■••' -An-Engineer is a person who
passes as an exacting expert on
the basis of being able to turn
out with prolific fortitude in-
•finite strings of incomprehensible formulae calculated with
micro metric precision from the
vague assumptions which are
based on debatable figures
taken from inconclusive experiments carried out with instruments of problematical accuracy by persons of doubltful
reliability and questionable
mentality for the avowed purpose of annoying and confounding a hopeless chimerical
group of fanatics referred to,
all   too  (frequently,   as  Engin-
; eers.
a committee, which arranges the
details for ecah function. The
Alumni Office on campus, to- ■
gether with one of the members
of the Board of Management,
help to co-ordinate plans.*
A good tunrout is anticipated
by each class, even with football offering strong competition
for attention.   . !
And when 700 or 800 graduates return to the campus for
the parties, some to be held in
old familar buildings, others will
be held in the new, they will not
be disappointed.
Cocktails before dinner, and
entertainment to follow, plus the
fellowship of by-gone days, will
make October 29 a memorable
evening. (Oct. 28 in the case of
Class of '25.)
This year the Cl'ss of '20 will
be holding a reunion at the time.
Usually these "'older" graduates
will have convened at the tir*>
of spring congregation.
This year however, with congregation falling at the same
time as Homecoming ,they are
joining the other reunion years,
and reuniting at the same time.
A very able committee, chaired by Judge Swencisky, has
been planning their 40the reunion for the past year and a
half. The yhope to see many of
of their class-mates at the
Faculty Club, starting with cocktails, dinner ,and some reminiscing, to round out the celebrations.
Socred Williston
To Open New Wing
Hon. Ray Williston, Minister
of Lands and Forests, will officially open the MacLean Fraser Wing of the Biological Sciences Building on Friday.
The opening, in conjunction
with other Homecoming activities, will take place at 4:00 p.m,.
Following imimediate.ly, Dr.
T.W.M. Cameron, head of the
Institute of Parasitology at MacDonald College, McGill, will
speak to  the gathering.
JACK POMFRET
coaches Birds
New Halftime Show
UBC'S annual Homecoming
basketball game is traditionally
featured by wild entertainment.
In past years, faculty and student council have performed
amazing feats of skill and daring
in trying to outdo each other.
This year, the entertainment
will be less hairy, and nicer to
look at. The Homecoming Queen
candidates will be presented.
DR. WILDER PENFIELD, former
head of Montreal Neurological Institute, will take part in
homecoming panel discussions
in UBC's Law Building Saturday at 10 a.m.
Two Awards
Available
Ceylon is offering an unspecified number of Commonwealth
Scholarships to Canadian students.
Application forms are available at Dean Gage's office. Closing date is November 30,  1960.
The Japanese government is
offering a 20,000 yen ($60)
scholarship tenable in the Orient
for two years beginning April,
1961.
Winner of the award will be
exempted of tuition, matriculation, and examination fees but
must pay his own travelling expenses.
Preference will be given students doing research in Japanese
culture or science.
Application forms may be obtained from the Consulate of
Japan, Rm. 1401 Standard Building, 510 West Hastings.
Deadline is Nov. 1.
ENROLMENT JUMPS
AS USUAL AT U.B.C
Enrolment has increased more than 11 per cent to a record
total of 111,657 students, registrar J. E. A. Parnall announced
today.
Officials had predicted an increase of six or seven per cent
which would have meant an enrolment of 11,300 for the 1960-
61 session.
The largest increase wTas in
the faculty of arts and science
with a total of 5,837 students—
665 over last year.
Faculty of education showed an increase cr 3 71 students
with a total of 2,190. The only
other faculty which grew substantially was graduate studies
which has 707 as compared to
616.
Japanese   Film
Showing   Today
Cinema 16 presents the Japanese film "Seven Samuria' today, 12:30, in Bu. 106.
No one who has seen Rosho-
mian or Gate of Hell will need
an introduction to the imaginative work of the Japanese theatre, or the force and effect of
the direction of Akira Kurosawa.
Seven Sumurai is an excellent
Registration in other faculties : example of the suspense, excite-
is as follows with 1959-60 figures j ment and humour with which
in brackets: agriculture 1791 Kurosawa embellishes the -es-
(171); applied science, 1,339 ] sentially simple folk stories of
(1,351); forestry, 183 (188); law,! Japan.
235 (245); pharmacy,  153  (142);       The film has been shown pre-
medicine,   203   (212);   commerce
almost exactly three to one.
631 (654).
A total of 8,253 men and 3,404
women are registered making
the ratio between the two groups
viously in Vancouver, at the
Summer Festival, where it was
very warmly received. It has
received international acclaim,
winning the Silver Medal at
Venice in  1955.
UNIVERSITY JAZZ SOCIETY
presents
Contemporary Jazz
by way of
THE TONY CLITHEROE
QUARTET
FRIDAY, OCT 28, 12:30 p.m., Bu. 104
Members Free . . . ^Others 25 cents
Memberships Available at the Door Thursday, October 27,  1960
THE    UBYSSE.Y
Page  11
FRIDAY NIGHT
Hoopster   Host
Awesome Alumni
The UBC Thunderbirds basketball squad officially opens
the hoop season Friday night against formidable opposition supplied by the Grads.
The galloping Grads will be
ably coached and otherwise directed by internationally-famous
basketball star Big Jim "Pinky':
Carter.
The awesome lineup facing
the Birds will include such former UBC greats as Nev Munro,
Reid Mitchell, Harry "The
Horse" Franklin, "Long John'
Forsythe and "Silver Fox" Osborne.
NEW OLD TIMERS
The first string will be backed
up toy old-old timers like Ed
Wild, Barry Drummond, Gordie
Gimple, and Brian Upson. All
four played last year in the
Inter-city league, Upson and
Wild with Dietrich^Collins, Gimple with Cloverleafs and Drummond with  the Birds.
The UBC side will toe formed
toy the nucleus of last year's
WCIAU champions, and toy
seven high school scholarship
players.
Foremost for the Birds will
be All-stars Ken Winslade, Ed
Pederson, and standouts Dave
Way, Kieth Hartley, Ed-Gushue;
and company.
SEVEN STARS
The seven newcomers are
ireshmen John Cook, Ron Parker, Mike Harcourt, Eckhardt
Perdinandi, Brian Adams, Jon
Henderson, and Jim Jamieson.
A  banquet  for  the ..grads  at
6:00 will precede the game,
which begins at 8:15. At hali
time the Gymnastics team will
put on a display and the Homecoming Queen candidates will be
displayed.
Last year, the Grads surprised the Birds 62-58 in the
Homecoming game. The Grads
were led by John Forsythe and
Mike Fraser, Forsythe getting
the winning basket with a min
ute left.
In a hilarious preliminary
game last year, a group of old
•old, timers whipped a group oi
new-new Birds. The oldsters
won 6-4 in the abbreviated game
mainly because of a sudden
meeting of the Basketball Commission which decided to allow
"the bad guys three points per
basket.
Officials will not say whether
the spectacle will be  repeated.
The Homecoming game, although more in the class of a
practise, will be one of only
three games before Christmas
for the Birds.
TOTEM FOR TWO
Besides this and two Totem
Tournament contests in early
December, all UBC's games are
in the second term.
The Birds will play only in
the WCIAU this year, and not
in the Senior A league as they
did in 1959.
VArttuoVtn JUNIOk. cANU, here displaying a pattern honouring the UbC rowers «f a ba_.
Lions game will provide half-time enertainment at Saturday's UBC-Saskatchewan football
game.
Noted Vancouver Junior Band
To Entertain Football Fans
When UBC Thunderbirds meet the Saskatchewan Huskies
in the annual Homecoming football game, they will have fa
work hard to win.
Bird coach Frank Gnup said they will work and they-will
Rowing Offers Plenty
For Ambitious Men
By DAVP ANDERSON
It is difficult to sit down and
write an article on rowing because rowing is something a
person can only experience, not
a person can describe.
The simplest description of
rowing at UBC would be to say
it is long hours of preparation
terminating in six minutes of intense competition. But rowing is
far more than that.
It includes months of arduous
calisthenics designed as much to
test the perserverence, the mental staying power, as it is designed to condition the body.
EARLY TO RISE
It includes morning after
morning of pre-dawn rows,
some remembered for being wet,
choppy, . freezing and unpleasant; while others, with a glass
smooth harbour to row on, and
with the sun spilling golden
light over the mountains, water,
DAVE ANDERSON
. . . crew captain
and the sleeping city, are remembered for being beautiful
beyond belief.
Rowing includes day after
day of frustration, when the
shells just won't move.
Day after day the oarsman
wonders why he voluntarily
subjects himself to such pressure, fatigue and abuse. And
yet more than compensating .for
the toad times it also includes
djays when the bladework is
crisp, clean and powerful /when
the shell seems to leap forward
on its own account; when the
oarsman delights in the control-
ed explosion of his perfectly
conditioned body; when it is, in
fact, sheer joy to sit in a boat.
GLOBETROTTERS
The sport holds rewards of
travel—the next four years will
see UBC boys in Brazil, Australia, Japan and quite possibly
England and Europe. It also
holds the less certain advantage
of prestige and recognition.
But travel and prestige are
far from being the important
parts of the sport. They are only
-ncidental to the satisfaction of
being part of the crew.
What is important ,and this i'
;he same whether one sits in
the Varsity boat or not, is the
satisfaction of being part of
Canada's most dedicated and
successful amateur athletic
organization.
What is important is to have
tried the university's most mentally demanding and physically
exhausting sport, a sport which
takes more in the way of self
discipline and desire than any
other, and to have the satisfaction, of knowing that you were
-iot found wanting.
STAN KNIGHT
. fights for QB slot
GRAD GIMPLE
Out to whip . . .
win.
Last week the Birds came up
with their best display of football this season, against the
Seattle Ramblers, but came out
on the short end of a 19-7 score.
The Huskies also lost their
last game, to the WCIAU champions, the Alberta Golden Bears.
Both teams will be battling
to stay out of the cellar.
True to the Homecoming tradition, Saturday's a c ti v i t i e s
promise to be an extravaganza.
Half-time entertainment will toe
provided toy the Vancouver
Junior Band, an internationally
famous band that has won 19
championships in the last 10
years.
The contestants for the Homecoming queen honors will also
be iri attendance and this alone
should toe enought to fill tfce
stadium-.
BIRDS ARE UP
For the fans who go to see
the footbal game, the Birds plan
to put up a real fight and-this
could prove to be the game of
the year. The team is in good
condition, both mentally and
physically, and the only regular
who may not start is Tonis Tut-1
ti who suffered a concussion in
the Birds' last outing.
UBC is also looking forward
to the services of Jim Olafson
and Jack Schriber who were
standouts in the game against
Seattle. Olafson scored the only
Bird touchdown and was leading ground gainer, while Schriber was a continual thorn in
the Ramblers" side as he played
a brilliant defensive game.
Game time is 2:o0 p.m. Saturday and the early birds get the
seats.
SPORT
Editor: Mike Hunter
Frosh Volleyball
Team to be formed
A Frosh volleyball team will
be formed for the B.C. Senior
Boys' championships November
25 and 26.
Prospective players must have
been under 19 on September 1.
Practices will be held Wednesdays in the Memorial Gym from
6 to 8 p.m.
The traditional matches with
the University of Washington
will be played in addition to the
Vancouver City and B.C. Open
championships. UBC will also
send a team to Saskatoon for the
Intercollegiate tournament.
Practices for all teams are held
Wednesdays from 6-8 p.m. in the
Memorial Gym.
More players are needed, and
are welcome to come to the
practices.
Students!
For a new dining pleasure
try our daily special.
DEAN'S
4544 W. 10th
Open 'till 11:30
'BIRD WINSLADE
.   1960 Thunderbirds
NOW   PLAY ING
Kirk Douglas — Tony Curtis
Janet Leigh — Ernest Borgnine
"THE VIKINGS"
The Greatest Adventure Picture Ever Made!
Color — One Showing at 9:15
PLUS
Montgomery Clift — Myrna Loy — Robert Ryan in
"THE LONELY HEARTS"
7:30 — Doors at 7
Hollywood Theatre
3123 WEST BROADWAY Page  12
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 27,  I960
'TWEEN CLASSES
Cancel all for Homecoming
Meeting to-day cancelled. Pool
training (meet on pool deck):
6:00. Skindiver class pool exam
scuba,•; 4:0.0-5:00; skindiving, 5:00-
to be held to-day and next Thursday. "> ....
* *    *
CINEMA 16
-Presents Japanese classic
"Seven Samurai", directed by
Akira Kurosawa.
* *    *
CCF CLUB
All club members interested
in debating asked to attend
meeting, Bu. 225, noon Friday.
NISEI VARSITY CLUB
General   meeting   today,   Bu.
205.
.*    *    *
BAPTIST STUDENT UNION
Bible study today in Bu. 2202
<new wing).
* * . *
EAST ASIAN SOCIETY
Today at 12:30 Dr. Ping-to Ho
will deliver a lecture on Chinese
classified"
WOULD the person who took
the wrong raincoat from outside Chem. 250, Tuesday, 9:30
call Joel,  AM  1-0933.
FOUND—Man's wrist watch.
Gold band. Call CA 4-6786.
FOR SALE—Royal, silent-writer
portable typewriter, recent
• model, excellent condition,
' reasonable price. Phone AM
1 1-8419 after 6 p.m. Cliff Ains-
worth. 	
MUST sacrifice 24 watt Bogen
istereoi*idndc amplifier only
used 3 mos. Phone Kerry at
CA 8-8032 after 6.	
LOST—Black leather wallet
containing important~~ papers
and  queen's   picture.   Please
1   phone Connie after 6:30 p.m
BR 7-7963.
painting      in      Anthropological j
| Museum (in Library). j
* *    *
SOCIETY OF BACTERIOLOGY
Meeting Wes. 100, Friday,
October 28, 12:30. Film: "Human
Diseases and Immunity". Everyone welcome.
* *     *
CLC.
Mr. Howard Edwards of Vancouver Food and Drug Labs will
give lecture and film, Friday
noon, Ch. 250.
* *     *
FRIENDS OF CHAMBER
MUSIC
Tickets for 13th Season of.
Concerto by famous chamber
music groups are on Scfte in
A.M.S office. Students' season
tickets $1.00.
* *    *
STUDENT CHRISTIAN
MOVEMENT
"The Impact of Western Civilization on Africa." First study
group on Africa Friday, 12:30,
Hut 1-6, East Mall. All welcome.
* * *
VARSITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Dr. Roy Seibel will speak Friday in Arts 100.
PHILOSOPHY CLUB
The paper to be given Monday
noon in Bu. 225 is "Dialogue Between Wittgenstein and Socrates" by Jack Ornstien.
* *   . *
IMMUNIZATION CLINIC
Regular immunization Clinic
normally Thursday 2:00-4:00 cancelled today because of con
vocation.
* *    *
JUNIOR CHEM CLUB
Film, Friday neon in Ch. 150.
Last day for new members to
register.
* *     *
BIOLOGY CLUB
Films "Between the Tides"
and "The Electric Eel" will be
shown Friday noon in Biological
Sciences 2000.
* *    *
GERMAN CLUB
Hear about Germany from
panel, including exchange students. Bu. 204, Friday noon.
* *    *
CCF CLUB
A discussion group on "Socialist Philosophy of the CCF" in
Bu. 2208, Thursday evening, 7
p.m. to 9:30 p.m.
Applications    Due
Applications are now being
received for the positions of Public Relations Officer and Editor
of the News-letter for Frosh
Council.
For    Frosh    Council
All qualifications for the position should be included in the
application. They must be placed
m Box 140, AMS office by Friday afternoon.
Students Involved
In Gambling Raid
Several UBC students were among those arrested at mid
night Friday in Vancouver's largest recent gambling raid.
After surrounding  the ibuild-
WHOEVER lifted black umbrella from mens' room Caf should
know it is radioactive. Save
yourself and return to office
154 Buchanan.
WANTED—A ride to 8:30's
Mon. to Sat. from 41st ave
and Rupert St. Phone HE
4-7778.
WANTED— Ride to leave UBC
at 3:30, vicinity of 41st and Arbutus. Phone AM 6-0617.
WANTED-^-2 students, roomi
and board, $65 mo. Car pool
$1.50 wk. Phone MU 1-4076
after   5:40  p.m.
XjOST—Pet squirrel, of sentimental value. Finder please
contact   Neil   Woolliams,   CA
,i 4-9962 or Bob Cannon, CA
4-9949, Okanagan House. Reward.
CONSUL for sale.exceptionally
good condition, engine and
transmission recently overhauled, new tires. Call RE
1-8003  or RE 3-0809,  eves.
LOST—Would the person who
took my dark reversible raincoat out of Physics 200 last
Sat. please return it to Brian,
TR 6-0892.
LOST-^Silver and blue Schaffer
Snorkel pen between Education Bldg. and Buchanan
Eldg. Return- to lost and
iound. Reward.
ing, police raided a skiers' "stag
party" in the Moose Hall on
Howe St., and arrested 130 men,
charged with toeing inmates of
a  gambling house.
Many of those arrested listed
themselves as university students. Only three of the -men
charged    appeared    in    police
Liquor Sales
on Campus?
Do you think liquor sales
should be allowed on campus?
Your opinion can be heard
during Student Forum debate
"Besolved: That the cafeteria
should be licensed to serve wine
and beer." noon Thursday in
Bu. 104.
The audience will then be
asked to question the speakers-
and to give their own opinions.
EUROPEAN TRAINED
BARBERS
Individually Styled Haircuts
UPPER TENTH
BARBER & TOILETTRIES
4574 W. 10th
TAKE IT TO
SPOTLESS
SHIRTS 191
5 or
More
VOLKSWAGEN OWNERS!
We have over 250 satisfied V-W owners patronizing our
station. Qualified V-W mechanics make expert repairs and
service a specialty.
Why not give us a try!
UNIVERSITY SHELL SERVICE
10th Ave & Discovery CA 4-0828
FREE; PICK UP AND DELIVERY
Court,   the rest   forfeited  their
bail.
The party was to support Junior Skiing.
"It's a pleasure to do business with them.
Such a selection and pleasant service.
They always cash cheques for the students and offer credit when required."
RICHARDS & FARISH MENSWEAR
802 Granville St. MU 4-4819
Vancouver, B. C.
"Complete Stock of University Clothes"
TRAIN FOR TOMORROW
serve your way through university

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