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The Ubyssey Mar 27, 1958

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 ±
*
MAKE
SURE YOU
ATTEND
VOL. XL
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 1958
No. 67
AMS-Cabinet Meeting Set
UBC To Send Brink
And Connaghan
University of B.C. may receive even more outside financial
aid than has been expected.
Representatives of the Alma Mater Society have been
invited to meet with the B.C. provincial cabinet. May 9 to
discuss a proposal that a federal scholarship plan would be
matched by the provincial government.
Both major parties contesting •  — --•  —   -■-
Those exams are  near and  this bright young co-ed i.s busily at her books in the Library.
AMS General Meeting At
Noon  To-day  In  Armouries
Hungarians
March Again
On Campus
Members of the UBC-Sopron
Forestry School will stage a
demonstration today at 3 p.m.
in support of "freedom fighters"
in Indonesia.
Carrying placards and shouting slogans, the refugee Hungar-j
sans will proceed from the Mains
Mall flag to the Memorial Gym |
and back. I
i
Their watchword is "Freedom
for Indonesia."
An open invitation has been:
issued by the demonstrators for
all interested students to join
in Uu   proceedings. i
UBC's Sopron students were
thcsmelves active freedom fighters a.s recently as the October,
1956 Hungarian r e volution
against Russian domination.
It was after that  abortive re-1
volt  that they were brought  to
UBC.
Elimination of WUS representative and addition of an
Engineering executive to Students Council will be the main
points of interest at the AMS general meeting at noon today
in the Armouries.
Ben  Trevino,   outgoing  AMS*  —
president,   will   give   his   pres- j
ident's  report  a review of the ; LJ f>.\\|\A/|*nIIC
year and a look into the future! ■  'vlllfVvllO
of the AMS. rv      I 1 A/•
George Morfitt will give thejDeD3te WinS
treasurers report which will con-j
tain some suggestions for the
future, including the reduction
of "A" card price, student discounts at stores, allowed to advertise on campus, and a recommendation that men's athletic
grants not be raised.
The motion to propose a "Student   Senate,"   a   body   of   328 ] showed
elected representatives from un-j Security
dergracluate societies and interest groups,  will die for lack of
support from ASUS.
Censure of tho South African [ League  suits,   to  matching  cuff
government  for  their policy re-   links,  defeated  Tony  Richmond
garding   the    race   problem *in   and  Pjul  Oakley of Forestry,
higher education will be moved.)
Motion  of censure of NFCUS1
will bc raised after being tabled
at the fall general meeting. The
motion  was made by  a student   socurity through conformity
the March 31 federal election
have promised increased aid to
university students in the form
of a scholarship and bursary
plan.
Invitation was announced in a
icier to the AMS from Wesley
Black,  provincial  secretary.
Delegates to the meeting with
tho Cabinet will be AMS President Chuck Connaghan, NFCUS
Chairman Russell Brink, and one
other student councillor.
Student officials expressed
deep satisfaction when news of
the new development became
known.
B.C. government has already
agreed to match UBC Development Fund receipts up to $10
million.
Thc AMS ■ Cabinet meeting
will take place in Victoria at
11:30 a.m., May 9.
- Dr,
•p rag-
Legion Cup
The Helliwell brothers carried off the Legion Cup Debating
trophy for the Phi Delta Theta
fraternity Monday noon, as they
that    "Conformity    is
WUS, WAD To
Hold Banquet
j All women students are in-
j vited to attend the annual ban-
j quet sponsored jointly by the
I Women's Undergraduate Society
j and the Women's Athletic Di-
I rectorate, Thursday, April 3.
j The highlight of the banquet
j will be the presentation of Big,
I Small, and Managers' Blocks by
I WAD and the awarding of an
Activities Trophy by WUS.
In  conjunction with the Centennial   theme,   guest   speaker,
Tween Classes
Panhell Punch
Parly Today
PHILOSOPHY   CLUB  _
B. Savery will speak on
matism" today at  12:30 in IIM2.
PANHELLENIC invites all
first,- second- and third-year
girls to a Punch Party in the
Brock Lounge from 3 to 5 p.m.
to hear a panel discussion "All
About Greeks."
*       *       *
FRIDAY
MAJOR P. E. STUDENTS and
Education P.E. Students, this
Friday, at the Horseshoe Restaurant (Hastings and Renfrew)
PEUS is sponsoring the annual
P.E. graduation banquet and
dance. Only P.E. graduates and
P.E. fourth-year students may attend the banquet which commences at 7 p.m. — tickets $5.50
a couple for dance and banquet.
Undergraduates in Education
P.E. and P.E. Majors are cordially invited to attend the serai-
formal dance at 9. Tickets are
$2.50. All tickets must be bought
in advance from P.E. yearly
reps. For a really good party
come out to the graduation banquet and dance.
•k *k *k
U.N. CLUB
The U.N. Club
John     and    Dave
identically    dressed,
Helliwell,
from    Ivv
Mrs, Wallace Wilson, will speak j presents its annual International
informally on early Vancouver, j Law Symposium, the topic be-
i During thc week tickets will in6' "The Control of Outer
! bc sold for 75 cents at booths Space." Dean Angus, Prof.
' in the Cafeteria and the Brock,   Bourne,  and  Dean  Shrum. will
They may also be purchased at j participate.   Arts    100,    Friday
the  door of the  Brock  Lounge \ noon,
on Thursday.
Dave presented the basis of
the winning argument in maintaining that even a nation gains
U.N.  Club !
International Law Symposium ,
will be presented by the United j
Nations Club, Friday noon in j
Arts 100, |
Topic under discussion will be '
the "Control of Outer Space,"!
a problem recently before the;
United Nations.
who   charged  that  NFCUS was
failing the university.
Foreign students on the campus with travelling scholarships ■
from NFCUS will be introduced
at the meeting, as will the HAA '
award winners,
Fil   Keuber,    Men's   Athletic!
Association   representative   will |
give his report on progress made
through the year.
Introduction of the new Council will  take  place   just before   Bake:
new business is brought up, ' raeni
"Conformity demands that a
nation constantly advance," he
claimed. "It i.s limited eccentricity which allows this advance. Total, uter, and complete
conformity of individuals within
a nation is not world conformity."
Judges were Prof, Willis oi
the- Law Faculty, and Professors   Jan   de   Bruyn   an<ii    Ron
O!
the   English   ctpw.:
NFCUS SLIDES NOW
BEING RETURNED
NFCUS photo competition
color slides have been returned for thc following
students: A. Ages. D. Metz-
kes, J. Madden. V. Flather,
B. Clay. D. Kendell, If. Palmer, D. Stewart. H. Hooper,
S, Watson, R. Goddard.
These- may be picked up
at the NFCUS oli'ice. Room
H>5. Brock Extension -.from
12:30 to 1:30. All other
pilotos  are en u-ut.
* *        *
PSYCHOLOGY CLUB — Psychology Club elections in HM2,
Friday at 12:30. All members
are urgently requested to attend.
•k *k -k
INTERNATIONAL  HOUSE—
This Friday evening at 10 p.m,
there will be a dance at International House. Come over after
the library closes.
* *       * ■
DEBATING CLUB — Genera!
meeting at noon Friday in Arts
103. Election of next year's officers, All members asked to
attend,
(^Continued on Page 3}
See   'TWEEN   CLASSES Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 27, 1958
Annual Report of the President of the Alma Mater Society
My first words must be of
deep and sincere gratitude to
all of those people who have
taken an active interest in student affairs. There has been
a conscious effort on my part
to increase the scope and ramifications of activities which
the words "student affairs"
•connote. Student affairs can
no longer be considered the
sponsoring and organization of
purely social functions or
purely extra-curricular activities. The words "student affairs" should continue to contain international, national,
provincial and local ramifications.
To all the Councillors, Presidents of Undergraduate Societies, Chairmen of Special Committees and Presidents of our
more active clubs, I extend my
sincere thanks for a successful
year.
LOCAL AND PROVINCIAL
Highlights on the local and
provincial level began with a
bloodless Frosh Orientation,
headed by Marlene James with
excellent help from Pete Meekison, Neil Merrick, Peter Po-
pove, Russ Fraser and all the
other members of an extremely active and well organized
committee. I hope that the
emphasis in the Frosh Orientation will continue to shift
even more towards welcoming
and introducing Frosh to UBC.
The Third Leadership Conference was again a successful
student function. The conference is designed as a form for
the airing of student problems
and it is inevitable that some
problems will become focal
points, The reporting of the
major issues merging from the
conference I consider legitimate and must take issue with
those .members of the administration who might feel that
everything done and said at
the conference is "in camera".
The Homecoming functions
were very well attended this
year, although the sales of tickets for the function in the
Field House did not meet expectations. Grant Macdonald,
John McKay and Peter Meekison, did an excellent job of
co-ordinating the festivities
and the parade. I hope the
policy of spreading the functions in the Brock, the Armoury and the Field House will
be continued since all three of
these buildings are necessary
to accommodate the number of
students who may wish to take
part.
For the first time in Canada
® provincial university has felt
it necessary to go to the public
for capital funds. I consider
the UBC Development Fund
Committee, in a sense, an outgrowth or a logical extension
of the student drive and petitioning that was conducted
last year in what is now
known as the Second Great
Trek. The committee's objective of seven and a half million dollars should be met, and
with funds from the Canada
Council and the provincial government the picture for capital development at UBC looks
for the first time very attractive. It was very gratifying
to see the students of this university respond to the need
and assess themselves voluntarily of a $5.00 per year pledge
to the Fund. Our contribution
in this way is more meaning
ful, draws more notice and
continues one of the few traditions that our young university enjoys. My personal
thanks go to all of those who
supported the motion to increase fees for this purpose,
and thanks are due irorn all
of us to Mr. Paul Cooper and
the other distinguished members of the UBC Development
Fund Committee.
The one night Blitz chaired
by Chuck Connaghan, Dave
Miller, Alan Thackeray and
Grant Macdonald, surpassed
the expectations of the Development Fund Committee's
most optimistic dreams. Again
I commend all those who took
part and responded to the call
for help, raising almost fifty
thousand dollars in a few
short hours. Special thanks
should also go to the members
of the UBC Radio Society,
notably Bill Ballentine, Jack
McGaw, Sandy Jordan, John
Greening and Andy Laughlan,
Vic Waters of Station CJOR
is also deserving of thanks
for the opportunity to carry
the Blitz activities over the
air.
The students who have joined us from UNIVERSITY OF
SOPRON in Hungary have not
been as well integrated as we
would like. The major reason
for this is the lack of classroom space available during
the daytime which necessitates scheduling of night-time
classes for Sopron. It is to be
hoped that with the opening
of the Buchanan Building,
class room space will be available next year to allow them
to join with us in our regular
daytime activities, so that they
may more actively participate
in campus functions and there
could be a better exchange of
ideas. I extend my thanks to
the members of the Forestry
Undergraduate Society under
their president, Everett Peterson, for working with the executive of the Sopron students
Miklos Gratzer, and hope this
co-operation will be extended
next year.
Although Mr. Fil Kueber
will be presenting a separate
report on Men's Athletics, I
would like to say personally
that the most important decision that the Men's Athletics
Committee has reached this
year is a decision to seek and
foster a Western Canadian Inter-collegiate Athletic Union.
Athletic competition with
other Canadian universities
has always been sought but
has been stymied by our geographical position. The attempt to seek a meeting of
managers for the Western
Canadian Universities on Athletics is a concrete step towards a full Western Canadian
Athletic program. It appears
that we will have at least a
limited version of a Western
Canadian League in operation
by  1959-60.
Our Triennial Open House
held this year has been extremely successful due ,.to the
magnificent organization of
the committee headed by Mr.
Ron Longstaffe. In the year
of the Development Fund and
with the interest students have
shown in the university's capital expansion it would have
been extremely easy to make
Open House a straight public
relations  affair.     That   it  did
THE UBYSSEY
Authorized as second class mail.  Post Office Department,
Ottawa.
MEMBERS CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF.   PAT MARCHAK
News Editor __ - - --- Barbara Bourne
CUP Editor  _ - _ Laurie Parker
Advertising Manager  ,   Bill Miles
Photo Editor     _ Michael Suae
SENIOR   EDITOR,    ALAN GROVES
Reporters and Desk: Kerry Feltham, Nova Bird, Rupert
Buchanan, Babulal Ramlogan, Jim Taylor, Barry Cook, Mary
Wilkins, Al Forrest, Bob Johannes, Sue Ross, Helen Zukowski,
Marilyn Smith, Diana Smith, Ken Lamb, Sylvia Shorlhouse,
Al Sprmgman, Barrie Hate, B'll Pikct, Brenda Runge, Terry
O'Brien, Elaine Bissett, Alan Dafoe. Photographers: 'Fenny
liaqq, Jim Barton, Dave Vaw.tor, Alan Groves, Jim. Mason,
Pete  Grayslone,  Walt  Hatcher.  Michael Sone.
not deteriorate to that and
that room was left in the program for such academic speakers as Dr. Hayakwa and Prof,
Earle Birney, is much to the
credit of the Open House Committee. It is estimated that
80,000 people came to tour the
university. It should not need
saying, but unfortunately it
often needs reiteration, that
Open House is a product of
students and faculty co-operation. I know that Mr. Longstaffe would be the first to say
that Open House would not
have been the success it was
were it not for the combined
efforts of both students and
faculty. The same spirit should
be extended into many other
fields.
The Second Annual Academic Symposium was another
example of the increased scope
of what is considered "student
affairs". This relatively young
venture has proven to be one
of the most fruitful functions
of the year. Financed by the
Students' Council, the Faculty
Association, Alumni and the
University administration, the
exchange of ideas between
these members of the University community, goes a long
way towards the understanding of common problems and
an attempt to find mutual solutions to problems concerning
the academic affairs of the university. The symposium committee has been asked by the
Students' Council to make a
submission to the Royal Commission on Education on behalf of the Alma Mater Society. It is to be hoped that the
Senate of the University will
seriously consider the recommendations adopted at the plenary session of both this year's
and last year's Academic'Symposium.
NATIONAL
UBC students are represented in two national groups,
the World University Service
of Canada and the National
Federation of Canadian University Students. The WUSC
committee headed by Wayne
Hubble has done an efficient
and capable job with a well-
established organization. The
UBC committee continues to
stress the exchange of scholars
from foreign countries and
direct aid to World University
Services program of action.
The NFCUS Committee
headed by George Nagler has1
been quietly but effectively
working to increase the stature and scope of the local
NFCUS program. In contrast
to WUSC, however, NFCUS
continues to draw fire from
both students and administration. NFCUS has a long history of a struggle to survive.
It is torn by the insistence of
many small Eastern universities for action in such things
as theatre discounts, short
story contests, blood drives,
photographic contests, etc.,
and the insistence of larger
universities that the NFCUS
role should be one of representing student opinion to the
Federal Government,
Last year the UBC delegation of the NFCUS conference, '
Mr. Don Jabour and Mr. Stan
Beck, cleared away many of
the smaller projects that hampered the NFCUS national office and mandated these projects to individual universities, leaving the NFCUS national office free to devote its
time and effort to such things
as the scholarship campaign,
income tax and unemployment
insurance.
This new approach and definite outlining of specific projects has already begun to
show amazing results. The
national office was directed by
the National Conference this
year to concern itself mainly
vvith two projects. First the
scholarship campaign and secondly the holding of a seminar
under the auspices of the Canada Council on "Tho Role of
the University's in National
Development".
The scholarship campaign
has, to all intents and purposes, been adopted and in fact
surpassed by both of Canada's
major -political parties. While
not all of this, of course, can
be attributed to NFCUS alone,
the brief which was prepared
by the NFCUS National Office
has usually oeen commended
as a milestone of student activity. NFCUS as an organization has a great potential for
benefiting all of Canada's seventy-five thousand university
students. We should lend it
our wholehearted support instead of becoming easy prey
to those who criticize the organization without understanding its internal problems
and limited finances.
INTERNATIONAL
The same organizations represent UBC students at International Students Conference.
In this section I only want to
say that I feel UBC students
should concern themselves
with the problems of students
in other parts of the world.
The loss of academic freedom,
the prohibition of National
Unions of students, the suppression of university student
organizations comparable to
our own, and the stifling of
political criticisms from students in other countries is
dangerous to us all.
Canada is playing an important part in world affairs
and as an exporting nation
deals with almost every country in the world. It is important for us to concern ourselves
with the suppression of student rights in other countries
if we are to be dealing with
the products of this suppression in later years. Our concern at the moment is for the
civil rights of students like
ourselves in other countries;
the other side of the coin is
that we should strive to ensure
tha*t these students meet us
later in the fields of diplomacy and world trade on an
equal footing. The heritage
of academic and political freedom should know no boundaries and should be one of our
major concerns.
In closing, there ,are some
individuals and organizations
which have not yet been mentioned that I would like to
thank.
The first is Mrs. Pat Marchak and the members of The
Ubyssey staff. I congratulate
them on a high-quality and
provocative newspaper, and
thank Mrs. Marchak for the
integrity she has shown and
maintained on her editorial
page. For the first time, the
Bracken Trophy for editorial
excellence rests at UBC,
A new club, the Debating
Union, deserves special commendation, I think, because of
the quality of the speakers
participating, and the provocative topics they have chosen
to debate. It has proved to be
one of the most stimulating
series of events held this year,
and I hope they will not lower
their standards next year. I
would like to single out Mr.
Graham Moseley for his work
and express my sincere thanks.
Mr.  Lawrence    Levin    has
been quietly waging a war
with the Unemployment Insurance Commission on a case
that could affect all university students. His tenacity
and work has resulted in a
decision favourable to his case,
although the court that heard
the case in Ottawa as presented by NFCUS and Union lawyers specifically said no precedent should be established by
the decision.
There is another UBC student with a similar case ready
to go, however, and it may be
that Mr. Levin's case will be
only the first of a series that
will iron out some of Unemployment Insurance problems.
The Totem staff, under the
editor, Norman Pearson, have
done a remarkable job under
entirely new conditions. Mr.
Pearson has made some unpopular decisions and has
stood by them. I am quite
sure he will be proved right
when the Totem comes out
soon.
Aside from the recommendations implied in the body of
this report, I would like to
make some specific ones:
I RECOMMEND:—
• 1. That the Undergraduate Societies do some soul-
searching about Faculty Editions of The Ubyssey, and ask
themselves if what they have
to say is for the benefit of the
entire campus, or have faculty
editions become nothing more
than "public relations" for a
faculty?
• 2. That both the Students
Council and the Student Body
inquire into the nature of editorial freedom and responsibility. Students must decide
whether they trust an editor,
be it of The Ubyssey, the Totem, or any other publication,
to strike a fair balance between publicizing events and
reporting them. But once an
editor is appointed, there
should be no attempt to control space or to dictate the relative importance of publicity
and news. I believe that, for
better or for worse, it is a
wiser policy to maintain freedom. Once an editor has been
dictated to, how can we expect
free criticism?
• 3. That some members of
Faculty, Administration, and
the public, learn that the essence of education is analysis
and criticism, and that we cannot learn to criticise and to
form our own opinions and
then be asked to keep those
opinions and criticisms to ourselves. Even if our criticisms
prove impolitic or embarass-
ing, any attempt to stifle them
is a negation of the concepts
implied in the word "University".
Thank you for the opportunity of serving you in this extremely interesting and fruitful
year.
Yours sincerely,
BEN TREVINO
LETTERS TO Tiff EDITOR
Useless
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Madam:
I would like to address this
remark to students of Architecture and light modulaters
in general.
Why is that god damn light
modulator still gracing the
main mall?
It has fulfilled its decorative
purpose and it does not seem
to modulate any light.
Other than a phallic memorial to a past glorious Open
House, it seems to be of no
use,
If something is of no use, it
is useless and if it is useless,
why not pull it down?
Yours very sincerely,
D. FITZ-GERALD
•**       *f*       *x*
Still With Us
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Madam:
I should like to say that I
am entirely in accord with my
sentiments as expressed in the
March 21st issue of The Ubyssey concerning the proposed
compulsory conversion of your
excellent paper to a glorified
club notice board.
Yours  sincerely,
ROBIN   MAUNSELL,
Ed.  V Thursday, March 27, 1958
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
'TWEEN CLASSES
(Continued from Page 1)
UBC CAMERA CLUB—Final
meeting of the club will be held
on Friday noon in Arts 204 to
discuss next year's business,
Clubs Day, and the president's
and treasurer's reports. j
* *      * i
UNIVERSITY     BAPTIST
CLUB   will   meet  Friday  noon!
in Physics 301 to hold an election   of   officers.   This   will   be ]
followed   by   a   short   message
from Rev.  Dick  Ronton. I
* *       * '
ISLAMIC CENTRE — General
meeting and elections will be
held on Friday at 12:30.
* *       *
VARSITY  DEMOLAY  CLUB
— Varsity Demolay Ball, Saturday at 8:30 in Brock Hall, $2.49
a couple. Everyone is welcome. ,
Tickets at the door or at*AMS;
office.
* *       *
ANNUAL    WUS-WAD    BANQUET — The annual WUS-WAD !
banquet will be held on Thurs- '.
day,  April  3,   at  12:30  p.m.  in
tiie  Brock  Lounge.  Tickets are ;
75 cents per person. The  Intramural and Big and Little Block
Awards will be given out.
FOR ALL YOUR
Pharmaceutical Needs
and Prompt, Efficient Prescription Service
SEE
UNIVERSITY PHARMACY
5754 University Boulevard
Jack and Millie Burchill
TRAVEL HEADQUARTERS
UNIVERSITY BRANCH
Why go all of the way to town to make your
Travel  Arrangements?
OUR SERVICES ARE ENTIRELY FREE
We have been appointed by all of the Major Air Lines,
Steamship Lines, Bus Lines, and Tour Operators.
To Serve the University, Faculty and Students.
If you are going Home or goin Abroad, We can Serve
You BETTER at our convenient location.
You pav Only the Regular Fare.
TRAVEL HEADQUARTERS
Your Headquarters for Travel Anywhere
4576 W. 10th Ave. Phone ALma 4511
' ■•<■     ' i
•^. ,'
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Insurance, as we offer it, is quite simple. There
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GROUP
ACCIDENT
R.   D.  GARRETT,  Provincial  Manager
619 Burrard Building — Phone MUtual 3-3301 Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 2X„ 1968
Remember
TUXEDO1
E. A. LES
imi   Hour   M
MAr       'J457
RENTALS
WHITL   CHATS   -   TAILS
MiiUMMt   <'OATK
f)IKK<TIHM   COAT*
HHIKTS  AM)  A(( KSSOKIIta
C©mitt*t«   fltnek   of   Latent   Mn<i**9
$1 discount to all UBC
students
THE LIBRARY. Remember those happy hours spent in
study or OTHERWISE. This is where students are supposed to spend all their time that is not scheduled for
lectures so that their intellectual pursuits may be attained.
Remember, dont let that spring- air keep you away from
the citadel during these closing weeks.—photo Mike Sone
Th
0
H
v   i-
*4
mi cU '
SOCIAL EVENTS HIT THE USUAL high points. Here a sin]
Sadie Hawkins day bash. We don't know if her  name  Ls  Mftl
Mae, but as it looks like she washes, we'll assume she was Da
Sadie Hawkin's Day. That  looks like a bee r bottle in the
what was a beer bottle doing in the Armouries? You figure
MAV'^fr-
New! A filter cigarette
with an All-White Tip
FOR THI!  SMOKKR  WHO  WANTS  A   PLAIN  END
FILTliR  CIGAR KITH
UNIDENTIFIED GENTLEMAN, obviously having lost a be
Moral: a rolling bowling ball gathers no dandruff. Comment:!
and nose bit, but not much of an improvement. Might we si{|
like dynamiting the school of education.
BOB CROSBY, Bill Sharman and Bill Russell, are three
of the pro basketball stars who will be playing on the East,
vs West All-Star game on April 21 at, UBC, I Thursday, March 27, 1938
THE  UBYSSEY
During
Page 5
t{>   *%i   J- WI '
n    ♦
Intertains at the annual
ta  McSwine,  or  Daisy
fixe. But maybe it wasn't
left  hand corner, and.
forms for the winners.
a switch on the peanut
Something constructive,
-photo Dave Reclekop
THE GREAT
IWHITE MOTHER
■MBER    the    football
between   the   Nurses
lie   Home-Ec;   and   rosier   the   great   auction
lies.     Pictured  here  is
sey   Editor.   Pat   Mar-
after  the  winner   of
[notion  threw  the  pie
|r.sfao«, ••••• '■■■*•■>.
Remember the March Gras, the wild Greek party
-photo Mike Sone
REVIEWS ID
Post," he mumbled.
"CHARLIE! You didn't!!"
He nodded and passed us the
bottle. Half an hour later we
were still sitting around listening to the sound of our own
breathing and trying to hit the
open end of the now empty
bottle with spit-balls made
from back issues of The Reviews and Criticism Page.
Finally, Charlie spoke up.
"Moving, eh?"
>     "Yeah."
"Lash  page  today?"
"Yeah."
'i wanted lo clo a couple of
articles for you, ol' man, but I
. . . but I . . . "
"Yeah."
"Who's going to edit the
page nex'ycar?"
"Fellow name of Rupert Buchanan."
"Whas he like?"
"Oh, you know. Like all
critics. He was an orphan and
his foster-mother drank. She
sent him out to rifle poor-
boxes every afternoon, and
every evening she beat him
with rolled copies of The Ladies' Home Journal."
EDITOR, RUPERT BUCHANAN
The  Fay  Pearce  Show
By JOHN V. COOK
In an analysis of William
Faulkner's "The Sound and
the Fury", Jean-Paul Sartre,
who never has to apologize,
talked of Faulkner's "mctaphysic" and that was the way
it had to be because Faulkner
writes the w a y Faulkner
writes; and here Fay Pearce's
"metaphysic" will be < talked
about, and that is the way it
has to be also,
The current exhibition by
Fay Pearce opened a week ago
Tuesday and it has attracted
a lot of attention and given
rise to a lot of talk since. These
twenty-five paintings and
drawings have a lot to say,
they are bold, lively, and one
of the most unboring collections (■>[ anything in Vancouver- at tho present moment.
Of those who go to a One-
Man Show to see what a painter has painted there is always
a fair percentage who are very
concerned over background,
and if this " is sal isl'ierl they
turn their shrewdness to a very
careful clinical examination of
Technique to see if this loo
can bo accredilted. And that's
fair enough I suppose, tlie Arls
loo will have their Customs
officials.
For those faseinalorl wills
Iho Technical, much of what
they're afler can be found,
fii'sl in inter Simplicity, in lhe
drawings: "IVJ'y Daughter Ann
and Pen Drawings"; second in
'inter Complexity", in "Painted Ladies" and "Arabian Wise1
Woman Seeking Alms", both
gouaches. These works come
easily lo mind but there is the
same degree of technical mastery present in all twenty-five.
But the heart of it. and this
explains the note of impatience in the foregoing Techni-
tSftHBxaiftirflrtion, is  that Fay
Pearce i.s no academic painting
for other academics. There is
no sensation of watching two
Russians at three-dimensional
chess. The paintings and
drawings speak of something
in value inestimable, and Pare
Reason choked to death for me
after ten minutes in the gallery. And here will carelessly
be built the threatened "metaphysic" for Fay Pearce.
Women are the subject matter 00 percent of the way
through, but it is soon realized
that this is coincidental. There
is the pathetic innocent little
girl whose naked shoulders
are bent as though for all sadness beneath a billowy explosion of nasty green; the "Three
Buga'nda Women", black mysterious distant figures who
stand and stand; and the Utile
pen drawing "Queen of Heaven", so small and so innocent
that a child could weep in
front of it.
The impact of these paintings is enormous and yet il is
the paintings that carry the
impact and not particularities
of character within liiem. A
smile, a hand, or even a head
cannol he lifted out of the pie--
ture so (Iial it can be said:
"There il is! Thai's whal.
makes your picture." Nor can
Women the1 subject mailer, be.
tilled oul of Ihe paintings so
that il can be said lhat Ihe
force is I here, for the same
force is in "Rainy Nighl. on
Hastings Street" and "Horse",
both with a distinct change1 of
subject matter.
I would say that if Fay
Pearce must be sentenced to a
statement about, her art, it is
that she has found expression
through the mystic of Relationship, of the relationship of
one particularity in her paint-
• 'ing to another, one figure to
another, one color to another,
one line to another, and the in-
extricability of the necessity
of such an endless linkage.
This is bold, for it is an un-
retractable statement made by
tier about her art, and simultaneously a statement about
Life and this is the boldest
gesture of all. And still some
young ex-innocent will stand
in front of her paintings and
find this Relationship unavoidably before him, and he will
make a Freudian deduction to
ease it, and in one way he will
have solved the Problem. -The
Problem which is 'in him, not
Fay Pearce.
This at least is what * find
behind the sound and the fury
of the work of Fay Pearce.
Her show in the Library basement closes April It,
Charlie Calls
It Quits
By BARRIE  HALE
We were emptying out our
desk  when  Charlie  rolled   in,
"Moving?"   he   asked.
"Yeah".
"Have  a  cigarette,"   lie  said.
We looked up. Charlie was
wearing a new slim look suit.
Willi one hand he was offering
us a freshly-opened package of
cigarettes; the oilier .held a
I'reshly-oponod bottle of five
star  Mario!.
"Charlie." we cried. "What
happened?"
He took a long pull of the
brandy, and mumbled something vve didu'l gel.
"What wa.s that'.'"
He lowered his bottle and
wiped his hand across his
mouth, then on his suit. He
avoided our eyes. "I sold a
story to the -Saturday Evening
ffjwttfofove
{ofottMcoM.!
• , , and a Savings Account af
the Bonk  of Montreal"  is lh<>
soy to guaran'wc yai/r-,elf lhat
secure feeling , , ,
'   i
Your Pa   noit
to Byttei tmny
*The Bank whoro Students' account*
aro warmly welcomud.
MERLE C. KIRBY, Manager
Your Campus Branch  in tha
Administration Building Page 6
THE   UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 27, 1958
Rowers Present Olympic Film To Raise BEG Money
By TED SMITH
UBC's famed rowing crew
are in the midst of preparation
for the defence of their British
Empire Games rowing championship in Cardiff, Wales in
July.
In connection with this preparation the UBC crew will be
presenting the official film of
the 1956 Olympic Games from
Melbourne, Australia in the
Auditorium on Monday noon.
The object of this presentation is to raise money for the
crew for the coming trip to
the BEG trials in St. Catherines, Ontario.
HARDER TO RETAIN TITLE
Realizing   that   it   is   much
more difficult to retain a championship than to first achieve
one the UBC team has been
working out continuously since
the beginning of the fall term.
Returning crew members appear to have lost none of their
desire after their victorious
trip to Melbourne.
All 1'o'ur members of the
Olympic champion four are
back practising at thc present
time. Don Arnold, Walter
d'Hondt, Archie McKinnon, and
Lome Loomer, the victorious
four, along with Wayne Pretty,
Bill McKerlich, Dick McLure,
Bob Wilson, and Dave Helliwell  from the silver medalist
eight are trying for positions
on the crews for the BEG.
THREE CREWS TO GO
Canada will be sending three
crews on the July trip. Tbe<e
will include as well as the usui.1
eight and coxless four, a new
entry, a coxed four. This should
in all probability give I've
more UBC fellows an opportun
ity to make the trip.
Before any UBC team will b,.
able to go to Wales, they mv.s4:
win the BEG trials in Ontario.
Eastern teams are extremely
keen this year because of i■■■■:
shellacking they have b,v:n
taking at the hands of the western teams for the past five
seasons.
Presently  the 36 boys trying for spots on the crews are
working out three times per
••/eek,   at  6  a.m.,  in  training
.arges on Coal Harbour. This
•. long   with   afternoon   cales-
. ienic exercises is providing the
ritical  bridge for the  crews
iver   the   break   for   examinations.
VARREN IS COACH
John Warren, youthful pro-
■■jge of famed Frank Read, is
•andling  the  coaching  chores
)ir crews. Warren rowed bow
•■n   the   first   of  UBC's   great
i vews who lost out by less than
>ne boat length in the Olympic
.rials in 1952.
After drawing a large crowd
EATONS
^kw\lmmwi f&kiottt MBl
Ready
for Rm
The Duster..
that clout.: .   ..u- z dress
coat, set. . be.'e in shower
resistant    ."on bengaline.
This  year""   '"as'hion,
^iven  now b.u:k  yoke  interest, r<m   ..'■..- the same
wvar-ove.''-''. very tiling
■'vn here m a
qua! i lie
colour pale , ,-cream.
$25.00
• from our black, '■■'".\ navy, brown,
cream collection I" '.'.vo styles.
Coals — Second 'rmoor,    MU, 5-7112.
at the Georgia Auditorium recently, the presentation of the
Olympic film should raise
much interest in the UBC team
on the campus. The Olympic
rowing finals are illustrated on
the film which is a 50 minute
color production.
40    YEARS OF SERVICE
TO THE   UNIVERSITY  OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA,
ITS FRATERNITIES
AND SORORITIES.
THEM'S A REASON
STATIONERY AND
PRINTING CO. LTD"
TELEPHONE     PACIFIC  OI7I
1035  Seymour Street
Vancouver 2, B.C.
Headquarters for
PHILIPS and FLEETWOOD
Radio, Television and Hi-Fi
Guaranteed Radio
And TV Repairs
Radio Rental and Repair
.      4453 West 10th Ave.      .
ALma 2244
GRADS!
FACTS ABOUT NFCUS
LIFE
NFCUS LIFE consists of a
10-year term insurance or
term to age 35, whichever
is the shorter period, with
ordinary lile thereafter.
The rate for the term period
is $3.50 per $1,000 annually
with ordinary life rates
thereafter.
ADVANTAGES OF
NFCUS LIFE
1. Group insurance such as
NFCUS LIFE allows a
guaranteed rate conversion clause. If ordinary,
life rates go up in the
future, you will still pay
the same rate.
2. You receive a credit of
$2.50 per 81,000 on your
first premium after conversion.
3. Comparable term insurance costs an average of
$5.25 per $1,000 while
NFCUS LIFE costs only
$3.50   per   S 1,000.
BUT . ..
To   be   eligible   you   must
register before you graduate
For   further   information
call  . . .
TERRY MULLIGAN
OF
CANADIAN
PREMIER LIFE
INSURANCE  COMPANY
779 W. Broadway    EX 29241
Sidney K. Cole, C.L.U.
Branch Manager
'.•*.'' 4     Thursday, March 27, 1958
THE   UBYSSEY
Page 7
SPORTS    EDITOR.    ALLAN SPRINGMAN
Reporters  and  Desk:—Bob Bush,    Allan    Dafoe,    Tony
Morrison, Ted Smith, Peter Irvine, Audrey Ede, Elaine Bissett
SPRINGMAN SPEAKING
The time has come for all good men, etc., etc.
This is the last sports page of the year and while my
first reaction is '"Thank God," my second is, "Too bad it's
over."
I've had many things to say to both The Ubyssey
readers and the members of our teams but I've never had
a chance to say them. One of the prerogatives of an editor
is to express his opinion, but because of an almost universal
shortage of space I've been unable to do so.
However, this once I shall take up some of this space
for a few words. What I want to do is praise some people.
First, there is the sports page staff. Bob Bush, who
came to The Ubyssey in the middle of the year, did so
well that he is going to be next year's sports editor.
Peter Irvine was our rugby expert. Peter outdid himself in the Wallabie series as our last few pages will attest.
Next there is Allan Dafoe. Allan did a lot of work
on the paper and got few bylines, something I'm sorry
about.
Ted Smith and Tony Morrison came to us via the
faculty of Engineering and they were good enough to
overcome this disability and become good reporters. Ted,
about the best we have, and Tony, one of the better staff
members.
Covering the female side of sports were Elaine Bissett
and Audrey Ede. Elaine spent part of the year as co-sports
editor in a particularly trying time, and Audrey did an
excellent job of reporting.
Hugh Barker was another excellent staffer who went
o nto greater (?) things as scrum half of the Chiefs rugby
team. Don Baker did a very good job and I'm afraid his
talents were wasted. There just didn't seem to be enough
things to keep him busy.
Thanks must also go to Bill Yuill, who covered hockey,
and Don Stewart and George Zebroff for their occasional
help.
Two other people must be mentioned, Lynn Clarke
and Ken Wiebe. Lynn helped me a great deal when I
was just starting to edit the sports page and Ken, even
after he had to give up the editorship, came down occasionally to give needed advice with criticism.
Well, these were the people who worked with me to
turn out a sports page. Even if the product wasn't the best
we tried to do our best, and that is about all one can do.
Some of these people wil lbe back and if they clo I
think that the paper will be better next year. But only
time, tide, and another term can tell.
HOME
TRIMBLE SERVICE GARAGE
4494 W. 10th Ave., Vancouver, B. C.
ALma 1551
1959 GRADUATES
f^\ i»^
The Royal Canadian Air Force
Offers a technical or air crew career to selected candidates in any faculty, subsidization commencing in school
year 1958-59.
Book allowances and pay under Regular Officers Training Plan.
For further particulars contact your Resident Staff
Officer, Squadron Leader J. C. McGIBBON or, throughout
the summer, RCAF Recruiting Unit, 545 Seymour Street.
Phone MU. 4-7577,
Weichert Stars For UBC
In PNW Championships
Dieter Weichert was the big man for UBC at the Pacific
Northwest College Gymnastics Championships.
Weichert piled up 474 points in capturing the men's all-
round competition. He scored victories in the sidehorse, horizontal bar, parallel bars, and all-round events while placing second
in the free exercises. £'-—	
This was the last team meet
Other UBC competitors to
place were Al Limfcjer in fifth
spot, Walt Mclntyre in seventh
position, and Tom Cross in
eighth place.
The final team standings saw
Washington State College finish first with 84 points while
Washington was runner-up with
74 points. UBC trailed in third
with 40 points. The withdrawal
of Oregon State left only three
colleges in the championships.
of the year for the Varsity squad
but individual UBC gymnasts
will continue to train for important meet this summer.
Dieter Weichert plans to join
the University Hill Turners in
the United States AAU Meet in
May.
Alex Ross and Al Limber
will enter the Canadian AAU
Meet at War Memorial Gym on
July 3, 4, and 5.
*>
WORLD CUP HERE
APRIL 3rd AND 5th
One of the biggest athletic
attractions of the year will
take place April 3 and 5 at
which time the UBC rugger
team will play host to California in the annual World
Cup Rugger Series.
The UBC Thunderbirds at
present hold a six-point advantage over the California
Golden Bears. The Bears
won the first game of the
competitions. UBC came
back strong in the second
contest to beat the Bears
17-9 and to take the lead.
Elected  Secretory
Bruce Verchere was elected
secretary of MAA Wednesday
by the members of MAA.
VOTERS  OF  QUADRA
THE PEARSON PLAN PLEDGES
GENEROUS UNIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIPS
AND BURSARIES PLUS
• Non-Interest Loans for University Education.
• A Program of Peace, Prosperity and Security
for All Canadians.
VOTE LIBERAL — VOTE FOR
[BOYES
PROF.
F.C.
ph
Director of Student Teaching
College of Education, UBC
Published by "Tat" Boyes' Campaign  Committee
PROF. F. C. BOYES
il
?
Are You Interested In Peaple?
The field of Social Work offers a wide variety of
exciting opportunities
Professional Social Workers would like to tell you
about their work with people and what Social Work
can offer you
Call any of the agencies listed below and ask for
"SOCIAL WORK CAREERS"
A personal interview will be arranged
Vancouver Social Service
Department    BA. 5727
Provincial Social Welfare .... MU. 4-6311
Children's Aid Society   CE. 8111
Burnaby Social Service
Department   HE. 1-1411
Family Service Agency BA. 4J)51
Child Guidance Clinic   DE. 9000
John Howard Society   EX. 3922
School of Social Work, University of British Columbia
Catholic Childrens Aid Society HA. 8800
Vancouver General Hospital
Social Service  EM. 3211
Alexandra Neighborhood
House  CE. 1636
THE
Canadian Association of Social Workers Page 8
THE  UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 27,1958
puts a lasting smile on
the face of a building
Now under construction, the modern office building of
A.tlas Steels Limited in Welland, Ontario, will have a bright,
shiny stainless steel exterior. The stainless steel used m
the curtain walls of this building contains Inco Nickel.
Everyone knows that in time, the face of a
city can get pretty grimy. Now it needn't. . .
ever. That's the beauty of this modern method
of building ... stainless steel curtain wall
construction. The bright, smooth surface on
thc outer wall of a building washes clean vvith
every rainfall. Upkeep expense is negligible.
Curtain wall construction costs less in the
long run. The walls go up in panels quickly
and easily. They reflect sunlight. They won't
crack or buckle. Stainless steel curtain walls
are less than half as thick as masonry walls,
allowing more useable space. The walls
weigh less, too. Builders can use lighter—
and less cosily—steel columns.
That's the economy of stainless steel curtain
wall construction. It explains why a number
of new buildings will have these bright, shiny,
rust-resistant stainless steel outer walls. And
Inco supplies nickel to the Canadian steel
company that produces stainless steel.
Nickel helps give stainless steel its rich, silvery
lustre and its exceptional strength . . . makes
it easy to fabricate. Small wonder that fine
tableware, modern sinks and so many other
beautiful and practical items for the home
are now made with nickel-containing
stainless steel. Another example of the way
Inco metals serve the Canadian industries
that serve you.
Inco has recently published a colourful and beautifully illustrated 32-page booklet about
Canada"s important nickel industry, entitled "Tiie Exciting Story of Nickel", It
is written primarily for Canadian youth hy Alan King, but adults will also find it
full of interesting information. Just write to Inco for a free copy of this booklet,
INCO THE  INTERNATIONAL   NICKEL COMPANY OF CANADA, LIMITED
/..'■ ......') »S VONCE STREET, TORONTO
PRODUCER OF INCO NICKEL, NICKEL ALLOYS; ORC BRAND COPPER, TELLURIUM, SELENIUM, PLATINUM, PALLADIUM AND OTHER PRECIOUS METALS', COBALT AND IRON ORE

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