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The Ubyssey Oct 10, 1958

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 PICK
UP
THE UBYSSEY
A. M. S.
CARDS
VOL. XLI
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1958
No. 10
COMMITTEE THREATEN CLUBS
Delinquent Clubs
Ignored Warnings
j        Twelve  university clubs  narrowly  missed  being  evicted
! from the Brock Area Wednesday.
|        Mamooks and Mussoc failed to redeem themselves after
ignoring the Brock Management Committee's request to submit
s a brief on clubroom usage,
) Other delinquent clubs presumed not to be needing a club-
| room this year were: Alpha Omega, Baptist Student' Union,
j Christian Science Union, Civil Liberties Union ,Critic's Circle,
| French Club, Obnova, Political Science Union, Pre-Dent Society, Pre-Med Society, and the U.N. Club.
BUSINESS MAY HAVE BEEN BAD for the first four days of the Blood Drive, but a few
people appear optomistic about the chances for overall success. Totals to date are more
than 1600 pints short of the target. —- Photo by Geoff Farmer
ONE  IN  SEVEN  DONATES
Blood Drive Far Short
Of 3000 Pint Objective
Tween Classes
Blackett Talks On
Atoms & Relations
SPECIAL EVENTS — Professor P. M. S. Blackett speaks
on 'Atomic Weapons and
East-West Relations" in Auditorium today  at  12.30.
* *     *
UNIVERSITY BAPTIST
CLUB — Meeting today at 12.30
in PHY. 302. Speaker: Rev. R.
Shodin — subject "Confession".
* *     *
MUSIC CIRCLE — Today in
Music Room, Brock Hall. G.
Green will introduce 2 Mozart
Horn  Concertos.
* *     *
S.C.M. -— General Meeting in
Buchanan   205   today   noon.
-A-     *     *
PSYCHOLOGY CLUB — Presents Mr. Cox speaking on "Job
Opportunities in Psychology",
Friday at  12.30  in  HM. 2.
■k       k       k
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION — Regular meetings held from now on every
Friday noon in Hut L.3. Panel
discussion on "What do you expect from University".
(Continued on  Page 6)
See 'TWEEN CLASSES
The Red Cross's blood drive
on the campus is in its last day.
This year, UBC has an enrolment of over ten thousand students. Of this number, less than
one third (3,000) was set as
the objective.
To date only 1,365 have donated. This leaves 1615 pints
to be donated today.
Here are some of the faculty
standings thus far: Forestry,
172%, Nurses 100%, Theo.
101%, Eng. 66%, Med. 70%.
The rest are below 50%, with
the frosh far behind with 28%..
Officials have expressed their
concern over the poor showing
of the student body, and they
are hoping for a much better
turn  out today.
If your faculty is below their
quota, today is your last chance
to  help  them  win.
It costs no more than a half
hour to donate and free cokes
arc available to all those who
do.
Although the female counterpart of the student body is outnumbered 3-1, they are being
outdonated 5-1.
Here are some comments from
a   few  of  Thursday's  donors:
"This is my second donation,
and  it was a cinch," said Shirley Tomalty, "I am a little disappointed at the turn out because
(Continued  on Page 3)
See   BLOOD DRIVE
FACULTY REPLY TO
EDITORIAL ON PAGE 2
UBC Faculty Association
has replied to The Ubyssey's
"Open Letter to the Faculty" editorial which appeared Thursday.
Text of the Association's
reply is to be found on Page
Two  of  today's   Ubyssey.
Future Will
Be Unknown
Future of proposed teaching
salary increases outlined in The
Ubyssey Thursday probably will
not be known until sometime in
1959.
UBC Board of Governors in
past years has not made public-
final decisions regarding such
proposals until total revenue j
from all sources lias been determined,
AMS Cards Ready
Alma Mater Society Privilege Cards will be distributed starting today, Come ■.
to AMS Office in Brock
Hall and present your stub.
A special meeting of the
Brock Management Committee
was held at 1 p.m. Wednesday for
those clubs who did not submit
briefs.
CHARGE REFUTED
Approximately 25 representatives of the various campus
clubs appeared to refute the
charge of student apathy printed  in the last Ubyssey.
Laurie Frisbee, former executive member of Mamooks, informed the Ubyssey that the
club at present has no one of
executive ability, as the membership is largely Frosh. The
committee decided to let Mamooks   keep   their   room.
REPORT AMBIGUOUS
Dave     Pears,     president     of!
Mussoc   thought   that   the   com-1
mittee's  letter  was  directed  to-;
ward   the   clubs   in   the   Brock
Extension.   The   misunderstanding   was   cleared   up   with   the
committee chairman Jim  Horsman, Mussoc will be allowed to
remain in their hut.
When questioned on the indifference of the U.N. Club, one
member claimed it was "busy in
the service of man", certainly
not apathetic.
Lome Payne of the Christain
Science Union denied having received the committee's letter,
and wias consequently forgiven.
Civil Liberties, Critic's Circle
and the Political Science Unions
eventually contacted the committee. Ron Pearson will post
eviction notices for the other
clubs, at the committee's discretion.
The Committee Room in the
upstairs Brock has been changed to a common room for the
use of all students. Horsman
stated "everyone can use it,
but no one can have meetings
there."
The Chess and Bridge Club's
request to hold their weekly
meeting in tiie Mildred Brock
Room was emphatically rejected, despite the president's plea
that the club be moved from,
its "dungeon downstairs". Academic Symposium will share a
room with NFCUS.
<$-
Anthropologists
Present Dr. Read
Dr. Margaret Read, C.B.E.,
one of the world's leading anthropologists arrives in Vancouver at 7 a.m. October 13.
She will stay at the Sylvia Hotel.
A crowded program of addresses, lectures, seminars, and
social functions will start with
a seminar in the UBC department of anthropology which is
headed by Professor Harry
Hawthorn.
Lunch at UBC Faculty Club
tendered by Dean Neville V.
Scarfe and the Faculty of Education will be given for Dr.
Read. At 3 p.m. a seminar with
Extension Adult Education class
of Alan Thomas, will be held
with her.
President N. A. M. MacKen-
zie's luncheon in honor of the
visitor will be given at the Faculty Club Thursday.
At 2 p.m. Thursday she will
conduct a seminar on "Urbanization in Africa and India" with
Dr. H. Peter Oberlander, associate professor of planning and
design, staff and students, together with the special Indonesian students and the school of
architecture. At 3.30 p.m. a
class talk on "Health and Diseases in Tropical Areas" in
Education building, 105. Philosophy of Education class talk
at 8:30 a.m. on "Philosophy of
Education  in  African  Schools".
October 18 — Opening of
Vancouver Institute Saturday
night lectures, at 8, in Buchanan 106, with an address by
Dr. Read on "Growing Up in an
African Aristocarcy."
Keen Interest
In Problems
Keenness of interest in the
present world situation is indicated in the increased enrolment in the University of British Columbia's Extension department's evening class on Current and International Problems,
Registrations for this course
total the largest of any of the
inon-credil courses, with that
sity  Club,  and  the  Sports  Car   on comparative second in popu-
SPECIAL   MEETING
Requests put forth by the
Caribbean Students' Association,
Chinese Varsity Club, Nisei Var-
Club for a larger allocation of
space are being considered at
a special meeting',
iarity.
For further  information telephone Alma 4600, Local 316. PAGE TWO
THE   UBYSSEY
Friday, October 10, 1958
THE UBYSSEY    student senate needless
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Student sv^scriptions $1.20 per year (included in AMS fees). Mail
subscript.ons $2.50 per year. Published three times a week
in Vancouver throughout the University year by the Student
Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society, University of
Britisn Columbia. Editorial opinions expressed herein are those
of the editorial staff of the Ubyssey, and not necessarily those of
the Alma Mater Society or the University. Letters to the Editor
shou.a not be more than 150 words. The Ubyssey reserves the
rigb'- to cut letters, and cannot guarantee publication of all letters
received. ., „ UH tj
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF,   DAVE ROBERTSON       """ ^*l
Managing Editor, Barrie Cook        City   Editor,   Barbara   Buiirne
Chief Photographer, Mike Sone       Features Editor, Mary Wilkins
Editor, Special Editions — Rosemary Kent-Barber    ~'~~"
Assistant City Editor. Kerry Feltham
SENIOR EDITOR,   BRUCE TAYLOR
Reporters and Desk: Brenda Runge, Jody Frain, Karry White,
GUEST  EDITORIAL
Faculty  Replies
(Ed. Note: The Ubyssey today turns over its editorial
columns to Professor A. W. R. Carrothers, President
of the Faculty Association, in order thnt he may reply
to our editorial "Open Letter to the Faculty" which
appeared in Thursday's paper).
Dear Mr. Robertson:
There are three points which I should like to make in
respect of your Open Letter to the Faculty in today's
Ubyssey.
First, the document to which your letter refers was a
draft brief sent only to members of the Faculty Association, for their consideration at a special meeting called for
that purpose and open only to members of the Association.
Today's Ubyssey was published before the members of
the Association had an opportunity to express individual or
collective views on the subject. It is appreciated, however,
that the object of your letter was not to publicize a confidential document, but to invite members of the Faculty
Association to address their attention, prior to voting on the
draft brief, to the important question of the relation of fees
to the support of the University by public funds.
Second, the brief is addressed to the Board of Governors. That fact has a two-fold significance. In the first instance, the Board will by inadvertence hear oof the brief
from the daily press before the Association has an opportunity to present the brief to the Board through official representation by the Executive of the Association. In the second
instance, and more important to the subject-matter of your
letter, the Board of Governors knows the views of the
Faculty Association in the past respecting student fees, and
it wa.s not considered necessary or appropriate to enlarge
upon the subject in this document.
The third point deals with the position of the Faculty
Association respecting student fees. In the spring of 1957
the Association went on record as favoring the raising of
student fees only as a last resort. This view was affirmed
in the spring of this year, Further, the Association has in
previous briefs supported the principle that the maintenance of this University, a provincial institution, is constitutionally the responsibility of the Provincial government.
But the financial responsibilities of the University are
placed by the University Act on the Board of Governors.
The Faculty Association conceives it to be its proper function to make representations on these matters to the Board
itself, not independently of the Board, and to work with
the Board in the common task of maintaining this University as a worthy institution, In addition, however, the
members of the Faculty Association are members of the
Canadian Association of University Teachers. Our members on the Council of CAUT 'have consistently advocated
that CAUT take a firm stand on federal support for Canadian universities, and at. the present time a committee of
our local Association is preparing a report for the Council
on the subject, ofuniversity financing, including the question
of a program ot scholarships and bursaries referred to in
our letter.
I think it can hv seen from tho fort-going thai the
Faculty Association al U.B.C. i.s not unmindful of the problems which prompted the writing- of your letter, nor is il
idle in respect; of thorn,
Yours sincerely,
A. W. R. CARROTHERS,
President, Faculty Association,
University- of British Columbia
Lets Keep The
General Meeting
•Ed. Note: The Ubyssey Tuesday ran a story to the effect that a majority of delegates
to Leadership Conference had prefferred a change from the present student government
system.
Jack Giles, Law III, took the negative in a Conference debate on the subject of representative government.   Here is his argument against the proposed system).
I am firmly convinced that •-
the current dissatisfaction with
the General Meeting results
from an exaggeration of its
importance and a misinterpretation of its purpose.
Many peole have the idea
that a General Meeting is, or if
it isn't, should be an operating part of Studenl Government Machinery, in the manner of an enormous Parliament.
When General Meetings are
judged by this standard they
come out looking very badly.
When this criterion is used
they are everything they
accuse them of being: unrepresentative, unwieldy, boisterous, chaotic, etc.
However, the inclination to
think of the General Meetings
in these terms I regard as
symptomatic of a complete misconception of the principles
upon which our present form
of Student Government is based.
The false assumption is that
we possess an attempt at representative government, when
in fact we possess a highly
successful form of responsible
government.
In lhe Sludents' Council we
find a combination of executive and legislative responsible
lo all ihe students.
The Students' Council is only broadly representative; no
faculties,   committees  or  pres-
Raucous Braying
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
Must the students of this
campus continue to be subjected to the raucous braying of
the University Radio Society's
sound cars?
There is no need whatever
for this "service", for every
student, saving the most apathetic whom nothing can stir,
knows what is happening on
campus of interest to him
through observing posters or
through the adequate coverage
of activities in The Ubyssey.
Last year, the Students'
Council retricted the use of
sound cars to noon-hours and
to the seven-minute breaks between classes. We strongly
Feel, however, that a complete
ban is long overdue. A sound
car going up and down outside
the window is hardly conducive
to studying. Studenls who are
not studying have any hopes
for a IVw minutes relaxation
shallot-eel by this damned
schoeching.
It.   is   high   lime   that   these
Radsoc types were un-pluggod.
Yours truly,
JACK CRESSWELL.
filh Education
ALAN  FILMKR.
2 Commerce
JOHN' D. HAWLRY,
4th Arts and Science
sure groups have specific representation.
Women and Athletics are unnecessary exceptions to this
rule. These groups have individual councillors to administer their affairs. However,
they are elected by, and thus
responsible to, the students as
a whole.
The Chairman of the University Clubs Committee is no
more a representative of the
clubs than the Minister of National Defence is a representative of the Armed Services.
The next question is; if the
General Meeting is not to be
regarded as an enormous Parliament then how is it to be
regarded?
I answer ihis by claiming
that ihe General Meeting
should be regarded as little
more than an overt symbol of
the students' latent legislative
capacity.
I mean that legislative power the students have refrained
from giving to their responsible legislative the Students'
Council.
After all the Council is a
body we all elect, and I do
not think it is unreasonable
to suggest that it is deserving
of   our   trust   and   confidence!
I see a significant parallel
between a community such as
UBC consisting of ten thousand,   electing   fifteen   people
for one year, and a community
such as Canada consisting of
sixteen million, electing two
hundred and sixty five people
for five years. In both you
find a combination of executive and legislature and thus
both are described as responsible government.
The fact that in our Council
the legislature and the executive are the same size and thus
the same people, in no way
derogates from its status as a
responsible  government.
Barring consideration of the
British North America Act, the
only significant distinction
between the Parliament of
Canada and our Students'
Council is that the former has
complete legislative capacity
and in the latter the electorate
has retained partial legislative
capacity.
It is my belief therefore that
the proposal to substitute a
representative assembly for
the General Meeting is premised upon the assumption that
the General Meeting is failing
to perform a representative
function that it has never performed, should not perform,
and does not need to perform.
The greatest gift of the British peoples to ihe civilized
world is that concept of Gov-
(Continued on Page 3)
See LET'S KEEP
Meekison Answered
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
With regard to the letter in
Thursday's Ubyssey from Leadership Conference chairman,
Peter Meekison, I should like
to point out several serious misapprehensions under which the
chairman seems to be laboring.
Firstly, had the chairman
bothered to read the whole
story, or had assimilated the
material therein, he might have
found that his "reservations"
were indeed included in the
story.
As the reporter for the Conference, I felt that I had recorded the opinions of the majority, namely that the concept
of representative government
had been accepted "with reservations," The story devoted
over one-third of its space to
the "reservations" of the delegates.
Regarding the chairman's
complaint that not enough
sfiaee in The Ubyssey had been
devoted to lhe Conference, perhaps he doesn't realize thai
some oilier people may also
have a distorted opinion of the
importance of their interests,
and tht- space which should be
a Doted lo ihem in The Ubyssey,
To quote a person who had
read tUe  letter in question:  —
"What would Meekison suggest be taken out — the clubs'
column?
In any case, the Conference
received 30 column inches of
space in the first issue, twice
that usually allotted for the
most important story of an issue, and another 25 inches in
the following edition (the one
in which his letter appeared).
But it would be nice if someday these people realized that
there are things equally important to OTHER people,
which THEY want to read
about in the university newspaper.
Yours truly,
KERRY FELTHAM,
Arts III.
What?
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
In commenting on Al For-
rest's "Campus Beat" of Oct. T,
I feel that it is only neees,sary
to quote the fine old Latin
phrase "Slercum tauri cerebrum vincit."
Sincerely,
FRANK BRYANT.
Arls II
(Ed, Note:—Sounds like a lo!
of   bull  to  us.     What   does   it
mean?) Friday, October 10, 1958
THE   UBYSSEY
PAGE THREE
LET'S  KEEP THE GENERAL MEETING
ernment known as responsible
Government.
It is broadly representative,
it is simple, it is democratic,
and it works. It is the system
adopted in Canada, and considering that we are Canadians
I feel it is eminently desirable
that it be the system we retain at URC,
If we were Americans there
might be some argument for
attempting to implement a real
form of representative Government in spite of its drawbacks.
It is these drawbacks that I
would now like to examine.
First I will turn to those difficulties that arise by virtue
of the introducion of such a
form of Government to the
UBC context.
The most glaring is the constitutional inconsistency which
automatically arises out of a
false understanding of the nature of our present form of
Government. At the present
time the Students' Council is
a responsible body, the proponents of representative government erroneously imagine that
the General Meeting theoretically is, and in fact ought to
be, a representative body.
Proceeding upon this assumption they conclude it is
a bad representative body so
they say they will make a new
representative body which will
be better: namely a representative assembly.
The latter, when lhe flaw in
ihis type of thinking is revealed, emerges as something
entirely new something that
never existed before at all.
Therefore, if this proposal
was implemented, we could
have a responsible council and
a representative assembly,
with the council in the unenviable position of being responsible to thc students as a whole
who elected them and at the
mercy of an assembly who did
not. A situation most conductive to conflict and obstruction.
Tiie council winning off a referendum every time they belt
the policy of the assembly
which conflicted vvith their
duty  to the students.
The fact lhat the general
meeting as such is unrepresentative, is a source of alarm
only to those who believe it
ought to be representative, I
have always regarded voting
as consisting ol: three rather
than two alternatives, i.e., one
may vote 'Yes', "No', or not at;
all. The Hitler being known as
abstaining.
i
Those   who   do   not   attend
General Meetings are abstaining, precisely as they would
be abstaining if Ihey failed to
vole in a referedum, a campus
election, or even in electing
delegates to a representative
assembly.
Therefore, by the operation
of  tliis  element aw democratic
■ i
pridplo, I believe that, those
who do attend General. Meetings are thoroughly entitled
to enjoy whatever action they
take.
The proposed representative
form of government suggests
one delegate per fifty students,
as well as representatives from
various pressure groups.
And then it is claimed that
(Continued from Page 2)
in theory this is no different
from a General Meeting except
that it is an improvement in
pratice by virtue of the fact
tha it is 'more representative'.
Representative of what?
How do you represent an abstainer.
The Faculty of Arts by this
plan is permitted forty-four
delegates, according to the best
sources of information available that faculty has the greatest difficulty in getting forty-
four people out to a meelng.
let alone elect such a number
io representative office. On the
other hand we have the Faculty of Law with five delegates and the faculties of Commerce and Engineering with
similarly  few  delegates.
When you consider that it
is from these faculties that the
great wealth of student leadership is drawn, surely even the
most fervant disciple of representative government is given
cause to reconsider. Particularly when reminded that in General Meetings, General Elections and referendums, the abstainers by exercising a democratic prerogative in not voting delegate the influence of
their ballot to those who do
vote.
The description of Representative Government in the
proposal to set up a legislative
assembly at UBC is not true
representative government at
all the only thing representative about it is the assembly.
In fact the proposal as outlined by the Brawner report
is a bastard proposal; it is
neither fish nor fowl. It combines the worst of both types
of Government and the best
of  neither,
On the one hand you have
a responsible Council, but it is
responsible not as an executive
to an assembly, but as a legislative to an electorate.
On the other hand you have
a representative assembly
which shares its legislative
capacity with its own executive; i.e., representative government without separation of
powers.
If you are an adhearenl of
real representative government, after the American fashion, then you should propose|
that the assembly wield all
legislative power, and the capacity of the Council or executive should be purely administrative within the limits pre-
Un iversity
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Wo arc  pleased   lo  announce
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INSTRUCTION
to   U.B.C.  Students   at
SUBSTANTIALLY
REDUCED   RATES
(Effective to 28 February '59)
Dual   controlled,   fully   insured,    standard,    automatic    or
English vehicles.
Information from-
ABC DRIVING SCHOOL
1049 West Broadway (at Oak)
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Approved A.A.A. School
scribed by legislation passed in
the assembly,
It is my personal opinion
that regardless of the fact that
we are Canadians, responsible
government is the superior
form. It has greater flexibility,
is less susceptible lo a deadlock, and by demonstrating
faith and confidence in our
elected leaders, it serves to
elevate the dignity of political
office.
Considering this is the type
of Government we now possess, and has been functioning
for some time with mechanical
excellence, I submit that the
introduction of a representative
Assembly as a result of an
illusory conception of the purpose of the General Meeting
would have a cripplving effect on the conduct of good
student   government   at  UBC.
"' <£33£5s. Ifl
*3R?ii*W
*
1 1M«*m>
M
WHAT MAKES YOU THI NK THE STUDENTS
DON'T USE THE TRASH CAN!
BLOOD DRIVE
(Continued from Page  1)
I expected a higher percentage
of the students  would donate."
"I'm thankful that I can give,"
declared Alan Carson. "I
couldn't wait until I turned 18,
because they wouldn't accept me
the last time I tried to donate."
He went on to say that a person never knows when they
might need to  have it back.
"It's a very good cause," said
Maureen Criuse, "but I'm disappointed at the students lack of
support, I don't know what
they're afraid of, because there
is nothing to it."
Col. W. A. Freeman, blood
donor panel organizer for Vancouver, was on hand to give
his opinion.
"Last October at this time
1095 pints had been donated;
up until Thursday morning 1009
pints had been given — and
that is 75 bottles clown from
last  year.
Today wc collected approximately 400 bottles, lets aim for
at least 600 for the last day,"
Abominable Litterbug'
Runs Amuck on Campus
By UBYSSEY STAFF REPORTER
I was sent out one rainy afternoon during the World Series
to size up the "Litter Situation."
The first place I looked was ,%~	
the Main Lounge in Brock just  other odds and ends strewn care-
after all thc avid ball fans had I lesly on the floor,
left for their 1.30's.    The floor!-	
FOR   SALE:   Microscope,
ex-
cellcnt  condition.   $100.00
or
best   offer.   Call   Dr.   M.
II.
Duffy, HE 4-2323 or Miss
B.
Mitchell,   CH  2028    after
6
p.m.
was  strewn  with  empty  lunch
bags.
This was only    a    beginning.
] Everywhere there  are  students
! there is trash — or so it seems.
IThe walks and lawns are covered
with all kinds of useless items
— empty lunch bags, milk cartons, empty cigarette packages,
empty match boxes, empty gum
wrappers, apple cores and newspapers.
s
|     Cigarette smokers are among
the worst offenders —■ one little
cigarette won't matter.
!     Then there is the breed  who
! never  quite  hit the  receptacle.
They almost make it, . .
I stood near a very busy spot
on campus, when there were lots
of people coming and going.
From my vantage point I
could see two receptacles —
within twelve feet of each other
! and during the ten minutes I
wa.s there only three people
made use of these facilities.
Even the reading rooms of the
library aren't sacred to the abominable litterbug. Even there
can bc found cigarette butts, and
Double-Breasted Suits
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SIDNEY the SKUNK
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You just can't ignore a
skunk. Know what I mecin?
I'm certain 1 have your undivided attention when I say...
You should see thc new,
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For my slriped outfit I'm
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Qowul ut, and tin
onsi DR. PAGE FOUR
THE   UBYSSEY
Friday, October 10, 1958
MARIANNE MOORE SPEAKS
American Legend
Spends  Day   Here
Ed. note: Because of lack of
copy Patience Ryan was unable to submit a UCC column
today. In its place the UBC
is pleased to run an exclusive interview with Miss
Marianne Moore.
by Rosemary Kent-Barber
A living American legend
came to UBC Wednesday.
Marianne Moore, born Nov.
15, 1887 and still writing and
creating today, came to the
campus.
Her work, simple, clear-cut.
strong and sure, is included in
every  major anthology.
Her latest collection, a translation of La Fontain's "Fables"
is a best seller in the world of
letters.
She read her own poetry at
noon, attended a special sem-
minar for campus writers in the
afternoon and a reception given
by Mrs. Laura MacKenzie that
evening.
She remained throughout her
friendly, courteous warmth and
charm particularly to any students present at any time.
And she talked continously
to those who asked of poetry,
of writing, of creating, of the
active world of art and letters.
Her voice wasn't musical, it
was almost harsh, But it was
compelling, it was vital, it was
alive.
She gives the impression of
Complete vitality. Of strength.
Of warmth not gushing but
sincere and sure.
Her clothes were very simple.
She wore a black velvet dress
and black low heels, the same
dress  and  the  same  shoes  for!
her recital,   her   seminar   and
her reception. No make-up.
She wore a small black three-
cornered hat at her recital. Her
gray   hair    drifted    over   her
j shoulders   at   the   seminar,   It
j was coiled and piled on her head
1 in the evening.
j     She   had   two   wrist   watches
I on  her left wrist and two nar- j
row gold bracelets and  a little
i gold   ring   on   her   right   hand, i
No other jewelry, j
She's   a   witty   woman.    The j
I Frosh   election   campaigns   ex-1
ploded outside the the auditor-!
j ium at noon and the sponsoring
1 Fine   Arts   Committee   blushed.
j     Miss Moore laughted. "I have
arrived," she said   with   mock-
: dramatic  seriousness  and  went
on reading.
She's a name dropper but not
in the conventional sense. She
actually has met, made friends
of, known, talked to every leading writer and artist in America
and Europe today. She talks
well about them.
At the seminar and at the
reception it was the students she
wanted to talk to, to listen to,
encourage. She did.
What did she think of current campus writing and of
Raven? "Good, very good." Particularly Raven. "One of the best
campus publications I've seen.
Very adult and realistic."
What advice for young writers? "Courage — to go on writing." Courage for living.
Young writers came to her,
she said, and asked if they
should go on writing.
Met
aiillliil
ii!!
mmmmmt
He says he does it by Sfeady Saving
ot the Bank of Montreal*
♦The Bank where Students' accounts are warmly welcomed.
Your Campus Branch in the Administration Building
MERLE C. KJRBY, Manager
If there was any doubt, if
there was any question of stopping, then they were self-answered, she said.
A graduate of Bryn Mawr,
Miss Moore went home to look
after her mother after leaving
college.
Then she taught school, Indian children, and was a librarian. But she always kept on
writing.
At one time she wanted to
be a painter. She still does paint.
"A very little," she said.
From 1925-1929 she edited
Dial Magazine, perhaps the
leading American poetry publication.
Today she occasionally lectures and reads manuscripts for
several New York publishing
houses.
NOON HOUR CONCERTS WILL
PRESENT VARIED PROGRAMME
UBC's weekly noon-hour concerts will offer a repe-
toire of instrumental concertos this winter.
Open to the public without charge, the concerts will
be held every Wednesday at 12.30 in Buchanan 106.
They are held under the auspices of the University
music department, the Fine Arts committee and the students' special events committee.
Professor Harry Adaskin will perform on Wednesday
next for the first concert.
Among other artists performing this season will be
Erns-t Friedlander. He will play a Dvorjak cello concerto,
with piano accompaniment.
Frosh Elect
New Council
The list of nominations for
Frosh Council is now complete.
George Brazier, Don North,
and Tom Annandale have been
nominated for President. The
Vice-presidency is being fought
for by Dorothy Dowsley, Judy
Jack and John Deachman. The
nominations for Secretary are
Joan Haggerty and Carol McLeod.
Fran Charkow and Bob Atkinson have won, by acclamation, the posts of Girls' and
Boys' Athletic Representatives.
The Treasurer has also been
elected   by  acclamation.
Frosh will vote all day today
to decide who will fill the three
remaining positions.
Annual WUS Assembly
Begins Today At UBC
The 13th annual national assembly of the World University
Service starts today at the University of B.C.
Registration started at 9 a.m. in Brock Hall.
AUTOMOBILES
Call FRANK FRAZER at Collier's Ltd., MU 1-2311 or residence BA. 8089. New Chev-
rolets and used cars of all
makes.
PHARMACY
KBPORTCR
By J.& M. BURCHILL
QUESTION — Are there any
statistics showing how
much soap people buy?
ANSWER — II has been estimated that the average
American or Canadian
family consumes about
S37 worth of soap yearly
in soft water areas. In
hard water districts, annual soap bills may run
to $100.
UNIVERSITY
PHARMACY
l12 Blocks East of Pool
AL. 0339
Iturbi Was
"The Most"
By BRENDA RUNGE
A small grey man walked on
to the auditorium stage Monday
noon; exchanged the piano bench
for a chair and ran his fingers
up the keyboard.
When the applause had stopped, he asked the audience in a
soft Spanish accent, what he
should play for them.
With no waste effort, the great
Jose Iturbi began his recital.
After warming up with a Largo
and Fugue by Bach, he played
t h e popular "Fantasie Impromptu" to an enthusiastic
audience which overflowed into
the aisles and onto the stage.
Two other Chopin pieces gave
opportunity to observe the artist's flawless, almost cold technique. He is a controlled player
with an uncanny ability to
change moods, and carry his
audience with him.
The strange and modern "Funeral March" by Lazarre was
received with amazement by
some and enthusiasm by most
Jazz lovers.
The intriguing "Malaguena"
by Albeniz, and "Pantomine"
and Firedance" completed the recital. The oblique rhythms were
mechanically perfect.
The audience sat spellbound
through the one-thirty bell and
Gershwin's "Rhapsody in Blue."
This humble and happy-appearing man with the engaging '
smile came out to the university
on the request of the Special
Events Committee, because he
thought many of the students
would not be able to afford his
performance on Tuesday even- ;
ing with the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra. He hopes his
appearance will encourage- appreciation of good music. |
Those who did  not leave too !
Delegates started arriving for
the four-day conference Wednesday.
The opening plenary session
starts at 1 a.m. in Physics 201.
Group discussion this afternoon will start at 4 p.m.
Lewis Perinbam, WUSC general secretary will report on the
seminar this summer in Yugoslavia at 7.30 p.m. this evening
in Buchanan 106.
SCHEDULE FOR SATURDAY:
9.00 a.m. — Committee meeting, Buchanan Building, rooms
as required.
11.00 a.m.—Meeting of round
table discussion groups, Buchanan, rooms as required.
12.30—Luncheon Royal Vancouver Yacht Club.
2.00 p.m.—Tour of Vancouver.
6.00 p.m.—Dinner at home of
Mr. and Mrs. F. Ronald Graham.
-Meeting of round
Buchanan,  rooms
SUNDAY:
J     10.00 a.m.-
! table  groups
'< as required.
2.00 p.m.—Meetings of committees, Buchanan, rooms as re-
; quired.
i     4.00  p.m.— Plenary    session,
: Room 106, Buchanan, report of
international  WUS  committee.
7.30 p.m.—Meeting of Faculty
; delegates, Penthouse, Buchanan
Building.
MONDAY:
9.00 a.m.—Final plenary session,
2.00 p.m.—Meeting of Faculty
delegates, meeting of WUSC
chairmen, Buchanan, rooms as
required.
quickly had an opportunity to
meet one of the maeslro's closest
friends, Carraccucas.
Carracucas is a Korean Palace
Hound who goes everywhere
vvith him, and saves him the expense of staving at the better hotels. A clog is subject to much
discrimination, whoever his master may be.
CASTLE
JEWELLERS
45«0 W.
10th      -      ALma 4208
jfty^fe.
Full   lines   of   Jewellery,   Watches,
$M$W  Aj ** tjtffl^^^^^^^B
Diamonds,  Chinaware,  etc.
W^M^r
Expert Watch & Jewellery Repairs
yjj^
IO'y   Discount   to  Students Friday, October 10, 1958
THE   UBYSSEY
PAGE FIVE
■?-.£f!£gS:iJSS,,
WBsMtWZ-VWmiM
*2#*w;
."r2>'!SS£:Mf5;'s'^
'TWEEN CLASSES
(Continued from Page 1)
RAMBLERS* ATHLE T I C j
CLUB — General Meeting in j
Physics 301 at 12.30 today. El-:
ection of officers.
k      -k      k
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE —
Four films to be shown in Club
Hut at  9.00  p.m. sharp Friday j
evening, comedy film and B.C
Centennial film "Tall Country"
* *     * I
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB — j
Consul-General Daniel Lew will j
Speak on  "China in the World!
today" at  12.30 noon today  ins
luchanan 106. j
i
* *    * |
EL CIRCULO — All persons;
joing to Spanish weekend must
>e at noon hour meeting today '
in   Brock   Extension   363.
k       *k       k i
THUNDERBIRD      BOOSTER |
CLUB — Important meeting today  at  noon  in  Buchanan   104. i
Exec, to be introduced and activities to bc discussed.
k       k:       k
ARCHAEOLOGY    CLUB   —
Introductory meeting today in
Arts 102. All interested please
come.
Function on Oct. 11
EDUCATION UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY — Gay Frosh
ir   worldly   grads.   All   will   be
"Getting to Know You" at the
11 October dance at the Arlington   Hall,   1236   W.   Broadway
Fun  starts at  nine  with  "live"
music.
Functions on Oct. 12
LUTHERAN STUDENT
ASSOCIATION — Thanksgiving
Retreat this weekend. Leave
Vancouver Sunday and arrive
back Monday. Armin Mohr of
Edmonton is in charge. Call
in at office 361 Brock Extn. or
phone  Jack  at   Elgin  6115.
Functions, Tues. Next
UNIVERSITY TENNIS CLUB
— Meeting at 12.30 noon in
Buchanan 327 on Tuesday 14th
October,
*     *     *
INDIA STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION — General Meeting of
the club on Tuesday 14th at
8   p.m.   in   354   Brock  Extn.
ROOM & BOARD
Available for one student,
male or female. $65.00. Telephone CH  9462  after 6  p.m.
JAZZ SOC — Dr. Marquis;
will speak on Tuesday 14th on
a modern approach to the understanding of Jazz. Short General Meeting of the society at
12.30.
PRE-MED SOCIETY ~ Film,
on  Cancer  Wednesday October
15 at 12.30 in Bu. 100. 25c non-;
members.
* *     * i
I
S.C.M.   —   Christianity   and
Humanism will be theme of Fall i
Camp   at   Ocean   Park   United |
Church Oct. 17-19. Speakers Dr. j
Ellen F. Flesserman and Dr. R.
C.  Cragg.
* *      *
GERMAN CLUB — The first
meeting of the German Club
will be held today, noon in BU.
214.  All out please.
WITH HANDS ON THEIR HEARTS and tears in their eyes
— the hierarchy of the Ivory Tower took up the challenge
flung down by Canada's great leader and "rallied to the flag."
Council tried to sweep away general meetings, being in favor
of representative government.
Motz ond Wozny
548 Howe St.
MU.:J-4715
Custom   Tailored   Suits
for   Ladies   and   Gentlemen
Gowns and Hoods
Uniforms
Double breasted suits
modernized in the new
single    breasted    styles,
Special   Student   Rates
MODERN
JAZZ
QUARTET
GEORGIA
AUDITORIUM
Fri., October 10
at 8.30 p.m.
Tickets:    Modern Music
$1.75,   $2.25,   $2.50   and
$3.00 inc. Tax.
fi&P'-i"*""'+"""
•MnWMta•*»•*•_••»
Safe Deposit
ExportA
FILTER TIP
CIGARETTES
John always did take things too
seriously . . , like that habit of locking
his Coke up in a safe! Sure everybody
likes Coca-Cola . , , sure there's
nothing more welcome than the good
taste of Coca-Cola. But really—
a safe just for Coke! Incidentally—
know the combination, anyone?
ORhVK
(mM
SIGN OF GOOD TASTE
SAY 'COKE' Oft 'COCA-COiA'-BOTH TRADE-MARKS MEAN THE PRODUCT
OF  COCA-COU  LT0.-TH6  WORLD'S  MST-IOVE0  SPARKUNG  DRINK, PAGE SIX
THE   UBYSSEY
Friday, October 10, 1958,
SPORTS EDITOR,    BOB BUSH
Sports: Elaine Spurrill, Irene Frazer, Flora MacLeod, Audrey
Ede, Mike Sone, Alan Dafoe.
INTRAMURAL   SWIM    RESULTS
RESULTS OF THE 55-YARD BREASTSTROKE
HEAT
I.
II.
III.
IV.
V.
VI.
VII.
Watchorn    (Zeta Psi) .
Edwards   (Carribeans)
Templeton   (USCA) __
Friedrick    (D.U.)	
McGrath (Alpha Delt)
Peter Miller (Beta) ..
Field   (P.E.)	
TIME
42.7
43.8
44.4
46.4
47.9
48.6
49.2
MAA Meet
Supports
The regular meeting of the
Men's Athletic Association was
held Wednesday at neon.     (
MAAs President brought forth
the problems of the athletes using the stadium and how they
were not at all pleased with
the services offered. MAA went
on record as in support of trying to have the services restored.
Honorable Eric Martin
Here For Season Opener
Dean Andrew will bully off
against the Hon. Eric Martin on
Saturday, October 11, at the new
Chris Spencer Field to officially
open the UBC grass hockey reason.    Game time is 2 p.m.
BEHIND BROCK
The playing area is located behind the Brock Hall and has been
used for many grass hockey and
cricket matches.
Following the opening ceremonies a Varsity team of past
and present members will meet
a league all-star squad.
FORMER PLAYER
Mr. Martin, a former grass
hockey player, is honourary vice-
president of the B.C. Grass Hockey Association.
The Saturday contest is a traditional game which begins the
grass hockey season for the Varsity team.
FOR RENT
Pleasant, private room in a
modern home available immediately. Kitchen privileges. Female student preferred. $35.00 per month. Phone
ALma 1299-Y.
BERNO PELL AT
CO-CAPTAINS
Members of the UBC Thunderbird Swim Team have elected Peter Pellat and Ernie Berno
for their co-captains of the 1958-
59 season.
Berno, a first class Pre-med
student, joined the team last
year and since has shone as an
outstanding sprinter.
Co-captain Pellat is a Commerce student and the main
stay  in  UBC's  diving division.
Both members along with the
entire team are now training
for the forth coming swim meets.
Last year, UBC made a clean
sweep of Evergreen team and
took top honors in the Evergreen Conference Meet.
Len Cox was introduced as
the new Public Relations Offi
cer for UBC athletics. Cox out
lined his group's programme for
the coming year.
Eligibility forms were explained by Bus Phillips. These
forms are very vital to the team
coaches and should be filled out
as soon as possible and turned
into  team managers.
Jayvees Playing Here
Saturday Against W.W.
The winless UBC JayVees
football squad will be trying
for their first win of the season when they meet the Junior
Varsity squad from Western
Washington.
Their chances of breaking into
the win column may be seriously affected due to the fact that
first string quarterback George
Home may not see any action
because of a broken nose.
Home's replacement would most
likely be Gordie Perkins, former
pilot of CYO in the junior Big
Four,
In practice Thursday night,
the JV backfield looked impressive as they ran through and
over the big Thunderbird line.
The general concensus though
is that they lack the bench
strength but should c o m e
through with a good display as
long as the first stringers hold
out.
Game time Saturday is 1:30
in UBC Stadium.
see the
great new
fi)t*5&af~
GORDON
BROS.
10th and Alma
PROF. P. M. S. BLACKETT
Nobel Prize Winner in Physics for 1948,
Speaks on;
"Atomic Weapons and East-West
•usxnt.
Relations '
today, 12.30, in Auditorium,
ANTHONY NUTTING
Former Member ol: the British Cabinet, who
resigned over Suez Canal crisis, speaks on
"Muddle In the Middle East"
12.30, Friday, October 17 in Auditorium.
SPORTS 'N VIEWS
By   BOB   BUSH
The services of a valuable man are going to waste. Sid Howe
is no longer acting one of the gang.
Ten years ago Sid started as a janitor around the Stadium.
In his spare time he helped the fellows who changed by providing
towel service, looking after lockers and in general, helped the boys
in any way possible.
His services were invaluable lo lhe members of the rugger,
soccer, rowing, track, and cross-country teams. He also helped
Mr. Bus Phillips in many matters.
Some years ago, the fellows on the Rugby team were willing
to pay out of their own pockets so lhat Sid could accompany the
team to California.
Sid has been an understudy of the great UBC trainer, John
Owens.
Now Sid has been relieved of his part in the Stadium. John
has been ill. Now the athletes using the Stadium are very poorly
serviced for athletic endeavors.
Towel service is very inefficient. Lockers now have to be
rented. Facilities, such as whirlpool baths, are not always available. Trainer aid is limited. Athletes of teams of university level
do not enjoy conveniences that should be offered them.
Something must be done soon to help regain the efficient
manner that once was in the Stadium, especially now, when John
Owens is ill.
Sid Howe is ihe man.
Some thought by the School of Physical Education and Buildings and Grounds should be given to this matter.
UBC Thunderbird footballers are somewhat out of practice
when it comes to making good a convert. Saturday, the Birds made
™ood on only one convert, while trying for four. The reason being
lhat UBC has seldom enjoyed the position of a try for extra points.
As of now, the Birds are two touchdowns short of the total number
attained in all of last year's games.
Athletes who think that the Swimming Coach, Peter Lusztig,
is an old fellow, might take a look at the record board in the Gym.
Amongst the names of Bagshaw, Tribe, Berno, for 1958, one will
find the name of Lusztig beside the 1950-51 records for relay
races. Yes, it is the same Peter Lusztig who was Men's Athletic
Association President in 1953, and is at present the young, active,
coach of the Evergreen Champion Swim Team, UBC.
The Thunderbird Booster Club deserves a pat on the back for
Ihe efforts of their club. The club's president, John Goodwin,
is a hard worker and will need the ready help of varh/js groups
on campus to assure the complete success of thc T.B.C.
Congratulations to the newly elected Co-captains Ernie Berno
and Peter Pellat of the UBC Thunderbird Swim Team. Both are
able swimmers with a lot of latent talent.
Is there an age when one should stop trying at strenuous,
sports? If there is, ask Dr. Howell. He tried rugger last weekend]
and still is having trouble hiding the limp he has. Seems that he ;
fell into something he couldn't get out of.
TOUCH    FOOTBALL   SCHEDULE
Beta 1 vs. Eng. 3,   Field 1 	
Ramblers vs. USCA, Field 2	
Phi Kappa Sigma vs. V.C.F.,   Field 3 _.
Kappa Sigma vs. Eng. 2,   Field 1 	
Ramblers 4 vs Alpha Delta Phi., Fid 2.
Delta Upsilon vs. Commerce,   Field 3 -
Union College vs Eng. 1, Field 1 	
Demolay vs. Hillel,    Field 2 	
Fort Camp 2 vs Eng. 4,   Field 3 	
Aggies 1 vs. Eng. 5,    Field 1 	
Fort Camp 1 vs. Alpha Delt,   Field 2 ...
Ex-Burnaby vs. Acadia 2,   Field 3 	
Newman 1 vs. Eng. 6,    Field 1 __	
Aggies 2 vs. Zeta Psi,    Field 2 _.	
A.T.O. vs. Psi U,,    Field 3 - -	
Oct
10
12
30
Oct.
10,
12
30
Oct
10
12
30
Oct.
22,
12
30
.Oct
22
12
30
Get
22
12
30
Oct
14,
12
30
Oct.
14,
12
30
Oct.
14,
12
30
Oct.
15,
1.2.
30
Oct.
15,
12.
30
Oct.
15,
12.
'■',()
Oct.
17,
1.2,
30
Oct.
17,
12.
:.i!)
Oct.
17,
12.
30
VOLLEYBALL   SCHEDULE
"A" LEAGUE TEAMS
Forestry vs. Phi Delt, Court 1, October 1-1, at
P. E. 2 vs. USCA, Court 2, October 1.4, Oct, 14,
Sigma Chi vs. Eng. 2,  Court 3, Oct, 14,
Fiji 1 vs. Newman 2,    Court 4, Oct. 14,
Alpha Delt 1 vs, Aggies    Court 5, Oct, 5,
Beta 1 vs. A.T.O  Court 6, Oct. 14,
Phi Delt 2 vs. P.E. 1  Court 1, Oct, 15,
Commerce 1 vs. Acadia 1   Court 2, Oct. 1.5,
Newman 1 vs. Dekes   Court 3, Oct. 15,
Forestry vs. D.U. 1   Court 4, Oct. 15,
Ed. 1 vs. Ex-Byng   Court 5, Oct. 15,
Eng. 1 vs. Z.B.T.   Court 6, Oct. 15,
12.
12.
12.
12
1 2.
30
30
30
30
30
1.2.30
12.30
12.30
12.30
12 30
12.30
12.30
_« Friday, October 10, 1958
TH*.   UBYSSEY
PAGE SEVEN
ACTION AND PLENTY OF IT will result this weekend when the UBC Thunderbirds
meet up with the College of Puget Sound in Tacoma. The Birds and C.P.S. have met
twelve times previous without a win for the UBC squad. UBC is still looking for win
number one in 1958 play. — Photo by Mike Sone
UBC Looking For First Win
When They Meet Puget Sound
It will be try number thirteen
for the UBC Thunderbirds and
they hope to win their first
game  of   the   current  season.
Saturday, thc Birds meet the
College of Puget Sound in Tacoma. This will be the thirteenth
time the two schools have met.
UBC has lost in every encounter.
But things should be different
this time for the blue and gold.
Mainly, the Puget Sound
team, second place finishers last
year in the Evergreen, have had
troubles   of    their    own.    Two
vv^eks ago, they lost to Seattle
Ramblers, 27-7. Last week they
lost out to Central Washington.
The big difference being in
this year's game is the new attitude of the Thunderbirds. The
Birds are out to win and are
showing it, They are determined. They hunger for victory
especially after losing by two
points to the strong Seattle club
last weekend.
The Birds have their hopes
'iigh  for a first win. The team
P
I
z
z
A
at the SNACKERY Granville at 15th
is in good shape and are in
fine spirits. No injuries plague
the Birds at present and their
reserve strength is becoming
better as the season has progressed.
Statistics released today by
Jack Bush show that the principle complete total ground
gainer for the Birds is Don
Vassos.
Vassos has gathered 246 yard;
while teammate and team cap
tain Jack Henwood has picked
up 150 yards.
START YOUR YEAR RIGHT
COME TO CHURCH
on the Campus
The Chapel of St. Andrew's Hall
(Beside the Law Building)
A FRIENDLY PLACE TO WORSHIP
Sunday Moraines,   11,00 a.m.
Chaplain. Rev, John A. Ross, M.A.. B.D., PhD.,
CAMBIE
Broadway at Ash
EM. 9515
Doors 6.30
Two Shows: 7 and 9
Painless absorbtion  of
learning until Oct. 11.
The  Sir  Alexander  Korda
production of
The Private  Life of
Henry VIII
Starring
CHARLIE LAUGHTON
(no slouch he!) in the lead.
Heads  of egg, hairs  of  long,
players club, English students
are alerted.
No Engineers
need apply
Disney's Melody
Time
FOR   ADDED,, ENJOYMENT
OFFICIALS NEEDED
Officials are still needed for
hight school football games.
Students who are interested,
please contact Bob Hindmarch
in the Gymnasium.
WOMEN'S
SPORTS
NOTICES
Finals for Women's Intramural Swim Meet will be held at
the Empire Pool on Thursday,
October 16.
GRASS HOCKEY — No league games are scheduled for
this weekend. Practice will be
held on Tuesday, October 14, at
3.30 on the Women's Field.
BADMINTON — There will
be a practice held on Tuesday
evening, 6.00 till 8.00 p.m.
October 14, in the Women's
Gym. It is important that all
girls seriously interested be present.
W.A.D. NOTICE
The position of Chairman of
the Girl's High School Basketball Tournament is still open.
Experience is not really necessary; enthusiasm and interest
are essential! Have your applications ready for W.A.D. President Theo Carroll by October
14.
NOTICES
Varsity soccer team will play
Alpen Club in a Second Division
contest on Sunday, October 12
at Knight park, Time of the
game  is  2  o'clock.
In a Third Division fixture,
the UBC soccer eleven takes on
Bob Lee at UBC on Sunday,
October  12,  as  2  o'clock.
SPORTS TO BE
REPRESENTED
The following are Men's Athletic Committee members and
the sport they are to act as
liason for:
L. Brown — football, swimming; H. Franklin — basketball, golf; G. Pickard — rugby,
cricket, badminton; R. Osborne
— track and field, cross country, baseball, fencing; Dean
Matthews — curling; C. Connaghan — grass hockey, ice
hockey; J. Helliwell — tennis,
rowing, sailing; D. Shore —■
gymnastics, water polo, weight-
lifting; B. Verchere — soccer,
volleyball, skiing.
THE   RAINY  SEASON   HAS  STARTED
SO   COME  OYER  AND
GET  YOUR
UMBRELLA
WOMEN'S   -   MEN'S
Standard and Push Button
•
DONT   FORGET   TO   GET   YOUR
A.M.S. and LIBRARY CARDS
PLATISICIZED
LOST    AND    FOUND    DEPT.
Location: Brock Extension
Hours:    1 1.30 - 2.30
•
Owned and Operated by the A.M.S. PAGE EIGHT
THE   UBYSSEY
Fridav, October 10, 1958
INCO METALS AT  WORK IN CANADA
You'll travel faster...more comfortably
aboard new ffiautteoAtSfew trains
^^i     CONTAINING INCO NICKEL    ^
New self-propelled railway cars are made in
Canada of stainless steel containing Inco Nickel.
They're completely air-conditioned .., smooth-
running . .. strong, lightweight, fast.
Each car has its own engines and controls. It
can operate as a one-car unit or as part of a train
of cars. Result: better service... because railroads can schedule lower cost single-car trips to
accommodate passengers during off hours.
The new cars are as efficient and economical
as they are comfortable and convenient. And
nickel-containing stainless steel helps make them
so. They travel faster with greater safety—cost
less to operate. Stainless steel doesn't need
painting; it tends to wash itself clean in every
rainfall. Maintenance costs are negligible.
Nickel helps give stainless steel its exceptional
strength and its resistance to rust and corrosion
, . . makes it easier to fabricate. Another way
that Inco Nickel serves the Canadian industries
that serve you.
Inco has recently published a colourfully illustrated
32-page booklet about Canada's nickel industry,
entitled "The Exciting Story of Nicker. It is
written primarily for Canadian youth by Alan King,
but adults will also find it full of interesting
information. Just write to Inco for a free copy of
this booklet. ^
.A
INCO THE INTERNATIONAL  NICKEL COMPANY OF CANADA, LIMITED
(,,,  , ...^       * SS YONGE STREET, TORONTO
PRODUCER OF   INCO NICKEL, NICKEL ALLOYS; ORC BRAND COPPER, TELLURIUM, SELENIUM, SULPHUR, PLATINUM, PALLADIUM AND OTHER PRECIOUS METALS; COBALT AND IRON ORE

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