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The Ubyssey Oct 14, 1960

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 THE UBYSSEY
NOON
TODAY
Vol.  XLIII.
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1960
Students
Buste
Gala_Pep\
Me
Boys
< *
*■*:-.*■£   "
Buster's going down - for the third time?
-Photo  by   Gyrta  Kiss
"'•'*•»-'-iff-
ena
resses;
For Free!
First pep meet ol the year
wiill be held today at noon in
Brock Hall.
Sponsored by the Booster
Club, the meet wiill feature folksinger Prof. Al Cox, Thunderbird football coach Frank Gnup
and the players, cheerleaders, a
band, majorettes and plenty of
yelling, all for free.
The meet is intended to stir
ug> support for the UB;C Thunderbird game against the University of Alberta at War Memorial
stadium Saturday.
Cheer sheets, and ."Boost the
Birds" tags will be given to all
students attending the meet.
Last year the meets were held
on the day before "eich^Important sports event and always
were sold out.
Develops Resources
By SHARON McKINNON
Nigeria can play an important part not only in Africa, but
in the rest of the world as well, a Nigerian speaker said Thursday
Gabriel Dusenya, who arrived
from Nigeria two weeks ago,
spoke as part of the program
"Nigeria looks ahead," sponsored by the Commonwealth
Club.
"Before you look ahead, you
must look back," he said.
After giving a brief outline of
Agriculture
Deans Meet
Eight deans from all Canadian
agriculture faculties will spend
from Monday till Wednesday
here to observe our faculty in
action.
This is the first time the deans
have ever gathered in the west
for this purpose. The honors of
this occasion are being shared
with the U of A.
UBC Dean of Agriculture Dr.
Eagles, said: "We will endeavor
to meet the students and speak
to them about their work and
attend lecture and lab session
to observe the faculty in action."
Those attending include: Dean
Eagles, UBC; Dean Bently, U of
A; Dean Graham, U of , Sask.;
Dean Weir, U of M; Dr. Mac-
Lachlan, president of OAC; Dr.
Dion, principal of Macdonald
College; Msgr. Diament, director of Laval University, and Mr.
Cox, principal of NS Agricultural College.
Mr. J. E. McCanrael, executive
secretary of Agrioulftural Institute of Canada, will speak in Ag.
« 100 at 12:30 Monday.
Nigerian   history   he   discussed
Nigeria today.
He stressed that Nigeria has
the resources, men, vision and
desire necessary to become a
great and proud nation.
"We also have a desire to play
an   important  part   in   working
out 'peaceful co-existence between East and West."
NIGERIAN STUDENT
Sam Akintobi, a graduate student in genetics at UBC, who is
also from Nigeria, was the sec-
and speaker.
He commented on present day
politics in Nigeria.
"Western nations have had
over two hundred years to prove
that they are sincere in their
efforts to help Arica. Relations
today between Africa and tbe
V/est are based on whether or
not this has been accomplished."
Regarding Nigeria's attitude
towards Westerners in their
country he said, "We have to
Shoulder our own responsibilities, but we wish to co-operate
with others Who have helped us
in the past and who wish to help
us in the future."
He expressed hope for a united
Africa. He feels all the African
nations would benefit.
CONFLICT INEVITABLE
Concerning South Africa he
said, "If she doesn't change her
policy towards the rest of Africa
somehow conflict is inevitable.
He also stated that although
Nigeria is behind technically
now she is rapidly developing
her resource* and some day be
able to- feed the world.
MINES MINISTER W. K. Kier-
nan will speak today in Bu
104 at 12:30 on "Sensible Re-
sources Development and
B.C.'s Future Economic Expansion."
By DENIS STANLEY
An  audience  vote overwhelmingly approved   the  motion,
esolved: That .Buster's Towing Service has no place on this
campus" noon yesterday in Bu. 104.
"There is no discrimination by
Busters," said Bryan Dulley,
Arts 2. "They tow off Austins
or Cadillacs. These men enjoy
their work. Who wouldn't? They
are not desirable,"
Dulley and John Coulthard,
Engineering 1, argued, for the
affirmative, that Busters are
neither necessary or desirable.
"They are not necessary.
There is ample parking space.
What purpose do they have to
tow cars away? Students cannot afford to have their cars
towed away simply to line the
pockets of Busters," said Dulley.
Arguing that Busters is necessary until some alternative can
be provided were Bob Hendrick-
son, Arts 2, and Ken Hodkinson, Arts 3.
"The growth of the University
has brought this problem to
mind. If there was no control,
there would be confusion and
chaos," said Hendrickson.
"The administration had two
alternatives. They could either
chain the cars to the Spot or
tow them away. They chose the
second and decided to farm the
work out.  '■
It would cost the Administration $12 to do what Busters does
for $7.50. They were chosen by
sealed tenders," he added.
THE  AFFIRMATIVE
John Coulthard, for the affirmative, backed up Dulley and
added, "There is no problem of
cars parked in the wrong spots
which might cause a lot of
trouble. They are simply in the
wrong lots.
"The presence of Buster's is
degrading to a University.
Visitors are afraid to park because they have heard of them.
We're just lining Busters' pockets."
Ken Hodkinson, the final
speaker, based his argument on
history. He said, "When men
first formed societies they found
it necessary to have laws. People naturally broke them so a
police force was needed." i
"J. S. Mills said 'the greatest
good for the greatest number'.
One student parked illegally in
front of the Fire Hall could
cause a lot of harm to a lot of
people; this is not fair," he said.
"Buster's are a very necessary
thing. It is the easiest thing in
the world to get rid of them.
All the students have to do is
park legally," Hodkinson stated.
The floor was opened for discussion and many irate students
expressed their views.
John Fulford, Ed. 2 and a
member of the new committee
set up to look into this situation, said, "The other day a
visitor was towed away from
a vistor's parking lot because
the Commissionaire thought he
looked like a student.
WESTBROOK CARS
"Twice, cars have been towed
away from Westbrook hospital
while the drivers were picking
up patients. I think they should
be thrown alt,-the campus. I
want them out."
Bill Piket Arts 3 came up
with many radical but amusing
suggestions.
He said, "There is a certain
priority in concern with the
parking lots. Some people can
park in nice lots while others
have to walk from the barns.
While upholding this artificial
class structure the administration is taking all incentive from
the students to make their 8:30's.
EARLY START
"The student knows he will
have to park by the barn so he
doesn't try to get here early.
• "Parking should start from
the middle of the lot and gradually work out to the edges,'
Piket stated.
"That way students would
race to see who gets the best
place," he concluded.
In the vote which followed
the rebuttals the affirmative
carried a large majority.
Peter Hebb, Debating Union
I President, chaired the meeting.
Homecoming '60
Milts Brothers Star In Rally
The Mills Brothers will star
at a pep rally, ; October 27 to
kick off this year's Homecoming celebrations.
This is the result of weeks of
negotiation between the Homecoming Committee and Ken
Stauffer of the C a v e , who is
bringing the singers to Vancouver to entertain at the supper
club, Homecaminig chairman
Alan Cornwall announced yesterday.
10-PIECE BAND
The well-known singing trio
wall be accompanied toy a supporting revue along with Dave
Robbins and his IQHpiece orches
tra. All the performers have
agreed to appear gratis since this
Pep Rally will toe a charity
show.
AH proceeds from tbe rally
will go to the RedFeather
United Appeal.
Said Appeal Chairman J. Gordon Gibson: "This should be a
great show for all students and
a chance for you to (participate
in the Red Feather United Appeal. The Community Chest
needs your contribution."
PAPER DOLL HIT
The Mills Brothers made their
name in show business by recording such hit songs as Paper,
Doll, which has sold over two
million copies. Some .observers
consider them to be one of the
greatest singing groups ever.
They will be appearing at
UBC through the courtesy of the
Cave Theatre Restaurant.
RALLY AT GYM
The Pep Rally will be held
on Thursday, October 27 at 12:30
in the War Memorial Gymnasium.
The gym was chosen (because
it affords good seats for over
3,000 students.
Since this is a charity show,
minimum admission will be 25c. 'Page 2
T*rt E      ICBYSSEY
Friday, October 14, 1960
&MMM*    %JMM M AASLX
Authorized as second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Published three times weekly throughout the University year
In Vancouver by the Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society,
University of B.C. Editorial opinions' expressed ^re "tTlose of the
Editorial Board of the Ubysey and not necessarily those of the Alma
Mater   Society  or   the  University   of   B.C.
TELEPHONES: CA 4-3242, locals 12 (news desk), 13 (critics-
sports),  14 (Editor-inChief).  15, 6 (business offices).
Editor-in-Chief: Fred Fletcher
Managing 'Editor Roger McAfee
Features Editor Ed Lavalle
CUP Editor Diane Greenall
Photography Editor Ray Grigg
Senior Editor Ann Pickard
„ Sports Editor    ....*...    Mike Hunter
Layout:.Ann Pickard
!        NEWS STAFF: Krishnay Sahay, Joe Bolduc, Barbara Mcintosh, Dave Taylor,  Dick  Arkley,   Sharon   McKinnon,
Denis Stanley, Fred Jones, Dorothy Raisbeck, Donna McAllister, George Railton, Brad Crawford, Ed Nicholson,
Payt Brownlow, Ruth Robertson, John Bonenfant.
SPORTS: Dieter Urban, Bert MacKinnon, Chris Fahrni.
Guest Editorial
Frat Man Replies
j In your editorial columns yesterday you hasten to assure
V your readers that the policy of the "Filthy Rag" qua fraternities has not wavered one iota from the norm, and
i that pubster's eyes are as jaundiced as ever, and one or two
,    other little things just in passing.
i Allow me, in my turn to assure you that these other
I objectives aside, you did succeed in proving that Ubyssey
[ editorial policy is ais trashy and near-sighted in this regard
1    as it has always been.
I Leaving .aside the question of your editorial "manners" in
j inviting a contribution to the paper simply to provide
< fodder for a back-biting commentary, who the hell are you
! to call the fraternities to the bar of public opinion to justify
f   their existence? ^
%Fust for your information, sir, ahd, incidentally for all
'■  ^ttrpOSefe fc* which you could possibly be interested, fra-
i    ternities "are completely  private 'unincorporated   associa-
]    tiohs/They may exist under the laws of this province'for
J    any purpose whatsoever other than an Illegal One, and their
1   light to so -exist is protected by the law despite what ydu
I    and your fellow sneefers might like to do about it.
i       Unfler the"'3arhe*laws, each fraternity is cofhple'tely free
j   "to" set any restrictions upon membership that it Wishes, and
j    to sponsor  any  lawful activity that   its  members  desire.
\ • There need be no further justification for fraternity exist-
i  • ence- of activity other than the fact that a group of Gana-
T*"diah- citizens desire to bring them about.
[      • Having invited the fraternities to plug up the embarrassing hole in your-proposed page five for yesterday's paper,
f   and having seen that they wfOte «hcme~stry what fraternity
[■  life-meant to them, you then proceed to look dc?wh your
nbse^at^-their values. ¥ou--say that if frat rffeh propose to
•'"■ have fun titey'shouM-vraiy so-. They did say so, and clearly.
; '^ey also said what'*lse:*tftey enjoy about belonging to a
' fratefnTty; ahd whether you happen toagree with those
reasons or not, it seems to rhe that it would be a matter
:'- ^of -common decency that you don't call them into-question
in the niaritter which you - chose.
"Of course men join fratermttes "Befehfee 'theyvw^nt to
■have soine fun- Do you want to imply that yoti joined'the
Ubyssey "Staff solely out of the altruistic desire to "serve
■ hufnattity Mth'fhe publication   of   a circularized notice-
board and adveftisihg "vehicle?
Why does any student join any club or campus organization from. Critic's Circle to Unidentified Flying Objects except 4p meet people ofMike interest . . . and to have fun.
' <J.t ^~Aimc^''the task of the frlterriities to prove !that
g^i^r)#hoisefpiiniaVyrlhnction is the social one belong on
eaSipus" (as you demand) that it is the task of any campus
OBgaaizatfon to prove it.
I fervently w*sh tfeat the Ubyssey would grow up and
stop its Snivelling, !bacK-biting attacks on fraternities once
and for all. At least stop trying to demand that they
"justify" their existence.
This sort of demand might have embarrassing repercussions if it were ever turned against your own beloved
Ubyssey.
Brad Crawford
Law IH
*       *       *
Editor's note: ^. Crawford is wrong in saying that we
simply usedthe fraternity article wJdch appeared on page
five of T^uirsday'st^yssey to fill spacerWe cut Other ctfpy
to make room for it and the pictures accompanying it.
letters To
the Editor
Jabber Wacky?
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Attention: Mr. Derek Allen:
It was apparent in your column, "Jabberwacky" of October 6, 1960, that you did not
understand the purpose of
Physical Education classes for
Freshmen university students.
You claimed that these classes
require and evoke military conformity in uniform and in exercise. Do not all the students
enrolled in a particular English
course use the same text books
even though the results may
differ?
You will agree, no doubt,
that "individualism, self-reliance, courage and forthright-
ness" are products of the mind
not qualities of the body. It is,
therefore, the purpose of Physical Education to engage the
young body in healthful, stimulating exercise, to clear away
the cobwebs, as a preparation
for the mind to pursue "individualism, sellf-reliance, courage
and forthrightness".
The human body does not
outgrow the need for physical
exercise at the high school
level, or at any level, a fact
acknowledged by many persons
after they have lost the faculties lor physical exercise.
The student who considers
his Physical Education classes
invigorating and stimulating,
who strives for participation
father than proficiency, is more
likely to achieve individualism
and a wholesome personality
than the student who considers
these classe as merely "compulsory".
Virginia Johnson
■' SdhOOV of "PifyysioifteFapy and
* ©cWapattonal Therapy,
^University of Manitoba.
*■   '
DeaflTSir,
r ani 'feeling lottery—would
like   to • KWow  if   there  is   a
'ISC'groupfbhHhe'compus?
!- Affectionately,
Kyle JMitchell.
'•*■*■*
©ea*"Sir,    <,
a'HaVe,1«e%rt "wondering where
WSC'^was at ^labs^DayV Can
you help?
" ^Romantically,
Edljewalle.
* s.   * *
Deaf Sir,     \
I recently; met a group of
students who said they were
'ISC' at UBC. I think they are
lying. There is no 'ISC' at UBC.
Passionately,
Stu Robson.
* *       *
Deaf Sir,
Yes, there is "ISC' at UBC.
However I am w6n<ferin% if it
competes with MAA? -
Amourously,
Don Robertson.
* *       *
Dear Sir,
I am positive there is 'ISC'.
I wonder if it competes with
the students council?
Intimately,
Eric Ricker.
* *       *
Dear Sir,
To all those who are in the '
dark — yes, there is 'ISC' at
UBC. It competes with MAA,
Student  Council,   Creeping
Socialism, ad infinitum.
Adoringly,
Pete Sheperd.
By DEREK ALLEN
Startling early morning sight of the week for this laddie
was that of a dignified looking gent peddling his bike across
the University golf course.
At first I thought this could only be a faculty member
demonstrating his underpaid status in a most obvious manner. He looked like a faculty member should look, perhaps
better dressed than most can afford to be but still with an
academic appearance. I'could be wrong—I only got a glimpse
of him.
As I began to wake up I realized that, faculty member
or otherwise, this fellow was an example of something other
than poverty. In our affluent society it is not only the carefree freshman who owns an automobile; many upperclassmen
—finances depleted by years of university, perhaps even by
a wife and children—find it possible to have their own cars.
When The Ubyssey can announce, "Parking Problem No
Problem" (fooling, I might add, nobody) the contention is
not that there are too few ears, but that there has been a
mamouth expansion of parking lot facilities.
The fact that these facilities are "way out",  in  a non-
beat sense, does not add to the parking problem, but simplifies it. Parking is easy. The problem now is to get to class.
* * *
UBC's system of peripheral parking lots (yes, that's what
happened to the Aggie cow pastures) is designed to promote
what the Faculty Council—or its instrument, the Parking
Committee—would like to call a "pedestrian campus". The
term is a misnomer: What they are really aiming for is a pedestrian student.
That the student body, in its first two years on campus,
is at present forced to endure the rigors of activities in the
Physical Education School is something that I have already
commented on in this space. Now that Faculty Council has
undermined the basic motive for this tyranny—exercise for
the good of undergraduate body and soul—it would seem
logical that the compulsory P.E. program be dropped. I
contend that a fifteen minute stroll in the chill dawn—enhanced, perhaps, by rain, sleet, snow or hail—is worth at
least half of what remains of a P.E. hour once the victim
has donned his strip.
The weary return through gathering dusk at 5:30 is
ample compensation for a second half period in the gym,
shortened as that period is by the time consumed by showering and getting dressed again. These comments would not
apply to some courses, of course: dancing, bowling and the
like.
* * *
But to get back to parking, it would appear that in spite
of the best Mt. Hughes and his compatriots can do, certain
people are able to get around the rules set up to regulate
use of present facilities.
At least one student has printed himself a faculty sticker
and avoided a long, wet walk to his classes. He was caught,
but how many of his friends are still on the loose?
Then there are the bicycle peddlers. I spotted 11 two-
wheelers parked oh the Buchanan courtyard the other day,
and no doubt they are to be found forming extra parking
lots near other buildings as well.
Motor scooters are another convenient form of transportation for anyone interested in getting close to classes. As
many as seven have been out beside Buchanan Extension at
one time.
Those brave persons who can ride in the open through
Vancouver's early morning rain to their classes certainly
" deserve some 'special privilege when it comes' to parking, and
I begrudge them their status not a bit. However one can't
help being a little jealous when—on a sunny, not too chilly
day, after one has just completed a hike from the rear of
C-lot to the Buchanan—a rosy-cheeked peddler dismountes
cheerily from his bike and leans it against the wall three feet
to the left of the door. The morning air has by then cleared
enough cobwebs from my head so that I can observe an almost
insulting air of invigoration and good health.
* * *
To think that this fine specimen must, if he is unfortunate
enough to be in his first or second year, be coerced into spending two hours a week under the tutelage of the School of
Physical Education is no less then tragic.
Perhaps if we all bought bikes and turned this into a
cycling campus we would not only solve the parking problem,
but also get rid of an obnoxious P.E. problem. How about it
chaps? You fellows from Victoria could set us all a fine
example.
What we need is a prominent student leader to take up
the torch, to lead a united student body into battle with all
the strength, courage, and determination of a St. George
attacking the dragon.
What we need is someone who has already proved that
he has the support of the student body, that he has the
students council behind him, an native son that can inspire
the men from Victoria to really get in there and fight.
Let's see now ... isn't Dave Edgar from Victoria?
* * *
JABBERITEMS: Congratulations to Frosh candidates for
sparkling up their election campaign. It is nice to see that
at least one candidate accepts the idea of her campaign image
being a stuffed dummy.
A  group of eager campaigners  ran  around Wednesday
night hanging effigies  of a  presidential candidate—and  by
the neck no less—from Brock totem pole, a lamp standard
and the Buchanan building. Was it their candidate they were    ,
hanging? Friday,  October   14,   1960
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  3
Where Fees Go
The statement appearing on
this page is a combination of
the actual income and expenditure for 1958-59 as certified by
the auditors, and the  proposed
statement of A.M.S. inconr* $nd <iwrtra^j^Jgvel of operation. The
expenditures
year.
for   the
"**
Women Get
New Houses
A new $850,000 housing development for women will be
undertaken this winter, the administration announced Thursday.
It is hoped two units will be
started in time to help the winter works programm and be finished by September, said Dean
A. C. Andrews, deputy to the
president.
The money used to pay for the
residences will come from accrued revenue. The university
was authorized to do this by an
order-in-council from the provincial cabinet.
NEW FINANCE METHOD
This is the f i r s t t i m e this
method of financing has been
tried for residences.
The accrued income will come
from student rents and rentals
during the sumimer.
The two new four-storey units
will house about 180 women.
They wil be built in the general area of the new men's residences on Marine Drive.
Pick the Mardi Gras
Theme for Two Tickets
Theme Suggestions for this
year's Mardi Gras are called for
by the committee in charge of
producing the twenty-first version of the event.
A box has been placed across
the hall from the AMS Offices
in Brock to receive suggestions.
Current Registration
Sets All Time Re
Registration at UBC if U|X
1,055 from lasl year.
Final figures releas*0 by
the Accounting Office ihow
11.697 students registered this
year as compared with 10.1642
in 1959-60.
The allocations are not based
so much on the size of the organization or importance of the
activity, as on the financial assistance  required   to   provide  a
number'Of students to be affected by a gi ~nt has also been
a consideration in weighing the
applications, and activities with
a wide appeal i.re generally
given priority over those involving the participation of a
limited number of students. Organizations which fall into the
latter classification and which
have special earning power are
asked to make reasonable use
of it, and are encouraged to be
self-supporting, where this is
possible.
It should be recognized that
the figures shown represent the
net expenses, and that the many
sports and activities which we
support bring in and spend almost $200,000 in addition to the
income provided by our A.M.S.
Fee.
You wijl see, then, that the
A.M.S. will be handling almost
one half million dollars this
year. I urge you to take an interest in how this money is
handled.
RUSS ROBINSON.
Treasurer,
Alma Mater Society.
Last Minute Club
Gets You Tickets
Memberships for Famous Artists' Last Minute Club are now
on sale in the AMS office.
They entitle students to reduced prices for rejected seats
at Famous Artist productions.
Memberships are sold for $1 and
performance tickets are obtain;
ed by payment of an additional
75c on the day before each
show.
Among coming attractions
are Roger Williams, Elsa tan.
Chester,  and Victor Borge.
Tutoring French, German,
English and Reviewi n,g
Grammar. Phone RE 6-0523.
Furnished, bright, quiet f oom
with view; close to everything. Private bathroom, double hot plate, dishes; bedding,
id phone. Separate
boose. Will suit oi
kle students. CA
iiiM  •iiiirtumjjMiL. r
_   **st
-fee
Dependable Repair
Service
and
Shoes of Quality
are a  specialty
at
Sasamar Shoes
4463 W. 10th Ave.
CA 4-1017
ALAMA MATER SOCIETY
ESTIMATED INCOME AND EXPENDITURES 19.60.61
INCOME
Student Fees	
College Shop and Rentals	
Other Income (Interest and Misc.)_
EXPENDITURES
Admnistration and General	
Publications	
Undergraduate Societies	
Clubs    .....   -   ...   _  	
*Brock  Extension Payments	
* Development Fund (Student Residences) _
*Men's Athletics	
'Women's Athletics --	
*World  University  Service	
*Brock Management Fund	
*Accident Benefit Fund	
*Brock Art Fund	
N.F.C.U.S:.	
Academic Symposium	
Conferences  	
Frosh Orientation	
Frosh Retreat   •-.
Grey  Cup Float-.. :	
High School Conference	
High  School   Tours	
Homecoming 	
Leadership Conference  	
Open House	
Radio  Society  	
Registration Photographs  	
Special  Events  	
Student Executive   Conference	
Others 	
Net Revenue for year 1959-60	
♦Operating  Margin   	
ACTUAL
BUDOET
1959-1960
1960-6J
$246,205.00
$268,000.00
5,087.65
4,900.00
1,562.44
1,600.00
$252,855.09
$274,500.00
ACTUAL
BUDGET
1959-1960
1960-61
$ 23,825.96
$ 24,700.00
21,453.77
19,015.00
6,280.00
5.50Q.00**
5,545.59
4,000.00
50,850.00
5&,625.00
51,570.00
56.25Q.00
43,292.40
47j30q.00
6,544.20
7,150.00
10,189.50
11,125.00
5,034.00
5,50Q.00
6,735.95
7,315.00
1,510.20
1,650.00
3,580.61
4,750.00
600.00
500.00
1,901.13
2,370.00
233.98
—
566.21
900.00
—
100:00
100.00
100.00
350.53
350.00
507.29
(1,000.00)
834.86
850.00
—
1,000.00
800-00
—
1,690.80
1,600.00
3,061.93
4,000.00
169.96
150.00
1,358.5*
—
4,267.63
—
—.
13,700.00
$252,855.09.
$274,500.00
* Allotments governed by rulings of the General Meeting Or the Constitution.
**This sum does hot nclude any grant to the Frosh, who will receive special consideration.
■ ».
Cafe Dan BtfiHe^l' Dance!
Important Anouncement to All Students
GAFE DAN welcomes back all our guesfs,
and friends from  UBC.     Special rate of
$1.00 per person (Friday only) is in effect
and continues throughout the season.
(A.M.S. card required)
Hurry and make your reservations now
Phone MU 4-4034 or MU 3-9822
"COME AND SEE US"
<mm
Jaunty as
a Jaguar
There's a delightful play.
.^buoyancy to this button-down
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ick>rni;up „ .,. slip' into  the
ashing lines of this exciting
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7.95
the shirt
n' tie bar
•58 SEYMOUR STREET
r -■      (In Bay Pqrkade)
"eome in
d tie one on"
Ivy League
Is it ever Ivy! Why, Coke is the most
correct beverage you can possibly
order on campus. Just look around you.
What are the college social leaders
going; for? Coca-Cola! So take a leaf
out of their Ivy League book and do the
same! Enjoy tbe good taste of Coke!
DRINK
(mM
SIGN OF GOOD TASJf
•coke; AND •COe*:COL*' ARE registered traoeihrks—both identify the same t
REFRESHING BEVERAGE—THE PRODUCT OF COCA-COLA LTD. HAVE A BREAK—HAVE A COKE. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, Od
/8£~GW   TOFHTER THE
/r/?/M?£«S of ihl7£U£CTVf)L
LIFE RT UBC f&L<MLYM/TO£
MYSeiF KMOU/A/.    f S*T*T
THE  thinker's T*eie /*/
THe   QRt=~
TH?LETTERS   CLU8 nSKSO THE PHILOSOPHY'Clc'8
HE To Ztfe/frtEerwas. *i/#S£0GE* Fok fty £V£RY
MY COMICVTS   QfiOOGHr THOUGHT-  FXESHMBV
A/ew ufs fMO Tttey ftewwbio Cfine to sir at My
M£  WITH   rH£ CHFHR —
/
Peer mousteiv-
I sne/v jo/f/so (kthe THe success c>*My ye**
lMTEi(-ecTu»t jokers I9T THE     «f*5 esTftBUSHea. Hfi/tfoBy
CBORgiR.   THE SEEK tlRDE  MS       THE CRITICS CIRCLE, t WAS
UL-^SuTt Oh/ rue PivnrclE—
STOCK it OOT—
fiUO THCM  «/H4TftflPI>£VEO?
yen*.
CRITICISMS
Editor: D.
AWAY^WiTH
Creeping idiocy abounds,
yet seldom affords such miani-
fold opportunity for excoriation as does the excerpt from
the UBC Alumni Chronicle
printed as an editorial in The
Ubyssey a week ago last Thursday. The author of the farouche
pastiche, one Stuart Keate, lays
himself delightfully open to
charges of bath specific illogicality and general fatheaded-
ness.
The thing calls itself a "character study" and various inane
definitions of the proper char-
DIALOGUE OF CRITIC AND ACTOR
ACTOR
0 Critic evil, Critic vile,
Critic without skill or style,
What right have you to ridicule,
You dog, you toad, you vermicule,
My acting talent? While I strain
To make Malvolio mope again,
Or Toby belch, or Andrew ail,
Harry succeed or Hotspur fail;
While hour upon rehearsal hour
1 strive to be more like Glendower
Or Capulet or Dicky Two—
What are YOU doing, where are You?
Debauching in some doubtful club
Or swigging suds in; fouler pub?
Not reading plays, of that I'm sure,
For else your comments would be truer!
Besides, your loathsome aspect speaks
Of disolute days and wasted weeks:
Pale face, a stoop, a whiskey croak,
Red eyes, red spots; a sicker bloke
There never Was. And yet you dare
When my performance you compare
To at-tribute to ME YOUR faults,
To write, "Clodd wheezes, fumbles, halts,
Clodd's voice is wrong, Clodd's body bent,"
And similar encouragement
To we who act, and those who would,
If your reviews were any good,    .
Pay to see us in our play.
Stay, Critic, I've not had my say!
What right is'yours, I ask once more,
To undertake this writing chore?
Six weeks I work, you not a night,
And THEN you're wrong in what you write!
If you're interested in theatre,
If you think you can do better,
Living to waste? Wasting to live?
THE   WASTE   MAKERS
by Vance Packard
$4.50
> i.
OWL BOOKS
4560 WEST 10th
CA 4-1841
OPEN FRIDAY UNTIL 9 P.M.
—Not probable!—come try it then,
You parasite with poison pen!
CRITIC
What intensity, what rage!
—Why can't you do that on the stage?
—What was I saying? Oh dear, yes!
I'm much impressed by your distress,
And now I'll try to set you right.
You say that I'm a parasite.
What are your audience then, I ask?
If you MUST take me to task
For holding views on your production,
Include them in. (Also, correction,
Re my suppos-ed predilection
For stronger liquor, redder wine,
Although I think these tonics fine
And disagree with Carrie Nation,
I spend my nights in contemplation
Of works by Shakespeare, Schiller, Shaw,
Moliere, and many more,
Brad]^,B^rbohnt, Beittey, Brooks,   ;
£<&*&*$§, magazines and books,
>Sid raw* I send a silent prayer
Addressed to critics gone UP THERE.)   ]
—Gone DOWN* you say? Ah^jBJease control
Your bitterness," and save YOUB'sbul!   .^
First ask yourself if part is true y
At least, of what I write of you;
For, if part is, then you may find
Remedies, and "think me kind.
"Which one of us his faults could mend
Unless corrected by a friend?
Discard that much of my advice
Yoa find" na use. .Yours is the choice.
.'Nojbarnv is dene; no audience,
If l DO make* so little sense,        -.
Will see mistakes which only I
Believe are1 there,'     •?
'...-' .'■■'     I lend my. eyes,
I, friendly brother criticus,
To you, but from Leviticus
You take your text, and would put out
-That which no art exists without,
The eye of objectivity.
Explain your odd hostility!
'.T
acT6r
UNIVERSITY JAZZ SOCIETY PRESENTS
Auditorium
ELEANOR COLLINS
with
THE DOUG PARKER TRIO
TODAY at NOON
Members free . . . Non-members 25c
Memberships available at the door
Wick«d Critic fu» (i
You don't fool me?
How can what you
When all the
My finest hours U]*on
All but one or twc
Cranks whom none
For no-one n
Less what an oddbfell
Believes. The?majt rity
audi* hce
i don't need you!
Write be true
applauds
the boards?
.that is,
of us would miss,
jrs Could care
here and there
is right!
And wrong the
It's often only co
That claps; only
That will no^:
And, act or
CRITIC
and lonely knight?
isy
idity
.have a voice:
&§ve a choice.
DAVID BROMIGE.
acter of   a  university  are  ,
tempted.
"Powerhouse of free dor
miay have a certain sinisl
aptness when we consider d
Crumb,    but    is    it    not    t
height of fatuous grandi
quence  to ascribe "characte
to a  university  which has
say in whom it shall accept i
enrollment?  A universi
forced to admit ever increasi
barbaric  tribes  originating
Dewdney, Grand Forks, Smii
ers,  Squamous? Hayseeds tit
they    are,    aren't   we    selli
these country boobs a fake b
of goods when we delineate
a "university" an institution
which they will meet prepic
derately their own s w i n i \
kind?
As for Keate's vaunted "re
dence living", the implicatl
is clearly that the great ma
rial luxury of the new re
dences will aid the student
his adjustment to college life
Which is cynical enough. B
who the devil could live
peace with himself in "Koo'
nay house"? I mean real]
such forced and pompous i
gionalism, it is to laugh. Thoui
it perhaps requires the subl
tongue and inuendo eyes of
Lee MacKenzie to proper
demonstrate the intrinsic hifi
ity of our native B.C. names.
FRUITLESS BULL SESSIO*
Keate's assertion of the s
periority of residences is ft
of the most asinine contradi
tions — if the poor commute
living in sybaritic splendor u
der mama's incestuous Shaug
nessy wing wastes wfaat? h£
an hour per day? (Keate's es
mate here is a palpable erro
getting home to study, ho
much time does his counte
part in residence waste lollii
around in fruitless bull se
^ilons with kindred louts (co
genial or no, they 'will was
his time equally) in the ohil
ennui of that mismanage
compromise with quaintne*
the men's residences? I can
. think of anyone of consequen<
at UBC in the ast five yea:
who didn't live either at hon
or in a "grubby Sasamat foas
ment". In fact the Sasam;
basement is plainly the on]
true character-builder as fs
as living-quarters  go.
The "apathy" of Mr. Keai
is really due to the honourafc
slogan, "we don't want Keate
brand of school spirit". If th
rowing team enjoys sluggiri
out its collective gut, fine. '.
they do it all for old Aim
Mater, they're simply stupi<
The Alma Mater idea is tin
students will be happy to pa
for spectator sports that the
don't want to watch, clubs the
don't want to join, graduatio
ceremonies they feel are extr;
aneous, and a huge studer
bureaucracy which they war
nothing to do with. At UB<
this idea is sanctioned and er
forced by the Board of Govei
nors.
The nearest thing to a dis
cernable thesis throughou
Keate's crapulous utterance i
that the character of the is?
versity   has   "perhaps   shiftei *, 1960
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
U REVIEWS
IN VENTIS VERITAS
BROMIGE
IE HAYSEEDS?
nue" as the university has
own bigger. The tenor of his
servations is in the flabby
d Pollyannaistic tradition of
ivid Reisanan. "Everything is
11 fine. No panic, no sweat,
•Ve simply democratized our
sals a littlle. We have to bend
til the winds of increased
rollment." This is the sentient of the mealymouthed, of
ofs with tenure, pendant
igs, and chalkdust matting
eir lank, phlegm - coloured
ir. This is the British ethos (
"it's so much nicer to be nice
an to be alive!"
that we're here to study, has
become a gamie, and not a
pretty game, for little popinjays in lasciviously striped
jackets. And to call that gilded
fornication a "student union"
building may be sexually apt,
but it's otherwise a patent misnomer, as there are almost no
students on the campus and
absolutely no union among
them. There is only a vast and
belching monolith composed of
• the Dewldney hordes in first
and second year,  the failures
AUTHOR MATTHEWS assaults another nincompoop.
—Photo Byron Hender
Sure it's nice to be nice, but
( times hardly allow. It's
;essary at this time to be
ire, to take part in riots and
sexually unpredictable. You
i-'t evade a juggernaut of the
(portions of the projected
rid holocaust with the out-
k and ideals of Rupert
>oke. The chickenhearted
jroach is in the best tradi-
3 of the dying Briton. By
om I mean the congenital
otional cuckold, livng stll
the 19th century, bereft of
guts and mentality to take
tab at living.
low Mr. Keate can maintain
Olympian  complacency in
face of my having to make
way to my table in the caf
ough clots of clutches ot
itreous,   dun - coloured   cols' of education toadpeople, I
r*t see. What I do see is that
ate is a traitor to the ideals
was bred under, a masquer
I a macaroni, probably   in
pay of Golly Godwin.
Hiis brings us back  to the
5S,   (albeit   the   transitions
getting shakier every min-
— truth, not style, is my
l^i which, besides being in-
isically evil, if you'll agree
retreating to the College of
Education, nursing and medical
students extending the pathetic
fallacy where it's least needed,
nasty bohemians perverting the
Languages and Fine Arts, maniacal theologs resisting analytic philosophy, models and
wlhores attempting theatre,
yapping and visionary jackals
imbuing themselves with the
chimerical ideals of crinkle-
r o o f architecture, and the
omnipresent Dewdney hordes
in Science, Engineering, and
Agriculture. From so portentous a polyglot slithers inevitably our hopeless lumpen-proletariat to vex and try the just
with sickening coruscations of
sheer multitude.
The way to accommodate
these 11,000 clogging and
smearing entities is with lethal
syringes and the big Eichmann-
style ovens. Why should the
thinking man's ideal for a university which must imply a
manageably small idocy factor
in the student body, go out the
window just because the truck
farmers of Dewdney are too
lazy and superstitious to use
birth control?
MICHAEL MATTHEWS
Intelligent movie - goers,
their palates jaded from Psycho and similar recent offerings, may take heart. Restoration and refreshment are at
hand.
There .is such an air of mystery and intrigue about Psycho that everybody has had
to see for himself what it is
all about, and then ifs too
late.
Inherit the Wind will be
coming soon, and here is what
it is all about. It is healthier
to know beforehand, and it
won't spoil the fun.
The story is a nearly factual
account of the Scopes trial in
the mid-twenties. For those
whom this tolls no bell for,
Scopes was a Tennessee school
teacher who corrupted his students' morals by teaching Darwin's theory, in violation of a
State law banning anything
that "denies the divine creation of man as taught in the
Bible."
THE LORD ON THEIR SIDE
Really, the case concerned
the interpretation of the law
and the scriptures. The local
Fundamentalists were elated
when William Jennings Bryan,
presidential candidate, former
Secretary of State, and wholehearted Fundamentalist, offered his services for the prosecution. When self-styled agnostic Clarence Darrow volunteered for the defence, their elation
was momentarily clouded, but
the Lord was on their side and
they soon rallied.
Two such figures as Bryan
and Darrow made stimulating
work of the proceedings. A
third colourful figure, newspaperman H. L. Mencken, reported the "Monkey Trial" for
the press, gave it its name and
fame.
"WE  KILLED THE
SONOFABITCH"
The outcome of the trial was
a humiliated victory for the
Fundamentalists — humiliated
because they lost a lot of
ground, and Scopes was given
only a token fine. Bryan, in an
impassioned speech of explanation, suffered a heart attack
and died in the courtroom.
*       *       *
Inherit the Wind was a great
Broadway play. It is a greater
movie, I think. Courtroom
drama is good on the screen,
if it is good at all—we get a
juror's-eye view of the trial,
a clear, sharp close-up of court
procedure. With the two great
old actors, Spencer Tracy and
Frederic March, playing two
other great old actors, it is
good indeed. For Bryan and
Darrow were well schooled in
the histrionic part of their profession; and Tracy and March,
who are always great when
some great occasion is presented to them, are great.
Other considerations of the
play are in descending magnitude from these two great roles.
But there are no weak supporting players, and some are
excellent. Gene Kelly is fine
in the Mencken role, and Florence Eldridge, who plays Mrs.
March in real life, is fine as
Mrs. Brady.
INHERIT THE WIND
Oh, yes. There is a love-story,
perhaps extrapolated, between
Scopes (I almost forgot about
him) and the minister's daughter. The minister is pretty upset, and threatens to disown
her if she doesn't disown
Scopes. Bryan makes an eloquent attempt to keep the family together — "For he that
troubleth his own house shall
inherit the wind." Prov. 11:29.
Reverend Brown is like ministers we might have known—
beyond the pale of the C. of E.
OFF-KEY RELIGION
Mood music is introduced
with the opening titles of the
movie, very effectively: "That
old-time religion" sung ballad-
style to a slightly off-key accompaniment apprises us that
something is slightly rotten in
the State of Tennessee1. At
the end, the music is in tune,
a good militant rendering of
the Battle - hymn of t h e Republic—"And His truth goes
marching on."
My keen eye for anachronisms in movies didn't pick out
any '49 Fords in the background of this one. I don't remember quite back to the
Scopes trial, but the settings
and the whole spirit of the
piece seemed redolent of the
twenties as I picture them.
Somebody said the attitude of
the Hillsboro hill-folk was an
anachronism — seemed more
like the dark ages—but I don't
think so. The issues of the
"Monkey Trial" are still in the
news, in somewhat modified
form, and some people get
pretty rabid about them. I
think the tough-minded bigotry
of Hillsboro rang true enough.
See what you think.
TOBY OLDFIELD
From The Swedish
The  choiring   bands   of   birds
confirm
That God was right to make
the worm.
With  joyful bark,   enraptured
tail,
The dog greets he who brings
the mail.
And fruity tones, and smiling
faces,
Meet him whom Usury embraces.
Rejoicing voice and mobile
limb
Have all whose prey is gathered in:
O help  me!   In t h e Brock*
this-morning
Diana   sang   and   waved   her
warning.
I. HELVETE.
* Uppsala universet  Koket,  in
the original.
The Frederic Wood Theatre presents
ii
UNDER THE SYCAMORE TREE"
by Sam Spewack
Oct. 14 - 22 at 8:30 p.m. in the
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
Tickets: $1.50 and $1.00 Rush: 75c
TO MAKE FRIENDS AND INFLUENCE PEOPLE
We have long recognized that our market lies with a
minority of the population sufficiently independent in
thought to make a thinking choice.
For this reason, we extend a particular welcome to University Students wishing to avail themselves of the opportunity to visit the continuous Hi Fi Show which goes on
every day of the week including Friday evenings in our
West Broadway showrooms.
Hi Fi Sales offers a special 10% discount to all music
conscious students attending U.B.C.
hi fi sales
LTD.
2714 W. Broadway
RE. R-8716 Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 14, 1960
Sports Shorts
Archery Ctub Formed
•*■& «
Attempts are being made to
form, an archery club on the
campus. Technical details have
been taken care of, and now all
that is needed are metatoers.
All men and women.interested,
in this club, please meet in the
Field House at 4:30 Wednesday,
October 19.;
SWIMMING
Practises for the w o men ' s
synchronized swimming team begin Thursday, October 20.at
12:30 noon in the Empire Pool.
All interested women welcome.
VOLLEYBALL
Women's Volleyball Team
practices 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. in the
Women's Gym.
HEY! PUBSTERS
Newspaper experts from
some of the beat- papers in
town will be down to teach us
lhe finer points of journalism.
This momentous event will
take pace for the first time
this year in the Pub offices
tomorrow s t a r t i n_g at 12:30
noon.
This is the biggest training
program eyer unde.r,take,n. al
The Ubyssey and will be followed up by a real swinging
party tomorrow night. Location of the party will be announced in the office noon
tomorrow.
BADMINTON
The first Men's Badminton
team practise will be held at
430 Wednesday, October 19 in
the Women's Gym.
Anyone washing to play badminton  this  year, please  come
out.
RUGBY
UBC Braves meet Meralomas
in Miller Cup action Saturday
at 1:00 on the gym field.
The Braves lost their first
outing of the year two -weeks
ago to their older brothers, the
Thunderbirds.
V.O.C Plans^
Many Hikes
The Varsity Outdoor Club has
planned' a series of hikes and
climbing expeditions for the
coming weekend.
Prospective members who did
not attend the long, hike last
weekend, must go on the short
long hike, Saturday, October 22.
Planned for this weekend are:
Work hikes from the cabin on
Mt. Seymour, both Saturday and
Sunday. Golden Baglesclimb (in
terestexj please contact John Farley at WA 2-2902).
A Lions climib is also, scheduled Sunday, from Lions Bay.
See notice, or contact John
Ricker at CA 4-9&53.
DAVE ANDERSON
. . . 23-year-old law student
and veteran of international
competition has been named
captain of UBC's oarsmen.
Anderson rowed in the. No. 2
seat in the recent Olympics.
Students Victors
In Tennis Motth
The students beat the faculty
3-2 in ah exhibition tennis match
Tuesday in the Field House.
In the singles matches, Veit
of the Physics department defeated student Vlaszaty 7-5, 6-4,
and student Sutherland defeated
Parkinson 6-2, 6-1.      •
The student teata or Johnson
and Robertson took the doubles
event in three sets. They edged
Howell and Mullins of the P.E.
department 7-5, 2-6, and 6-4.
Only th§ choicest
Virginia Tobaccos
are used in
du MAURIER
saya FRED DAWS
TV's fop panel moderator
"There's something extra special about a
du MAURIER cigarette; two things, in fact.
One is the choice Virginia tobacco. The other is
the "Miueeel" super filter. Together, they give
you the best cigarette ever."
... fa ~£o*
du MAURIER
m really milder high grade Virginia Cigarette
Golf-Tennis Team
Heads To Alberta
Edmonton is the scene of the
1960 Western Golf and Tennis
Tournament taking place today
and tomorrow.
Bus Phillips, UBC athletic director, gave a "quite good' verdict when asked about UBC's
chances of taking the honors.
Last year the UBC squads
earned a good second place behind the winning Alberta efforts.
This year. UBC is sending a
men's golf team and two men's
and women's tennis teams. Joe
Veit has taken over temporary
coaching duties for the strong
sex team and Diana Lawrence
will lead the women in their
bid for first place.
Other tennis players include
Dave Robertson, John Sutherland, Bob Johnson, Monika Allien, and Maiy   Shakespeare.
The four golfers entered from
this campus are Bill Perkett
(coach), Gary Puder, Gordie
Robinson and Ron Irish. UBC is
not entering a women's golf
team.
Although the UBC teams
placed second in the total score
iast season, the women's tennis
squad showed marked superiority in this racket.
They are expecting to repeat
their previous good showing.
Competition includes singles,
doubles and mixed matches.
Yes,,she'll get all her fashion
mileage froin our new fall selection.
A great way to travel with the
school crowd.
"TAMMY"
Black Marac
Black Suede
Tobacco Plu
Bed Plush Sued*
"LO-TIGER" (elastic lacing)
Black Suede
Maverick Brown Plush Suede
Green Plush Suede
ALL STYLES ONLY
8.95
Available at all leading stores in B. C.
Vfc^l Friday,  October   14,   1960
THE      UBYSSEY
Pag£ 7
fg«zr ^fjv* -"$'•-"
UBC THUNDERBIRDS' big men control lineouts in 18-11  win.
Rugby, Birds Tak   Japanese
With Big Second Half Surge
By CHRIS FAHRNI
UBC Rugby Thunderbirds subdued the insurgent Japan,
ese, 18-11, in a fast-moving and well-played contest at noon.
A light drizzle, Which persisted
WCIAU Title
Up For Grabs
UBC Thunderbirds clash with the University of Alberta^"
Golden Bears at 2 p.m. Saturday in what could prove to be the
game that decides the WCIAU Championship.
If   the   Birds  lose   this   game' "
throughout the game, made the
field skiddish and the ball hard
to handle, particularly for Yawata. Even the cheerleaders
were forced to don their yellow
slickers.
Yawata's kicking (gave then
an 8-6 lead at the half, but the
tide soon turned. UBC, through
their excellent wide running,
spirited scrum play, -and deadly
tackling, surged ahead to win by
V points.
NO CONVERSIONS
The Thunderbirds were forced
to win the tough way, by scoring lots of tries. They failed to
make good one convert, though
most of these were tough angle
shots.
Gilmore, however, put tha
Thunderbirds ahead for the
first time with a 30-yard field
goal in the early second half.
Yawata scored 5 points on kicks.
Bird break Mike Chambers
picked up the ball after a scrum
on the visitors 20, and twisted
his way to the corner. Japan retaliated with a 25-yard field
goal.
BIRDS' BIGTHBLUSX-——~rr-
Then, on a beautiful 3-line
play, precipitated by Bugg, Morton went over after a pass from
Howie. Halftime score, 8-6 for
Yawata. /
Gilmour's kickstartod thi
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RENTAL & SALES
• Full Dress
'• Morning Coats
• While and Blue Coats I
• Shirts and Accessories
ond half scoring campaign, and
the Birds never stopped rolling.
On one of tlhe game's outstand-.
ing plays, Cummings kicked
through and Morton, showing
blazing speed, knifed in .and
flattened the receiver. Dubois
picked up the ball; dodged two
tacklers, and crossed the goal
line to make it 12-8 UBC.
The scrum squashed a Yawata short drop out attempt and,
gaining possession in a loose
ruck, sent Sandy Tucker over
for the try.
Alan Morton put the cap on
the game with a 20-yard try
down the sidelines. He somehow
darted through the three Japanese who met him on the five
and crossed the goal line alone.
GOOD TACKLING
The second half stifling of
Yawata was largely due to the
tackling of the UBC backs,-especially Morton, Cuimmlrags and
break Gordon Treble.
The upset by UBC was only
the Japanese' second loss of
.their current Canadian tour.
they have no chance of holding j
onto the title they won in such
great style last year.
The team doesn't intend to
lose the game. Despite the 21 to
2 loss the Bears handed the
Birds last weekend, Coach Gnup
thinks his men have a good
chance of winning this vital
game. He believes that the inclement weather was one of the
main reasons the Birds lost.
"If the offense can rack up
same points we'll take the
game," Gnup said. In an effort
to rack up points, Gnup plans
to use the short punt formation
that he initiated last Saturday.
There is still doubt <is to who
will start at the quarterback
slot, but indications are it will
be Bill Ghenpeta, who started
Saturday. Cherpeta waS'impres-
sive despite a lack of protection.
The team is up for this *game
and Gnup does hot think there
will be a repitition of last
■week's dismal showing. "They
•wanted that-game more than \» .-
did," he growled, "but the boys
want this one."
SPOR T
CARD
SATURDAY
FOOTBALL
UBC   Thunderbirds   vs.   U. Of
Alberta, 2:00, UBC stadium.
RUGBY
UBC Braves vs. Meralomas,
1:00 on Gym-field.
Thunderbirds vs. Trojans, at
Brockton.
P.E. vs. Kats, Balaclava.
Frosh, vs. Ex - Glads, Connaught.
SOCCER
First Division: Thunderbirds
vs. Canadians, 2:00 at Central
Park.
GRASS HOCKEY
Varsity vs. Cardinals, 2:00-«>n
UBC NO. 1.
•Golds vs. Spurs, 2:00 on UBC
No. 2.
Blues   vs.   India   "B",   3:15   on
UBC-No. -2.
Peds vs. Hawks, UBC No. i.   .
SUNDAY
FOOTBALL
Fraser Valley Junior: Jayvees
vs. TSiirrey( (away).
"Saeh eoutdfind Ml different use
for it in his own field of studies!
' And we can prove it . . . with oor famous,
booklet "300 Tested Uses for a Philips Tape
Recorder".
Learn how a Philips Tape Recorder can help
you as a student, and for  years  following
graduation. Ask for our booklet at your dealer,
or write Philips Electronics Industries Ltd.,
116 Vanderhoof Ave., Toronto 17, Ontario.
%**t.S
v*>
takes the time to build the best
90S*
J Page 8
THE     U-B'Y S S E Y
Friday, October 14, 1960
'tween classes:
Bounce At Bromo Ball
PHARMACY
UNDERGRADS SOCIETY
The Bromo Ball, Tonight, 9-1.
Lance Harrison. Admission 75c.
* *       *
"PLAYERS  CLUB
General meeting, noon today,
in Green Room .Check Rehearsal Schedule for "The Flies"
now.
* *      *
PHILOSOPHY CLUB
Social get - together tonight
8:30 p.m. at 5530 Kings Rd. Discussion Monday noon BU 225.
Topic "The Way of Zen."
* *      *
CAMERA CLUB
Meeting today Bu 203. Mr.
Eli speaks on portraiture and
lighting. Portrait session postponed till Oct. 21.
* *       *
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
La reunion du groupe de conversation (avances) aura lieu le
vendredi dans la salle 1213 du
batiment buchanana a 12:30. M.
Treil parla de la "Vie culturelle
au Canada Francais."
* *       *
-■R AMBLERS
Meeting today in Physics 302.
Everybody interested welcome.
* *      *
UN CLUB
Social igathering at 6264 Carnarvon St., 8 p.m., Sunday.
* -..*      *
JAZZ SOCIETY
Eleanor Collins and The Doug
Parker Trio noon today, Auditorium. 25c. Members free.
* *      *
BOOSTER CLUB
Meeting for those interested
in social committee, Monday
noon in Club jspom.
* ; *      *
CONSERVATIVE CLUB
MP Ferguson Brown speaks
on  "Labour and Related Problems" noon today Bu 205.
*.     *       *
BIOLOGY CLUB
General meeting noon today
in Bio.   Sci.  2321. Field  trips,
program  and  film are   on  the
»agenda.
* * *
EAST ASIAN SOCIETY
Meeting tonight at 2003 W.
35th Ave. at 7:30 p.m. All mem-
oers please attend.
* "   *      *
SOCIAL CREDIT CLUB
Hear Hon. Ken Kiernan Bu
104 noon today.
* *      *
PRE-SOCIAL WORK SOCIETY
Monday noon in Bu 202. Film.
* *       *
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
Weekly testimony meeting,
noon today in Bu 227. Everybody welcome.
* •■ *       *
CCF CLUB
Dr. D. C. Noms of the UBC
history department will speak
on "Hstorical notes of Socialism" in Bu 203 at noon on Monday.
* *      *
HAMSOC
Code and theory classes in
BuJJ 15 every Monday and Friday at 12:30.
* *      *
UNITED NATIONS CLUB
The U.N. club is having a
social meeting on Sunday, Oct.
16th, at 8 p.m., at 6264 Carnarvon street, if you have no ride,_
»hone JacMe at MU. 3-1430.
; *     *     *
UNDERGRAD  WRITERS
WORKSHOP
Meeting at 2240 Blanca street,
home af R. M. Frildion. Those
interested please attend.
* *       *
VARSITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Lecture today at 12:30 in Bu
106. Will Wilding to speak.
* *       *
DANCE CLUB
Jive taught in clubroom today. All non members welcome.
* *       *
UBC STUDENTS WIVES CLUB
The UBC students wives meeting was held on October 11—
not October 14th, as previously
stated.
* *       *
CIC
Film "Exploration with the
high temperature microscope
today, 12:30, Ch. 250.
* *       *
PHARMACY UNDERGRAD
SOCIETY
Every one welcome to the
Bromo Ball, tonight in Brock
Lounge at 9:00 p.m. Come stag
or dated.
CLASSIFIED
FOR SALE—Coffee table, 22 x
48. RE 3-3605.
LOST — Political Science 300
. notebook, taken from Buchanan Building, Wednesday.
Phone Jeff, AM  1-2455.  Urgent.
FOR SALE—Volkswagen rwin-
d o w van "Camper" 1959
model, 23,000 miles; blue,
complete with sofas, tables,
bed, cupboards, stove, water
containers, curtains, rack, tarpaulin. Motor and vehicle in
excellent condition. Come to
the front of the Brock, Friday
12:00 to 2:00 or phone RE
1-3600 or MU 1-7341.
WILL the person who took the
red   and white  umbrella  from
the College  Library  on Oct.
11, please call CA 4-5705.
WILL the girl Who borrowed my
Math 101 notes two weeks
ago, please return them.
Phone Barbara, RE 8-0443.
WANTED—To drive 1 day (per
week in a car chain from the
West End. Call Mike, Mutual
1-9991.
LOST — While hitch-hiking, a
zipper bag containing a sweat
shirt, swim suit, towel and
hair brush. The car in which
these articles were left w&s
going to North Surrey. Phone
CA 4-9143.
RIDE WANTED—to leave UBC
at 3:30, vicinity 41st and Arbutus. AM 6-0617.
mimSa-AimSa
Beauty Clinic
We are now open for business and. look forward to
helping you in any beauty
problem you may have.
WE SPECIALIZE IN:
• European Styling
• Hair-Cutting
• Tinting
• Permanents
• Facials
• Massages
FOR STUDENTS: We have
special rates.
4395 W. 10th Ave.
For apointment phone
CA 4-1231
Open from 9-5:30
Closed Mondays
Frosh Promise
Great Results
DEAN   DAVID   L.   THOMSON,
vice principal of McGill, will
speak Saturday at 8:15 p.m.
in Bu. 106.
Bessie  Beds Down
in Union College Hall
Who put the calf in the Union
College  foyer?
Students awoke Thursday
morning to find the animal
peacefully sleeping in the main
rotunda.
Students at Anglican College
disclaim any knowledge of the
incident.
Over 200 Frosh gathered,
Thursday, to hear the campaign
speeches of candidates for Frosh
Council.
Promises to banish Buster's
from the camipus, expand eating
facilities, and unite the Frosh
were heard throughout the
speeches.
Eleanor Collins, Doug
Parker To Play Today
Jazz singer Eleanor Collins
and the Doug Parker trio play
in the auditorium at noon today.
It is the first of a series of
Jazzsoc Shows. Admission costs
25 cents.
TAKE IT TO
SPOTLESS
SHIRTS 191
5 or
More
The speeches ended a week of
campaigning. Election stunts included free cigarettes, matches,
buttons and a hanging of dummies.
Polling will  lake  place today   until   4:00   p.m.   Polling
booths are located in the north
and south halls of the Brock, _
inside the main   door  of   the
Buchanan, in Buchanan Court,..
at the bus stop, the Quad, and.
in the Education Building.	
Ex-Scouters
Like to keep in touch with
the Scout movement during
the University year?^
Troop near gates urgently
needs regular or casual assistant leaders.
Call CA 4-0720
or CA 4-5640
the bay brings you...
Today Europe reflects a
thriving and pulsating
activity. Industry gives
to the world a bountiful
harvest of technological
advances and new excellence in wares. Are-
surgenee in agriculture
mirrors tomorrow's de-
signs for pleasurable
living. Connoisseurs of
art will respond impulsively to the imaginative talents of her painters and sculptors.
modern europe interprets the trends and developments of a continent bursting with new
life. See for yourself on
every floor of the Bay
from October 6th to
22nd. among the many
modern europe exhibits,

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