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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Oct 16, 1951

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The
VOLUME XX3fflL-J
Ssa-—- - eiT -' i'iii j !B1*i^|||iWMiM>*w
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 16,1951
5 CENTS
NO. 10
—Photo by Tom Hatch tr
1 . 7 s *
FORCED TO DONATE blood in armories Monday afternoon was Ubyssey sports editor
Al MacGlllivray. He was kidnapped by angry engineers from his desk in tfxe pub office
about noon, then carried bodily to the armories where he was given full treatment. But
Al had no hard feelings after it was all over. Hs came back to Ubyssey offices with the suggestions that V we all do the same thing."
Redshirts Riot Helps
To Boost Blood Clinic
Engineers Capture Editor,
Him To
l^iil Anderson, AMS treasure* .Jfisterday set forth The
students' lor photbs tajken dur-
ing Registration Week.
Anderson gave the reasons as
follows: .
As proved from the success of
the 1948-49 Tdtem, which contained
everyone's picture, It seemed essential for the success of the Totem to have every student's picture Included.
UNIFORM   PIX
The theaters demanded a uniform ty^e "head and shoulder" picture on the AMS card befoi;e they
would accept them for students' reduced rates.
The . AMS election committee
strongly recommended that pictures be placed on every card before they were Issued.
The administration desired a picture of every student for their rec-
cords ,for which they were willing
to pay 5 cents ot the total 50 cents
cost per picture.
FOR  FILES
The picture would remain on file
for the students* convenience If
copies were needed for passports
or application forms.
AMS originally Intended to collect the fee and explain the details
when the photos were taken, but
the administration refused to allow
AMS to collect the 25c or to notify
-students that they were to be
charged difrlng registration.
"OUR   ERROR"
"Our failure to notify students
that they would be charged when
they deceived their pictures was
our error, for which we sincerely
apologize. We hope you will stand
with us in an endeavour, which we
feel Is most beulflclal to AMS
memibers," declared l'hil Anderson.
Student Council Treasurer.
Giye His Pint
"WE WANT BLOOD!" thun
dered a band of beresk engin
eers as they descended oh the
Pub offices Monday afternoon
"Get me It you can!" challenged
Sports Bdltor Alex MacOillvary as
he ground the first Redshlrt's face
into the keys of his trusty typewriter.
Last year, when the Engineers invaded the offices of Ubyssey, MacOillvary slipped through their .tin-
gers .laying claim to the .title of
baseball manager.
VALIANT  HATTLI
This time, MacGlllvary battled
valiantly against the (renzled mob.
The Engineers, backed by heavy
reinforcements, gave their famed
war cry as they surged out of the
Hrock Hull with MacOillvary withering high above their heads.
Alex's numerous admirers lined
the road to the Armories. Many
wept openly as he was manhandled by the Redshirts.
Sclencement dragged their victim
through the Caf and then into the
Armouries.
KINO NURSE
A kind nurse took pity on the
pale, trembling boy and gave him
a bottle of coke. A massive Red-
shirt snatched it from Alex's grasp
and downed it in one gulp, bottle
and all.
They  managed  to  squeeze  the
last drop of blood from his arm
as    the    blood-crazed    Engineers
danced around his bed in triumph.
******
Red Cross officials report that
over 900 pints of blood have been
donated on the UBC  Campus.
The clinic continues till Friday
and will be open between 10 and 4.
No appointments are necessary.
EAST-WEST
SCHOLARSHIPS
PROPOSED
COMMERCE PUPIL
WINS SCHOLARSHIP
Albert M. Harbottle. 2:', 2756
W. 11th, has been awarded the
Osier, Hummond and Nanton Ltd.
Scholarship of $150.
He Is at the present, time in
fourth year Commerce r.t the
University of British Coltimbi.a
and won the award for high
scholastic achievement, "personal
qualities   and   character.
He is a member of the universlly bifseball team and of the
J'hi   Delta   Theta   fraternity.
The LPbyssey has proposed
a concrete scheme for cooperation between the Soviet Union and the western • world to
provide east-west exchange
scholarships.
The proposals, outlined ln a
page two editorial today, follow a request from the Soviet
journal "News" for "suggestion to clear up the worlu misunderstandings which u o w
exist."
Doth the "New York Times"
and the London "New Statesman ailcl Nation" suggested exchange scholarships as an effective means of proving the
sincerity of both sides. • .
The Ubyssey suggests that
three UHC students go the
USSR and three Soviet students   come   here.
Filmsoc
Presents
'Cage of Gold'
Today's Filmsoc presentation
will be "Cage of Gold" starring Jean
Simmons and David Fa-rrar.
The movie will be shown ln the
auditorium at 3:45, 6 and 8:15 p.m.
In the auditorium.
Students are reminded to bring
their AMS cards. Admission will be
85 cents.
Two technicolor films "Tickets
to Jasper" and "Mexico and Guatemala" will be shown free in the
auditorium at noon.
Gourley Resigns
Camp
'TWEEN CLASSES
To Hear
er
Students
Discover
'Gold Mine'
SKATTLK — (CUP) — University of Washington Student's
Union is •'surprised and delighted"
with recent finding of errant bank
accounts totaling $2342,
The cache was discovered while
clealng out files of the Huskle
Union Building. Two bank books
from University district banks listed deposits dating from 1929 in
balances of $1,260 and $1,081.
Last deposits listed were ln
1942. '
The deposit belongs to the old
Women's Federation of the University of Washington, long since
changed to Association of Women
Students.
No withdrawals has been made
from one account since 1933, til
though the Women's Federation
activity manager continued to add
money.
The manager died ln 1942 and,
apparently, maintenance of. (die accounts died  with her.
The money will be turned into
the general student fund.
UNITED NATIONS Club will
hear Mrs. W. Stevens, secrtary of
the Vancouver UN Association In
Arts 100 at noon today. Her topic
will the "The Price of Peace.''
I NT! BNATIONAL >TU PINT'S
Club will" hold their HrstTocIS!
evening on Friday, October 19th
at 5575 Angus Drive at 8:30 p.m.   '
* *       •*
i
PROP. P.. C. WOOD will speak
on the Players' Club history In
campus activities In Hut M6, Tuesday at 12:30.
* *       *
SQUARE DANCE show fer new
members of the Square Dance Club
will be held' Wednesday at 6 p.m.
ln Hut 04.
* *       *
SCOTTISH COUNTRY Dance
Club will meet Wednesday in Hut
04.
Fine Books
On Display
In Library
The Sedgewick Memorial room
In the U.BC library will bo the
scene of an unusual display of fine
British books until October 24th.
One hundred British books on a
variety of topics have been chosen
by the British Council as the best
and most representative samples of
binding1,  typography and  printing
■ • * *
produced In Britain in 1950.
Matchett And Ostrom
Head Fort Camp Executive
The Resignation last week of .Bob Gourley, Fort Camp
Committee President, was announced at the Genera} Meeting
of the camp's residents last night.
i' *■$ ■  ■■) ■*"
' In his letter of resignation, Gourley stated that he found the attacks made on him by the Ubyssey
"quite unbearable." He also stated that several members of the
Fort Camp Committee had' constantly harried him.
DIPPERENT  OPINION
Another factor in - Gourley's resignation was his difference of
Opinion with the camp superintendent.
Gourley did not elaborate on
what these difference constituted." *
The committee accepted his immediate resignation with regrets
and appointed Bob Matchett as Interim president.
A meeting was called (pr last
night to choose a new president
and also to elect for the first time
a vice-president to assist the president ln his duties.
MATCHETT NEW PRES
Bob Matchett was elected president by an overwhelming vote.
Brock Ostrom, author of the famed
Ostrom Plan for Athletic Scholarships, was the camp's choice for
vice-president.
Matchett thanked the camp residents for their vote of confidence
and stated that as a long time
resident, of the camp, he knew what
improvements the camp needed,
and that he would do'hls utmost to
make It a home for aH occupants,
again. It took only 23.
♦ By MARY STEWARD
Ubyssey Waff Writer
-*
UBC students will have in
opportunity to welconve
Her Highness Princess Elili-
beth and Prince Phillip whtn
the royal party makes an appearance during Saturdj^aS
football game. //'';
The party will arrive _«t the Mi-
dlum at approximately 4:30 p.tt.
on Saturday. They will be met it
the entrance by President
tie who will officially greet
Princess and her husband.
•>£
The   procession   will
around the track inside the still'
urn before stopping in front ofi*f|l
grandstand where the party
led to the royal box.
It is"- particularly Iterestlng to
note how British publishers bave
adapted themselves to paper shortages and limited materials for
binding.
The exhibit contains excellent
samples of wood cuts, reproductions of some of the best engravings by William Blake, and some
original and unusual jacket covers.
Public can view this display
each week day from 11 a.m. until
6 p.m.
ALL ACTIVITIES
CANCELLED FOR
BIG AMS MEETING
All campus meetlnga end activities will be cancelled Thursday noon so that students can
•attend the AMS meeting In the
Armouries.
Jack Lintott, co-ordlnator of
student aotlvltlea told the Ubyssey Monday he has stopped sll
student meetings so thet as
many students as possible will
attend the meeting on constitutional revision.
"Nothing except possibly the
blood drive will go on," he said.
Ths meeting, originally scheduled for last Wednesdays waa
postponed when only about 400
students attended. Over 1000 stu-
ents are neded for a quorum.
.'My'
' , .. <$£&■
After ths playing of Ood flif*
the King the party will be Iritj*-
duced to Brigadier and Mrs. &iio>-
wood Lett, Mrs. Norman MactteV
zie, and other guests who #!$]?• J»e
seated ln the box. >>
Mrs. Lett will present Prinoees
Elizabeth with a beautifully carved
slate Totem pole as a gift from tiie
University.
During this time the game will
have been brought to a halt, but
will be resumed at_ this point and
will be viewed by the royal pttrty
for approximately ten minutes. '
Vaughn Lyon wiU then make-a
statement on behalf of the |||-
dents, and with the playing of O*
Canada, the royal vtslt^to* UBC IfWl
be over.
International
House
-•*■
VRC'u International House So.
he opened officially next SuWdiy
by Mrs. Sherwood Lett and fir.
N. A. M. Mackenzie. ''
The tea at Acadia Camp will p*
the first official function of Mrs.
Lett, wife of UBC's newly elected
Chancellor.
SAMBO AND QUADRUPLETS CREATE   HUB HUB'
First Births Reported In Womens Dorms
By DONNA KERRIGHAN
, Ubyssey Staff V-friter
First births in •?.• women's
dorm has brought family trouble to Isobel McGlnnls hall in
the form of Sambo and quadruplets.
Over-authorltlve dorm staff
attempted to keep the affair
hush-hush Monday, however, a
Ubyssey staff photographer
braved female guards to get
the picture.
Sambo, feeling her time to
be near, presented herself at
Room l-'O early Monday morning. Sympathetic Lois Dunlop
(Humane Society please note)
ga-ve Sambo refuge in a clothes
closet..
Lois hopes, by locking her
door when she goes to classes,   to   keep   the   family   Intact
-Photo  By Walt Sussel
SAMBO AND FAMILY
until they can be transferred
to a Fort--Camp basement
where they will be tended by a
warm-hearted janitor.
It Is suggested thc forlorn
quartette may be a result ot
n raid en the dorms last spring
by Impeuous pranksters.
Two of the kittens are already named McGlnty and McGlnnls (after Irish Knglneers?)
says Penny Peatfleld, who gs/vc
Invaluable assistance In clambering through a dorm window
to remove the family to the
lounge where they could be
photographed.
The affair created "quite a*
hitbliub" around thc dorms,
according to Dorothy Zocher,
who bemoans the fact that no
pets are allowed In Women's
residences. Page Two
THE UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 16,1951
THE
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVER8ITY PRESS
Authorized as second class mall by the Post Office Dept. Ottawa. Student subscriptions
$1,00 per year (included in AMS fees). Man" subscription $2.00" pf "year. Sfhgte copies
five cents. Published throughout the University year by the Student Publications Board
of the Alma Mater Society, University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions expressed
herein are those of the editorial staff of the Ubyssey, and not nfcessarly those of the
Alma Mater Society or of the Uniyewrtty.
Offices in Brock Hall, Phone ALma %QH           For display advertising, phone ALma 8253
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF LES ARMOUR
EXECUTIVE EtHfOR—ALLAN OOliDSMITH MANAGING EDITOR—D0UO HEAL
City Editor, HaroM Berson; Copy Editor, Chuck Coon; Features' Editor, John, ifftpler-
Hemy; Fine Arts Editor, John Brockington; CUP Editor; Shlela Kearns; Women's
Editor, Florence McNeil; Senior Editors, John Napler-Hemy (Tuesday), Doug Upex
(Thursday), Elsie Oorbat (Friday).
ft To
The appearance of the Soviet government's latest propoganda sheet "News'* has
aroused continued speculation in the past
three months. .
Aimed at the English speaking world,
the) journal is devoted to the thesis that nothing but' misunderstanding (mostly American) stands in the way of world peace.
Whatever'the facts, the thesis remains
interesting.
When its editors called for suggestions
to ease world tension, -journals ranging from
England's "New Statesman and Nation" to
tht "New York Times" immediately took up
ti$^aflibie:''---:   (
Ont of the more interesting (it comes
both from the •"times" and foe* "New States-
mum'1) cadled for ta\ east-west tjxohange
scholarship system for university students.
The "Kew Statesman" received a vague
reply frpm the Moscow party organ "New
Times" to the effect 'that "there is a differ-
tnet between legitimate cultural exchange
•nd espionage"—a statement which means
•bdlsutely nothing. ,,
/  So far, the editors of "News" have remained silent on the issue.
But up to now no one has proposed any
cohcerete scheme.
Pressure Groups?
On Thursday of this week students will
bt faced with a major change in their constitution.    ,
Two plans will be presented. Both are
an attempt at making the AMS more derno-
cratlc on the premise that the Students CouncU is not representative of ihe students.
~ fii order to make the Council representative, the plans cal} for the undergraduate
societies to send representatives to ike Monday: night meetings. One plan has three representatives from undergraduate societies, the
other has eleven representatives from undergraduate societies.
Both plans call for the elimination of
junior and sophomore members.
Those who have drafted this plan are
making the same mistake that many of the
cttleS of this continent have made many years
ago.
In order to make their city governments
democratic they evorved the ward system
- We think it would put the question to
the test if UBC were to offer to accept three
Soviet students on a scholarship basis—provided that three UBC students are accepted
by the Soviet government.
In many ways, UBC is the ideal institution to start the ball rolling.
* The establishment of a department of
Slavonic Studies (oner of the best in the
country) here has aroused a great deal of
sincere interest in the problems of eastern
Europe. .
What better-, plabe to recruit students
interested in studying in the USSR?
From the other side our engineering
faculty, our faculty of agriculture^ and our
school of forestry are equipped to provide
just the sort of technical know-how in which
the Soviets are interested.
The administration, student council, and
ISS should get together to draft a set of
concrete proposals.
Meanwhile, the Ubyssey will forward a
copy of this editorial to the editors of "News"
and await their reply.
A sincere acceptance of the USSR might
be just enough to convince the western public
that the Soviets really want to co-operates.
\ei-~
% The
Hit**
,M-1.     I..-.,!!-*.
TO A THIEF
Keep The Money'
Return
where alderman each represent a section of
the city. The City of Vancouver used to use
tills type of City Council.
But the system broke down. Aldernian
were more interested in representing their
burroughs than the city to which they belonged. The ultimate was reached in Chicago
where ward bosses virtually controlled their
section of the city like a medieval tyrant.
The wiser centers got rid of the idea and
replaced it with a city council elected by all
the citizens.
What we need on campus is less cause
for bickering, for there is enough of it now.
UBC is not like* a province or. federated
country. It is like a small city. The very fact
that we call our government a council is evidence to that fact.
TKe student government need represent
no one but the students of this university.
We do not need representatives of pressure
groups.
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Alter reading your editorial of
Oct. 12, I find it neces-jary to clarify my position with respect to
the,incidents of the past week invent Intf mysetf and other members
of students* Council.
As fai* as I aUT concerned, the
lncidet which took place TueBday
evening last, ended Tuesday evening last. With this attitude, I approached Mr. Lyon on Wednesday
morning to Inform him of the
possibility of a similar mktter be-
ing brought up' troih the floor of
the Oehehil meeting that day. This
rumor had come to my knowledge
f conclusion of events Tuesday even-1
just the previous day and with the
ing. I was of the opinion that it1
was not my position to support it.
I am still of the opinion that I am
not and wiUnot be 1 a position to
shpport it should the matter bej
raised ThttttdS^ next, either. "The'
uhaefgtodia tiBfics ot s6twe Coun-'
citlors" have not been brought to
my attention and I think you will
find d> very large limb Is being'
sawed off in making that statement In the Ubyssey.
The situation Is not completly
hopeless. Most, If not all, of the
parties Involved are willing to
continue working for the good
of the AMS generally. The year's
activities can be completed to the
general well-being of all.
Yours truly,
Bill Neen, chairman use.
LIKI8 COLUMN
Bdltor, the Ubyssey:
"i have Jntft read your criticism
of the Province's expose of "Stalin's Secret Plans."
I thought lt was an excellent column. We hear a good deal of talk
these days about iv free and honest press, but I personally would
settle for at least art Intelligent
approch to the news.
In any case, congratulations on
a tine piece of Journalism.
Sincerely,
Bay Gardner, sec,
B.C. Peace Council.
7
And AH That    By Les Armour
Sociologists tell us that a substantial
majority of North Americans spend most of
their- lives dreaming of achieving Executive
Status.
Next to the Esqtiire calendar girl, the
plush carpet and private office probably
ranks tops among the continent's day dreams.
-■•■ This column, having achieved Executive
Status some three weeks ago, feels that the
time has come to give a first hand report on
the Great American Dream.
Take this morning, for instance.
Bright-eyed and god-like we strode with
a majestic air into the Publications Board.
" As we marched past the outer door we
came upon three freshette reporters busily
debating the relative handsomeness of the
managing editor and the executive editor.
"Who," said one of them looking hard at
us, "is that?"
"Oh him . . .", said the second. "He's
a guy from the Society of Microbiologists
come to sneak in a meeting notice."
"No, you're wrong," opined the third.
"He's an assistant janitor. I can tell from
his baggy trousers. Besides, he hasn't shaved
for a week."
Maintaining a stiff upper lip, we ignored
them and strode toward our office.
At the door we were stopped by a restraining hand.
"I'm sorry," said a firm young man. "You
can't go in there. They're having a meeting
of photographers there."
Oh well, we reflected, democracy is a
great thing. Who are wc monopolize an office?
.Filled with a spirit of righteousness we
button-holed the city editor.
"Think we've got a good story for you,"
we said authoritatively.
The city editor looked blank. "Oh that,"
he sai'd. "I washed that out an hour ago.
Haven't got enough reporters }o handle stuff
like that."
Only a trifle dejected, We moved ott to
the news desk. The news-editor was busily
murdering other people's copy with a thick
black pencil.
"How about a nice 72 point line on the
front page," we asked.
"Nah," said the news editor. "It'd haul
up page ofte. Now look, fella, I'm busy. See
me later."
Beaten, we paid a visit to the managing
editor. Maybe we could persuade him to find
some pictures of pretty girls on page one.
He was polite but firm. Patiently, he explained that a three column picture of Dean
Mawdsley in academic robes would be much
better for the paper. #
We were about to slink out the door
when a deep booming voice intbned our
name.
Two great beefy han^s encirlced our
throat.
"Armour," said the voice. "You're the
guy responsible for leaving my middle intial
out of the paper.
"I'm gonna call a special general AMS
meeting to have you thrown out Armour.
You're a menace to this campus." •
We disentagled ourself and thanked him
profusely for his thoughtfiilness.
We felt much better.
FOR SALE
RADIANT ELKCTltlC WA'TER
heater, like new. Only $22.50. DE
1220R, evgs. 9—2
BADMINTON RACQUET. (RE-
paired). Cheap. Phone^ CE 6800
after 6 p.m.
CABLE SKI HARNESS, BRAND
new, miciomatlc adjustment, excellent buy at ?8. Anne at KE 3497R1
TRANS^ORTXTidW
WANTED — RIDERS PROM COM-
mercial Drive and 9th Ave or 12th
Ave. Phone FA 3O10L.
WANTED — RIDE FROM VICTN-
Ity of 40th and OranviUe for 8:30's
dally. Phone Pat at KB 8338. 9—3
RIDE WANTBI FRlOM GlLLEY
Ave., South Burna<by. Call Gerry at
DE 6240L.
DRIVING TO SEATTLE SATUR-'
day, returning Tuesday. Would,
like passenger. Ph. Vincent AL
3296M.
RIDE WANTED FROM VICINITY
of 41st or 49th and Victoria Drive
for 9:80*8 Mon. to Sat. Can go
home any time after 3:30. Phone
Frank,. FR 6923. 9—2
RIDER FOR 8:30 FROM S. BURN-
aby. Mon. to Fr. John after 7. DE
1393L.
RIDE FOR 8:30's FROM THE Vicinity of Collingwood and Point
Grey Road. Phone Doug, CE 3509.
LOST
LOST — ONE PAIR MEN'S HORN
rim glasses, bifocle. Ph. CH 1195.
Reward.
PLASTIC UMBRELLA W I T H
green trim on Tuesday, October 2.
Phone CH 363?.
TOP OF GREY WATERMAN'S
fountain pen. «Please turn In at
AMS office or phone AL 0583M.
ONE NAVY BLUE RAIN COAT,
belt missing and one light brown
overcoat with Everett, Wash, label
Inside. Please contact Bob Stewart,
KE 2232L.
M1S9ING FROM UPSTAIRS PH-
ysics coat rack, hlue grey cravat-
twill overcoat, carrying Dunn Bros,
label. Please return to Physics office.
A NAVY BLUE JACKET IN HUT
HL2 or In Library. Ph. KE 2908L.
BOARD AND ROOM
CLEAN, COMFORTABLE ROOM
with or without breakfast on 41st,
nenr Dunbar. Immediately available.  KE  r.S42M.
What would you d6 if $155
lap?
It actually happened to a lucky
canipus-Ii&.bitue just five daya after
lectures resumed. Of course lt
took a little prompting, for God
helps those who help themselves.
Picture yourself pitting In* the
bus stop having coffee—you notice
a woman's purse on the shelf under
the counter. It's owner engaged
elsewhere. It's a simple matter to
whWlc It' ott the shelf. Vou do.
MA^W you recognise the owner
to bC a menjber of the UBC administration staff, If so y6u pi'obt'bly
khow staff payday ls just past. But
maye we're leaving too much to in-
fell out of the blue into your
telllgece maybe it was just luck.
So you have a new purse, some- *
body else's monthly earnings a-nd
personal documents, including airforce discharge papers and a wallet. Good work!
Now, we knbW you can use. the
money, and maybe the purse, but
what do you do with tbe wallet
and the documents?
The wallet is valued tdt sentimental reasons. Probably you have
no sentiment, but the owhei* has,
Keep tbe money. Pleats mall, an-
oymously of course, the wfcllet and'
papers to the woman whose purse
you stole.      D.K.
A
fi
the Alma Miter Society Monday released the following list ot
names of persons who have neglected . to pay pledges to the War Memorial Gymnasium.
They are asked to pay their
pledges at the AMS office, ln Brock
Hall.
C. J. Austrom, Norman S. Babb,
CLASSIFIED
•
WANTIO
GERMAN 100: COMPLETE GER-
man course (Russon) Chem 200.
Talbot's Quantitative Analysis. Ph.
AL 3760R.
A COPY, OF DR. CRUMB'S .MAN-
uel on Money and Banking. Phone
Vern, ifR 8*687.
WANTED — GARAGE SPACE IN
vicinity of 44600 block W.' !2th.
Phone Bill at AL 0U9Y.
NOTICIS
PRE • MET) NURSES MIXER, 150
gorgeous, glamorous, beatutiful
nurses, Oct. 19 in Brock Hall. Tickets 50c at AM£ or from any Pre-
Me'4 'executive or nurse. 9—3
WILL J. M. KINGSBURY piEfASE-
call at the Alma Mater Society
Lost ahd Found.
PRE - MEfofi—WILL ALL VOLTJN-
tears for our Homecoming float
please meet in Brock Hut 2 Wed.
noon.
PRE - MED GRADS — ARRANGE
to have your grad pictures taken
en-mtms Friday afternoon.
THERE WILL BE A MEETING AT
noon today ln the Common Room In
HM3 of all those students who
would like to join the Psychology
Club. Interesting business on the
agenda.
FIRST EG-KITS KLUB DANCE
will be held Saturday, Oct. 20 at
8:30 p.m. at the Kit's Community
Centre. Admission 25c for members. 50e for non-members.
MMM* 10 DANCE
t   •   QUICKLY
, •    PRIVATELY
3 Lessons $5.00-10 Lessons $15.00
ronces Murphy
Da tare School
Alma Hell
CE. 6878
3«79 W. Broadway
— BA 3428
P. A. Babcock, Brook Back; Alan
Bacon, John S. Badanlc, ChitWai B.
Bailey, Robert Bailey, Roderick
Bailey, William J. Bailey, Douglas
W. Bajus, Glen W. Baker, Olenson
J. Baker, Patrick J. BiMtf, Richard Baker, Marlon Baldwin, Charles Ballam, George Bancroft, John
P, Bandy, James A. Banham, M.
P. Bannd, Allan Barad.^J. M. Baril,
Robert Barker,. Douglas Barnett,
Joan Barton, Margaret Barton, Joseph Baruqh, Stanley Basford, Betty
Basssett, John E. Bastin, William
R. Batten, John Battershill, Marg-
aret Batty, Alfred Bawtree, Edna*,
Baxter, Margaret Baxter, DaVld
Begg, Leon* Behm, Brian Ball,
Bealrsto, John Beard, James Du
Beaton, M. C. Beckett, Jean M,\
Douglas Bell Harry E. Bell, Kenneth E. Bell, William J. Bell James
E. Bellamy, Robert Bentley, Alan*
K. Berry, Kenneth Berry, Marilyn
Berry, Ronald Bickiiell, Norman
Biehl, George G. Blely, W^ianhe
Blgeby, Norma M. Bllan, Allsffl 8.
Blnns, John R. Bird, B. A. "Blckett,
Ronald A. G. Blrnle Anti Blssett,
G. Blssonette, Brian Bjarnason,
Delbert Black, William G. Blake, R.
J. Blackball, Beryl Blandy, A. G.
Blatchford, York R. Blayney, H.
E. Blomqulst E. C. Blundell, Stanley Boale, Thomas L. Boal, Peter
Bodnar, Genevieve Bone, Ann R.
Boniface, Barry D. Booth, Edgar
Booth, A. H. Borthwick, Henry
Rose, William Bottlng, John C.
Bouck, N. M. Boultbee, David Bowden, Eleanor Bowes, M. * Bawkett,
Thoma*s Boyd, R. E. Bradley, Bon-
nlo Boyd, Ronald Bradshaw, John
Bradshaw, F. D. Braid wood, Thomas G. Braid wood, J. W. BValthwalte,
and P. J. Brennan.
U.B.C.
STUDfeNTS
Luncheon Special'
A Full Course Meal For
at
j* H.    Pu    JJ* ■
v.
4865' W. 10th Ave.'
Near University Oates
TO UNIVERSITY STUDENTS
Do not miss hearing the world-ifamous Italian Opera Star of the "
leading opera houses, In Europe and America! (Five musical films,
radio, records, opera, concert, television).
TAGLIAVINI
Vancouver flocked to see and hear him In one of his chief films,, the
opera, The Barber of Seville. Although he receives three thousand
dollars a night, tickets to his concert can be had at $1.18 rush,
good'seats at $1.76. Modern Musdc, TA. 3622, *
One Night only—Thursday—Deman Autitorlum, 8:30 p!m.
MSJa„lB*ftCrj?tlonal„Celebrity Concerts (Est. 1921)
lan-mi ,iii[i ig
i'jj^jiLjiiui.i <i am
BOOK
Hrs.: 9 a.m. to 5 pirn.; Saturdays 9 a.m. to nopn
Loose Leaf Note Books, Exercise' Books
Ahd Scribblers
GRAPHIC ENGINEERING PAPER, BIOLOGY PAPER
LOOSE LEAF REFILLS, FOUNTAIN PENS AND INft
AND DRAWING INSTRUMENTS
Owned and Operated hy the University of B.C. *wrT
.<  4.
•   \
Tuesday, October 16,1951
THE UBYSSEY
Page Th'rst
FLORENCE McNEIL—Editor
e florm icmcmM
PRE-MED SOCIETY
ftAYS HOST TO
NURSES AT DANCE
Nurses from Vancouver General and St. Paul's Hospitals
will be guests at a mixer to be
held at Brock Hall on October
10.
The dance is sponsored by
the Pre-Med Society, and admission is 50c. Tbls price includes refreshments and enter*
tainment.
Dancetlme is 8:30. Music Vvill
be provided by Radsoc, featuring "the beBt  bands  in lhe
Pan-Heft
Rushee
Exha
"It's over at last," sighed Monica
Holty, 3rd year Arts, w|en asked
how she felt as sorority pledging
period concluded. '
Three weeks of attending coke
parties, teas, closed parties and
table rushing in the Caf have insured a busy back-to-the-campus
season lor over 100 rushees.
Particularly harassing was the
effort to remember the many new
names ahd faces, affirmed Monica*,
who was not on the campus last
year.
She pointed out that pledge*
must conform to standards set by
the Pan Hellei|c Society, which
requires girls to have high moral
standards and to have completed
at least 136 units toward their first
year at univesrlty. They should
have *.'.* scholastic rating of 60 per
cent or over and be proceeding towards a degree.
During pledging period, which
lasts until-Initiation ceremonies in
December, pledgees meet regularly
In the Caf where they wait upon
their fraternal brothers and sisters.
A sense of belonging ls what
Monica anticipates from sorority
affiliations. She explains that fraternal orders aim to provide a congenial and refined environment for
Its members, to teach them tact
and tolerance "hy close association
with others, and to emphasize
group loyalty.
No, we arc not shocked. Only
glad of an*opportunity to teli'you
all about Home Economics. Incidentally drop over simetime for
cookies'  (and an education!)
Plan Meeting
There will be a general meeting
of all co-eds on the Campus, Wednesday noon In Room 100, Forestry
and Geology Building (formerly
Applied Science.)      , ,
The meeting Is sponsored by the
Women's Undergraduate Society.
Purpose Is to explain to women
students the proposed constitutional revisions und to clarify the
Issues. Women will then be able
to take a stand and vote at the
mass AMS  meeting Thurday.
MAftY
'     Home Ec Grad Has Choice
Of Marriage Or Career
Editor's   Note:
In the Ubyeisy ef October 2. an editorial stated. In part:
"Home economlos students ootid well spend two or three years in
"professional apprenticeship somswhere"—the.staff and equipment
oould thus be dospsnstd with—and the fine new building devoted
to this study rsvsmpedi for use by some more etrlotly university
oours*.    '
The saving would be considerable and tittle would be lost." $.
The following article was written by a Home le, student, who
gives her opinions on ths subject.
By THELMA BARER
Fourth Year Heme leortomloa Student
No Home Ec student was really shocked by the brave
editorial of a few weeks ago. Of course, Home Economics .Is a
technical course, but then so is agriculture.
To suggest that Home Ec. thouldt>
be divided as Is the nursing course,
part on campus and part In local
hospitals is a wonderful idea—but
we are already doing this! Fourth
year students spend almost half of
their last year working in campus
cafeterias: Brock Faculty Club,
Acadia, Fort Camp and the famed
Cafeteria.
But Home Economics is more
than cooking and sewing. Courses
taken ln the four years include:
commerce, bacteriology, chemistry,
psychology, English, biology, physics, in addition to tbe requisite
courses of nutrition, house aad
business management] quantity
cookery, marriage add family relations, textiles ahd draping and design.
The Home Economics graduate
moves into a valuable position immediately upon graduation. Never
before has there been such empha
sis on world health and particularly nutrition. The demand for trained food and clothing; experts, not
to mention writers in the field of
Home Economics, demonstrators
and food and nutrition experiments. Responsible for all the recent advances in nurtition and diet
in disease, the Home Economist is
Indeed a valuable contributor to
our society.
Because every Home Ec. student knows that upon graduation
she Is a valuable part of many aspects of Importance in the field
of just plain living, she is not worried or shocked or even aggravated by any obviously Ignorant remarks from the sidelines. Was It
so very long ago that women medical students were also considered
an "added expense" at medical
schools?
We are only sorry that more students and indeed, more people generally, could visit our building,
could interview our graduates and
could read a few Nutrition Joun-
arts. It woul certainly be an enlightenment and something that would
give any UBC student a great
feeling of pride.
Every woman graduate faces a
choice of marriage versus career,
although In some cases these may
be successfully combined. Home
Ec. could not offer any better background for marriage with Its studs
of management, efficiency and
cookery and nutrition. Home Ec.
also offers some of the highest paid
carrers for woman in all of Canada. (The two highest paid women
in all of Canada are dietitians for
Eaton's, Toronto.)
«AY NORRIS
, here Wednesday
President
■y   MAUAIIN   WADDIN ^
Ubyseey Staff Wrltor
Featured today In this column is
the extremely able and very popular president of WUS, Mary Lett.
Among Mary's varied duties is
attendance at the regular Student
Council meetings. In co-operation
with the council secretary and the
WAA president, she represents the
feminine point of view to the predominately male council.'
Also, Ma'ry presides over the biweekly meetings of the WUS Council whkii ls composed of represent-
Itlves from all undergraduate societies which bave women members.
HI-Y  PRESIDENT
During her high school career
at Magee, Mary was the president
of the Girl's Hl-Y. In her second
year at UBC she wk*s president of
the Phi sub - chapter of Phrateres.
As third year Arts representative
on WUS she gained much knowledge to help her keep up with the
Innumerable amount of activities
ln which the WUS president takes
part.
Outside, Mary's WUS interests
is her enthusiasm for skiing, selling, and her special favorite, VOC.
Mary enjoys this club because, as
she says, "It's members are very
genuine."
INTIftEST HELPS
Mary's sincere Interest In people will surely assist her ln her
chosen field ot social work.
Her trip to Europe this summer
has further broadened her outlook
and understanding.
Noted for her capability and friendliness, Mary Lett is admirably
suited to head the women undergraduates on the UBC campus.
One of tbe best Jazz combo's in
Canada—Ray Norris and his quintet—will be on the campus Wednesday for a noon bour concert iu
the auditorium.
Brought to the campus by tbe
Ja*zz Society, the 'Norris quintet
has won acclaim for their unique
musical styllngs, '
Fraser McPherson will display
his talents on the elarinet, a change
from his old alto sax, and apparently a happy one.
Drummer Mickey McMartin and
bassist Stan Johnson, and pianist
Christ Coge complete the rhythm
section.
Admission Is 25 cents.
Large Crowd
Year's firs* P«sp
Hickapbo's presented their first pep meet of the year to
a lalrge crowd in the Armories Friday noon.
The meet got under way with an <$>-
actural blood donation on the stage
to prove to all present  that  "it
doesn't hurt a bit."
At the some time as the operation was taking place, there was a
short pep talk urging supporters to
come out to Saturday's game.
FOUR D$T6, DASH
Ode of the highlights of the show
were the Four Dots and a Dash.
Stars of the quintet were Dick Stephens, John Wllllnghby, Al Fon-
seca and Audrey Easterbrook who
sang "Dream," "Hand Me Down
y Walking Cane." As an encore
hen led a sing song of "I've Been
^Working On the Rail Road."
HAIL USC
Star of the meet was Eleanor,
well-known to those on the Campus
last year. She sang, accompanied
by Mickey Martin on drums, Stan
Johnson, base, and John Emerson,
piano, such songs as "Sometimes
I'm Happy," "By the Light of the
Silvery Moon," and also two spirituals.
To conculde the show, alter a
few minutes entertainment from
John Emerson, the Instrumental
trio rendered, among other tunes,
a medley which started out as
"Hop Scotch Polka" and ended
with "Hall UBC."
COOKING, CLEANING. AND BUDGETS
Batchtntf Can Be Fun
By   BEA   CHESTER
'1Oh, you're batching, are
you? That must be fun. and
such good experience, too.".
I always nod in agreement
when I hear these now so familiar words.
Oh, yes, I'm learning to cook
and clean house and balance
a budget, Why, when I, graduate from Varsity I'll make a
wonderful   wife.
Of course, everybody has to
learn, and that first batch of
hot cakes unnerved me a trifle.
Hut now they dissolve in water
and don't bend the forks.
I'm learning how to buy. too.
I ,i*;o into tho Inrnl siiperni'.vkot
anil  take home all the canned
been*    and    spaghetti    1    cau
carry.
t
These delicacies, along with
peanut butter for lunches will
constitute my food foi1 the
week. Of course I do get tired
of beans and spaghetti, but If
I do I have discovered a substitute. If I can make lt to the
dog's dish before he can, I/get
a meat meal.
Then, too, I got, parcels from
home. A shoe box full of cookie
crumbs can be quite nourishing. Economy comes first, especially for a student, so I
don't wu«te as much as a
single crunil). Mixed with water
1 find they make substantial
l>io  crust.   Mixed   with  alcohol
they're a good tonic.
It's amazing how well I get
along with my room mate.
It's sometimes necessary to
count the beans when It's her
turn to serve supper. However,
we co-operate very well, es-
peclf.lly at essay time.
We seem to have trouble
keeping our rooms as tidy as
we would like.
The kitchen Is fairly neat. We
keep the tin mug on the shelf
beside our two spoons. The
hedroom-study-llvlng room la a
little cluttered. We can't seem
to keep all the hooks In one
apple box, and we like to keep
the chair clear for guests.
Yes, lueedd, batching; is fun
and such good experience!
Clement
To Receive
Award
Dr. F. M. Clement, retired
Dean of Agriculture, will be
made a Fellow of the Agriculture Institute of Canada at a
meeting to be held Tuesday at
8:06 p.m. in the Kelly Douglas
auditorium.
The"* award, made for "outstanding contributions to agriculture'ln
Western Canada," will be presented by Dean of Agriculture Dr. Blythe Eagles.
A life membership in the Institute to Dr. Robert Newton, past
president of the University of Alberta, will also be made at the
meeting by UHC president emeritus. Dr. L. S. Kllnk. Dr. F. H.
Smith, chief district veterinarian
for the health of animals division,
will deliver the adtlres-s of the evening
Activities
Cancelled
At McOill
MONTREAL — (CUP — For one
week, no student activities v ill
take place at McGill University.
In a pla*n to cut down the number of failures, student council approved u recommendation to close
the student union for all activities
and cancel publications of the McGill Dally, newspaper, during the
wek of November 19 to the 23th,
A concentrated effort ls being
mt'.cle by the uiflverslty authorities
to impress upon the students need
for getting time and paying adequate attention to their studies,
the McGill Dally reported.
MEMBERS
TO MEET FRIDAY:
M ARTS 102
All IRC members Interested
In attending the Northwest International Relations Club regional conference in Portland,
Ore., vvill meet Friday in AM
102.
The conference, a meeting of
representatives from IRC clubs
at northwestern universities,
is scheduled for November 2
•and 3 at Lewis and Clark College. It will include five round
table discussions on specific
problems ln National Defense,
Europe, the Near East, Fat-
East and* Southeast Asia.
UBC delegates to the 1959
• conference at Tacoma were
Tom Duckworth and Lea Hors-
field.
a
Special   to   The   UbyNsy
SYDNEY, A'ust. — The University of Sydney has launched a housing appeal through the Lord Mayor
of Sydney and the* city council to
secure proper accommodations lor
students oa the campus.
Chancellor of the University, Mr
Charles Blackburn, stated that
without communal living quarters,
the students were unable to pursue their studies properly or to participate in cultural activities.
A professor at the university
stated that most of the 1300 students from the country are living
in deplorable -conditions in fcyduey.
Especially bad are living coalitions of ex-service personnel, wno
have to live In garages o- worst;
often separated from their wires.
Organizers of the appeal* Ir.tehd
to approach civic leaders of tha
area* and enlist their support. It is
hoped that they will take practical
steps to raise funds to provide al
least adequate accomodation for
the students an official said.
35 YEARS Of JMVIC!
TO THI UNIVERSITY Of
BRITISH COLUMBIA,
ITS FRATERNITIES
AND SORORITIES.
THm'S AHASm
wkwmsmm'
Enjoy
a pipe with
ssUWter
MILD
BURLEY
TOBACCO
at its
best..•
 ■.wj-ww^-j'^
Save Wisely TODAY.,
for TOMORROW
Consult any of the following Sun Life Representatives who have had wide experience in budgeting
your income to meet essential insurance needs:
FRED McCOLL
JACK PEARSON
JOHN TENER
LARRY WRIGHT
J. J. CAPOZZI
J. R. BRANDON
ROYAL BANK BLDG., VANCOUVER
PACific 5321
SUN UFE OPCANADA ' ^-(r'-^jjjpKfS
Page Four
THE UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 16,1951
—Photo by ■ill OurnTngham
NO OFFENSIVE BLOCKING was the sad Uie of UBC's 52-6 loss to Western Washington Saturday. Flashing George Puil (left) broke through a number of times only to get
heitoned in by Washington players and no one to block for him. Puil turned in by far tiie
best performance of the game.
ngs
Batter
Loss In
i
Birds For
Five Years
TT
AUX MacGILLIVRAY
FEW misty rumours I'd like to quash concerning my
-pedal visit with members of the UBC engineering
faculty yesterday*.
*_*J___*__J_tJ_l '
, (1) That t,he engineers were anything but polite to iiie during
ouj* sanfulnary march through the cafeteria. My only complaint is
" Vv        v that they forgot I wa* on their
shoulder's when we wont
#throught the doors. I_think one
of my shoulders Is still there.
(2) That upon getting to the
Armories that nurses asked
astontehedly looking at me,
"What Is THAT!" after the redshirts had dumped me Into a
plush wicker chair.
(3) That After giving up my
pink of existence that Alan
Fotherlngham analysed it find-
it to be of even higher conteut
than Lucky Lager.
(4) Thut I needed 21 tf*ana,l'u-
sioni-s to put me on my feet
again, lt took only 23.
DON GLEIG
. .looked good
i
ETTKHS today:
"Dear  Mr.  MacGlllivray:
Please accept this m notice
oj an official challenge from me to^a fencing duel, Wednesday, 12:30
on the Arts Lawn. Failure to show up will be an admission of your
cowardice. The UBC Fencing Club ls looking forward to your appearance.
Sincerely
Sam Allmsn, Fencing secretary.
*
Don't Wanta Sot Foiled
Dear Sam: '
Are you asking tne to spill more blood? I think I've given enough
already. So true to the great strain which has run through our family
from Alexander, 1 to tho present holder of the name, I feel I must
disappoint you. A pint of blood once a week is enough for me.
Sincerely Almac.
*
*
FTBIt wutchlng the 'Birds get whipped Saturday ut the Stadium
some wiseacre iiulpped. "UBC has a well balanced club. They're
all had."
H>
*
Jelly's Optimistic Kind
One thins I like about Jelly Andersen, lie's au optimistic kind ot
coach. Just after the stadium fiasco says .lolly. 'Birds should win next
week agulnst Eastern Oregon."
*
*
Notice Don (Jlelg finally sot out with the Varsity soccer eleven
Sunday and played a terrific game. Locals should have won that ball
Sann* so they tell me,
As Jack he long, top Vancouver sports columnist might say: It
pays io lie a sport particularly it' the lOimineers try to persuade you
to drain yuiirsrill', *
UBC Sport Picture
Has Silver Lining
By PETE LUZSTY
Ubyesey Football*Writer
Western Washington Vikings
the team that two weeks ago dump*
ed Conference champion Eastern
squad 59-0, did the expected here
Saturday steamrolllng over game,
,but definitely inferior Thunderbirds, 52-6.
Before 4000 chilled fans, Vjfrelty
was handed their severest licking
since they switched to the Amerl
can code in 1946. The Bellingham
squad that Included one lone home
town product had only one occasion to worry, and that was In tbe
first quarter when Oeorge Phil
broke loose and ran 60 yds. for
touchdown to narrow the gap by
making the score 13-6,
GOT WORSE
From that time on, things start
ed to get worse for the locals, with
Cal   Murphy   repeatedly   fumbling
the ball, and the substitute quarter
buck Roger Kronquist doing no bet
ter.   Hod   it   not   heen   for   deter
mined defensive play by Bill Ewing
Bob   Hind march s  drive,   Al   tizzy's
repeated good  blocking, and  Dave
MucFarlane's   punting   that   must
now rate among the longest In out
Conference,   the   half   time   score
would have  been far worse than
20-6.
Alberts Rugby
Lads Trample
Ex-Brits 17-tf
By BRIAN WHARF
*    Ubyssey  Rugby Writer
The only consolation for
UBC football fans after weekend play must be that while
the much-publicized Thunderbird grid-iron squad wilted and
collapsed under a red-hot Western Washington attack, their
country cousins the Varsity
Chiefs came up with their second straight win in Miller Cup
Rugby competition.
It.was only after a hard fought
game with a scrappy I Britannia's
team that Varsity came, out on
the long end of a 17-0 Bcore. The
final result was not iadlcative of
the general run of play aa tbe
Chiefs only displayed the exceptional brand or rugger of which
they are capable at Intervals,
THEY WIRI GOOD
It was during these intervals
that John Newton, Danny Oliver,
flay Cocking and Oesard Kirby
went over the line to register the
four tries scored by the Chiefs.
Captain Gerry Main converted tbe
latter try to complete the scoring.
' A canny veteran of many rugger
battles Gerard Kirby was definltly
the sparkplug on Saturday afternoon, while scrum half Danny
Oliver and full bake Stewart Clyne
tHayed steady and consistenly good
rugger throughout the game.
■RAVES   WIN
South Burnaby and Vindex Club
also maintained their unbeaten records to remain tied with Varsity
tor league leadership. The former
team edged the number one Row
log Club XIV 12-6 and the latter
squad eked out an equally narrow
win over the North Shore All
Blacks.
In second division Play Frank
Gowar and Bill Ware led the Var*
sity Braves to an 11-3 triumph over
the Rowing Club. Graham Cox con
verted one of the tries as the
Braves chalked up their initial win
of the season.
DEFAULT WIN
Only other scheduled game .between Varsity Redskins and Varsity Tomahawks was awarded by
default to the Tomahawks as the
Redskins were unable to field a
team.
SPORTS
ALEX MacGILLIVRAY, Sports Editor
Varsity, Collies
In Grudge Battle
Varsity Settle For Tie
In Opener At Callister
By VIC EDWARDS
Ubyssey Soccsr Writer
Varsity's upstart soccer squad dame within an ace of up-.
setting the undefeated Collingwood' eleven last Sunday at
Callister Park.
KtrrisdaU
At half time, excellent entertain
ment by both the Western Wash
lngton and the revived UBC band
was well received by the crowd.
Why UBC only had, two cheerleaders on the field as compared to
Westerns four is still a mystery
to this writer.
FIVE TOUCHDOWNS
The fact that the Vikings scored
five touchdowns in the last half
leaves little to be said. One might
add however that both teams played hard and fast ball, with men
being repeatedly carried off the
field. Leo Lund, one of the best
linebackers UBC has, will be out
for the rest of the season. So much
Tor Saturdays fiasco.
With regard to the forthcoming
game with Eastern Oregon, many
people are looking forward to it
being the turning point, not only
because it might well be start of a
winning streak by the 'Birds, but
because the campus will asume
that "blgtlme" look. In addition to
the Royal Party being at the game,
four full bands will be here to put teams even brought cheering see-
on an Impres'lve half time show.     tlons with them,
KE PRACTICE
SIT TONIGHT
UBC Thunderbird hockey
team will hold a full equipment
practice tonight at 10:30 p.m.
at Kerrisdale Arena. For the
next three weeks until the
'Birds play their first game of
the Commercial Hockey League
practices will be held every
Tuesday and Thursday at 10:30
p.m. at Kerrisdale Arena.
Coach "Wag" >Vagner lifts emphasized that all players who
*• have not turned out to date
* should come to this practice.
Varsity Bcored ln the first halt
when Bud Dobson banged the ball
ln from a scramble in front of the
Coille net. This proved to be the
best half for Varsity as they outplayed Collingwood but could not
Mid to their score.
COLLIES CAME SACK
Collingwood came back strong ln
the second half and continually
pressed the Thunderbird defence.
It was not until the last two minutes that the defence broke long
enough for the easteners to tie
the contest,
It  was   the  second  tie  ln  two
outings tor the men of the blue
bind gold. Last week they also bat-
led to a 1-1 deadlock with South
Burnaby Legion.
The team as a whole played a
much Improved game over their
first contest. Don Gleig was much
Improved at inside-right, while Don
Ronton and Bud Dobson (who scored the goal) turned out to play
after spending the week at home
trying to get rid of bad colds.
CHIEFS BOPPED
The UBC Chiefs'did not find the
going sto good at Confederation
Park in North Van and went down
0-0 at tliq hands of L&K Lumber
leagues, the L & K men frolllced
with the young and Inexperienced
UBC boys.
Howie Lear and Rogers Fox played a hard game for UBC.
Kickapoos
Demand
Support
"Unless the Kickapoos receive
more support from the student body
pep meets, home coming parade
and other ceremonies, will be discontinued," Doug Franklin. MC of
the first Kickapoo Pep Rally Fri*
day announced.
A meeting will be held today at
12:30 ln the Men's Club room of
Brock Hall. The size of the turn*
out, at this meeting will decide
whether or not Pep Meets will be
continued.
Tennis Meeting
There will be a meeting of the
Tennis Club on Wednesday, Oct.
17, ln Hut M9 at 12:30 p.m. All
members and prospective members
are urged to attend.
Goli Start
Annual Sport
Intramural Volleyball got off to
a good Mart last week with seven
games being played. The girls were
very enthusiastic and a couple of
MUGS SWIMMERS LOOK
GOOD IH FIRST WORKOUT
Coach Doug Whittle held the first swim team training
period of the 1951 season yesterday, and judging by the
quality of the men turning out, UBC will once more be
favored for the Conference Crown.
Both the Junior and Senior Varsity hopefuls met in
the new gym and underwent the first of a series of dry land
excercises that are a must before waterwork can start.
Added strength was given the team when Max Bertram
voiced his intention of competing this year, and by the
presence of Dick Clayton who will be diving.
$200. TRADE-IN ALLOWANCE
FOR ANY CAR, ANY AGE —
ON A NEW AUSTIN
TERMS
A-40 AUSTIN SEDAN $1710.00
WE HAVE GOOD USED CARS
MASTERS & SON
804 WESTMINSTER HWY.
LULU ISLAND
RICH. 0740
Vancouver Branch Office — 402 W. Pender Street
ERIC V. CHOWN, LLB., Branch Manager

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