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The Ubyssey Feb 19, 1925

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Full Text

 Issued Weekly by the Students' Publications Board of The University of British Columbia.
w
Volume VII.
VANCOUVER, B.C., FEBRUARY 19th, 1925
No. 16
WILL VARSITY .
KEEP THE CUP?
i/Great Rugby Struggle at
Brockton February 28th
The Varsity McKechnie cup rugby
team is working night and dt y for
the game of Saturday, Februa <■• 28,
with the strong Vancouver Rep team.
The game is the crucial one of the
McKechnie cup series, and a win
means the trophy for Varsity for another year. The team is doing everything in its power; every man is turning out every morning at six-thirty,
and the most rigorous training is being done. Tihe squad is absolutely
determined to keep the cup for 1925.
The Rep team is stronger than it
has ever been this season. The coming of the All-Blacks forced them into
getting into the best condition possible, and Varsity has never gone
against a stronger team. Certain
tactics of the All-Blacks will probably
be adopted by both teams, and the
keenest struggle ever witnessed in
Vancouver 'may be expected when
the teams meet at Brockton Point
oval a week from Saturday.
This is tihe last big rugby game of
the year. Every student should see
it. Tickets will be on sale next Monday, and students may get them for
their own special section of the grandstand. The team deserves every support, and the students can give that
support by turning out, and rooting
hard to bring the McKechnie cup
back to Varsity for another year.
Let's go, Varsity.
Victoria College
^y    Invades Varsity
Basketball and Rugby
Encounters Staged
Victoria College athletes invaded
Varsity territory Friday, Saturday and
Sunday to play return games with the
U. B. C. rugby and basketball teams.
The Victorians lost the rugby, 3-0,
when they played the Freshmen; and
basketball honors were "divided. The
Victoria women were too fast for the
co-eds while the men proved easy for
the VarsJtjLJntermediate B squad.
Almost 50 members of the Victoria
College Alma Mater took in the trip
and were the guests of the Arts men
at the smoker and the women at High
Jinks. The co-eds were accompanied
by Mme. E. Sanderson-Mongin. They
returned to Victoria on the Sunday
boats some going in the morning and
others at night. Several of the students were taken to the new buildings at Point Grey and other points of
interest,  by their Vancouver friends.
Day After Tomorrow—
Con Jones' Park
Third Round of
Mainland Cup
Everybody Out!
2:30 p.m.
Miss Jean   Tolmie Miss   Helen   McGill
Miss  Vera   Mather. Miss Phyllis Gregory
CO-EDS TO MEET
OREGON MAR. 3rd
^Keen Debate Expected on
Japanese Problem
Great interest is being aroused in
the forthcoming debate with Oregon
Agricultural College. Two very strong
teams of women have been chosen to
represent U. B. C. Misses Helen MacGill and Phyllis Gregory will travel to
Corvallis, while Misses Vera Mather
and Jean Tolmie will speak in Vancouver. Miss MacGill has achieved an
enviable record as a debater during
her four years at Varsity. Paired with
Miss Gregory she has won debates
for Arts '25 in each of the four years.
As President of the Women's Lit.,
Miss Gregory has transformed the society from an institution that was
slowly dying of dry rot, into the thriving organization that it now is. Miss
Vera Mather won the women's oratorical contest last year, and has several times distinguished herself in
forensic activities. She is a quick
thinker, able to grasp a point and refute it with consummate ease and
skilfulness. Miss Jean Tolmie, who
is Miss Mather's team mate at home,
headed the whole province in matriculation last year. If the freshmen (and
freshettes) have any class spirit at
all they will turn out en masse to support the first international debates
representative that the freshman class
has had since 1922, and the first
freshette debater that has ever represented the college. As to her speaking ability it is sufficient to remember
that she was the winner of the '27-'28
interclass debate. She won the High
Jinks costume prize, and has generally upheld the honor of her year.
CAMPAIGN NEEDS
HEARTY SUPPORT
Students Asked for Caution
y Money
Members of the three senior years
have very vivid recollections of the
campaign waged last year to raise
money for the Point Grey playing
fields. The drive was a great success, thanks to the loyal co-operation
of the entire student body, and well
over $8,000 was raised. To get this
sum much self-sacrifice was practiced
by the students, many of whom will
never benefit from its use.
At the present time two fine playing
fields have been constructed with the
money, but the fund is now exhausted.
There are still many necessities that
have to be purchased; the grounds
have to be fenced, a grandstand erected, and track equipment procured for
the W. I. A. A. U. meet to be held here
soon. To meet all these extra expenses, a further campaign is being
inaugurated, and the student body is
again asked to co-operate. It has
been suggested that the caution money of the students be devoted to this
worthy cause, and should the suggestion be put to a vote, it is certain that
the self-sacrifice involved will not hinder their generosity. It is up to the
students to show the hard-working
committee in charge that everyone is
solidly behind them, and that the
students are willing to sacrifice to
insure the athletic future of the University—"Attend the Meeting Friday."
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28
BIGGEST GAME OF THE YEAR
VARSITY vs. VANCOUVER
5000 TO SEE
SPRING PLAY
Will "You and I" Be
There ?
This year is the tenth anniversary
of the Players' Club's foundation. The
members are working hard to make
it the most successful year on record.
The play this year is being presented on three nights instead of the customary two. It is rumoured that the
freshmen intend holding a theatre
party, taking the balcony for one
night. We hear also that other classes
are thinking of following their example. Several of the high schools
have promised to take blocks of seats
on the different nights.
The Players' Club hope that the students will back them up in their effort
to make thia year a good one, by advertising the play among their friends.
If each student in the University sold
two tickets to non-University people
it would fill the theatre for one night.
In the past the earnings of the club
have been devoted partly to charity
and hospitals, but to a greater extent
to University undertakings. The proceeds this" year are to be devoted to
the auditorium at Point Grey. By assisting the play we are helping ourselves to swell our none too large
building fund.
In past years students with their
earlier opportunities for purchasing
tickets have acquired a large proportion of the best seats in the house, so
that the general public has had to
content itself with the cheaper seats.
This was found to deter many from
coming. The management of the
Players' Club hopes that students will
appreciate this fact. The acoustics
are equally good in all parts of the
house and a good view may be obtained even from the back row of the
"gods." By bearing this in mind and
acting accordingly, students will be
doing an act of courtesy and helping
the seat sales.
Student ticket sales will begin on
Tuesday, February 24th. Exchange
tickets will be sold. These tickets
must be exchanged for regular seat
tickets at the Orpheum box office on
or after March 2nd. The seats will
be assigned in the order that these
exchange tickets are received at the
theatre. If a self-addressed envelope
is enclosed the seat tickets will be
mailed on March 9th; if not, they may
be procured at the box office on that
date.
The prices are as follows: Boxes
and loges, $1.50; orchestra and balcony, $1.00; second balcony, 75c; reserved gallery (first five rows), 50c;
rush seats, 25c.
ARTS '20 RELAY
Arts '27 won the Annual Arts '20
relay race yesterday afternoon, covering
the course in 35 minutes, 29 4-5 seconds.
The record was 36 minutes, 23 seconds.
Arts '25 finished second, and Science '27
third.
The winning team was composed of
the following : F. Elliot, H. McWiliiams,
J. McKay, R. Parmley, J. McKinnon, A.
Sturdy,  E. Mulherne, C. Mottley. 2
THE   UBYSSEY
February 19th, 1925
MEN'S
Blue Serge Suits
In Popular Favor
For Spring
$29.75
Tailored carefully in good fitting style of full 18-ounce Indigo
serge, guaranteed fast color,
from the best looms in England. Goat is tailored in the
regular two and three-button
conservative style, finished with
a full hymo canvas, unbreakable, front and first-grade wool
twill body lining; vest closes
with five buttons; trousers are
well proportioned and have five
pockets, belt loops, plain or
cuff bottoms; sizes 35 to 44.
sr*
David Spencer
Limited
SHAMELESS SHEBA
, SITS IN ON SMOKER
Elsinore Retells Hot Jokes
LUNCH     TEA     SUPPER
Household and Vegetarian Cooking
Phone, Seymour 2940
The Cosey Corner
MRS. DANBY SMITH
Rooms for Private Parties, Etc.
116 EMPIRE BUILDING
603 HASTINGS ST., W.
Opposite Bank of Nora Scotia
"Xerxes," said K. A. S., poking his
head in the door, "write up the Arts
Smoker."
"Wottineck do you think I am,"
said A. X. M., "a blinking reporter?"
"Shut up and write that story," replied our chief reporter and disappeared from the scene.
Xerxes thought deeply for a few
minutes and then spoke to me. "One
thing is certain, anyway.I can't go.
Doc Sedgewick wants to see me, I've
got to go back to the North Pole."
"Why," I protested, "Doc isn't going to the North Pole, is he?"
"Of course not," he replied, "that's
why I'm going there. So I can't go to
the smoker. But somebody must go,
so you'd better, Elsinore."
"Me?    How?"
"Oh, I've thought of that. The reason why girls have never been able
to get to the smoker so far, is that
tihey have been foolish, trying to go
disguised as a man. Kenny Noble
is to act in a skit tonight as a woman.
I'll go out and hit Kenny over the
head with a pile driver, and then you
go out in his place."
"But I . . . "
"Oh, shut up, you"re going, or else
I won't love you any more."
I went, — and, —
I enjoyed the smoker.
First of all they had some boxing
bouts. They were mostly uninteresting and brutal. Poor D'Arcy got into
a plight with a tough-looking man who
was very brutal and D"Arcy had an
awful time in winning. Then Jack
Ledingham and the much-married Kee-
nan exchanged swings at the inoffensive air for awhile. If either of them
had hit each other they would have
broken their wrists. There was to
have been a battle between two other
men, but one of them, called Madely,
I think, refused to fight, and I was very
bored indeed.
Then the Professors all made
speeches but none of them knew very
much about their subjects. Mr. Logan,
who teaches Latin, talked about English poems such as Pippa Passes, Mr.
Spencer talked about a Frenchman
called Amourette who drank a lot of
whiskey. Dr. Sedgewick gave us a
speech on not making speeches, and
Mr. Soward told us a few funny stories—which I didn't quite get the point
of.
Then there was a ventriloquist-conjurer who  was  awfully  good,  but he
(Continued on Column 4)
WORK OF GHANDI
HIGHLY PRAISED
V      Indian Speaker Tells of
Leaders Influence
NEW SPRING
Our line of New Spring Caps surpasses anything
we have been able to offer in the past, both as to
_ value and variety.    Fine English models in heavy
mm       all-wool tweeds of plain colors or fancy mixtures,
jm made  with   silk  linings,   unbreakable peaks and
leather sweatbands. There's a style and color
and quality to meet d*0 E*A d?0 f\t\
your requirements at <p£««/l/ ®* «P«J*UU
WILLIAM DICK LIMITED
Agents for the World-Fatnous JAEGER Lines
45 - 47 - 49 HASTINGS STREET, EAST
Mr. ^Williams, a native of Ceylon,
addressed the assembled students last
Tuesday noon on the very interesting
and thought-provoking subject "Ghandi
and His Influence in India." The
speaker was well qualified to speak on
the subject. He has, besides his extensive education in his native land,
spent five years in England and some
months in United States and Canada,
studying such subjects as theology,
economics, and education. The[^C.M.,
under whose auspices he spoke, is to
be congratulated on their choice.
In introducing his subject, Mr. Williams deplored the misconceptions of
foreign people and their customs. "It
is true," he said "that the world is
like a patched quilt—that it is not one
race and one people. But, it is all
composed of human beings. So, to
understand Ghandi, we must understand India, the scene of his activities." On the surface the problem
seems to be economic, sprinkled liberally with the question of politics.
But, fundamentally, the problem, the
agitation, the strife, of India is bound
up with religion.
The speaker went on to give a picture of Ghandi—modest, uncompromising, independent, quiet, undiplomatic and honest—a man, troubled when
beset with admiring crowds, happiest
when in solitude, alone with his
thoughts, alone with his conscience.
Ghandi, a successful student of law in
London, gave up his lucrative practice to become the national leader of
India—"the savior of his people."
His aim, his desire, his passion, is
"the freedom of India."—freedom in
not only political and economic life,
but also in religion and mental life.
"Let us," says he, "take our freedom.
It is not something to be begged for
from an outsider. It must come from
within. India must solve her own
problems."
Mr. Williams continued in his eloquent exposition of Ghandi's position.
The native of India must liberate his
mind from the shackles of foreign
thought. He must create an Indian
spirit that is truly and wholly Indian.
Education is to be the means. Indian
culture has remained dormant under
English education. The English native
(i.e., the native educated in English
thought), generally thinks himself a
superior being. He becomes a snob.
Ghandi feels that this is wrong; that
Indian culture is as worthy of study
as Western science. He proposes to
change the educational system of India. To this end he has formulated
a code of vows which he declares all
Indian teachers should take. They include: absolute truth in all he says,
passive resistance, celibacy, and regulation and purification of the habits.
It is Ghandi's contention that we
should sacrifice our powers for the
sake of our fellows. He asks "Is my
education for myself or for others?"
"Ghandi," said Mr. Williams, in closing, "is standing for political freedom,
for economic freedom, and, above all,
for the freedom of the soul."
Badminton Championships
Tuesday Night—King Edward Gym.
Men's Singles—D. Hincks beat
W. Argue.
Ladies' Singles^-Miss Violet Mill-
ener beat Miss Joan Creer.
Men's Doubles — Hincks and
Davidson beat Woodman and Argue.
Ladies' Doubles—Misses Millen-
er and Davidson beat Misses Hall-
arrore and Harvey.
Mixed Doubles—Miss Millener
and Woodman beat Miss Davidson
and Argue.
Ever Have
A Birthday ?
Of course you do. And
doesn't it give you a
thrill to receive a real
friendly
GREETING
CARD
on the day of days ?
Others will appreciate
your remembrance too!
SEASONABLE
CARDS
of all kinds at
GEHRKE'S ^
Printers, Engravers,
Social and Busitifii Stationers
65 l  SEYMOUR STREET
(Near Hudson's Bay)
GRANTHAMS
IRealFruitJuiceI
p4RTY PUNCH
PUKE CONCENTRATED
FRUIT JUICES
and CANE SUGAR
Phone for Sample
Fair. 1250
F. C. GRANTHAM & CO. LTD.
700-716 16th Avenue Wett
VANCOUVER. B.C.
Midway <*
Pharmacy
Cor. Broadway and
Heather Street
W. H. Caldwell, Proprietor
Phone, Fair. 840
DRUGS
LOOSE-LEAF SUPPLIES
WATERMAN'S PENS
EVERSHARP PENCILS
KODAKS
(Continued from Column 2)
made some nasty remarks about some
of  my friends.
Then Walter Turnbull and Russ Pal
mer did an awfully good nigger skit,
as they called it. I hope Xerxes gets
me a dance with them at the twenty
five class party.
My act, representing an incident on
the Victoria trip, written by Ted Morrison, was very good, as I made up
all my lines impromptu. The crowd
were very much astonished by the
smallness of my hands, but it liked my
act very much. I smoked two cigarettes, and wasn't even sick, that is,
not very.
I heard afterwards that Xerxes had
double-crossed me and gone to High
Jinks but got put out very early.
The main difference between a girl
chewing gum and a cow chewing her
cud is that the cow at least, looks
thoughtful. February 19th, 1925
THE   UBYSSEY
Just Arrived !
SOME VERY SNAPPY PULL-OVERS FROM
DEAR OLD ENGLAND. JUST THE THING
FOR THIS TIME OF THE YEAR, PRICED AT
$6.75
TURPIN "BROS., LTD.
Men's Outfitters
629 GRANVILLE ST
t
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'»••.•«•»•••••••••«
COLLEGE INN
752 ROBSON ST.
Just West of Granville.
COSY AND SELECT
4.
Club Breakfasts, Luncheons, Dinners
50c. up
Also, A la Carte.
PARTIES SPECIALLY CATERED
FOR.
8 a.m. to midnight.   Open on Sundays
Phone, Sey. 8096
The Palm Garden
FRUIT, CONFECTIONERY,
ICE CREAM and TOBACCO
HOT LUNCHES SERVED,
Also, AFTERNOON TEAS.
Phone, Fair 377
Cor. 10th & Heather St.
*■<
I
i
i
i
T
•♦"•-•-•-•-••.I
>•••••»•«•»•«••••••<
THE LESTER
Dancing Academy
SATURDAY   EVENING   SOCIAL
DANCE (by Invitation)
Instruction by Appointment
LESTER COURT
Seymour 1689
Ed. Da Motta
HAIR CUTTING a Specialty
Expert Attendant
2558 Heather Street
BADMINTON
RACQUETS Re-strung
and Repaired.
Workmanship Guaranteed.
February BRUNSWICK RECORDS
Now On Sale.
McGill-Sparling Ltd.
Sey. 4653      718 ROBSON ST.
>£*•••••••••••»••••••••••»•••••••«•-•..•..•..•..*..*..•.
.t.».*.tH».|^.4.*M|.|.|^.M.|.|Mt„|„*,^.,,4„(.|.|„|..|.,H|.f„|.^
SPORT NEWS
*••»••>•«*•>•••••••-•
!••••••••••••"•<
SECOND SOCCER
MEN TAKE GAME
\s  .
Varsity's fast stepping second soccer eleven took the measure of the
Central JPark squad at Robson's Park
when they forced the suburbanites to
take the short end of a 3-1 count. All
counters came in the first stanza and
to Hec Cant goes the honor of being
the first Varsity soccer forward of any
of the U.B.C. teams to pull off the hat
trick this season. The second team
center forward got all three goals and
beat Henderson, a former Varsity net
minder, to a standstill on every occasion. The losers' outside left scored
their lone tally when he beat Sutherland just before the interval with a
well-placed shot.
Central Park put up a stubborn resistance and if anything had the edge
on the play in the second canto. Only
the stellar defence tactics of Gibbard,
Robertson and Shields saved the day
for   the   students,
The winners were at a disadvantage
in that they had a makeshift forward
line composed mostly of defence men.
"Flea" Sutherland had a narrow escape about ten minutes from time
when he appeared to carry the ball
over the line, but referee Webster was
lenient and gave the collegians the
benefit of the doubt.
Normal Gym. Scene
> /Pf Two Encounters
The Varsity basketers broke even
in their two encounters with Victoria
at the Normal Gym o nSaturday evening. The Varsity men's intermediate
A quintette took'"fhe long end of a
19-11 count against their fast stepping island rivals. The visiting women's team pulled a surprise when
they subdued the Varsity Senior A
women by a 9-8  score.
In th men's game the Varsity squad
-had the game fairly well in hand at
all stages, but the losers provided
enough competition to make the game
lively. Norman MacDonald was the
star of the game; playing running
guard, the IT. B. C. freshman scored
five field baskets, Faubister was the
pick of the Victoria squad, scoring five
points during the game.
The Teams.
Varsity—MacDonald 10, Thompson
1, Verchere 2, Lee 3, Aune 4, Legg.
Victoria—Bailey 4, Faubister 5,
Rhodes 2, Bowers, Parfitt, Fletcher,
Rose.
Freshmen rugby player to Pug Greg-
gor, who has just put up a sign:
Wanted 15 RUGBY players to turn
out with the McKechnie squad. "I
want to turn out."
Pug:    "What's your name?'
Freshman:    "Please, sir, Hal Black."
Pug:    "You'll do."
Everybody out for the big game next
Saturday at Con Jones Park when the
fast stepping Varsity soccer eleven
stack up against their old cup rivals
the I.L.A. at Con Jones Park, 2:30
p.m., in the third round of the Mainland Cup. Varsity won that cup in'
1923 and they can win it again, but
they need lots of support—keep next
Saturday   open.
Campaign Meeting
Friday Noon
Auditorium
SATURDAY GAME
VERY IMPORTANT
A> ^   '   .	
I Varsity's first soccer eleven play
their third round Mainland Cup game
on Saturday against their old cup rivals the I.L.A. If the students are
successful they will enter the semifinals and play either the winners of
Saint Andrew's and North Shore United, or Sapperton and South Hill or
Shellys and Vancouver City.
The soccer men have the toughest
kind of opposition to contend with this
year and have been severely handicapped through the loss of Mosher, their
star goalie, and Auchinvoile at center
forward, nevertheless the blue and
gold squad are out to win next Saturday—and it's up to everyone to get
behind the team and root at the Con
Jones enclosure this week.
Varsity's team will be selected from
the following: King, Crute, Baker,
Wilkinson, Buckley, Phillips, Leding-
ham, Emery, Butler, Evans, Huestis,
Jackson and Cameron. Max Evans is
a new man, just graduated up from the
second team, come out and watch him
do  his  stuff!
Seniors Win Game
Varsity Senior A basketers moved
into a tie for second place, two points
behind the league leading Y. M. C. A.
as a result of their 39-16 win over tiie
King Edward Old Boys at the Y. M.
CV A. gym. on Saturday evening.
The Varsity team was superior to
the King Edward squad from the
start, though they were a little slow
in entering the scoring column. Varsity were much better in their shooting than the Old Boys who handled
the ball well but were off on their
shooting.
Dad Hartley starred for the college quintette, scoring ten points,
while Arnold Henderson and Tommy
Wjilkinson were close behind with
eight and seven points respectfully.
The whole Varsity team showed fine
combination, breaking free for the
basket at every opportunity.
Varsity—Arkley 4, H. Henderson 4,
A. Henderson 8, Dad Hartley 10, Wilkinson  7,  Grauer 5,  Peck 1.
King Edward—Dixon 6, Boyd 1,
Hall 4, McAdam 2, Duff 3.
is
BASKETBALL
Tuum Est
The senior "A" basketball team suffered an unexpected defeat last Saturday evening at the Normal gym.
when they met Victoria. The game
constituted BTTfeen struggle between
the two teams, and at the end of the
second quarter the score was 6-4 in
favour of Varsity. However, in the
second half the Victoria girls gained
the lead and the game finished 9-8 in
their favour.
Varsity team:—G. Swencisky, K.
Reid, J. Gilley, F. Musgrave, D. Shorney, W. Straight, M. Bell, I. Russell.
Victoria team:—I. Musgrave, N.
Ross, C. Ross, A. Jost, I. Worthington,
J. Stott.	
Arts 28 lost to Arts '26 in their
game Monday evening, February 16th,
at the Normal gym. The Freshies and
Juniors both played an open and interesting game, but the Juniors, largely because of the brilliant playing of
Jenny Wilkinson, were able to finish
with a score of 22-8.
Arts '26 team:—Winona Straight,
Flora Musgrave, Jenny Wilkonson,
Doris  McKak,  Ada Moffat.
Arts '28 team:—Doris Woods, Doris
Allan, Ethel Paterson, Noran Home,
Evelyn Fuller.
Gym. Bloomers
FOR
Women and Misses;
Small, Medium and
Large Sizes
—of fine quality navy serge,
pleated,   and   with circular
belt;
$4.25 and $5.50
—of fine navy serge, with
straight waist, band and elastic at knee
$3.50
—Drysdale's Undergarment Shop
Second Floor.
&
-^
LIMITED
575 Granville St.
pOLLIIi* pin
Bake shop
CAKES, SANDWICHES
for the
Dance or Party
2415 GRANVILLE STREET
Phone, Bayview 4076
As you know, 1020
handles Sporting Goods
only, and the aim of an
exclusive Sporting Goods
Store is to carry everything,   and  do  it   at  a
better
price.
**
Lisle Fraser
Sporting Goods
1 AOA  GRANVILLE
±\J4\J STREET THE   UBYSSEY
February 19th, 1925
(Eh? IhijBgnj
(Member   Pacific   Inter-Collegiate   Press
Association)
Issued  every  Thursday  by  the  Publications Board of the University of
British Columbia.
Extra Mural Subscription,  J2.00 per
Session.
For  Advertising  Rates,  apply
Business Manager. Phone Fair. 2093
EDITORIAL STAFF
Editor-in-Chief T. W. Brown
Senior Editor Miss Helen MacGill
Associate Editors Miss Sadie Boyles
A. Earle Birney
William C. Murphy
Exchange Editor John Grace
Literary Editor Miss Doris McKay
Sporting Editors H. Les. Buckley
Laura Mowatt
Copy  Editor    Marion   Smith
Chief   Reporter Kenneth   A.   Schell
Reporters •— Florence Williams,
Dorothy Arkwright, Mary Esler,
Jean Fraser, Janet Watson, Margaret
Smith, Les Graham, Donald Gillingham.
David Warden, Francis Stevens, G. W.
Ashworth, James Dunn, Dave Taylor,
T. S. Byrne, F. W. Dimmlck, Alice
Weaver.
BUSINESS  STAFF
Business Manager H. A. Thompson
Circulation  Manager E.   J.   Eades
Business Assistants....!!.  G. McWilliams
J. Stanley Allen
W.  F. McCulloch
EDITOR   FOR   THE   WEEK
Sadie  Boyles
STUDENT ELECTIONS
The first of the student elections
this year will be Monday, March 9th,
two weeks from the coming Monday,
when the president of the Alma Mater
Society will be chosen. All the elections this year are to be one week
earlier than in previous years, thus
giving the newly elected "divinities"
a chance to acquaint themselves with
the duties of their positions. Moreover, competition for offices promises
to be exceptionally keen as there are,
by the amendment to the constitution,
only nine offices to be competed for,
in place of the former twelve.
In past years the proportion of students voting in the elections has been
in most cases from sixty to seventy
per cent, of those qualified. This proportion is too low, and shows a lamentable indifference on the part of
students to their own best interests.
There is no reason why every student
should not cast his vote in the six
elections in whcih he is qualified to
vote, and in very important elections
like that of the president of the Alma
Mater Society there should be a ninety per cent, ballot.
Let us give the elections this spring
all the careful consideration they deserve. Everyone should make it a
point to attend campaign meetings,
and find the mreits of the various
candidates before making his decisions. Let us choose the best possible council for next year by taking
a whole-hearted interest in this important phase of student life.
By The Way
Wanted—A soporific for the double-
headed Cerebus that daily makes
these halls resound—hideously.
Other even more potent medicants
are being suggested for the owner of
said  Cerberus.
-o-
Some of the smoker jokes were so
weak that we are thinking of putting
them in the Ubyssey.
We were out to the Point last Sunday, and now we have a word of encouragement for all handicapped lecturers; the new lecture rooms have
blackboards running along THREE
sides of the room. Professors will
be able to write on the boards for
weeks before having to rub out the
tracks of their forerunners.
GRAVITY MARKS
CLASS LOTTERY
It was shortly after dawn and the
cheerless sun glared from behind a
mass of clouds when a fatal bell clanged loudly at the hour of twelve and
a solemn procession of Freshmen,
mumbling incantations and tales of
woe, emerged from a cluster of famed
wooden buildings and wended its way
along Eleventh Avenue to a cold, grey
building of immense proportions. With
choking sobs the wretched students
bade farewell to friends, wiped gathering tears from their pathetic eyes,
glanced lovingly at the beautiful
world and plunged through the great
gates of doom into a dungeon
(labelled King Edward Auditorium).
There they came upon a few more of
their number, and in the gloomy light
their faces seemed deathly pale. The
air was damp and heavy. Now and
again cruel, ugly sophomores and old
bearded seniors poked their devilish
faces through the wide portals and
mocked and grinned intimidatingly.
Oh, it was cruel, cruel.
Soon tihe terrible committee clambered on the platform, and a learned
individual (known as Prof. Soward),
spoke encouragingly, but the audience
merely laughed hysterically. Then a
heartless marshal, a brute in black,
bellowed forth the message of doom.
There was a list of names arranged
alphabetically on the table. He crossed out a name and cried to a male being to arise. Someone plucked a white
slip from a box—the suspense was
horrible—and a female student stood
up amidst a tumult of exclamations,
shrieks and groans. The terrified
man tottered and collapsed at the
sight. "Water," he feebly moaned.
The girl looked aghast—was that, that
her partner? She fainted. Another
individual arose, and still another.
Quickly the hand of destiny fell, and
when the 550th Freshman saw his
"fate," a bell suddenly clanged the
hour of one and the sober throngs,
with bowed heads, marched quietly
back to the famed wooden buildings
to collect their scattered thoughts
under the kind guidance of the lecturers. But some were affected by the
terrible strain and ran amok, crying
aloud, like foolisih children, "Whodja!
Whodja!"
FIVE TO COMPETE IN
ORATORICAL CONTEST
Last Monday afternoon, the Men's
Literary Society held eliminations for
the annual Oratorical Contest. Mr.
Soward and Mr. Angus acted as
judges. Those who were successful
were Messrs. Sturdy, Craig, Dunn,
Norman and Mikawa. The above result shows that, for the first time,
every year of the Faculty of Arts will
be represented.
The former winners of the Oratorical Contest were Mr. Susuma Kobe
and Manghat Singh. Kobe gave an interesting  speech   on  East  and  West.
Last year Manghat Singh won the
gold medal by successfully bringing
forth ihis views on "Woman." He
handled the subject so well that it was
conversation for a fortnight after.
Whether he gained the respect of the
women   is  uncertain.
This year's contest takes place on
Tuesday evening, February 24. Anyone not present deserves to lose an
interesting evening.
A little hair tonic, sir?
Yes, I'll take a glass.
BIGGEST GAME OF THE YEAR
VARSITY vs. VANCOUVER
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28
1400 Students Out
Honor is Confered
on Local Professor
THfe faculty of Agriculture is receiving much publicity these days. Word
has lately been received of the election of Professor H. M. King to the
presidency of the Production Section
of the Western Section of the American Dairy Science Association. This
is a unique distinction as Professor
King is the first Canadian to be thus
honored. The Western Section includes all the western states of the
United States and also British Columbia. Two years ago Mr. King was
president of the Western Dairy Instructors' Association, which body is
now amalgamated with the aforementioned association. Prof. King is a
B.S.A. from Toronto University and
is at present head of the Department
of Animal Husbandry at the U.B.C.
Not long ago Professor Lloyd and
Amundson were complimented for
their work in the Dept. of Poultry
Husbandry and with this recent announcement it is pleasing to think
that the earnest work of our professors strongly influences popular sentiment and is very important factor in
reconciling the public to the University.
the Uarsity Clothes
Shop of Young Wen
OUR
LOOSE ENGLISH
DRAPED SUITS,
with wide roomy Trousers,
have arrived.
We invite you to come and
see them.
You will find us as willing to
show them as to sell.
Tlios, Fosters, Co„ Ltd,
Tasbion Craft
608 Granville Street
THE WEEK'S EVENTS
PROFESSOR CHRISTIE
ADDRESSES INSTITUTE
At the Vancouver/Institute last
week, Professor ILJR Christie, speaking on 'F'orests and Water Supply,"
emphasized the fact that injudicial
deforestation of watersheds surrounding the sources of mountain streams
was a menace to the topography of
the  country.
The lecturer explained that it was
very advantageous that luxuriant timber growth be allowed to protect
mountain valleys from the agencies of
erosion which are ever active against
prominent  contours  of  land.
Numerous slides revealed the widespread devastation wrought by uncontrolled torrents. In Europe the
work of foresters in directing the
course of dangerous streams has done
a great deal to protect the main sources of industrial water supply.
Mountainous country from the slopes of which all the tall timbers have
been logged, tends to slump and become subject to avalanches. The necessity of taking steps to avert such
catastrophies has given rise to extensive construction work among the hills
of France and Switzerland.
Thursday,   February  19th—
Vancouver Institute, Physics Bldg.,
Mrs. Walter Coulthard, "British Music."
La   Canadienne   at   home   of  Miss
Lucie Sheppard, 726 15th Ave. W.
Friday, February 20th—
Basketball at Normal gym.; dancing. Varsity Int. "A" vs. Normal.
Ex-Normal Ladies vs. Normal.
Arts '27 class party in auditorium.
Saturday, February 21st—
Soccer, Con Jones Park, 2:30; Varsity vs. I.L.A.
Soccer at Marpole, 2:30, U.B.C. vs.
Army and Navy.
Basketball at Normal, Varsity "B"
vs. Varsity "A."
Basketball at Normal, Varsity "A"
vs. Rowing Club.
Monday, February 23rd—
Badminton Bridge, auditorium, 8:30.
Tuesday, February 24th—
Letters Club, home of Dr. Walker,
1425 10th Ave. W., at 8:00
Wednesday, February 25th—
Musical Society Recital, 3:15 in auditorium.
Historical Society at home of Mr.
Justice Murphy, 1236 Davie Street.
In Main Hall at noon, notepaper
sale.
Travel gives a character of experience to our knowledge, and brings
the figures upon the tablet of memory into strong relief.—Tucker-man.
EDUCATIONAL TOURS
EACH  ONE  INCLUDING
BRITAIN   -   HOLLAND -   BELGIUM   -   FRANCE
The first tour, under the auspices of
Guy Tombs, Ltd., leaves Montreal on the
"ATHENIA" for Glasgow, June 19. Returning from Cherbourg, July 17, on
the "AUSONIA."
The third tour, under the auspices of
Guy Tombs, Ltd., leaves Montreal July 3
for Scotland, on the "LETITIA." Returning from Cherbourg, July 31, on the
"ASCANIA."
Inclusive Cost of Tour
The second tour, under the auspices of
W. H. Henry, Ltd., leaves Montreal June
27 on the "AUSONIA" for Plymouth. Returning  from   Liverpool  July   24  on  the
"ALAUNIA."
$330.00
The Third Cabin accommodation of the ships is reserved
exclusively for these tours; thereby assuring you of comfort,
enjoyment nad congenial fellow passengers.
For full particulars of itinerary apply to:
GUY   TOMBS,   LTD., W.  H.   HENRY,   LTD.,
285  Beaver  Hall  Hill, 286  St.  James  Street,
Montreal. Montreal.
THE   ROBERT   REFORD   CO.,   LTD.,
20   Hospital  Street,  MONTREAL.
CUNARD—ANCHOR—DONALDSON
The Cunard Steamship Co., Limited, 622 Hastings St. W., Vancouver February 19th, 1925
THE   UBYSSEY
"VARSITY"
Outstanding Styles
In Young Men's
OXFORDS
Scotch Grain Calf.
Black and New Shade Tan.
Toes—Square, Plain,
No Box.
Soles—Oak Leather, Crepe.
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WILSON^
TWIN SHOE STORE
<{»••-•«••.•••••••-••••»•« .«..•..««*..<
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UNIVERSITY OF MANITOBA
Hudson's Bay Company
research fellowship
The above fellowship, of the value of $1,500.00,
tenable at the University of Manitoba, in any
branch of pure or applied science, open to
graduates of any Canadian University, will be
filled for 1925 about May 1st. Applications
should be in the hands of the Registrar of
Manitoba University, Winnipeg, Manitoba, by
April 1st. Further particulars on application.   Address
THE REGISTRAR,
University of Manitoba,
Winnipeg, Manitoba.
Evans & Hastings
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eg:
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WHEN   THEY   DESIRE   THEIR
MONEY'S  WORTH.
We make a specialty of
Magazines, Annuals,
Dance Programmes, Legal Forms
and
General Commercial Printing
See us be/ore ordering elsewhere.
Phone, Sey. 189      576 Seymour St.
For Your Dance or Party
take the Promenade
2024 Beach Ave.   Phone, Sey. 9032
Excellent Floor, Heating and Ventilation
Fire-Places and alt Accommodation.
SHELLY'S
Bread and Cakes
are baked according
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purity.
j    Correspondence
*§»*• ■>■'»■'•■ .•^*»*>W*.»......«....«»w.-....^.«.w.-....».HJ>
This column is maintained for the use
of students and others who wish to express themselves in moderate language
on any topic of general interest. The
"Ubyssey" does not assume responsibility   for   any   of the views expressed.
All contributions must be signed and
written legibly in ink, on one side of
the paper only. They must not exceed
two hundred words in length, and must
reach this office not later than noon
Monday, in order to appear in the issue
of the following  Thursday.
EDITOR SHOULD NOT SIT ON
COUNCIL IS CLAIM
Editor of the Ubyssey:
Dear Sir: —
There seems to be a great amount
of intolerance shown by most of us
at U. B. C. toward those who have different ideas from our own. I am going to criticise the way the Ubyssey
is controlled, and I am hoping that
the training that I have done for the
relay will stand me in good stead in
case the concensus of opinion is that
I  should  be lynched!
My criticism is not of the staff or
what they write, (I used to criticise
them, particularly the sports editor—
but not now), but the fact that the
paper is government owned as it's
funds are granted by the Council and
policy indirectly dictated by them
through the Editor in Chief who is a
member of that august body. When
the present editor went down south
to a council of editors of U. S. colleges, he found that he was the only
one who sat on a student council.
If my information is correct it costs
each student $2.50 a year, or about
ten cents a week for the Ubyssey. The
Saskatchewan "Sheaf" and the Alberta
"Gateway" are sold at a slight profit
for ten cents a week and their enrollment is no larger than ours. Why
can't we sell the Ubyssey for ten cents
a week, too? My-arguments in favor
of this policy are, briefly:
(1) The paper would be left to its
own resources and would be stimulated toward greater efficiency and
economy than now, if that were possible.
(2) The paper would have a free
hand in giving constructive criticism
of the policy of the student's council
which, if comparable to other governments, is not above, and benefits by,
such   criticism.
m The students' council would be
further reduced and hence more efficient.
(4) There would be no member on
the council who is not voted in by
the student body as is now the case
wihen the Editor-in-Chief is appointed
by the Council on the recommendation
of the then encumbent of that position.
Yours for a SMALLER Council and
a BIGGER Ubyssey.
H. L. BUCKLEY,
Agric. '25
Editor's Note—At the Council of
Editors in Seattle, last fall, it was
found that the majority of editors sat
on their governing bodies—and in sever? 1 cases the business manager also.
The Ubyssey costs each student
about $1.10 a year. This year the
Annual and the Ubyssey together will
cost about $2.55 a student.
IN DEFENSE OF THE WOMEN
Dear Sir:
A certain man who glories in his
brain power has been pleased to be
facetious concerning the electioneering spirit of our women. This letter
was very unfair to the women of the
upper years, who do realize the seriousness of the matter. There may be
some truth in these accusations as
applied to the freshettes, but it is no
doubt due to lack of knowledge. For
their benefit then the following information may be useful:
The  chief position  on  the  council
is that of president, who must be an
undergraduate of the senior year of
any faculty, and who is chosen for
his  outstanding  personality.
The treasurer must be an undergraduate of the junior or senior year
of any faculty, who has previously
shown ability in similar work.
The president of the Literary and
Scientific Department is elected from
the junior or senior year of any faculty.
The secretary is a member of the
junior or senior year and is frequently a woman.
The president of the Womens Undergraduate Society is a member of
the senior year, and is elected by the
women only.
The president of Women's Athletics
is also chosen by the women only,
and is a member of the third or fourth
year.
In the election of two other councilors the women take no part, namely, the president of the Men's Undergraduate Society and the president of
the Men's Athletics. The editor-in-
chief is elected by the Student's Council.
May  we   urge   the   women  to   consider   carefully   the   ability   and   personality of candidates for the above
offices before rushing off to vote.
Yours  sincerely
ALFREDA  BERKELEY,
LENORA IRWIN.
CONTEMPTIBLE!
Dear Sir:
Last Friday at "High Jinks'' a rather contemptible incident occurred.
Two Arts men(?), not content with
their own party, arrayed themselves
in fancy dress and invaded the women's domain. There can only be
one opinion regarding this conduct.
It shows an utter lack of sportsmanship and college spirit.
Yours sincerely,
_ W. U. s.
OTHERWISE
Dear Mr. Editor:
It is a regrettable truth that even in
an institution that is supposed to develop broad-mindedness, sophistication
and a true sense of sportsmanship
that there should be some few of the
co-eds who are ready to put an evil
intention to any prank or indeed anything out of the ordinary that occurs
in the University. I refer particularly to the attitude adopted by these
women when a couple of men had the
temerity to invade their domains. I
think that the men showed a marvellous amount of nerve, and a good deal
of skill and resource in their somewhat successful attempt to elude the
keen eyes of the fair ladies. Many of
us wish we had their opportunity and
perhaps these same women were jealous of the unnatural beauty of the
men. So far from having any evil
motives they are far too reticent
about telling the rest of us what happened and I fear High Jinks must be
even worse than it is reputed to be.
The joke was conceived in a spirit of
good-natured bantering on a night
when everyone was supposed to enjoy
themselves heartily, and I can think
of no reason why any of the women
should see any harm in it. But of
course, I wasn't there.
One Who Wants To See Fair Play.
Remington
Portable Typewriters
Terms—
$5.00 Cash; Balance, $5.00 Monthly.
See them demonstrated in the Stationery
Department.—Main Floor.
Invaluable to students and everyone who
has much writing to do.
Has the standard keyboard and is built
for accuracy and speed.
Hudson's Bay Company
Vancouver. B. C.
YOU WILL FIND IN THE
s
PROTT
HAW
CHOOLS
•OF-
C0MMERCE and TELEGRAPHY
Courses of Instruction which are
advantageous for almost everyone.
Not only have we prepared many
University Students for fine Secretarial positions, but we have a
first-class
ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT
in charge of J. B. Fleming, M.A.,
in which we coach students of the
first and second years in Languages, Mathematics, Science and
Economics.
If we can be of any service to you,
give us a call.
eg 1 Seymour 1810; Fairmont 41
1 Seymour 7125; Seymour 745
R. J. SPROTT, B.A., Manager
^OUTDOORS CLUB
A very enjoyable hike was held over
tihe week end, about 25 members taking part. Some of the gang went up
Saturday night, the rest, accompanied
by the fairer members of the club arriving on Sunday morning. The day
was spent in snowshoeing, skiing and
tobogganning. Outside of going over
the ski-jump and disabling the toboggan, no casualties occurred, and the
troops returned to town about 5:30.
Next week the hike to Echo Peak will
take place. Watch the notice boards
for further information. The B.C.M.C.
Photo exhibit (free) will be held in
the School Board office, Feb. 23-26,
from 4 to 9 p.m.
AMBASSADOR  CAFE
610 Seymour Street
Headquarters for Service
Club Luncheons, Dinners, Banquets and  Conventions
Private Dining Rooms for Private Parties.
Suitable for Meetings and Socials. Fraternity Banquets a Specialty.
music, Dancing, Entertainment
EVERY EVENING
9:00 p.m.  to 1:00 a.m. THE   UBYSSEY
February 19th, 1925
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So in the classic Duofold
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Any good pen counter will
sell you this beauty. Flashing black or black-tipped lacquer-red, the color that makes
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Parker Duo/old Pencils to match the pen, $3.50
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LOST
Lost at the Arts Men's smoker an
overcoat belonging to Norman Brown.
All will be forgiven if the present possessor will return the coat immediately to locker 450.
Unofficial Tour
Of New Buldings
Reginald and I Ramble Through
Library
Reginald and I walked out to our
new buildings at the Point last Sunday. It was one of those days with
a sky like a robin's egg—"cerulean,"
Reginald called it—and, as he was so
thoughtful all the time and walked
slow for my sake, and said such wonderfully clever things about everything, the way didn't seem long at all.
It gave me such a thrill when we
first came in sight of the building.
Just to think that next year we'll be
studying in that gorgeous, grey-stone
place, with its dignified, ascetic lines
—at least I will, though poor Reginald
is going to write his exams this year
and it is possible that he will graduate. Perhaps ihe was thinking of that
at the time, for he got into one of
his cynical moods — "iconoclastic,"
Reginald calls it—and he meanly
drew my attention to the library's
bare sides where additions will be
built later, and he said the back of
the Science building looked like a
child's drawing of a modern factory,
with the smoke stack left out. But
after we had walked around to the
front, Reginald returned to his own
lovable self and paid worthy tribute
to the wonderful stonework and raved
about the artistically-leaded windows
lending a substantial simplicity, truly
Victorian, or Elizabethan, or something, in effect and yet blending with
the unobtrusive grandeur of the ensemble.
And the library! Why the architecture has the very spirit—so Reginald
said—that Longfellow bodied forth in
"The Gleams," at least I think he said
Lontrfellow—one of those great Eng-
anyway. Academic, yet not severe,
anyway. Academic yet not severe,
rronastic, yet not forbidding, modern,
and yet a thing of beauty. And inside
there's the most wonderful reading
room, with lots and lots of room, with
a grand ceiling, miles and miles up
so that the whispers can rise up and
disappear, and stained glass windows
with University coats of arms on
them, and other rooms that are going
to be specially for talking and reading
magazines in, and a sweet with a fireplace and carved marble with patron
saints on the corners for the Head
Librarian and places for Persian rugs
and Honor students and—I'm sure I
must be getting mixed up in my construction, but anyway you can imagine
what its like and I'm only a Freshette
anyway, even if I am an old-fashioned
one that can appreciate Art, and, by
the way, there's a niche carved in the
stone at the very peak of the Library,
and who do you think they're going
to put up there? I mean who's statue?
Guess.
We got another thrill when we found
thPt the temporary buildings aren't
a bit "temporaryish" at all. They're
lovely and white and serviceable and
simole and roomy (that not a pun—
Reginald doesn't like puns). And the
auditorium! A stage that has all the
Capitols in the country backed off the
map for size, modern conveniences
and inventions and everything, including a sounding board that is a marvel
of the plasterer's art. And the refinement and purity of the decorative
scheme, with the wHe, white, chaste
nanels and the simple designs of the
facings, the immaculate effect heightened by the contrast of the multicolored dome in the ceiling.
Reginald bumped his head going
down to the cafeteria, no we didn't enjoy it so much, and anyway it wasn't
finished enough for us to imagine what
it's going to look like except that
there are lots and lots of pillars, and
probably tables all round them.
They weren't allowing visitors in the
it< ■•"•■.•■■•■■•■■•■■•■■•««•..•-•"•■.•..•..•-.•-•.■••.«... ■•'■•■■•-•.■it
LITERARY CORNER!
-•-——• -•-»..•-•■■•■■• I '•■!•.
■-•-•-•"•-•Mf*
fVA have   you   linger,   dear,   a   little
while
In this old garden, shadowy, moonlit, fair,
Where  night's  soft  voices  whisper
wond'rous tales,
And moonbeams weave pale cobwebs
in your hair.
Here in the garden I would offer you
All that the garden holds, for it is
full
Of golden, magic things—dreams of
a  child
Wlho played alone, in other years, and
knew
Strange forms of beauty lurking in
the  trees,
And  fairy  pathways  leading up  to
God.
—Adele, Arts '28.
Science Building, but Reginald lifted
off a door and wandered down a long
white-arched, Moorish hallway and
gazed into lecture rooms with light
oak finishing and light oak desks and
seats. Next year's freshmen will havj
to use sharper pocket knives. Reginald was showing me a doorknob with
the U. B. C. coat of arms on it and
explaining that it was put on it so
that nobody would take it away, when
a care-keeper came along Jand although Reginald told him he was a
member of Arts '25, he insisted that
we leave immediately and was really
rather rude about it.
Reginald was very patient and good-
tempered, however, and consoled himself with pointing out the felicity with
which the olive-green glint from the
library windows contrasted with the
gorgeous salmon-pink of the sunset.
We walked home.
many new kinks
mark; high jinks
\s'_	
This write-up seems superfluous,
since all the women were at High
Jinks, and all the men have been told
what details their two representatives
could gather in their short lived stay.
But it is customary to write up these
functions, and we are always willing
to do the right thing.
Miss Bollert welcomed the gjrls to
High Jinks and Miss Mclnnes presented the prizes. Miss Dorothy McKay as a mid Victorian lady received
the first prize for the best woman's
costume, and Miss Undine Howay, as
an eighteenth-century gentleman, the
first prize for the best gentleman's
costume. The prizes for the most
original costumes went to Miss Alice
Weaver as an "overgrown parsnip,"
and to Miss Jean Tolmie as a "mature
carrot."
The skits were cleverly done and
afforded much amusement. There was
a "kitchen orchestra," with its queer
assortment of instruments and noises,
under the able conductorship of Miss
Dorothy Peck. Then Miss Helen
Creelman and company gave a breezy
little song and chorus called "Palm
Beach."
The next attraction was a skilful
burlesque on a Grecian dance. This
was followed by a pretty and original
interpretation of the Spanish tango,
by Miss Joan Meredith and Miss
Gladys Harvey.
The girls are to be highly complimented on the next act which was
exceedingly amusing, being a clever
dramatization of "Clementine," starring Miss Mary Dobbin, which was
presented in a manner that showed
much thought and preparation, besides a rather deep knowledge of
showmanship. Miss Doris Shorney
and Miss Laura Mowatt concluded
with a novel drill. "The Parade of the
Wooden Soldiers."
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Dapper Dan Bows
IN THE NEW REGIMENTAL
AND COLLEGE STRIPES.
EKED 50c. to $1.50
Call and see our assortment.
NEXT TO CASTLE HOTEL
GRANVILLE
We Cive 10% Off To Students
ENGINEERING and
DRAFTING SUPPLIES
Canadian Distributors for
A. W. Faber Pencils
Carl lelss Binoculars
Icacameras
Hughes Owens Co. Ltd.
6alt Building
WINNIPE6  -   -   Manitoba
"A Good Photograph speaks
a language all its own"
X
Charlton $ Ratbbun
PHOTOGRAPHERS
Specialists in Colour  Portraits
X
711 Holden Bldg., 16 Hastings St., E.
(Jmt Ea«l of B. C. E. Rly. and Carrall Si.)
Phone, Seymour jj6g
We have a large
variety of
Beautiful Playing Cards
Loose-Leaf Books and
Refills
Fountain Pens
Propelling Pencils
Drawing Instruments
and Materials
THE
Clarke & Stuart
Co., Ltd.
-:- Educational Supplies -:-
550 SEYMOUR STREET
PHONE. SEYMOUR 3000 February 19th, 1925
THE   UBYSSEY
J. W. Foster Ltd.
7^:5 Hastings Street,   West
FIT REFORM CLOTHES
All the Newest Models in
College Suits and Overcoats,
at Prices that are Right.
BURBERRY COATS
See  US Before Buying
Best Productions direct from
New York at the
Strand Theatre
Excellent features and artists
that can be seen or heard
nowhere else in Vancouver.
T. J. KEARNEY & CO.
Statural Sirrrtora
Private Ambulance Service
PHONE. FAIRMONT 3
802-808 Broadway, West, Vancouver, B.C.
t
Phones : Fair. 77, Fair. 5660-R       \
WILLOW HiUL
806 17th AVENUE, WEST
One Block West of Heather Street
This Hall is for rent to Clubs and
Private Parties.
For terms apply to F. S. LOCKETT,
Proprietor.
•♦
No Charge for Extra Passengers
5   Can Ride for the
Price of One.
^PHONE
SEYMOUR
4000
t
T
t
t
STRAW FROM THE STACKS
The shingle probably got its name
because it is so near wood.—Ex.
•••»•«§>••-•«
Were you ever in Holland?
No, but I've been in Dutch.—Ex.
Stude:    Know what a zebra is?
Second:    No, what is it?
First:    Just a sport model jack-ass.
—Ex.
Limericks
There once was a feminine joker
Who    disguised    and    attended    the
Smoker.
But a Frosh who was hep
Destroyed all iher pep,
Being a much too solicitous stoker.
A handsome young person, hight Binks
Slipped in as a girl, to High Jinks.
But the length of his feet
Laid bare the deceit,
And  they  dragged  out his  body  in
links, by Jinks.
A. E. B.
She:    Do you always take the other
girls for such long walks?
He:    No,  it isn't necessary.
Senior: Gosh, you are dumb, why
don't you get an encyclopedia?
Fresh: Cause the pedals hurt my
feet.—Ex.
Doctor (examining life insurance
prospect):    Do you talk in your sleep?
Prospect: No, I talk in other people's sleep.
Doctor:    How come?
Prospect: Oh, I'm a college professor!—Ex.
- A Modern  Dairy.
Assistant:     Here  are   a   couple  of
divorces in the most exclusive circles.
How shall I head the story?
Editor: Say "Cream of Society
Goes  Through  Separator.'
—Ex.
He:
night.
She:
He:
I  got  a  cut  on  the   lip  last
So I see—dull razor?
No.    Rough road.
-Ex.
Miss Oma—Do you think young
people should be trained for marriage?
Dr. Campbell—Certainly; I have always been opposed to sending raw
troops into battle.
Tough.
"My good man how do you come to
be lying on the floor?"
"Sh'all right, brotha. I just shaw
two chairs, and sat down in the one
that wasn't.
Untimely.
"When I left college I didn't owe
any one a cent." "What an awful
time to leave."—Ex.
••-•*§>•••••■
Hum: When I was in China I saw
a woman hanging from a tree.
Drum:    Shanghai?
Hum:    Oh, about six feet.
.•m««^*>.*«
When  Time  Stands Still.
"I hear you gave a party last night,
old chap.   What was it to celebrate?"
"It was  for  my  wife.    It was  the
tenth anniversary    of   her    thirtieth
birthday."
.»-•-§-•-••
Absent-minded Prof.: Didn't you
have a brother in this course last
year?
Student: No, sir, it was I. Im repeating the course.
Absent-minded Prof.: Extraordinary resemblance, though. Positively
extraordinary.
Tom: Harry ate something that
poisoned him.
Jim:    Croquette?
Tom: Not yet, but he's pretty sick.
—Ex.
An ideal professor
Never holds class over time.
Is occasionally eleven minutes late.
Sometimes  fails  to make  an  assignment.
Grades high.
Gives  few  and  easy  quizzes.
Once in a while dismisses class very
early.
Talks much and asks little.
And makes a final snap.
But  unfortunately   there   is   no   such
animal.
—Ex.
DEBATE RESULTS
Arts '28 defeated Arts '25 in the
finals of the women's interclass debates on Tuesday, thus capturing
the shield which Arts '25 has held
for three years.
Navy Blue
Herringbone
Worsted
SMART-FITTING
D.-B. MODEL
Special
$25.00
C. D. Bruce
LIMITED
Cor. of Hastings and Homer Sts.
M- COMMERCIAL
and Secretarial School
INDIVIDUAL COURSES
709 GEORGIA STREET, W.
Opposite Hotel Vancouver
BOOKS
All Kinds  of Books
Usual and Unusual.
LANGS
Old Original Bookstore
1184 Granville St.
Phone, Seymour 1013
After the Show	
Visit Our
Soda Fountain
Burns Drug Co., Ltd.
Opposite Hotel Vancouver
BADMINTON
The open championships were continued at the Drill Hall on Saturday
and some excellent matches were
played.    Results were as follows:
Men's Singles.—D. Hincks beat Gordon Shields. J. Shakespeare beat G.
Wilson but lost to Hincks. W. Argue
beat J. Hockin and now meets D.
Hincks in the final for the singles
championship.
Ladies' Singles.—J. Creer beat E.
Davidson. M. Craig beat H. Matheson
but lost to J. Creer. Joan Creer is
now in the final and meets the winner
of Joyce Hallamore vs. Violet Mil-
lener.
Men's Doubles.—Woodman and Argue beat Hockin and Marion and are
now in the finals to play the winners
of Bincks and Davidson vs. Wright
and  Shakespeare.
Ladies' Doubles.—Joan Creer and
Margaret Craig beat R. Warder and
R. Griggs but lost to J. Hallamore and
G. Harvey who are now in the final.
Mixed Doubles.—W. Argue and E.
Davidson beat D. Hincks and J. Hallamore and reached the finals in this
event.
Luck or Law
Luck at the best is a gambler's
chance—the sport of circumstances, but the operation of law is
certain. Are your interests protected by the Law of Life Insurance or
depending on " Luck " ?
ireaf-We^
HEAD    OFFICE   -  WINNIPEG c/
THE   UBYSSEY
February 19th, 1925
^.     MARK    ,.
fS  IN CANftO"
BUY
j Spalding Goods
for Quality
Goods of other manufacturers
may be offered at prices less
than those quoted in our Catalogue, but only by degrading
quality.
No one  can furnish Athletic
Goods of equal quality at less
than we quote.
SPECIAL PRICES
TO  STUDENTS
f       X      OF canapa/limiteo
424 Hastings Street, W.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
WE HAVE THE BEST
Adjustable Clamp Lamp
ON THE MARKET.
Can be attached anywhere.      Movable
Shade.   Indispensable to every student.
Price, $2.50 only
including six feet of cord.
For sale only at the
GREAT WEST SALES CO.
Room 309, 315 PENDER ST., W.
Say you saw it in the "Ubywey"
BAGGAGE
TO       FROM
ALL TRAINS AND  BOATS
ROYAL  TRANSFER
PHONE,  SEY.  6
DANCING
Private and Class Lessons
Lady and Gentlemen
Teachers
W. E. Fenn's School
COTILLION HALL
Seymour 3058-O or Seymour 101
«|>t>|>|>|»|>4H*H,.*.«.l«.«m^<|>|>»»|.|M|l.|H«l>
James Peter Fergusson
TEACHER OF
Elocution, Public Speaking, Dramatic
Art, Acting and Interpretation.
Second place obtained in B. C. Musical
Festival. 1924.
Pupils Coached for 1925 Festival.
For terms apply :
Studio   -   -   70 Fairfield Building
Phone, Seymour 2734
t    Residence -   1504- 14th Ave., W.
J Phone, Bayvi.w 4101-R
,$*.-»..«..«~«..*«.-«~*..i
Fine Recital To Be
<--• Given by Society
Selections Front Popular Opera
Will be Rendered
Next Wednesday, February 25th,
at 3:15, a delightfully amusing and
entertaining programme will be rendered in the auditorium by members
of the Musical Society. The programme will be in the form of a recital
composed of selections from "The
Mikado," "H.M.S. Pinafore," "Chu-Chin
Chow", and "Pirates of Penzance,"
members from both the Glee Club and
the Orchestra taking part.
The entertainment promises to be
decidedly worth-while, for considerable time and effort have been devoted to the preparations, and, under
the leadership of Mr. Joe Kania, practices have been carried on assiduously for the past month.
As the plan of having another drive
for the Development Fund has been
abandoned for the present, the Society
has discontinued the collection idea,
and admission will be absolutely free.
The Society extends a cordial invitation to the Faculty and to all students
and friends outside the University.
Tihe Musical Society, as a whole is
also working hard now in preparation
for the Spring Concert to be held in
Wesley Church, on Friday, March 13.
Be sure to keep this date free. This
will be the great nighti in the year
for the Musical Society.
WRITE-UPS OVERDUE
A few Annual write-ups are still
overdue. Every write-up positively
must be in by the end of this week.
Women's Lit.
Engineering Discussion Club.
Senior Rugby
Second   Rugby.
Boxing Club.
Ice Hockey.
Men's   Swimming  Club.
Women's   Senior  "A"  Basketball.
Women's   Senior  "B"  Basketball.
Rowing Club.
Women's Track Club.
Agric. '25 Class History.
D.  B.  Charlton.
C. A. Dougan.
Dorothy Murray.
Eric Dunn.
G. F. Hagelstein.
Harold Henderson.
FRESHMEN WIN
CHAMPIONSHIP
Victoria College are Beaten in
Return Game
Victoria College succumbed to the
Frosh to the tune of one unconverted
try to nothing, in a return match played   last   Saturday   morning.
The players were greatly handicapped in being forced to play on the
hard King Edward field which was
coated with a thin layer of greasy
mud, and good rugby was practically
impossible under the conditions. However, a fairly close game resulted,
though the Freshman line was never
once in danger, while the Victoria line
was only saved on several occasions
by the inability of the Frosh backs
to handle the slippery ball.
The Freshmen forward line was not
up to its usual standard, partly due
to Hundal's absence through injuries,
while Ken Eckert was missed on the
three-quarter line. Harold Hall who
played his first game at forward this
year gave a good account of himself,
and Red Davidson, who scored the
only touch was prominent in his
smothering of the Victoria three-
quarter runs.
The Freshman line-up was as follows:    	
Mclnnes, Eaton, Curry, Ballentyne,
Shields, Teed; Bull, Taylor; Forrester, Chamberlain, Adams, Bridgman,
McMillan,  Hall,  Davidson.
Molly Jackson.
C. A. Kelly.
Edith Martin.
M. Miyazaki.
Sonvm&rk
, L.IMITS1P *
556 Granville Street
Phone, Sey. 5330
New English
BROADCLOTH
OVERBLOUSES
THREE
STYLES
$5.95
SILK BROADCLOTH.
High neck style, in sand or
white; monogram embroidered, in all colors; tie to
match.
TUCKED  MODEL
In sand or white, V neck,
link cuffs, silk crepe tie.
STRIPED MODEL
With convertible collar and
eyelets; shown in grey and
mauve, tan and saxe, tan
and grey, fawn and brown,
black and white, rose and
grey.
Portraits can be made
at any time from the
GRADUATION
PHOTOGRAPHS
STUDIOS
553 Granville St.
ELECTION!
Honorary President, and President
of the A.M.S.—Monday, March 9th.
Secretary, Treasurer, and President
of the Literary Society — Monday,
March 16th.
President of Men's Undergraduate
Society, and President of Women's Un-
dergrad.—Thursday,  March 17th.
President of Men's Athletics, and
President of Women's Athletics—Monday, March 23rd.
Nominations must be in the hands
of the Secretary seven days before
election day. Each nomination must
be accompanied by the signatures of
not less than ten members of the Alma Mater Society. No student can
sign the list of nomination of more
than one candidate for each office.
iviia>T»T>i\ii^i^i«ffl^t>»i^aa<^
Of Course You Don't "Enjoy Dancing"
when you can't dance. There IS no enjoyment in being pulled
around, and that method is surely out-of-date. We hare made
a study of teaching dancing, and you will even enjoy your
LESSONS as we SHOW you how it's done.
Broadway Dancing School
1400 BROADWAY, W. (One Block East of Granville St.)
Phone, Bay. 5834 "We Correct All Faults."
Mr. and Mrs. S. J. Broadhead
iwmyv&v^v&v/xv/&W).vMW^
CAMPAIGN MEETING - FRIDAY NOON

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