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The Ubyssey Nov 22, 1938

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 PUB-COUNCIL GAME
Published Twice Weekly by The Publications Board of The University of British Columbia
Vol. XXI.
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 1938
No. 17
PLANS TO BE
SUBMITTED
FOR BUILDING
BROCK     COMMITTEE
PLANS PENDING
The sub-committee of the Brock
Memorial Committee will shortly submit tentative plans for a semipermanent Union Building to the
University architect for an estimate
of cost.
FLANS  STILL INCOMPLETE.
The plans for the Union Building
are not as yet In a Anal form, but lt
ls expected that lt will be a semipermanent building.
According   to  the   plans  submitted, the building will provide meeting places for many of the campus
olubs.  It  Is  to  be  a sort  of  large
mixed common room.
One half of each floor will be devoted to women's activities, while the
other  half  will  be  reserved  for  the
men.
C.O.T.C.  SPACE.
The O.O.T.O will, according to the
present plan, have half of the basement, with a rifle range and several
other rooms.
BALLROOM?
The greater part of the first and
second floors will be taken up with
two   large   assembly   halls.   There
may  possibly  be  a  dance  floor  as
weU.
It ls expected that some provision
will  be  made   for   a  possible   future
addition to the building.
MEN AND WOMEN
CLASrMN DEBATE
Renewing a once annual affair the
Men's Discussion Club and Women's
Undergraduate Society of Victoria
College clashed ln a debate on the
subject "Resolved that women have
not lost dignity, prestige, and femininity by their emancipation."
ENTHUSIASM EN MASSE
The entire college turned out to
hear the contest, ln which the men,
whose case was upheld by Jack Williams and Dave Harper took the decision from Lavonne Purves and
Betty Mae Brown.
Lavonne    Purves,    leader   of    the
affirmative, started the ball rolling
by stating that "women can't have
lost dignity because they never had
any before their emancipation, and
further made the assertion that "it
is a biological fact that women can
never lose femininity. All they have
done  is  freed  themselves  from  restrictions.
Jack Williams retorted that "woman
Is but a biological necessity with high
heels" and had lost the dignity evidenced by the women ln a picture like
"The  Gleaners."
Ruby Mae Brown drew attention
to the women of Shakespeare's time
who attended the beer-gardens. She
also referred to present day women
who have written great books.
INTELLECTUAL   NAKEDNESS
Dave Harper cinched the case for
the men by citing the exhibition Just
put on by the women as an example
of Intellectual nakedness.
For their efforts the men received
a handsome tin can which will be a
perpetual challenge trophy.
REQUEST FOR
LONG NOONS
TURNEDDOWN
COUNCIL. REFUSES TO
GIVE EXTRA TIME
H ■______
The Faculty Council, ln a special
meeting has refused the Student
Council's request that Monday and
Friday noon hours be lengthened by
half an hour, and that Wednesday
afternoons be left free of lectures
from 3.30 on.
Faculty Council did however
make provision that absolutely no
lectures or examinations would be
held during the noon hour. This
will mean that although the short
period still inconveniences many
societies members will at least be
free for one hour.
INTRA-MURALS IN BAD WAY
The refusal of the Faculty Council
leaves the intra-mural sports and
L.S.E. activities tn a very difficult
situation, as the students, after eating their lunches, ca'n not And sufficient time for sports or meetings.
REQUEST  TOO  LATE
It Is rumoured that the reason for
the Faculty refusal ls that the request was not submitted soon enough.
The sweeping changes ln timetables
that would have been necessary had
the request been granted was apparently considered impracticable at this
late date.
It is expected that the Student's
Counoil   will   start   a   drive   early
enough  next year to Insure sufficient  time  for  aU   L.S.E.   meetings
and intra mural sports.
Speaking  of  the effect of the present   limited   noon   hours   upon   his
Intra-mural    sports    program,    coach
Maury  Van  Vllet said  "It handicaps
us   to   the   extent   that  we   can   only
service a limited number of students,
whereas intra-murals should be open
to everyone."
HUP
1—5—47 ... SHOOT!
PUBSTERS ATTENTION 1
AU members of the Publications Board must appear in
the Publications Office by 18.30
today. No excuses will be accepted. The staff will then
proceed  to the  gym.
DOUBLE BILL FOR
PLAY READERS
Pat Keatley, convenor of the Thespians' Playreadlng Committee, announces the second program ln hts
"Play Parade." Super de luxe histrionics will be served up on Wednesday
at 3.30 ln Arts 100.
DOUBLE BILL.
The double bill features Don Munro's fantasy, "Drifting and Dreaming," and a cryptic drama of science
and Shanghai rats, "Of Mice and
Men" by A. Doyle. Both these plays
were written during the summer by
upper classmen and submitted for
the Players' Club competition last
September. It ls hoped that Mr. Sidney Risk, Player's Club director and
former prize winner himself at U.B.
C. will be on hand with comment and
criticism for the neophyte dramatists.
Don't forget the time, Wednesday,
Nov. 23rd. Everyone welcome.
LADEEZ AND OENTLE PEOPLES! . . . Today noon ln our fair gymnasium—for the small, slight—In faot Infinitesimal—admission fee of one
cent, a penny, one hundredth part of a dnllah—you will see the greatest,
hottest, most titanic exhibition of mortal strength
Step right up men and women, honour students, pass studenta, grads
and Sclencemen alike for the Battle of the Century. Those ferocious paper
doll cutters, erstwhile Ooon Gods, supposed high mucks In student government, will trot on the gym floor to be slashed to their normal half-pint
stature by the driving, devastating, dynamiting, attaok of the all-powerful
Pub contingent.
Says Council—"Unbeatable, and unty-able, we shall prove once more
we are all-powerful and unconquerable!"
Says Pub—"We say naught, except that the Pen is mightier than the
sword, even a rusty dull one wielded by a conglomeration of nincompoops!"
All we say is WOW!—and will we bo there to watch the supposed
Irreslstable  Force  meeting the supposed Immovable Object!
Just by the way, the duo of squads have chosen basketball aa the
sport to murder.
OPERA PROGRAMS TO
BE HELD SATURDAY
The Metropolitan Opera Association
has finally announced that It will
hold the first Saturday radio matinee
of Its 1038-39 winter season on Saturday. November 26, with a performance of "Orfeo ed Eurydice" by
Chrlstoph  Willlbald  Oluck.
This broadcast will be reproduced
ln the auditorium through special
High Fidelity equipment beginning
at 10.55. A preview of the material
of the opera by way of recorded selections will be held ln Arts 100 at
12.40 on Wednesday.
C.S.A. Advocates
Dominion Wide
Schol ar ships
That "the large majority of our
able matriculation body are prevent-
ec' from attending university by financial difficulties," was the view expressed by Dr. Orant Lathe last Friday in dealing with the question of
the coming nation wide campaign
for National Scholarships.
INADEQUATE SCHOLARSHIPS.
He deplored a situation in which
12 scholarships only in the whole
Dominion are adequate to meet the
financial requirements of the student. The present plan sponsored
by the C.S.A. accordingly recognizes
the necessity of Inducing the Dominion Oovernment to issue a federal grant of five hundred thousand
dollars to be divided into a thousand scholarships of five hundred
dollars each.
AWARDED   FOR  SCHOLASTICS.
These would be awarded by provincial boards on a basis of financial resources and scholastic standing of
students.
For the successful culmination of
the campaign outside as well as student support ls enlisted, together
With the endorsation of members of
parliament. As this drive constitutes
at present the major issue facing the
C.S.A., Dr. Lathe dealt only briefly
with Its history and purpose as a
medium of discussion of Canadian
student affairs.
LAST FORUM DEBATE
WILL BE ON NOV. 28
The final debate of the year will
be held Nov. 28 In Room 201, Hotel
Vancouver, when the Forum team of
Harold Rome and Alex McDonald
uphold the negative on the resolution
that "Mass Production ln Education
ls to be Deplored" against a team
from the Junior Board of Trade,
Dave Lesser and Len Martin.
"There will be no more meetings
of the Forum until after the Christmas holidays," stated secretary Don
McOlll this morning.
XMAS PLAYS
BILLED FOR
THIS_WEEK
THESPIANS  PRESENT
NEW ACTORS AND
PLAYS
A final polishing was given to the
Christmas plays at the dress rehearsal last night, and while the
stage crew lushes ahead with last-
mi nuto paint Jobs, hard-worked
Thespians are resting today for the
presentation of their four one-act
plays from Wednesday to Saturday
of this week.
NEW MAKE-UP
Students will see the results of
six weeks' combined efforts by all
sections of the Players' Club. The
make-up committee have been studying and practising their cosmetic
art on unwilling fellow Thespians.
Seen for the first time will be a new-
type of make-up cream especially
Imported from Hollywood for the
plays. Two of the Interesting "props"
employed will be a modernistic bed
and a cocktail stand, included for
the vicarious stimulation of science-
men.
The   most   novel   setting   is   that
designed   for   the   "300th   Performance."   The   Varsity   audience   will
son a side  view of a stage within
the  reul  stage.  Actors  tiro  playing
t«i   an   Unseen   audience   at    right
angles to the actual one. The play
Itself  Is  a  psychological  study  of
the  effect of morbid environment,
and is directed by Mr. Sidney Risk,
just back from London.
Guaranteed     to     revolve     classical
scholars  in  their graves,  the  Impertinent   "One   Evening   at   Nero's"   reveals  the  inside  stuff  about  a  false-
front emperor and his unconventional   court   who   all   have   feet   of   clay
underneath   their   flowing   togas.   A
whimsical    treatment    of    matricide
provides    the    plot    for    this    farce,
directed   by   Mrs.   Caple,    a   former
Players'   Club   star   herself   who   has
returned  to  Vancouver  from  the  interior.
INSPIRATIONAL   COMEDY
If you  have  ever wanted  to  spend |
(Continued on Page ii) I
TOTEM STAFF ANNOUNCES
"DOLLAR WEEK" ON CAMPUS
"Slander Trial"
Goes Before The
" Court" Tonight
"The slander sensation of the campus, Don McOill vs. Elmer Jones, will
go before the Judiciary Court of the
Law Society tonight at 7.30 in Arts
100. Mr. R, H. Tupper, prominent
Vancouver lawyer, will act as the official Judge throughout the mock
trial," thus stated Bernard Reed
president of the Law Society when
Interviewed today.
"We   have   spared   no  efforts   towards making this mock trial one
of   most   unusual   and   Interesting
nature," he continued.
Witnesses   have   been    subpoenaed
by both sides.
MADAM X.
Rumors ln mock legal circles have
it that a certain lady will testify for
the plaintiff, Don McOill.
Interviewed yesterday, Alex Sharpe,
chief counsel for the plaintiff, stated,
"We aim to protect campus statesmen
from slanderous utterances."
POLITICAL, SIGNIFICANCE.
The trial has political significance.
Defense counsel Reed who ls Liberal
leader in the P.D.C. recently led the
house in a non-confidence vote
against McOlll, who ls the Conservative leader, when the latter's bill for
Imperial Defense was defeated by
the efforts of Reed and Volpe, assistant defense counsel.
Everyone is welcome. 7.30 tonight.
Arts 100.
MEMPHIS TEAM SHOWS
HUMOUR IN DEBATE
Acting as Judges the university
students unanimously decided that
the Lemoyne team, Byas and Gtlton
defeated the Forum representatives
Belkin and Hayman in the debate
last Friday noon.
Since the Lemoyne boys showed
a definite sense of humor In proving that 'world peace was undestr-
ahle and Impossible' the debate
was more humorous than serious.
JAPAN COLLECTS CHINA
Opening for Lemoyne Byas contended that because the dictators
had imperialistic tendencies; because
they were economically deprived of
the basic materials; because the
nations of the world were arming at
a desparate rate therefore was world
peace an impossibility. Quoting as
examples the German expansion in
Europe, the Italian invasion of Ethiopia and the 'Japanese hobby of
collecting China' he pointed out the
inefficiency of the World Court to
preserve   peace.
Hayman claimed that world peace
Is an actuality because man was
gradually learning the horrors of
war, the futility of 'wars to end
wars,' and because former belligerents were living side by side ln peace.
WAR A NECESSITY?
Ollton maintained that the present
status quo, peace, was such that it
was undesirable. Undeclared conflicts
in Spain, and China were to him a
'peace that passeth all understanding." To him defensive wars, revolutionary wars, admonitory wars, were
necessary   for human  progress.
A   DOLLAR   PAID   NOW
CINCHES A TOTEM
By FRANK  SPENCER
This weak Is DOLLAR WEEK on
the U.B.C. campus.    The staff of the
Totem  has Anally been  able  to  establish   a system  by  which   the   students may obtain tbelr copies of the
Totem. ' A dollar paid down to any
one of the numerous canvassers who
will be haunting the campus and all
major  clubs   this  week,  will   ensure
you of a copy early ln the  spring.
In  former  yeara  the  prospective
buyers   of   the   Totem   have   been
able to sign a list thereby reserving themselves a oopy.    It wae a
good   system   except   for  the   faot
that  when  the  time  oame  to  receive the Totem far too many of
those who had signed did not turn
up   with   required   cash.   The   raault waa that the Alma Mater Society waa left holding the bag ln
the form of a huge deficit.
This  year  the students  have  only
to pay a dollar down for which they
will    receive    a    handsome    receipt
which    guarantees   a   book   at   the
payment    of    the     remaining     ooat
(92.00)  ln the spring.      The number
of booka printed will be determined
by the number of down paymenta received   this   week.    If   you    want   a
copy   of   positively   the   beat   Totem
that has yet been published be sure
and pay your dollar this week.
An advertising scheme on a aoale
never before witnessed will be carried on. A Pep Meeting so collosaal
that lt will make your hair stand on
end will be held on Saturday and a
selling campaign will be carried on
in all major clubs by Individual
members.
Remember this ls DOLLAR
WEEK. For the sum of ONE DOLLAR each and every student of
U.B.C. can obtain a copy of the
greatest Totem ever published. No
longer will you have to drain your
coffers In the spring to pay for the
Totem   in   a   lump  sum.
From now on you can have a
Totem and you won't even know you
have paid for lt. Pay your dollar
this week and receive your receipt,
then In the spring bring your receipt and only two more dollars to
the Publishing Office and receive
your  Totem.
Amazing,  Isn't  it.
You receive a magnificent copy of
the   Totem   and   your   pocket  doesn't
even know it.    Bring your dollar tomorrow.
SYMPHONY ENGAGES
VIENNESE CONDUCTOR
Vancouver Symphony Society announces the engagement of Walter
Herbert, formerly conductor of the
Vienna State Opera, for its third
concert this season, in the Oi-pheum
Theatre Sunday afternoon, December
11.
For this occasion Mr. Herbert has
chosen a Viennese programme, which
will come as welcome news to those
fortunate enough to be present at the
final symphony concert In Stanley
Park last summer, when he conducted Strauss' "Tales from the Vienna
Woods." The performance of this
familiar work revealed Mr. Herbert
as a sensitive and imaginative artist,
and an  inspiring  leader.
It ls advisable to make reservations
early, at the M. A. Kelly Piano House,
659 Oranville St., as many were unable to obtain seats for the previous
concerts.
DOLLAR   DOWN   BUYS   YOUR   TOTEM Two
THE    UB YSSE Y
Tuesday, November 22, 1938
THE  UBYSSEY
Issued twice weekly by the Students' Publication Board of the Alma Mater
Society of the University of British Columbia.
Office: 206 Auditorium Building ...
Oampus Subscriptions, $1.50
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
Dorothy Cummings
SENIOR EDITORS
Tuesday
Jack Mair
ASSOCIATE   EDITORS
James Macfarlane
Phone Point Orey 206
Mall Subscriptions, $2.00
Friday
Robert King
Irene Eedy
Joyce Cooper
Rosemary Collins
ASSISTANT  EDITORS
Ozzy Durkin Jack Mercer
Van  Perry Lester Pronger
C.  tl.  P.  STAFF
Editor
James Macfarlane
Assistants
Van Perry Ann  Jeremy Joyce Cooper
PUB. SECRETARY CIRCULATION  MOR.
Virginia Galloway Harry Campbell
REPORTORIAL  STAFF
Jack Margeson, Helen Hann, Pat Keatley, Joan Thompson, Bill Backman,
Joan Haslam, Ted Underhiil, Jacques Metford, Ruth Millar,  Janet Walker,
Brlta Vesterback, Bob Manson, Florence Hurndall, Bill Osborne, Ken Vernon,
Frank Spencer, Doreen Henderson.
SPORTS  STAFF
Editor: Orme Dier
Associates: Basil Robinson, Myrne Nevlson
Assistants:   Lionel   Salt,  Jim  Harmer,  Ormle  Hall,  Frank    Turner,    Austin
Frith, Byron Straight, Ted  Pallas.
Advertising  Office
Standard Publishing Co., 1037 Pender Street West, Vancouver. B.C.
Telephone:   SEVMOUIl 4484
All advertising handled exclusively  by Standard  Publishing Co.
NOON HOURS
It is rather unfortunate that Faculty Council did not see fit
to accommodate tlie student body by allowing them an extra half
hour on their noon period twice a week. The students felt that
it was not out of tlie way to ask for the longer noon hour periods
on only the two days, particularly when laboratories are kept open
until six o'clock under the present system.
Their decision is doubly unfortunate in that there are two
means whereby they could make the necessary changes in timetable. If the time-table proposed by the campaign committee had
been accepted the long noon hours would have been quite easily
retained. Likewise Students' Council suggested to the Faculty
Council that lectures might begin ut 8.15 leaving only 15 minutes
extra after 5.30.
However the Faculty Council was justified in refusing the
request on ont! ground. That, is that the proposal was put to them
too late for them to make the necessary arrangements. If this is
true the noon hours will stay as they are this year but will be
changed to one and one half hours at the first of next year.
DOLLAR WEEK
The students of this University may have lived through a
publicity campaign of aome Import, and may possibly continue to
live to see the odd building erected in the near future, but there
is some uncertainty as to the percentage of the student body that
will be able to survive the newly established Totem "Hollar
Week."   (A dollar down  buys jour Totem.)
In spite of the fact that this campus is inclined to be apathetic
in student affairs, the Publications Hoard is holding its head high,
and is setting out on one of the dire schemes of the age. ($1.00
down buys your Totem.)
It is introducing, through its agent, the Totem siaff, the marketing system of 'sale by the installment plan.' Economics professors have long since condemned it as unfeasible, unnecessary,
unpractical, uneconomic and totally uncontrollable. Hut then
students are not economics professors!—nor do they find themselves always in  receipt of a monthly pay cheque.   ($1.00  .  .  .  .)
The result of it all is that the student i.s now in possession of
means whereby he may escape the payment of the price of the
Totem  in a large lump sum.
.Starting today a dollar down buys your Totem . . . and the
number of dollars received during the campaign equals the number
of books printed in the Spring. Remember to bring your dollar
on  Wednesday tit  the latest.
BASKETBALL AND PASS SYSTEM
Recently, criticisms of the Student pass system have been
made iu connection with the Senior basketball games, llasketball,
which has been one of the few money-making sports on the campus, has, since the pass system has been inaugurated, lost a considerable amount of its revenue.
The trouble, however, is not with the pass system but with
the Senior League's allotment of gate receipts. The system is that
each team keeps the gate receipts from its home games. Thus,
Varsity keeps the receipts of the Wednesday games and the four
city teams split, the  V.A.C  gate.
However, Varsity home games, held as they are on .Wednesday and being "single headers," drew a mere handful of customers besides the student pass holders. On the other hand, the
'V.A.C gym is packed every Saturday night. Also, the Students'
Council pays $200 for the pass holders who attend the games at
the V.A.C. The result is that financially, Varsity is left out in the
cold.
A much more sensible arrangement and one that was turned
down by the league officials this fall, is to pool all gate receipts
as is done in Canadian football. Then Varsity could pay a certain
amount to (he league for each game away from home and share
equally with  the other teams in the profits.
Oi-, if this arrangement is not satisfactory to the league, then
a certain proportion of tlie Saturday night "double headers"
should be played at  the campus gym.
In any ease it appears that the I'niversily
teams in the past few years have been among
and hence the best drawing cards in tbe league
of  its rightful  share of the  profits.
ALONG
By PROXY
whose basketball
file most colorful
is being  deprived
CAMPUS RELIGIOUS
GROUPS   TO   HOLD
SERVICE WEDNESDAY
A combined Fellowship Service of
the four groups interested In student
religious life -Anglican College; S. C.
M.; Union College, and V. C. U.—will
be held in Union Collese chapel on
"Wednesday.   Nov.  23  at   3.45  p.m.
STUDENT  SPEAKERS.
Ernie Ollbeit, Shellnh Hutchinson,
Cal   Thompson     and    Dave   Ellis   are
the    student    speakers,    represent iny
respectively,    the   above   groups,   who
will each glvo a brief message on  tlie
theme,   "The   Challenge   of   the   Modem World  lo the Christian Student."
This   Is   the   first   service   of   this
unique character  to be held  on  the
campus,   antl   It   Is   the   hope   that
two such  services will  be  held each
year,  nt   the   beginning  of  the   Fall
term and at the close of the Spring
term.
A cordial invitation is extended to
nil students who are free at this hour
to  attend  and enjoy  this  service.
Ever    since    this    column    cracked
down  on  the  Book  Store  last  week,
I've   been   doing   a
DEPT. OF bit    of    eavesdrop-
BOOK STORE,     ping here and there
about the Caf. and
in lecture and Common rooms.
Opposition to my suggestion that
the Book Store employ students has
come In a most peculyah manner. It's
almost unbelieveable, as a matter of
fact. I've heard people on this campus say that no student would take
a Job of such menial proportions as
clerking  in  the Book Store.
Frunkly, I don't believe a word of it.
The studes around U.B.C. are, for the
most part, a snobbish lot. But there
ls one element, I'm convinced, which
hasn't either the time or the money
or the social distinction to be hoity-
toity.
Well, we have students working in
the library. And we have them working for the B.C. Electric (.no plug).
And during the summer—and at
Xmas—we have them working at almost any old thing.
Just who draws the line between
ditch-digging off the campus and
Caf-lounglng on lt? And why is it
drawn? I could tell—but it would be
better not to mention it. In spite of
that line—and It's only an imaginary
one—I'm still positive that at least
several students out of our more than
2000 would Jump at the chance to
earn a bit of book-money by working
in  the Book Store.
And to prove my contention, I'm
offering a challenge. Both to those
who say it can't be done, and those
who think lt can. A bit of a straw
vote:
NOTICE
All students who would be Interested in gainful employment in or
about the University grounds, in any
capacity—menial or otherwise—please
get In touch with Proxy immediately.
This offer won't be good after November  30th.
As   a   matter   of   fact,   there   seems
to   be   tangible  evidence   that  certain
students   need   Jobs
TRANSITION.       —or   at   least   that
they can't afford to
buy books.
This morning a mend of a friend
of mine reports the theft of a very
valuable black leather zlppered blnd-
ei containing notes in five subjects.
Tlie heel who removed it from the
Men's Common Room in the Library
cn Saturday must be very hard up.
It would be a coincidence indeed if
the heel was taking lectures in the
same five subjects that my friend's
friend elected this year. It's not such
a coincidence that he—the heel—
liked the looks of the note-book well
enough to s*^al lt.
Book-stealing, of course, ls a far
more thrilling pastime then working
in the Book Store. But is it more
lucrative? Is lt possible that stolen
books are sold at local second-hand
stores for a handsome several bucks?
Notice to heels: If you must steal
note-books, kindly remove the notes
you don't need and leave
HEELS. them behind. It's bad
enough to cause a student
financial embarrassment by stealing
his books, but it is certainly not necessary to ruin a person's chances
for academic supremacy.
Incidentally—I'm also out for book-
stealing  heels.
Those students who are forced to
work their way through school—or
beat their way through by
FINIS. some other method—should
be Interested ln the State
Scholarships proposal of the Canadian Student Assembly. Dr. Orant
Lathe. C.S.A. representative, i.s on
the campus this week explaining the
project to interested groups. This ls
n worth-while undertaking, and
should receive tlie support of every
university student  ln  Canada.
PLAYS
(Continued from Page 1)
a week In bed, you'll like the portrayal of this theme in the comedy
"Good Night Please," directed by
Prof. Walter Gage. You'll like the
contagious yawns of a lazy bank
manager, and you'll probably get a
great   deal   of   vicious   ploasure   out
SIR  GEORGE  PAISH
DECLARES PRESENT
SYSTEM IS ROTTEN
Sir Oeorge Palsh, a governor of
the London School of Economics,
speaking before a large audience
yesterday in Applied Science 100
termed the present world situation
as "pretty rotten." '
The policy of statesmen, he suld,
Ih leading the world deeper Into
trouble, whieh might even lead to
a complete world breakdown. The
only solution Is ln the common
sense of the people and the power of their opinion In Influencing
the bodies politic.
PUMP-PRIMING
Every country In the world today,
he claimed, has been "pump-priming." Italy. Japan, Germany have
kept from bankruptcy only by dint
of much borrowing and Oreat Britain while in a somewhat better position, is no exception. The slump
following last year when President
Roosevelt stopped borrowing Is an
Indication of the chaos which might
follow such measures.
ANOLO-AMKIUCAN
CO-OPERATION
The power of nations to continue
la coming to an end duo to their efforts to "put the clock back" and
become self sufficient. The Trade
Treaty consummated last week ls a
step In tho right direction. It should
lead to closer co-oporatlon between
Britain and America, and lt ts hoped,
to an understanding between the
powers.
In clo.sing Sir George made an appeal to University students and
Young people in general to use their
Influence on the political leaders and
business men in the hope of bringlng
the world out of its present situation.
$5.00 REWARD
For information leading to recovery of a black leather zipper
note-book—large size—lost In the
Library on Thursday afternoon.
Please communicate with D. Darling through the Arts Letter Rack,
or  A.M.S.  offloe.
"Let me serve your oar and your oar will serve you"
"Prank" Pioke
U.B.C.  SERVICE STATION
24-Hour Emergency Service.
SOUTH END OF McQILL ROAD
Complete Repair Facilities.
PT. OREY S3
• IIHIIIIIIMIIIIHIIIIIIIMtllllMIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIII*lllllliMMIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIfllllllll)lllllt(IIIH
BIRKS  CHALLENGER WATCH
Majors in good time for every busy man
and  woman.
Appearance   plus   performance   at   Prices
Hanging from  $25.00.
SILVERSMITHS
GOLDSMITHS
BIRKS
VANCOUVER, B.C.
DIAMOND
MERCHANTS
44IMII44l4l4l4t,MI4IMM4l44»llll4IMI4l44l44IIIIMIIIIIII44llll4l4lllll4ll44ll41ll4lll4l4lll444l4lll4IIMIII4llllllll4l4ll444ll4|444lllllllll4llll,
l444lll44l444l4IHIItlllllll44llllll44ll44ll44444(4l4lll4ll4lllll4ll(l4llllllll4444llllll4ll444l44444l44l4ll444ll44l4IIHt4ll, I Ml,1141,11144,41444*1
UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE
Hrs.: 0 a.m. lo S p.m.; Saturdays 9 a.m. to noon
LOOSE  LEAF  NOTE BOOKS,  EXERCISE  BOOKS  AND
SCRIBBLERS
AT REDUCED PRICES
Graphic   Engineering   Paper,   Biology   Paper, XMAS CARDS
Loose  Leaf  Refills,  Fountain  Pens  and   Ink NOW   ON
and Drawing Instruments. SALE
1)IMI<ll4IIIIIIIIIHIIIIIMIIt,HI*IIIIIHII>l*llillHIII|4lllll4lllll4lll4l4ll44llll444444l44IHmim*4l4ll,l*llt4IH,4l4tHII4444llll44lllllll4l4l4
HOTEL
COFFEE SHOP      {
and
DINING ROOM
Fountain for
After Theatre
GEORGIA
LUNCHEONS
DINNERS
TEAS
DANCES...
formal or informal.
SEY.  5743
RINGS
^■f g   ttft
Rumors are rampant that we are
going to hold another Open House
in connection with Education Week
this spring, so get the old thinking
caps on and try to dip up something
really new and spectacular to make
this "Tlie" Open House of all time.
Every scienceman is expected to do
ills part, so let's put some real
"umph" into lt.
It ls Intended ln this column, to
substitute blank spaces for cuss
words, so if you can't find the 	
thing some week you'll know that I
was really regusted about something.
SMUS   REACTIONS.
Below is my sincere reaction to the
way the cancelling of the 1 Hi-hour
noon period has put a crimp in the
Intra-mural games.
Maurle Van Vliet really did get a
lot of keen rivalry worked up last
year through his extremely diligent
efforts. This year he ls lucky If he
gets two full teams out for a match,
simply because the boys who want
to get through their courses Just
can't seem to have their lunches, play
a game, have a shower, and get to
their  lectures all  in  one hour.
At present a llvc-wlre committee
is trying to straighten out the timetables of the different years in an
effort to give us either two l'-j-hour
lunch periods or one 2-hour period.
The two l'i-hur periods should do
the most good.
So far all of the classes have
given good co-operation to this
committee, by handing in their
timetables,  excepting  the  3rd  year.
of  seeing  how  badly  hia   idea   works
out.
HEAVY DRAMA
The serious element of the evening will be Laurence Houseman's
powerful tragedy, "Judge Lynch."
The theme is a true one, the title
indicating the origin of the word
"lynching." Set In a 15th century
Irish castle, the play shows the mental torment of a Judge who has condemned his own son to the gallows.
Its heavy atmosphere of melancholy
and inevitability has almost the intensity of Greek tragedy, and will
require deep character insight from
the actors. The director is a former
leading lady of the Player's Club,
Just back from England, Miss Audrey  Phillips..
Only nine men out of that large
class have had the energy to overcome their monstrous inertia and
do. this little job.
Wake up you dopes and help out
these men who are spending a lot
of time in your  interests. The second  year men are helping 100 per
cent, and the Civil Department has
responded  magnificently.
Speaking of  Intra-murals, you can
bet your slip-stick on  Science  '39  to
take   the final  volley  ball  game  this
week. Just  another Varsity  "Wonder
Team." Oh yes, oh yes, oh yes.
ENGINEERS  TO  SPEAK.
This Thursday we will be addressed by C. V. Brennan, president of the
Association of Professional Engineers
in B.C., and John Oliver, the secretary at the U.S. meeting this Thursday. This will be an excellent opportunity for the 2nd and 3rd year men
to get an Idea of how the association
1 unctions and Just how it will govern
their futures as engineers. Don't miss
lt.
Congrats are due to Bill Bacon for
the quality and quantity of the
speakers he has lnvlegled into addressing you monkeys. The meetings
have been far above the standard of
former years and your excellent support backs up this opinion.
NOTICE
The Glee Club will meet Friday at
6.45 in Applied Science 100 this week.
New music. Tenors and baritones desired.
LOST
Zip pencil case, rose-colored fountain pen and small change purse and
money. Finder keep money If he returns the case and other contents to
A.M.S. offices.
APPLAUSE
. . . for a performance at the
Christmas plays, or for u lovely
dress the girl you take Is wearing ... Is conveyed best by
flowers from Brown Bros.
Joe Brown  (Arts '28) Mgr.
FLOWEKPHONE
Sey.  1484
ROS.
& CO. LTD.
685 Oranville Street
Students!
Support
Ubyssey
Advertisers
When buying
mention the fact that
you attend the
University...
it will help you
and help us Tuesday, November 22, 1938
THE    UBYSSEY
Three
from . . .
THE OUTSIDE
... by Darby
PIONEER  AT REST.
"M-7" ls for sale.
You can buy her If you have $25
spot cash—no terms.
For freshmen, who have no Idea
what I'm talking about, I might explain that M-7 Is, or was, the most
valiant of all the crates that used to
carry students from Sasamat to the
campus. Freshmen of today, who
ride to and fro ln smart streamlined
jobs, will have no appreciation of the
affection we oldsters have for M-7
and her companions.
For years we on the Ubyssey agitated for new busses. We ranted and
raved—but lt was all show. We really
loved the crates. Perhaps we loved
them for the fact that they were
veterans—they carried the wounded
off the fields of Flanders, and then
they carried the youngsters of British
Columbia to university.
Today, if you have the money, you
can buy M-7 for $25. I firmly believe
that the Alma Mater Society snould
buy her, then place her ln a conspicuous place on the Mall, there to remain for all time, a symbol of the
pioneer  spirit  of  U.B.C.
Subscriptions for this nobel cause
may be addressed to me, ln care of
the publications office. Remember,
it's good  to give.
a * x.
VARSITV TIME.
Experience counts. That fact has
been proven in connection with Varsity Time as never before. Last year
the program was a hit and miss attempt to air student activities of the
student body, and the hits were few
and far between.
This fall, Ozzle Dili-kin, a man with
an Idea, and his associates have done
a good job. I should know, for I was
In on last year's failure. Varsity Time
is a good radio show, and If council
would countenance lt, there would be
little trouble ln finding a sDonsor
IThe Idea, as a matter of fact, should
be given some thought.
Only one or two things remain before Varsity Time can be called A-l.
More careful casting of the playlets,
and shortening of Bob Thompson's
smart dramatic scripts. Perhaps, too,
the early-anticipated debut of the
Varsity band will help some.
In the meantime, from one who
knows what a thankless Job running
Varsity Time is, here's a salute to
the present staff.
* . M
CIVIC PRIDE.
Vancouver Is one of the few university towns on this continent that
doesn't swell with civic pride over the
accomplishments of the students and
faculty. This fact has created a mammoth problem, the task of getting
business and professional leaders to
lend their moral and sometimes financial support to the university.
Our campaign committee has worked to correct this. Some success has
been realized, but the Job ls a long
one. Every step taken must be carefully thought out, or trouble may
arise.
I never thought much of football
as an aid to university public relations, but a winning team seems to
help a lot. Working down town this
fall I've found more people willing to
talk U.B.C. If you open up the conversation with a reference to that
disputed game of a few Saturdays
ago.
Football   and   all   sports,   however,
R. H. Marlow, society photographer, for fine portraits, phone Trin.
2187.
THE NEAREST BANK IS
The Canadian
BANK OF
COMMERCE
Tenth and Sasamat Branoh
'' A general bank business
is transacted and accounts
of the faculty and students
of the University of British
Columbia   are   welcomed. *'
P. AN KKHK   TO   THF,
Al.MA MATER
SOCIETY
C. R. Myers, Manager
Hr
NOTICES
TUESDAY, NOV. 82:
Carnegie Recital, Prof. Clark
guest   speaker.     Art*   100
at 12.40.
Pub.    Council    Oame,    gym,
12.80.
Mock  Trial,   Arta  100,   7.80.
WEDNESDAY:
Carnegie    Opera    Recital,
Arte 100, 13.80.
Play Reading, Arta 100, 8.80.
C.CM.   'Contemporary  Leadership',   12.30.
Christmaa Playa, Auditorium
7.30.
THURSDAY:
Carnegie Orchestral  Recital,
Arta 100, 12.40.
Christmas Plays, Aud., 8.18.
FRIDAY:
Carnegie Orchestral  Recital,
same aa former.
Olee  Club,  Ap.  Sc.   100,  6.48.
SUNDAY:
S.CJVI.,   'Living   Creeds,'   Afternoon.
SYMPHONIES OF
BEETHOVEN TO BE
GIVEN THIS WEEK
Today's Carnegie Record Concert
will be devoted to a performance of
the choral finale of the great Symphony No. 9 in D Minor, Opus 125,
by Ludwig van Beethoven. The program will open with a popular overture, probably Oiacchino Rossini's
brilliant "Barber of Seville." and then
tlie guest speaker, Professor A. F. B.
Clark, who ls well equipped to speak
with authority on musical matters,
will arrive to discuss the famous and
lengthy Allegro assai, one of the two
greatest choral works of the Western
civilization, based on Johann von
Schiller's "Ode to Joy."
HISTORIC   IMPORTANCE.
Anticipating the Saturday evening
radio performance by Arturo Tosca-
nlnt, Beethoven's gigantic Symphony
No. 3 in E Flat Major ("Eroica"),
Opus 55, will be presented by recording In its entirety later ln the week.
The broadcast, which ls the first radio or gramophone presentation of
the "Eroica" as interpreted by the
world's greatest Beethoven authority,
will   be  of  historic  importance.
On Friday will be heard the bustling third movement, the first great
Beethoven scherzo, which he so successfully Inaugurated as an essential
part of the symphonic form, and the
finale, a monumental set of variations on a simple pregnant theme,
based, like the hero theme of the
beginning, on the three notes of the
commonest chord. Here again the
example of the form is surpassed
only by tlie same composer's Variations  on  a Waltz  by  Dlabelll.
can't be relied upon. Turn a winning
streak around and you get losses.
With losses U.B.C. fades out of the
sports picture, as lt has done so
often, and the same men who listened to your arguments before
squirm with that "I've got an appointment" look on their faces.
You can't rely orv football, but you
can on a slow, deliberate campaign
designed to Impress outsiders with
the good points of the university.
Campaigns have come and gone.
The present one may last another
few months, then lt too will pass Into
campus history. Remaining will be an
Impression made upon government
leaders and private citizens. An impression which will sink Into the
background of memory, to be revived
when  next  U.B.C.  campaigns.
CHINESE STUDENT
LIFE PORTRAYED
IN C. S. A. FILMS
Vivid      films      portraying    Chinese
student  life and  activities  were provided    by   Dr.    Grant    Lathe    yesterday   noon   ln   the    auditorium.      Dr.
Lathe has just  returned  from  China
where   he   acted   as   C.S.A.   representative   on   the   International   Student
Delegation   designed    to   carry   sympathy and  greetings  to  Chinese  students from others all over the world.
Extensive  work  in   mass  education,   provision   for   refugees,    and
medical assistance are some of the
more important activities  now  assumed   by   Chinese   university  and
high  school  students.     Such  work
Is carried on among the havoc and
destruction   created   by   Japanese
bombs.
STUDENTS  BUILD
THEIR   UNIVERSITIES
Two-thirds of the Chinese universities being demolished, students
have been forced literally to build
with their own hands tenij ornry
quarters away from the "death
areas." Despite the adverse conditions there, however. Dr. Lathe declared that "the morale in China is
excellent."
HOPPING
with
MARY ANN
Mudguards are not only for cars but appear also in the newest
footwear fashions. . . . These are the solution of rainy weather shoes
. . . Rae-Son's Mezzanine Floor Shoe Store, 644 Granville Street . . .
Suede shoes, suitable for campus treks and afternoon teas, have the
special handsome leather mudguard trim and protects the toe and
lower part of the shoe from the rain splashes.
"Whittier" a particularly attractive afternoon shoe in black
has the front tie and lizard trim heel and mudguard front, the remainder of the shoe being black suede. . . . These are $7.50 per pair and
will be the pride and joy of every coed.
We have just uncovered the greatest hoax in the campus newspaper world, to wit., Chang Suey and his accomplice have never once
been in the cafe, 'during their two years here at this institution. What
we would like to know is . . . how is he so familiar with Caf. coffee?
Maracain leather shoes in block and rich brown, featuring the
comfort producing cork-filled platform soles, and chick zippercd
front are the latest in coed styles . . . ideal for light rains. . . . slip-on
Russian styled light weight rubber overshoes . . . block, white, brown,
plain and plaid cuffs, or zippercd fronts at Raeson's Mezzanine Floor
and  the price is from  $1.95  up.
(S (S (S
"All aboard," cried the conductor, as you part from your campus
to journey homewards for the Christmas season. The holiday is a time
of relaxation for ^ou because you have already visited Phoebe's Hosiery
Shop, 713 Dunsmuir Street, for your Christmas gifts which are all
gaily wrapped for you. For your Mother there is an exclusive handmade imported slip she has been wishing for. . . . Your favorite aunt
will be the recipient of the heavy weight stockings in wine tints that
she admires, . . . Sister Susie's box contains a dainty velvet scarf in
Persian shades. . . . Your best friend is not forgotten either. ... A
dainty trio in holiday is for her—sheerest black, mulberry crepe, and
"Evening" gossamer hosiery . .  . for evening wear.
Imagine the surprise of the Phi Delt who visited one of his
courses for the first time this year, only to find they were having a
mid-term.  . .
Now what is there for sistcr-in-l.iw Joan? . . . The very thing!
. . . Olive green gloves will harmonize beautifully with her mink coat.
One pair is fabric with zips, and the other is a suede pull on style
... at Phoebe's, 713 Dunsmuir.
af       _<       ts
Christmas shopping is well underway now and a suggestion in
exquisite gifts is the colorful array of sleeping apparel which Mrs.
Paton has stocked in her Lingerie Shop at 2793 Granville Street.
Dainty French hand made gowns in white with ecru lace patterns,
special Chinese slip with the exquisite embroidery and light as a feather,
flowered satin with tiny frogs and pearl buttons arc among the dainty
selection which make delightful Noel gifts. . . . Phi Kap pledge
boasts that he has twelve ties which he wears in chronological order,
so that when he arrives back at Number One Tie, the creases have all
disappeared . . . saves pressing, he added. . . . Powder pink and atmosphere . . . two new shades in sleeping dresses ... at 2793 Granville
Street . . . the powder pink has the coiled shoulder strap and buckle
effect on the sash all in gleaming satin. . .
tS eS tS
Students will find that the best service is rendered them by the
Mary Ann advertisers: Mrs. Paton's Lingerie Shop, 279 3 Granville
Street; Rae-Son's Mezzanine Floor Shoe Store, 644 Granville Street;
Lora Lee Dress Shop, 28 14 Granville Street; Phoebe Hosiery Shop,
713 Dunsmuir Street; and Fred Holmes Imported English Wear for
Men,   2845   Granville  Street.
cs        _?        es
For the militia events between now and St. Andrew's Day—
dress shirts, marcella, pleated, plain, and with collar attached arc the
order of the season. Smoked and white mother of pearl studs, the
former for the dinner jacket outfit and the latter for tails, plus key
chain for tails, tics, white silk handkerchiefs, heavy slik scarves and
kid gloves both in white, are appropriate for the male evening attire,
as well as being ideal Christmas gifts for father and brother, and a
host of other male relatives ... at Fred Holme's, 2845 Granville Streea.
In case you have been wondering what to buy for your fraternity
brother for Christmas here are a few suggestions, and a small deposit
on any article will keep them until Christmas for you—spats, dressing gowns, house slippers, socks, woolen tartan scarves, silken scarves,
gloves, ranging from blacks to light tan, shirts, plain striped, colored,
with and without collars, sportswear—badminton shorts, mesh shirts
and  white sports socks, garters and  braces at 2845  Granville Street.
tS eS tS
Phi Kappa Pi's are a little worried. . . . They are afraid that they
might have to bask in the reflected glory of the deeds of the Phi
Kappa Sigmas (known on the campus as Phi Kaps, which appellation
they, Pi's claim as their, Pi's, own) .
Lora Lee Dress Shop, 2814 Granville Street, has a new shipment
of smart woollen ensembles, in the popular red copper and monterey
blues and featuring the basque neck and crew neck . . . jackets of
blazer and shirtwaist in tartans ranging from the colorful Royal
Stuart, to the blue tartans . . . deep pockets and natty belts add to
the chick styles. . . . "I'm in love," gasped a Musical Society male in
dire straits, to his caf. cronies . . . the only consolation that his calloused companions could offer him was "What again?" and "Hah,
hah, just waking up to the fact." . . .
Twin sweaters in the new winter shades, one piece dresses of
woollen raspberry with gold buttons, and black patent belt at Lora
Lee's Dress Shop which is open until six every evening and until nine
on Saturday night . . . and remember . . . present a Mary Ann ad.
and get a one dollar reduction on every dress five dollars and over.  .  .
MARY ANN
Illll II11 Mil IH1 Hill HI III MIM.MHH I HIHHH III III Mill ll
H.   JESSIE   HOW,  B.A. 1
Public Stenographer 1
,   I
4481  -West 10th ATI.
-Ba.in.yn and Thitti Typed
ltM4IH,MI44l4l,MIH||,|t,|,,l,||,,,,,|,,,,,||||,,,|||,,,,,,,,,,,'
Iltlli4,,,lllllll,ll,,l,l,,,,,,,(,,,,|,,,,, ||, 4,,l||ll,,,,|, ii,I,,,,,,,,!
VARSITY  SERVICE I
STATION f
"AT   THE   GATES" f
"OUR   SKUVICIO   MEANS 1
HAPPY MOTORING" \
IIII44IM)I*I|||,,IIM,MIM,,||,|,,|,,|,,|,,||,,||,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,||M,7
Fraternity and Sorority
Printing- and Engraving
Our Specialty
DANCE    PROGRAMMES
INVITATIONS.    'AT   HOMES,'
LETTERHEADS   and
CHRISTMAS CARDS
GEHRKE'S
568   Seymour   St.
J
BE COLLEGIATE—Smoke  u  Pipe  .  .  .
Peterson's Iteg. $2.00—SPECIAL $1.79
WORLD WIDE  NEWS
Across from the Commodore
867
Oranvllle
The
choice of
the
majority
***** BEST MILK CHOCOLATE MADE
tf-SHOT
Thl*» 1st the flrst prize-winning T-shot submitted ln the Tea Expansion
Iiin-cuu's contest for unusual shots of people drinking tea. The contest
will run for ten weeks with prizes of $3.50 weekly and grand prizes of
$35, $10, $5 at the end of that time.
The picture above ls of Jack Hunter and Ken West brewing their
own In the chem. lab. It wus submitted by Ted Underhiil and Irene Eedy.
Oet your pictures In by Friday noon of each week and get your share
of  the  prizes.
CASH PRIZES IN
COMPETITION FOR
LITERARY EFFORTS
The Women's Canadian Club of
Toronto ls sponsoring a literary
competition for 1938-30 offering a
prize of $100 for the best poem submitted before February 15th, 1939.
The poem may be a lyric, sonnet,
ballad, ode, or narrative. With the
exception of the lyric, which must
not exceed 25 lines, the poems should
be within 100 lines. Send your contribution  to:
Secretary-Treasurer of the Women's Canadian Club of Toronto, 69
Bloor   St.   East,   by   registered   mall.
For further Information, apply to
the office  of the  Registrar.
THIS WEEK IS DOLLAR
WEEK. BRINO YOUR TOTEM
DOLLAR TOMORROW
LOST
Missing . . dark navy blue overcoat, from Library common room
Saturday afternoon. It ls getting
rather chilly now these days. Leave
any information for Ray Anderegg ln
the Arts letter rack, or leave the coat
In  the Students' Council office.
TRINITY 3377
MACK A.
STARK
LIFE INSURANCE
897
ORANVILLE
(At Smythe)
ICE CREAM
After Theatre
Specials
Silk Hat
MARGARET FINLAY.  Arts   '31
JACK   PARKER.  Ar'.s   '30
-AS   NEAR  AS  YOUR  PHONE"
SEYMOUR 2405
Delivery   Anywhere   in   City   Limits
E ' S   .   .   .   840 GRANVILLE
U.B.C.  ROOST
SALISBURY LODGE ANNEX
"Where  The Gang- Meets'
LUNCH 25c
DINNER 35c RUGGER DROP THRILLER TO ROWING CLUB
Intramural  Volleyball
Final
Wednesday Noon—Oym
OR-T
RESULTS:
Varsity 11—Lions 3
Varsity 3—Rowing Olub 4
U.B.O. 0—All-Blacks 6
Seconds 3—Nlppons 11
Four
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 22, 1938
'Birds Smear Lions In Grid Thriller
FIGHTING VARSITY LINE PAVES WAY
FOR WIN; WILLIAMS, ap ROBERTS STAR
By LIONEL SALT
Fighting  back  from   their   own   one  yard   line,   Varsity's   Thunderbirds   of   the   grid-iron
smashed over a touchdown in the last quarter to  ground the  North Shore Lions in the  dirt  of
tho Stadium 11-3. Varsity's scores came in the flrst   nnd   third   quarters  with   field   goals   kicked
by ap Roberts, and the last quarter touch by Tommy Williams. The Lions' lone scoro came in
tho first quarter with a field goal kicked  by H indie. The game was a grudge match all the way
through. Both teams slugged and kicked in the p ile-ups  and  two  men  were  waved  to  the  bench
by the referees.
■ APPY SCORES
Early ln the first stanza Williams
G
RIDIRON
LEANINGS
O. D.
HAPPY APPY
YEA TEAM!
Well folks, have we got a football
team, or have we got a football team?
For a long time now lt has been rumoured around the campus that the
Blue and Oold gridders were a fair
weather team, and that as soon as
the going got tough our campus heroes would fold like a house of cards.
Well, Alphonse, did Carson and his
cohorts bring home the bacon or are
they a bunch of hams?
Congratulations boys,  and may all
your Xmas marks be big ones.
ROUGH  AND  TOUOH   STUFF.
From our nice comfortable seat in
the grandstand, it gave us a real
thrill to see the way the gladiators
ot the gridiron tore Into one another
and acted like 22 cave men on the
loose. But after all, the would-be-
tough Lions from over the water
started the rough stuff and lt McOulre, Smith, Stradlottl, Mclver,
Straight, Drummond, Dowrle et al
proved to be just a bit tougher than
Bishop's bashers, lt all adds up to
yet another feather ln the Blue and
Oold helmets.
Don't  look  now,  but  If  the  Thunderbirds  walk   all  over   the  Lions  ln
their  next  meeting,  don't  tell  us we
didn't warn you. The way those 'Birds
turned on the heat in the last quarter on  Saturday   they could  take all
comers  from  the  kids on  the  corner
lot to the mighty Notre Dame outfit.
And   now   for   a   bit   of   a   minor
scoop.   Captaln-prexy   Carson   McOulre Is working on a pet scheme
to bring the eastern inter-colleglate
football  champs—the  McOlll  Bed-
men to you over there in the corner—out    here    for    a   New   Year's
Day Evergreen bowl contest.
Nothing ls definite, Carson tells us,
but he Is all pepped up over the idea
of    staging    a    Canadian    collegiate
championship series, and If the eastern representatives of  the  grand old
fall sport  feel  the same  way  as   the
boys out here do, it should be quite a
classic.
STOP PRESS
The Varsity Senior Women's
basketball team defeated Cunninghams last night 20-22.
GET VALUE
IN PRINTING
for the activities
of your—
SORORITIES
FRATERNITIES
SOCIAL
and
OLUB   FUNCTIONS
It'a Evan "Appy" ap Roberta, whose
trusty, point-anagglng toe gave the
scrappy Thunderbirds a lead they
never relinquished In the classic grid
dogfight staged at the Stadium Saturday.
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CO-ED SPORTS
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U.B.C. grass hockeyists crached
back into the win column again Saturday with a convincing 8-0 win
against South Burnaby. This leaves
the co-eds with a lot more prestige
and second place ln the league.
Forcing the game wide open the
Blue and Oold stick artists scored almost at will with quick passing attacks. Burnaby managed to shoot for
goal but once ln the whole hour of
play.
Outstanding ln the scoring department were Anne Carter, centre-forward, and Pat Carey, left inside, each
with three goals to her credit. Best
play of the game was the second goal
scored by Anne ln ten seconds flat
from a bully at the fifty-yard line
without the losers coming near the
ball.
* >x ■:-
CHILLIWACK   CHISEL.
A fighting gang of high school basketballers in Chllllwaek took the
senior B co-eds (reinforced by three
A's) 23-18 when the collegians made
their annual trip to the valley town
Friday. With a score of 16-0 against
Varsity, Ruth Wilson arrived on the
scene ln the nick of time to bring the
co-eds up to within one point of the
farmerettes.
It seems as if the lady-like tactics
of the collegians are practically useless In a rugby game—the girls were
Just mowed down to quote the senior
manager, Rosemary Collins, but a
vigorous cheering section was on
hand  to encourage the victims.
took a kick back from the Lions
and ran lt from their fifty down to
the thirty, Finlay ripped off a first
down in two plays to put the students on the fifteen yard line, ap Roberts booted the ball squarely through
the up-rlghts for the first htree pointa
of the  game.
Coming back fast and taking advantage of the breaks the Lions
wiped out Varsity's lead with a field
goal from the Students' fifteen after
attempting a pass. Two successive
flrst downs put the ball tn position
for Hlndle of the Lions to kick the
equalizers.
LINE STABS
Throughout the game the Varsity
line plunged, tackled and blocked
the Lions off their feet. The North
Shore backs saw their pass offense
crumble before them as Varsity linemen broke through to smear the
pass-thrower every time. Only twice
during the game was Bullock able
to get a pass past the line of scrimmage and then both attempts were
grounded.
Showing great Improvements over
the exhibition put on during the
protested game with the Lions, the
Varsity linemen stopped the North
Shore running attack through the
middle cold. Norm Modine, principle ground-gainer for the Hillbillies found nothing but a stone wall
to run through. Most of their yardage was gained through end-around
plays with the Varsity ends getting
sucked into the middle.
KWICK KICKS
The kicking edge went as was expected to the Lions. Jock Taylor
booted them consistently all afternoon and twice caught the Varsity
safety man off-guard -with quick
kicks. Johnny Pearson tried nobly
but was out-distanced nearly every
time.
The break came ln the third quarter   when   North   Shore   took   possession of the ball on their own twenty-
four.
APPY   SCORE  AGAIN
Quarterback Harry Bullock called
for a pass but was smeared when
three Varsity linesmen broke
through to drop him ln his artcks.
He dropped the ball and Varsity recovered. With throe minutes to
three quarter time, Varsity backs
fought their way to the fifteen
yard line in two playa. Again ap
Roberts went back to try for a field
goal with Williams holding, and
again he boosted the ball through
the up-right for a perfect goal to
give the Students a 6-3 lead that
they never relinquished.
Most thrilling Incident of the
whole encounter came in the fourth
quarter. North Shore kicked to the
Varsity twenty. Two running plays
got  the Students nowhere and Pear-
JUNIOR GRIDMEN TAKE
COUGARS 11-0
Varsity's Junior gridders upset a
surprised gang of Cougars from Main
Street on Saturday and even went
the seniors one better by chalking up
a   11-0 victory.
The Varsity line Just wouldn't give
ground and English, Livingstone and
Byers nailed tlie Red-shirts for
plenty of negative yardage. The students got a bit too complicated for
the visitors in tlie second quarter,
when   Don   McLeod   rifled   a   shallow
lateral of a fake end-run and Paul
Cote, receiving, passed to Frith Just
before he was smeared for the students to go ahead 5-0.
In the second half with the desperate Cougars trying hard to equalize, Al Smith intercepted a forward
pass and raced the rest of the distance for the final score converted by
McLeod.
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U.B.C. RUGGERS
BUMP RUGGED
ALL - J3LACKS
The U.B.C. rugby team stands supreme as Vancouver's original gas-
house gang today after beating the
only other respectable claimants to
the title, North Shore All-Blacks, 9-6
at Brockton Point last Saturday. The
rough and tough All-Blacks, conquerors of the mighty Meralomas and the
only team outside of Rowing Club to
give the Varsity a battle, was outfought by the flgh tinges t bunch of
rugger players ever to dry themselves
on the same towel.
Pre-game adds would have shown
the U.B.C.'s on the short end. But
the cocky students forgot about that
and during the first canto, playing
uphill, held the North Shore tough-
les scoreless.
SMITH   SCORES  TWO
Turning around and going with
the force of gravity in the laat half,
the Varaity let go their bag of
tricks and smacked over nine
points. "Waddle" (eome to papa)
Robertson started the ball rolling
by punting high and following up
to pick the baU out of the fullbacks' arms and race over for a
try.
Oeoff Mackle weaved and swerved
nicely to cut through the entire All-
Black team several minutes later and
then passed to Captain Bob Smith
who dashed over for another 3 points.
Bob .put the Blacks definitely behind
the "elghtball" soon after by climaxing a three-quarter movement with
another try. The score incidentally
put Smltty up front among the leading scorers ln the loop. None of the
trys were converted.
North Shore rallied  with  two  tries
but couldn't dent the U.B.C. line for
the winning points.
THE HONOUR COLUMN
Special honours go the three 3rd
division men, Wilf Calnon, Oeorge
Schuthe and Malcolm Brown who
played as well If not better than most
bf the regulars . . . Calnan was particularly  effective at hook.
son dropped back to kick. A bad
tump from Lee Straight got away
from Johnny and the Lions recovered the ball on Varsity's seventeen.
HOLD  THAT  LION
A penalty and a first down advanced the ball to the two yard line.
With goal to go and three chances
to do lt in, the Varsity hopes looked
plenty dark. But plugging the centre of the line, the stalwarts of the
front trench dug in and held off
the Lions' bitter attack in three successive line plunges. Bill Bishop and
Freddie Smith were waved to the
bench when feelings between them
got   a   little   frayed.
The Thunderbirds then went ahead
to sink the Lions further in the mud
when they started an irresistible
march down the field. With the ball
tn Varsity's possession Williams took
the ball and with some beautiful
ghost running weaved and swayed
through almost the entire North
Shore team to carry the pigskin to
the fourteen-yard line.
TOMMY   TERRIFIC
Williams made another seven
through the line, as both teams mlx-
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Drop Goal Gives Rowers
Edge In Brockton Epic
Varsity lost one of the toughest games in its long and honorable career Saturday whon the fighting Studes were nosed out
by an inspired Wowing Club team 4-3. The Club capitalized on
one of their few scoring chances to boom over a field goal early
in tlie second half and then successfully held off a feverish Varsity
uttat-k for the rest of the game.
Play was even during a torrid flrst
NIPPONS OUTSCORE
COLLEGIANS 11-3
The Nlppons proved the nemesis of
Varsity Seconds as they outhustled
the Collegians Saturday afternoon to
a score of 11-3.
Varsity started like a house afire
early ln the game when Bobby Lowe
slipped and hipped his way through
seven Japanese for what was to be
our solitary try; Captain John Run-
kle missed the convert.
The Nlppons took the lead sparked
by Ex-Rep man Shlratshl who went
over for a converted try late ln the
first half. Varsity fought hard ln the
second half but the fates were
against them. The Nlppons scored
twice ln the second canto, both tries
being unconverted.
FROSH RUGBY
The Freshmen ruggers snapped
their losing streak Saturday when
they swamped a game North-West
squad 27-0 at Douglas Park. Leading
11-0 at half-time, the Frosh went
ahead to sink the North Shore lads
27-0 going down hill ln the second
stanza.
Leading the scorers was red-
thatched Oordle Pyle with one try
and three out of five converts. Oerry
Wood with two tries, and Physlck,
Nell, Bingham and McOulre wtth one
each completed  the scoring.
SOCCER
Wanted . . . and no fooling . . . some
four or five stalwart soccermen to
complete the lineup of a Junior team
to be entered In league competition
. . . thoae Interested please contact
Dick Clarke in the Arts Letter Rack.
ed it up a little, ap Roberts made
another two, and Tommy Williams
climaxed the drive when he skirted
across the Hold to plunge over near
the sidelines. The touchdown left
the North Shore side completely demoralized and Varsity might have
scored again but for the blowing of
the  final   whistle.
half that had the crowd on thetr
feet at all ltmes. The heavier acrum
of the Rowers completely dominated
play in the forward division, ceding
the threea away on many threatening runs which were stopped only by
the sensational tackling of Lumsden,
Bird and Leggat.
"HALF-BACK SNEAK"
Varaity'a hustling pack advanced
the ball Into Rowing Club territory
and after aeveral attempta by the
three line to outdistance the Clubbers* backs, Basil Roblnaon pulled
a "half-back sneak" on the blind
aide to register Varaity'a lone
aoore. Bus missed the convert, taken
from a difficult angle.
The game was featured by the
hard tackling and aggressive, rugged
play of both teams. Ted and Howie
McPhee were too closely marked for
any breakaways, and only on rare
occasions did Lumsden or Leggat
get ln the clear.
FORWARDS BETTER
The forwards redeemed themselves for their performance of laat
week by turning ln a scrapping
game, getting the threellne away
time after time ln the second half,
only to see their efforts wasted aa
the deadly tackling of tho Rowers
stopped the Blue  backfleld cold.
—Harmer.
BOOM BOOM BANG
GO THE INTRAMURALS
BLAST . . . Here's the latest dope on
the Intra-murals from Maury Van
Vllet: The championship volleyball
game will be played Wednesday, November 23rd pitting Arts 42 against
Sc. 30. The following Wednesday a
grudge match has been scheduled
with   Arts   39   challenging   Sc.   39.
Rope climbing season starts on Friday, November 25, with all classes
competing; full team comprised of
five men. The Mall Race will be run
off on December 2 with five entrants
allowed to each class. Length of the
course ls 385 yards.
Meetings scheduled for January 9
to discuss basketball and English
rugby. Consider yourselves blasted.
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