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The Daily Ubyssey Oct 7, 1948

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 The Daily Ubyssey
VOL. XXXI
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 7, 1948
No. 10
Religious
Clubs May
Lose Grants
Meeting Demands
New Allocation
Campus religious clubs will
probably lose their AMS grants
following an amendment passed
to redistribute club grants at
Wednesday's AMS general
meeting.
The resolution proposed by Joe
Lotskar, CCF Club executive, and
Ray Dewar called for redistribution
"to conform with the principal that
only those clubs serving the general
interest of all students should receive
grants."
"Some clubs who have only from
10 or 15 students to their meetings
are receiving grants while others regularly drawing 300 or more receive
nothing," Lotskar contended.
"I feel that since I pay AMS fees
some of those fees should go to those
organizations in which I have my interests."
Dewar felt that grants should be
distributed "on a basis of value to
the students as a whole.
Roger Pedersen, president of the
Literary and Scientific . Executive
claimed "there is no comparison between political and religious clubs.
All have a faith but only a few of us
partake actively in party politlos."
Administration May Seize AMS
If Budget Fails, Plant Warns
AMS Meeting Gives 99 Pet Vote
To German Scholarship Plan
GRANT LIVINGSTONE, last
year's AFS president will find
himself the key figure in a budget probe when he returns from
his European trip this month.
Canadian Students
To Exhibit Photos
Photo wise UBC students will soon
have a chance to display their work
on a national scale.
In a letter to the Daily Ubyssey,
the Camera Club of Hart House at
the University of Toronto, annaunced
the Second Annual Canadian Inter-
University Salon of Pictorial Photography. It will be held in the Hart
House Gellery November 15 to November 22.
The aim of the Salon is to link the
photographers of Canadian Universities together and enable them to
display their work on a national basis.
Entry forms are available from
Joan Bennett at Alma 1487-L.
The jury of selection will include
Frank E. Hessin, Lenord Hutchinson,
A.R.C.A., and Randolph MacDoald,
F.R.P.S., A.I.B.P.
Closing date for entries is November 7, 1948.
EUS Banquet Best
Bargain On Campus
Say Redshits
The finest fifty cent meal
in town is the bargain offered
sciencemen at the annual Engineers Undergraduate Society
banquet at the Commodore on
Thursday, October 14.
The show will be complete with
"wine, women and after dinner
hpeakers."
A nffcre formal theme is planned
for this year's affair. Guest speakers
will be Dr. H. J. McLeod and Mr.
Douglas McBrown.
In past years the EUS banquet has
been one of the gayest stags in the
social calendar. The night usually
ends with a mammoth snake parade
raising the hallowed cry of "Science"
through the downtown streets and
theatres.
Thunderbird Hits
i Nov. 30
The Thunderbird, UBC's literary
magazine for budding authors, will
be published around the end of November, according to editor, Dan Paul.
Any student is invited to submit
his work and the editor anounces
that they are now ope for contributions  of  short  stories,   articles,  plays
and poems.
Manuscripts should be typed on
paper 8V2" by 11" and dropped into
the contribution box in the outer
office of the Daily Ubyssey in ihe
north  basement  of  Brock Hall.
Deadline for material is October
31.
GREEKS SAVED FROM RUIN
AS 'BORE' WAR IS WON
Scores of UBC fraternity men marshalled their forces
Wednesday for what turned out to be, for most of them, a
"Bore" War.
Interfraternity Council was told Tuesday that a group
on the campus planned to propose a ban on Greek Letter
Societies at Wednesday's general student meeting.
The phone wires hummed Tuesday night as fraternities
summonsed their, members to the meeting in order to save
themselves from ruin.
yBut the resolution never came, and the fraternity men
dragged themselves back to the cafeteria after waiting nervously for twb hours in the rear of the UBC Armories.
Livingston And Harwood
Centered In AMS Probe
Grant Livingstone and Bob Harwood were threatened with
court action for last year's misappropriation of funds at Wednesday's general AMS meeting.
If student government fails to meet its obligations this year
it may be taken over by the University Administration, Paul
Plant, student treasurer, warned Wednesday's general meeting.
In   moving   adoption   of   Council's^1— '■ =—^ '■	
flirting with fiancial ruin,
The lack, he said, "had been built
during the past three years by mismanagement on the part of previous
councils.
"Unless this year's cut in expenditure are effective, the ociety will el-
austerity budget he pointed to $20-
000 capital shortage now facing council.
He warned  solemnly  that in their
mismanaged policy of lush spending
TONGUE TWISTER FOILS
LANSKAIL AT MEETING
The day's prize slip of the tongue was made by student
Don Lanskail at Wednesday's stormy AMS meeting.
Lanskail, in attempting to amend the charges laid against
Livingstone and Harwood, wanted the word 'misappropriation" be deleted as unappropriate.
But apparently the flying verbal ack-ack had rattled him.
Lanskail actually asked that "the motion be amended as
misappropriate."
Power Cut:
Electricity Cut
Threatened For
Toronto Students
TORONTO, Oct., 6, (CUP—
University of Toronto students
may find themselves in the dark
this year in more ways than
ane. #*■•'
Ontario Hydro Commission officials
have warned that "unless there is
full co-operation from every undergraduate to conserve power, there
will be definite, drastic power cuts."
Instructions have been issued to
colleges, departments and care takers
on tho expansive Toronto campus to
conserve  power.
Accoring to the university build-
inp superintendent, women's residence, Whitney Hall, is amog the
worst   offeders.
Power trouble has arisen out of
hydro commission's effort to increase
province wide economy in preserving
power supplies for Ontariols essetial
industries.
^ The "legacy of debt""issue sparked
a stormy half hour of commet, and a
counter-amendments from the 3500
welter of motions, amendments and
amassed studets.
Sightseeing Job
Open for Bidders
Want to see Europe?
International Student Service needs
a new executive.
Applications for the position are
now being received. They must be
university graduates with some administrative experience and be free
to travel in Europe, U.S., and Canada.
ROARING APPROVAL
The court suit suggestion made by
2nd year Law student Bob Dodd, won
roaring approval from the 3500 am-
massed students present.
An alternative motion sponsored by
Dodd, demanding an AMS probe into
last year's spending spree was finally
passed.
Resolutio calls for: a committee, including treasurer Paul Plant, be
formed to launch the investigation
into the fiscal policies of the Living-
stone-Harwood   administration.
Committee will:
1. "Assess and report" on those responsible for t'he misappropriation of
Memorial   Gymnasium   funds.
2. Draw up an amendment to the
Constitution to prevent further misappropriations.
AMENDMENT
An amendment sponsored by Law
Student Don Laskail, protesting the
use of the word misappropriation as
"criminal" was defeated.
Students voted down a counter
motion made by Arts student Eric
Broderick, calling for tabling the motion until Livingstone returned here
to face charges.
Livingstone is just completing a
trip to Europe as UBC delegate to
the International Union of Students
conferece.
past student governments had been  most  certainly  face  bankruptcy."
Build A Surplus
The only hope of replacing the
$32,000 now owing the Memorial
Gymnasium lies in building up a surplus through slashed expenditures,"
he declared.
"To go on spending as last year's
council did would be, to invite ruin."
Major cuts in the budget were:
1. Restriction of MAD grant to a
maximum of $5,000 on the basis of a
20 cent subsidy on every game admission sold.
2. Slashing of special events grant
to $2,500, barely enough to cover costs
of Symphony concerts and insuffici-
An Extra Dollar
It wil^ now go to Board of Governors for approval of its clause that one
dollar be added to next year's dues
to pay for the scholarships.
Greer and his seconder, Greg Belkov will now petition the Canadian
Plea for hiring of a business manager to avoid mismanagement resultant from changing treasurers every year was rejected by an overwhelming majority.
Roger Pedersen, Literary and Scientific Executive president, declared
the   motion   "impractical"   since   no
ent to allow for usual special events
program.
3. Twenty to forty small clubs *l»
left without grants. Re-distribution
called for in a new resolution may,
however, give some of these a small
grant.
Resolution by Cliff Greer asking
UBC students contribute four scholarships to bring European students
to Canada to study democratlcainstU
tutions, passed by a 99 percent majority after Greer called for a standing vote,
government and UNESCO to act upon
clauses   requeuing   them   to  provide
provided by Canadian students,
two $1,800 scholarships for every, one
NFCUS is expected'to spread the
plan to other Canadian universities,
funds could be found for payment
Dodd protested that $3,600 expend-
of a business manager,
iture on a manager would probably
save $50,000 from misappropriation
but students were unconvinced arid
shouted down the motion with a loud
chorus of "nay".
Daily Ubyssey Photo By Bill Wallace
BURIED IN THE CROWD at yesterday's AMS  meeting, last year's treasurer Bob Harwood,
(second from left' heard charges of "misappropriation of funds" and "irresponsibility" hurled
at the past, administration. He and ex-AMS president Grant Livingstone will be the subject of
an Alma Mater Society probe.
DVA "GYPING"
MAY  BE CAUSE
OF FUND LACK
Department f Veteran's Affairs
"short-changing" on UBC veterans'
AMS fees may have been responsible for a large part of AMS fund
deficiency.
A speaker from the floor at
Wednesday's meeting suggested
that much of last year's shortage
was due to council's budgeting for
i),:i00 students whereas fees were
received from only 8500 owing to
DVA  technicalities.
Treasurer Paul Plant agreed that
this discrepancy accounted for
several thousand dollars.
Sports Desk Asks
Sport Results
Since the Sports Desk of the Ubyssey is still in the organizational stage
executives of all mionr sports clubs
are asked to report the success of
meeting s to the sports desk. Publications office is located in the North
Basement of the Brock Hall. Clubs
are asked to give the editors their
complete co-operation for the benefit
of full sports coverage on the campus.
Ubyssey Stays 'Daily'
Despite 'Toy' Charge
The Daily Ubyssey will continue to publish four times
weekly by request of student body despite charges of Herb
Adams that the paper "is just a toy in the hands of a few
students.'*
® Adams' resolution at Wednesday's
AMS meeting that grant to the Daily
Ubyssey of $1,500 be cut and: that thW
paper revert to two or three issue* a
week to facilitate council's plan to
replace War Memorial Gym was de-
feated by a resounding shout of "nay"
from an estimated 80 per cent of
students.
Ron Haggart, Publications Board
Editor-in-Chief, told the meeting that
the Daily Ubyssey is already operating on a three issues a week budget
but continuing to produce four issues
and that the Totem had^been put on
a self-sustainnig basis thus saving
students between three and four
thouand dollars.
Mass Protest On
Martin Case Held
Mass protest of campus organizations against Law Society's stand on
the Martin case has been postponed
one week so that further information
may be brought  in.
Two Law Students, Jim Sutherland and Hugh Legg will draw lote
today's session of the Parliamentary
for debate on resolution that "the
British Columbia Law Society was
justified in barring a Communist
from law practice.
Student Song Book Will
Aid Barber Shop Choirs
No longer will students have to move their mouths unintel-
ligently when a sing-song takes place on the campus if plans
for the student song book go according to schedule.
The   book,  under  production  sincef-
1946   is  scheduled   to  appear  on  the
stands   in   mid-November,   according
to editor Dave Morton.
200 PAGES
He and assistant editor Ruth Ketch-
ison expect the 200 page pocket- sized
book   to   sell   for   about   one   dollar.
It contains 175 songs with interesting notes and illusi'ratios o each. The
illustratlg is done by Buzz Walker,
creator of "Totie,"
In order to compile the notes, Morton and his staff spent long hours in
book stores ad the public libraries
reading every available book on the
subject.
POCKET   SIZE
When the idea first originated and
was approved by the 1946-47 Students
Council, Morton wrote to various
colleges and, upon receiving huge
volumes, decided to produce the book
in pocket size,
All songs had to be copied in hand
since cost of type-set music would
be prohibitive.
COPYRIGHT BATTLE
While this was being done, tfie battle to obtain use of copyright material
was begun.
Most publishers co-operated, but
for one song "Liza Jane", over twenty
letters had to be written and legal
advice obtained.
Binding on the book will be blue
linen with a gold crest and Totie.
SONGS LATE
ities, and faculties are holding up the
At the moment, fraternities, soror-
procedure by their lateness in turning in songs.
A final deadline of October 8 has
been set for these songs. Page 2
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
Thursday,    October    7,    1948
Member Canadian University Press'
Authorized as Second Class Mail, Post Office Dept., Ottawa. Mail Subscriptions—$2.50 per year
Published throughout the university year by the Student Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society of the
University of British Columbia.
•Y. * X *
Oliver Twitt
By Konrod Egilson
Classic Productions Click
Editorial opinions expressed herein are those of the editorial staff of The Daily Ubyssey and not necessarily those  makers should  turn  to  the  classics  of  their
of the Alma Mater Society nor of  the University.
V V V
Offices,, in, Brock. Hall, Phono ALma  1G24 For  display  advertising phone  ALma  3253
15DITOR-IN-CHIEF   -   -   -   -   RON  HAGGART
WA IMAGING EDITOR   -   -   -   -   VAL' SJEARS
GENERAL STAFF: News Editor, &ob Cave, Chuck Marshall; Features Editor, Ray Baines; Photography Director,
Ellanor  Hall;   Sports  Editor,  Jack   Wasserman;   Womens'    Editor,    Loni    FranciA
Editors This Igsue — ART WELSH and JACK LEGGATT
We are very fortunate that English movie
Who Shall Share The Cake
Twice in, the, past two weqks, The Daily
Ubyssey has warned Treasurer Paul Plant
that so^e^r, or~, later he would have to face a
sieamrolleer movement for a permanent busi-
i}jag£ manager, to oversee the afTairs of the
Alnqa A?ater Society.
The. movement started yesterday, but one
cf Pla.nt's aides on Student Council suc-
tqe^ss|ully halted the demand for non-student
s)iji|er,vi^on of studnet finances. He did it
\*ith awne rather, roys.tify.ing logic.
S$u4^nt^&. have sp mishandled their own
avoirs, in,past years, Roger Pederson said in
e*eetto the general AMS meeting, that they
are now too broke to pay the salary of a
tyujSifle.CjSSi; manager who might bring sound
economy to the AMS.
The proponents of office managership must
Jftfjl be satisfied, however, and Plant can satisfy,, them i nqflly que way—by guiding the
limping Alma Mater Society back on its. feet.
■Plant'can do this if the organizations who
<ary for his cake can keep within the slices
1$.. cuts.. His allotments for student expendi-
..'iji&es we. a rnasterpiece of compromise and
appeasement, but his budget as a whole is
almost impossible of widespread support.
• As this paper told him a few days ago,
I?l.%nt has opened hirrxself to wholesale critic-
i&ria. over a minor item in his budget. He has
been swayed, we fear, by sentimentality in
his consideration of political and religious
cloths and the subsidies they should receive.
His policy has been to subsidize clubs which
swerve the university as a whole, but to cut
cAl without a penny those organizations who
work only for their own benefit. Unfortunately, he has apparently lacked the courage
to back up this policy, fomenting an ex-
agerated teapot tempest over a quite unim-
portnat issue.
Plant ha.s eliminated payments to political
clubs under his austerity program, but has
kept religious groups still on the payroll. No
one can deny that political clubs serve selfish
interests and that the Alma Mater Sqciety
would be foolish to subsidize the distribution
of political propaganda on the campus.
But Plant has failed t'o stick to his policy
in regard.to religious clubs, and has thereby
undermineed the confidence of students in
his entire program. *   ,|
Organizations forced to be "self-sustaining"
will naturally be jealous of the eta-time social
clubs who still garner handouts from student
funds because they serve a supposedly higher
master—their church.
In fact, religious groups still in the AMS
breadline are no more than church fraternities
and Plant can ease a seething resentment if
ho politely, and of course regretfully, re- [peare have been of the two former.
moves them from hi scharity list.
Only then will he salve the bitterness of
such people as the political club member who
ow.n country to produce superlative scree/
art and entertainment. It is not accidental
that this should be the case, nor is it an accident that the results achieved have beet\
what they are. It is enough to assume that all
that is necessary for success is to take a
classic and go to work. Some of the attempts to
film Shakespeare in the past, on this basis,
have proved the fallacy of sjaeih an assumption. By taking the work of Shakespeare and
Dickens as source material for films, English
producers are not attempting anything new.
What is new is tbe spirit in which these works
are being approached.
OLIVER S SUCCESS
It is unnecessary to speak of Sir Laurence
Oliver's success in filming Shakespeare's Henry V, and now Hamlet, show how conclusively
successful a presentation of Shakespeare can
be- * * wMiMM
It must be remembered that Laurence Oliver is a great Shakespearean actor, supreme
in his own field, who has the ability of being
able to* transmit to other actors some sense of,
the interpretation of a play and a character
as he conceives it. He inspires tfaem to join
with him in creating a production which is
sensitive, intelligent, and alive.
David Lean, who does for Dickens what
Laurence Oliver has done for Shakespeare
is not an actbr, but a highly competent and
sensitive director. He approaches Dickens
with affection and respect. The results of this
approach have been, first CHEAT EXPECTATIONS and now OLIVER TWWT. It is
probably not too much to say that Dickens
lovers have been as enthusiastic in their
prcise of these films as adroireers of Shake-
The CinegiW production of OLIVER TWIST
is made by the same group who made GREAT
EXPECTATIONS so successful. The story is
told students yesterday "maybe we should,a grim social document of England in the
form the CCF-Presbyterian or the Liberal- early decades of the nineteenth century. It
Anglican Club, if we want any money. |»s almost overpowering in its force. It is the
time of parish workhouses, widespread industrial changes, the eterrible poverty of the
poor and their miserable mode of existence.
The facts are presented simply bu^ with crushing weight.
In watching the story unfold, we feel we
have accomplished something in the past century from social and humanitarian view.
IMPOSSIBLE
It is impossible to present the richness of
character and situation found in any Dickens
novel in one picture, uch has been left out,
but the main thread of the story has lost
little, i nstrength or appeal.
I^ekens chooses a happy ending for us,
and even though we feel the stretch of the
long arm of coincidence to be slightly incredible, we are happy that Oliver should
find happiness after so many miseries.
In a picture of this kind it is only right that
there should be no star. Rarely have I seen
a picture in which there is such uniform excellence of characterization. Though Oliver
serves as the focus of attention in the story,
the presentation is so honest and impersonal
that you get the impression that this is no
isolated or even unusual case but merely one
which has been singleed out for demontration.
Because the standard of the acting is so. high,
even in the smallest bit parts, it is unfair to
mention those actors which are known to us
and! to ignore those whose names we do not
know.
The world of Dickens as portrayed in his
books is recaptured on the screen with amazing fidelity. It would be interesting to know
how many new readers have been or will be
introduced to the magic of Dickens as a result
of these two films. As pictures they serve
a double purpose which Dickens would have
highly approved. They provide entertainment, and are documents of social evils which
have been remedied. They give, with a convincing air of authenticity, some of the harsher aspects of the beginning of our modern
era, and they present it in a way which is
pleasing both from the artistic and the, optimistic point of vieW.
Accommodation
QQ$X SUITE SUITABLE FOR TWO
; students. Includes study, with| fireplace and bedroom with twin beds.
935 a month per student. 4217 West'
12th.  AL  1562-Y.
FOR RENT. COMFORTABLE
ftfent sleeping room. Phone AL 2043-L
or call.at 3828 West 10th Ave.
YOUNG WOMAN WANTED TO
share, large room, twin beds, breakfast. Also two girls for second room,
twin beds and breakfast. Superior
home, recently occupied. 4577 West
5th.  AL 0567-L.
FOR POT. TWO ROOMS FOR 3
men si'udents. Phone KE 5057-R.
GLEAN DOUBLE ROOMS FOR
boys. Twin beds. Morning and evening meal optional. AL 2948-Y.
TWO SINGLE ROOMS. WILL GIVE
breakfast  and  lunch.  Rates  by   ar-
ratibement. Phone Mrs. Gardner, BA
2291-R. 3991 Puget Drive.
ROOM    AND    BOARD    FOR    ONE
girl on West 41st Ave. 2 blocks from
Qtmbar. Phone BA 391Q-M.
TOP-NOTCH BACHELOR ACCOM-
odation — 2 vacancies—self-contained.
4000 West l()th Ave.
For Sale
PORTABLE TYPWRITER IN GOOD
condition. Cash. AL 1830-R.
l'ERRIN    WRITER'S    GUIDE    AND
index.   KE   1963-M.
NEW   ANATOMY   TEXT   BCOK
r.aclci iology Le-pt. Fcr fure'.io.   in!'
m;itio:i  call  at  Bad.   Dept.
IN
ngs
THERE WILL BE A MEETING OF
the Chess Club in HM 16, Friday,
Oct. 8 at 12:30 p.m.
GLEE CLUB REHEARSEL THURS-
day, Oct. 7 in HM 1 at 12:30.
WEIGHT   LIFTERS   MEETING   OF
i   *.;' i'    .' f
Varsity Barbell Club in Arts 102
Friday, Oct. 8 at 12:30.
.FILM SOCIETY-GENERAL MEET-
ing. Friday at 12:30, Arts 108. All new
members requested to attend.
VAltSlTY   BAND-NEW   MEMBERS
wanted.   Please   bring   your    instruments   to   practice   this   Friday   noon
(nt Hut B 3 behind Brock,
MEMBERS OF THE U.T.A. AND
iritetestecl teachers—Jour first opportunity to listen and ask questions
will bo Tuesday, Oct, 12th at 12:30.
Arts 204. Mr. C. D, Ovans, General
Fee. cf tho B.C'.T.F. will speak on
"1 he wc rl. and Objectives of the
B.C.T.F."
THERE WILL BE AN OLD MEM-'
I ets Dinni r on Wed. Oct 13 in the
I'nu'k Dininje, Room at fi;0l), Tickets
nu 75 cents and will lie on sale at, the
I'Hai'eie • Beard on Oct. 12 and 13
Hum 11.30 to 1:30, Tickets also on
sale at the door.
AUTOMATIC RECORD PL.'.ViZR &
seecral albums of classical records
(Mo/art, Bachf- Chcpin, Scarlatti) in
excellent condition. Half price. Phone
AL 1641-R, Ask for John,
ONE TUXEDO COMPLETE WITH
shirt and brocaded vest. Size 38;; also
one pair of white trousers and waist
33" worn only once. Phone BA 3916-M
PORTABLE RADIO FOR "SERIES"
complete with two set's of batteries.
Both AC and DC. Price $45.00
TEACHER-TRAINING BOOKS FOR
•ale. Phone BA 6877-M.
8    TUBE    OLDER    TYPE    PHILCO
radio. Marvellous reception for local
end distant stations. $10 cash, Phone
Chuck  at BA 4051-M.
WILL THE BOY WHO FOUND A
single strand of pearls in the cafeter-
ia please phone again? Anne. BA
8415-  L
WOULD PERSON PLEASE RETURN
the tan jacket, he took by mistake to
the Physics 100 coat room. Yours has
yiitii'  name  in your pocket'.
BLUE PARKER PEN WITH SILVER
top. Lest in field house, Phone Ron
Williams at CE 2248.
COLLEGE SURVEY. LOST IN ARTS
100 Wed. Name Benny Kent in book.
Phone KE 3813-R.
PERSONAL
WOULD HECTOR ROBERSHAW
phase   phone   DE   0602   re    personal
letters.
Vo LUCED RATES SEASON TIC-
i.-.'i. far Vancouver Symphony Sun-
''■ \ ia. meals are still on sale at the
/>;',"■'.. Eai'iirc to take advantage of
lh::- u ducVion now will result in the
a. is elia'.i; u  of  this  privilege  te  UBC
Transportation
RIDE FROM VICINITY KITS. POOL
for 8:30's Mon. Wed. and Fri. Phone
Sharon at BA 2371-L.
WANTED. A RIDE FROM 41ST AND
Blenheim fcr 8:30's every morning.
Tlicne Joan, KE 1108-M,
ANYONE MOTORING TO NORTH
Okanagan this week-end with rocm
for paying passegcr please cotact C.
Brcen or phone BA 5585-L immediately.
WANTED. A RIDE FROM CORNER
o"f*41st and Granville for 8:30 Men.
Wed. Fri, KE 1963-M. Edna-May,"""
ANYONE WANTING A RIDE TO
Chilliwack Friday phone G. Bowman
at AL 3352-L.
ANYONE   MOTORING   TO   NORTH
Okanagan this weekend with room
for paying passenger please contact
C, Breen or phone BA 5585 immediately.
WANT TO FORM CAR CHAIN Vicinity 32n Ave. and Granville. Phone
BA 9333-L
Lost
TV!
.   Mr
MNO     OF      1
a   lie va.  ('!',
iSSAYS
Hall!).
TYI'
i?-l;.   quick
SE11V-
D.u'
\   ■t.l'.HI   Weal    1
ilh   Ave
WILL THE PERSON WHO GAVE
mo a lift to Arbutus and 12th Ave.,
on Monday please return raincoat
left in car to Lost and Found o-r
phone BA 8968-R,
LOST. MAROON SHAEFFER PEN.
Valued as keepsake. Will finder
please return i'o lost and found.
LOST. ONE Vs POUND TIN OF CIG-
aretto   tobacco,   Ogden's.   KE   0639-L.
LOST LAST WEEK SHELL RIM-
ejasses. Return to Publications.
LOST. PAIR OF FAWN PIGTEX
"loves by commerce huts. Please return  to  Publications.
BRCWN CDN. SQUIRREL JACKET
X.,u 16, $40. Blue Harris tweed coat
s2.">, sie 16. Both in good condition.
Phi ne   BA  8191-L. [
BLACK   ONYX  RING  INITIAL  "R"
'.d'I   Wednesday.   Finder   please   turn
ii   to   tlie   AMS   or   phone   PA   2875
sfler 6:00. Reward.
i'AIR OK GLASSES IN BROWN
leather ea: o. Contact Kalhryn at CE
28,ri0.
(LOST BETWEEN BUS STOP AND
auditorium, brown wallet. Contents
urgently needed. Reward. Call P£»t
at AL 2110.
GOLD      RING,      BLACK      ONYX
stone initial "R" valued as keepsake.
turn in pub.
BROWN LEATHER WALLET CON-
taining   money   and   papers.   Return
to AMS  office,  Reward.
GREEN    SHAEFFER'S    FOUNTAIN
pen,   Friday   October   1.   Phone   AL
1339-Y.
RIDE FROM BROADWAY AND
Main for 8:30's or 9:30's, Phone Cherie
at FA 8033-R.
RIDE FROM VICINITY DAVIE AND
Nicola for two girls 8:30 Monday,
Wednesday and Friday. Phone Rae
PA 4756.
AT THE ANTARCTIC CLUB ON
Sunday morning, woman's blue bur-
beray, one pair toe rubbers and one
ON  THE CAMPUS DURING  LAST,2r»d   YEAR  COMMERCE  STUDENT
letter to
Dear Sir:
Aft the meeting of the AMS on
Wednesday, several contributors to
the Ubyssey (including myself) were
singled out in a general motion on
Ubyssey financial appropriations as
contributing material which did not
merit the space alloted to them. Although the major point of the motion
regarding further cuts in the AMS
grant to the Ubyssey was defeated,
there was no indication on the part
of the students present as to their
assessment of the Ubyssey contributors included in the motion, General
left this in doubt.
applause on the original motion had
Speaking personally, the attitude
of the student body at the meeting
to the Ubyssey in general implied
a lack of confidence in the present
executive of the paper and in the
material submitted to it. I would like
to suggest that the Daily Ubyseey
institute a campus poll as early as
possible to indicate a general endors-
ation or vote of confidence in its
leadership and also reader interest
with Vespoct to features and columns
appearing in the paper.
Until such time that, such a pell is
laken. or some other indication is
given that "Briefly Noted" is not
merely space-filling material, I feel
that it. would lie unfair to the Ubyssey
leader lo continue this column.
Leon   Lipson
April exams, one pair clear-rimmed
gksses. in blue leather  case  having
'Robert  Strain,  optometrist  on  case.
«
•Please phone BA 3916-M.
WOULD    HECTQB    ROBERTSHAW
please phone DE 0602 re personal
letters etc.
WILL THE PERSON WHO PICKED
up a slide-rule and log book in App.
Sc. 101 please call A, C, Kenny at
Fort Camp.
EXPERT TYPING-NOTES, ES-
says, etc. Quick service, 12 cent's per
page. Mrs. J. C. Davie, 4000 W vOth
Ave. Work can be left with J. C,
Davie, 1st year Law.
ROOM   AND   BOARD   FOR   GIRL
student in return for light services.
Kerr.  5891. 5989 Hudson.
MATH REFERENCE BOOKS. MAR-
geneau and Murphy, Maths for Physics and Chem." Doetsch "Laplace
Transformation". Phone Bob at FA
7844-Y.
who wants room and board within
reasonable distance of UBC. Will
share with other student. Call Bob
at KE 0548.
ROOM TO RENT. StEEPHYG ROOM
for two boys sharing. Short walk to
IJBcTnls.AL 3165-R.  *~
ROOM AND BOARD FC4 2 MEN
$12.00 per week. Phone Hast. 1292-R.
RIDE WANTED DAILY FOR 8:30
lectures from 12th and Burrard. Also,
if available, ride downtown from
UBC  at  12:30.  Phone  Reg.  CE 3744.
RIDE WANTED. ALL 8:30's MON
to Sat. inclusive from vicinity 16th
and Dunbar. Phone BA 5587-R.
WANTED. RIDE 8:30 DAILY VICIN-
ity Hastings and Nanaimo. Phone
Jack. HA 5379-L.
WANT A RIDE? ANYONE LIVING
in the Kerrisdale district and Interst-
ed in forming a car pool please phone
KE 2513-Y.
WANTED BY COMM, STUDENT
RIDE FROM WEST END(VlClNlTY
of Kitsilano Beach) for 9:30 lectures
Mon. to Sat. Phone Helen BA 8476-Y.
ride from 25th and Heather for 8:30's
Like a Letter Home
The Daily Ubyssey sent home
to father, mother or to the little
brother who'll be here next year
will tell the folks at home how
you're spending their money.
Send The Daily Ubyssey Home for a Year -
Brock  Hall,  University  of British  Columbia
$2.00 Thursday,    October    7,    1948
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
P«gt 3
^b§ UdlT
'Glod To Be Bock' Onjy Comment
4)fopr Discovery By lm$ DcUgote
Nationwide search for tyv;enty-one year old Jtme Baker,
l^niyer^ity of Toifpnto Rre-med student ejrided Wednesday when
she was discovered working as awaitress in an Ottawa restraunt.
The   five   foot   six   inch   auburn-&
six
haired girl was discovered by R. B.
W*Haoe,   Toronto   delegate   to   the
^regressive-Conservative    convention
in Ottawa, who informed police.
ABATED  ••..
In a long distance phone call to
June's parents Wednesday night, Dr.
\V, & Blstz, University of Toronto,
psychologist told the Varsity, U of T
newjspaper, that June is physically
wjjjjj bMt terribly agitated,
ti[er only comment was that she was
glad to be back with her parent's.
1$".',B^ASO^. • •        •■   ••   ..'.»••....
felatz, who taught child psychology
cat, tbe University of British, Columbia during the summer season, went
to Ottawa with June,s parents when
she was discovered.
Ife said she required a prolonged
rest but' gave no indication of reasons
for her disappearance.
Certified teachers on the campus
ha^e amalgamated with the teacher
education class to form the university ie^eher's Association. It will be
the camP«s local of the B.C. Teacher's Federation.
The association will consider federation policy and pbject'ives, education
outsidp BC. and other educational
thf>,. inlorjnation provided by guest
matters, Discussion will be based on
speakers.
(^ff^ets of the association are Stan
Haywood, president; Cliff Greer,
vice-president; Alex Surrey, secre-
t«ry.ti;e8surer, and Mary Rogers,
Qordon Clarke and Jim Stewart'.
All certified teachers on the campus
a^e invited to attend the meetings
and join the association. Anouce-
me(nt of rneetiitgs will be posted en
the Quad otice board.
Learn Arts, Crafts
More is demanded of the Social
Mfprhers these days than a sympathetic smile.
IA 1
Fifteen Social Work students are
finding that out at a special short
course in group work at the University Youth Training Centre at Acadia
Camp. The course includes training
in handicrafts, physical educatio and
group singing.
This si the only group work training centre in this part of the continent, according to Miss M. Smith, head
oi the De,partmet of Social Work.
The nearest similar schools are Toronto and southern California.
"Group work is a most important
port of Social Work," said Miss Smith.
tat the past nine days the students
Ot the training centre have been
moulding clay, weaving, working
leather and copper, and constructing
puppets* and masks. There is no division of male and female tasks.
fhis week is being devoted to
spclal recreation activities. Miss Marion Henderson will introduce the
dancing and special group games and
«i'OUp to the mysteries of square
activities.
Assistant Professor Elizabeth
Thomas has been active in organizing the group wcrk section at UBC.
Mr. George Whiten, well known for
his Boys' Work activities in Vancou-
vejr, will assist as field Work Instructor in group work.
Group work students will ultimately; take positions in community centers, youth hostels, adult education
cciAterk and similar organized groups.
They must have a working knowledge of arts and crafts in order to
tcJtc'h  and  supervise  hobbyactivities.
BLOOD BANK LOW;
RED CROSS  URGES
tLOOD GIVING NOW
Dtwdent blood Is still needed.
Red Cross officials state that the
supply in the blood bank is still
lev and that students should register new at one of the hooths on
the campus.
After registration, students will
bo  notified  if  their  Wood  is  acceptable  and  where  they  are  to
I da in a to it.
Of iclals   assured   students   rltat
there will  he  no ill  afteects  nnd
I lienors will be supplied with cof-
\fcc on completion of their donation.
Microbiology Club
Organization Meet
The Society of Microbiologists will
hold its first meeting in room 210
(Chemistry Building), on Thursday,
October 7th, at 12:30 p.m. At this time
the e^cec^tive 'will present proposed
activities for the coming year.
Students of Bacteriology in the Department of Bacteriology and Preventive Medicine, as well as those connected with Dairy Bacteriology, are
cordially invited to attend,,
In the past, the Society has presented outside speakers, as well as members of the various university departments, to talk oit the different
phases of bacteriology and subjects
directly related to bacteriology, In
addition, films pertaining to the study
NOTICES
Track, Field and Cross-Country
Club; there will be a meeting in Hut
L-2 on Friday at 12:30. Training
schedules will  be  discussed.
GEOGRAPHY 102 TEXT, CASE AND
Berbsmark Phone KE 0797-L.
GENT'S WINTER OVERCOAT SIZE
42. Color, dark navy. Almost new.
Less than half price. Phone AL 0340-L
ONE    PAIR
shoes.  Cheap.
SKIS   ALSO    SNOW-
Phone  AL  0340-L.
■33 CHEV STANDARD SEDAN IN
good condiiion. See at 3460 W. 41st
Ave., Van., B.C. anytime after 12:00
noon,
PRE-MED ELECTION. ALL FIRST
year pre-med students meet in Arts
103, Thursday, October 7 for the purpose of electing a first year representative to the pre-med executive.
A full attendance is requested.
SPECIAL MEETING OF THE JAZZ
Society will be held this Wednesday
noon, 12:30 in the club rooms behind
the Brock. The purpose of this meeting is the electing of this year's executive and the formation of general
club policy. It is hoped that everybody interested will attend.
In UBC Blood - Letting
Campus niusclemen have shown the way in UBC's current
blood donor campaign.
They lead all other laculties in sign- f"
ing up for the donations with 33 per-
ceent pledged at press time. Wednesday.
Arts students proved to, Engineers
they actually, do have, Wood and stand
Wit 'TROPHY' VANISHES
The siladium goalposts are still
standing but the triumphant Vikings
of Western Washington took oe trophy back to Bellighom after last
Saturday's game.
A large banner which decorated
the, university gates prior to the game
was go^e  when  Qle  Bakken,   grad
manager  of  athletics went   to  claim
it Saturday night.
Only solution for the mystery is
the explanation that boisterous Vike
rocters flushed with their team's victory had taken the banner to decorate
Battersby field where they will be
host to a UBC invasion in November.
in second piece, with 23 percent.
Compleete results follow;
Facutti/
Quota Registered
Percent
Phys. Ed,
M
11
33
Arts
m
218
23
homo Ec.
5«
9
18
Aggie
139
19
14
Law
112
1>
14      '
Pharmacy
«
7
14
Ccnjmerce
144
20,
13      ,
Nursdngi
2*
3
12
Teachers
30
3
;8
CAMPUS BARBER
stm wjfck *w
WORLD HftJfi
Peter Dyke, proprietor of, the campus barber shop, atmoimces that the
world series will be broa^test on the
barber shop radie again ttyi year.
Last year sttuienti Jenunedl both the
shop and the adjacent Men's Cloak
Room in order to hear the programs.
!
Off For The
Weekend?
In an hour or so we could
send you forth completely
lubricated, oil changed,
washed and polished—proud
as ever to be behind that
wheel. We wouldn't forget to
check battery, tires and othei
safety features either. Know
of a quicker, more complete
service? See you soon!
DUECK
iHcvKfiLtT uiihHUBHE
CINlHAl    MOIOVq
WtiOLtjfiLt  Xah'iXi Uli,)K!Su,ORS
:
The 20 foundation or "baby" teeth
are among a child's most precious
possessions. If they are not properly
cared for, the child's mouth may not
UuO  Oi.A A    Itti,
Typewriting, Essays, Theses,
Notes, Manuscripts, Etc.
RATES MODERATE
Mrs. A. O. Robinson
4180 West 11th Ave.      AL. M15R
develop properjy, resulting in poor
adult eating habits, speech difficulties,
and a great deal of pain and discomfort in later life.
Itm Woman's Undergraduate Society
Fall and Winter
Wednesday. October 13th
4:00 P.M.
in the
BROCK HALL
*%.
Woodward's have selected an exciting group of
college fashions. Included in the Show are practical dresses, for campus and date-wear, rustling
party frocks, brilliant ski togs, imported sweaters,
lilmy formals, tailored suits and short and full
length coats. Our 1948 wedding pagentry is in a
Victorian theme of Champagne Brocade and Nutmeg Brown velvet.
• COMMENTATOR - ESME
• MUSIC BY FRANKIE McPHALEN
• VOCALIST-JULIETTE
HASTINGS AT ABBOTT ftfil
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
Thursday,    October   7,    1948
FRED MOONEN, Sports Editor
Pirating Of 'Birds Off;
Ruggermen Stay Loyal
Despite the reports of several downtown newspapers,
ruggermen on the UBC campus are not deserting the English
game enmasse to plug up the holes in Coach Don Wilson's
American grid squad. In spite of his weighty position as
 -$> head of male athletics at UBC, Spiers
 — f ,
by
Fred
Rowell
Canadian Trackmen „were
something less than sensational
at the last Olympiad in London
this past summer, while the
thinclads of Uncle Sam scampered merrily over the red brick
track and cavorted about on
the greensward to take the unofficial championship by an
overwhelming margin.
American superiority is no accident. The intensity of their college
competition continues to produce
top-notch athletes every year and
they can always field a team which
con dominate any international com-
petitio.
Canadian universities as a group
are not in a position to assist Canada
in the same way. The long summer
vacations eliminate the possibility of
having a spring track season and the
conference meetings in Eastern and
Western Canada take place late in
October and often on snow covered
fairs is not conducive to the produc-
tracks. This unfortunate state of af-
tion of champions.
Some of the eastern colleges operate summer clubs for those who are
able to remain in town for the summer but very little can be done during the college year.
These defects apply in part to UBC
since^ the conference meet is held one
month after the summer vacation begins.
Californians point with pride at
their recent record at the Olympic
Games. They assert that they won
the unofficial track and field championship followed by Sweden with
United States in third place. Their
supremecy is no accident'. Favored by
a mild climate the athletes can train
all through the year and attain that
perfection of form and condition
which is essential for  Olympic  sue-
"Mjillf
B. C. stands in the same relationship to the rest of Canada as does
UBC has a unique position among
California to the rest of the U.S.A.
oe who competes in American cofer-
Canadian universities. She is the only
ence. In addition to conference competition dual meets can be arranged
with American schools during preceding weekends.
All year round training is possible
except for the brief period of the
year when the track is snow covered,
training can proceed at the stadium.
Jumpers are forced indoors for a few
weeks only and the weight men can
train  outdoors  throughout   the  year.
In the past three years of conference competition the trackmen finished second in 1946 and first place in
1947 and 1948. Four members of las(
year's team, Ez Henniger, Bob Piercy,
Dave Blair and John Pavelich qualified cor the final Olympic trials io
Montreal. Blair and Pavelich finished
second in the high jump and shot
put respectively and Henniger was
selected for the Olympic Track Team.
This is only a small beginning of
what might happen in the future with
a well intergated track program in
the fall and spring. The track men
on the team are Coast Conference
calibre but the field men with one
or two exceptions have a long way
to go, This difficulty can only be
overcome by steady training and not
only  UBC  but Canada  will  benefit.
is going to take an active part in
sports, and has decided to offer his
services to the  needy  football  team.
The only other English style artist
to cast eyes toward the gridiron is
Bill Dunbar, who after working out
for a couple of weeks before the
season opened disappeared out of
the picture completely.
Ever since football came to the
campus there has been a number of
players, such as Dougie Reid and Don
Nesbit, who have Dlayed the American game in the early fall and then
switched to rugger at the close of
the grid season,
Tough Round Ahead
For Golf Champs
Plans for the 1948-49 golf season
were outlined at the first meeting' of
thc   University   Golf  Club,   Tuesday.
The qualifying round, for club
championship will be run off October
6-11  inclusive.
Defending champ Doug Bajus will
have to be at his best to hold down
such outstanding performers as Bob
Esplin, Dick Hanley and team member Peter Bentley.
Strong competition is also expected
from Russ Latham, Jim Bruce, Don
Bodie, Doug Angell and former Victoria junior champ Gordon Dodds.
All contestants are asked to pick
up their cards from University Golf
Course professional Harry Winder
before they start their qualifying
round.
The qualifying round results will be
posted on the caf side of the Quad
notice board.
PROSPECTIVE COG in this year's version of the Thunderbird hoop machine is Dave Campbell. Campbell was a member 0$
Canada's Olympic basketball entry in London at the 1948 Olympiad. In early practice meets Campbell is showing fine form and is
a probable first stringer. Thunderbird hoopsters opening contest will be in November. \
Fans Despondent
As Braves Cop Opener
Boston Braves won. *i  ■£   \ "$ ^jfl'j:
UBC's Indian fans went into mourning today as the realization of the fall of mighty Bob Feller in the hands of Braves'
Johnny Sain formulated a grim picture.
Jubilant   Bostonites   view
Laithwaite Predicts
Powerful Rugger Squad
the remains.
Featuring a dramatic pitcher's duel
from the opening stages till the final
put-out in the ninth frame, the game
painted a pictur* of top-notch airtight baseball.
Victorious Stain evenly spaced
four Indian hits and overcame two
team errors before finally posting
mia first world  series  win  in  major
league  base!);.11.
Faltering slightly in the bottom
half of the eighth stanza, Rapid Roberts gave up his second base blow of
the contest after allowing two consecutive base berths on balls. Tommy
Holmes' linc-.sma&h over third scored
the lone counter of the game and permitted Braves' 1-0 margin of victory
in Boston yesterday.
INTERMURAL VOLLEYBALL
All Games Played At 12:30 P.M.
Thursday, Octobeer 7
1. D.U. "A"
2. Newman "B"
3. Phi Kappa Pi
4. Phi Sigma Chi
5. Kappa Sig "A"
Friday, October 8
1. Newman ''A''
2. Psi U. "A"
3. Phys. Ed. "A"
vs
Chi Delta "B"
F.H.
vs
A.T.O. "A"
F.H.
vs
Phi Gamma 'B"
F.H.
vs
Legion
Gym
vs
V.C.F.
Gym
vs
Architects
F.H.
vs
Alpha Tau Omega
'B' F.H.
vs
Kappa Sig "B''
F.H.
This  year's  edition   of   the   Varsity r
!■':.   i -a     rugby     i.s    li.uai d     by     b1 a i
i< sell   Albert   Laithwaite   ;<a   he ing   as.
powerful as it was last year.
FOUR SHORT
This    year's    aggregation     will     he
minus  only  four  of  last  year's  stars,
Harvey   Allen,   Barry    Morris,    Keith i
McDonald and Stan Kerr,
Varsity has always had an anvle-
sloek of reserves, and there arc se.v-
oping into top-noteh team members.
era! froeh who give promise of devel-
POSmONS  OPEN   *
I.'nt there i.s still room for anyone
who i.s interested in  the game.
Ability   or   weight   arc   secondary,
need at least fifteen players.
Ihf.re arc seven  teams and  they  each
There will bo two first division
teams,    two    second,    and    the    fiosh
wil!   enter   two   teams   in   the   third.
r\cim;Kits too
The Engineers might also enter a
team in the second division if the
schedule which has already been
mode  up can  he changed.
Laithwaite thinks that there should
he co-operation between all teams
en the campus—that is why he asked
Oi;ird Kirby and Eric Cardinall to
turn out for American football. Thc
oxjorienco will also be invaluable
to them as they are taking physical
Ed,  courses.
At one of the fh'sl practices a former Vancouver Rc'p turned out but
lias not appeared since, Mr. Laithwaite would like to contact this individual as soon as possible.
Practice session are held every
Tuesday and Thursday at 3:30.
MY-HOW SMART
YOUR HAIR
LOOKS/
Banish  Washday  Blues  At
VARSITY
LAUNDERALL
4368 W.  10th Ave.
Phone ALma 2210
10 pounds for .35c in V_ hour
Hours:
8 a.m.  —  10 p.m.  Mon.   thru  Fri.
8 a.m. — 5:30 p.m. Sat. J
American  Football
Oct.  16 Willamette University at UBC
(Willamette 33—UBC 0)
Oct. 23 Whitman College at UBC
(Whitman 7—UBC 6)
Oct. 30 College  of  Idaho (Homecoming)
at UBC
(Idaho 33—UBC 13)
Nov. 6 Lewis and Clarke College at UBC
(Lewis and Clarke 7—UBC 26)
Nov. 13 Linfield College at UBC
(Linfield 21—UBC 0)
Nov. 25 Western Washington College of
Education at Bellingham*
'"Denotes non-conference games
Scores are from last year's games
s Is YOUR Opportunity
Go
l
Campus Booths Are Open
mmMMmmmmmMmmmmmmwm
"10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
hWffimmmmmmmMmmHMmm
UBC Blood Donors Clinic Of
mmMMmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm
CANADIAN  RED CROSS
inge Of Address
&■
*
y>ii
l! you have clian.,.;od your aihiross or acquired a telephone number since re-isl rui ioo, please notify the Pub
secretary in the 1'.rock JYor.'h ] !a.-;omeiil  hy Thursday,
October 7, lor correct  listinc, iu the
fjpif  wwrv
U€u
THANKS TO       m
brylcreem/,/
Said
•v«rywh«ri]
In handy **
tub**
There's nothing like/well-1'
groomed hair to improve your
appearance—and makela hit
with the g^rls! That's) why
Brylcreem is so populair with ,
men everywhere . . . why it is
the largest selling hair drqssing
in Canada! It instdntly
makes your hair smoothl well-
groomed, attractive—without
being smelly or greasy,  I
GIRLS—Brylcreem is aitf ex-j
cellent dressing for your jhaiTj
too-*— try it!
FREE COMB
et a spp
rylcr|s
cia.
em
pocket-comb and easel Sen<^ an
empty Brylcreem carton with tyout
name and address to:
Brylcreem, Department    Sip
2<-)4 Richmond St. W.
Toronto, Ontario
Brylcref.m
JPfltfMj • HO SOAP- flO AIC0H01 ■ M STARCH

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