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The Ubyssey Oct 4, 1960

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 IT'S NOT
IH VAIN
THE UBYSSEY
TO DRAIN
A VEIN
Vol. XLIII.
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1960
No. 8
IT'S BtOODY MONDAY for Ubyssey staffer Derek Allen, as
he, with the help of two pretty nurses, drains a vein for UBC.
—Photo by  Lynne  Nixon
Canadians Ignorant
Of World Affairs
HALIFAX   (CUP)—An eastern university professor told
a recent NFCUS congress that Canadian students are probably
the world's most ignorant in the field of international affairs.
"Canadiani   students  are   fat,
well-tailored, well-fed and ignorant," according to Prof. Guy
MacLean of Dalhousie University. "This ignorance," he said,
"makes participation in international affairs difficult and
leads to apathy."
Prof. MacLean was part of a
panel discussing "The Student
Voice in International Affairs."
Others on the panel included:
Canon H. L. Puxley, president
of the University of King's College; Brian Fleming, Dalhousie
NFCUS chairman; Jacques
Gerin, president of NFCUS, and
Robert MeCleave, a Conservative M.P.
Mr. MeCleave believed that
international affairs should not
be left entirely in the hands of
"the experts in external affairs."
"External affairs should be
summoned from behind its curtain of mystery," he said, and
stated that External Affairs
Minister Howard Green wants to
take it from, behind this curtain
to hold debates in the House of
Commons. Mr. MeCleave said
that he held reservations on
such "a great debate."
Mr. MeCleave if it was a good
thing for Canadian students to
present a variance of opinion
With the Canadian government
at international studet gatherings.
Mr. MeCleave indicated that
there should be a unified Canadian policy. "It would be too
bad if these opinions differed,'
he said.
Another McGill student, Roy
Heenan, who is international affairs vice-president of NFCUS,
defended international intervention by Canadian students and
pointed to the South African,
and Hungarian issues of the last
year as increasing international
awareness on Ganadia campuses.
Callig for student action in
such matters Prof. MacLean
stated that NFCUS resolutions,
"will not shake the East Block
because the federal government
does not take you seriously
enough."
He added that the Canadian
student must be pushed to the
point where he must support
South African and Algerian students. "It comes to the question,
"Am   I  my  brother's   keeper?
Stuart Smith, of McGill, asked And the answer is yes."
Why Wait-We
Need Your Blood
By DEREK ALLEN
Ubyssey   Blood  Donor
Giving blood is a pleasure
when two beautiful nurses hold
your hand and caress your forehead.
But this pleasure is nothing
compared to the satisfaction of
knowing that you may have
helped to save someones lfe.
The Fall Blood Drive is in
full swing at the Armoury and
pretty vampires will be on duty
all this week from 9:30 to 4:30.
They want to see 325 donors
every day.
No guarantee is given that
you will receive the same treatment I did when I gave my pint
of life Monday, but the nurses
will be glad to see you.
You will be given a free coke
(to put sugar in your blood) and
your blood type will be ascer-
Higher Education
Who Should Pay?
HALIFAX (CUP)—University student groups have to contend with the blind, lame and old age pensioners when they
ask for Federal aid, a Conservative MP said here.
Edmund Morris told the NFCUS congress, "You are asking the Federal government to pay more money, but where
will you get the money? You will get out of the government
what you put into it."
He warned that if taxes were
the means.49iey w®al4*belevied
against you in your future coming years."
Mr. Morris was part of a sym-'
posium on "Higher Education—
Who Should Pay?" at the 24th
annual congress of NFCUS
Other members were: Prof. Edwin Harris, Dalhousie University; David Matheson, a student
at Dalhousie, and Prof. Marc
Lalonde of Montreal.
The question of money is one
of the most important Mr.
Morris stated, and when NFC
US makes its brief to the federal government it should consider that it is "contending -with
old-age pensioners, federal and
provincial civil servants, and
the blind, the lame and the
halt," and others who ask for
moniey.
"It takes time, patience and
understanding," he told the
delegates. However, he intimated that "you are now on the
verge of an initial step. You are
much closer to some break in
the clouds than you think."
Prof. Lalonde -was the most
outstanding exponent of government support of education. "An
overwhelming part of the finances should be assumed by the
state openly and directly," he
said. He pointed out that primary and secondary education are
not harmed by government control.
Today, he pointed out, everyone wants the federal government to pay but no one wants
to give them credit.
Three reasons were offered
for state control by professor
Lalonde: efficiency, responsible
social control and academic
freedom.
"In democracy education
should be responsible to the
public," he declared and added
that  academic  freedom  cannot
CARAWAN shows cool, relaxed style, in   Brock lounge.
Monday.
be assured by private dusiness-
men who tryo to control it.
As an example he cited
France which has most of higher
education under state control,
but possibly no other country
has so much academic freedom.
Prof. Lalonde called for universal free education with a
condition and a reservation. His
condition was, "a genuinely free
system of primary and secondary education." His reservation
was, "universal free education
will only subsidize for quite
some time, the richer people,
because the university student
comes from a high income family.
tained by a clever lady who
takes a red drop or two from
your finger and does mysterious things to it on a glass sheet.
You will talk to a lady with
a typewriter and tell her many
things about yourself, including
your name, address and telephone number.
And you  will bleed.
That's all actually. Really
very simple. They give you
coffee and cookies after you
bleed, orange juice if you prefer,
and speak kindly to you.
Anybody can do it, and every-
boy is welcome. After five donations they give you a little pin
to wearin your lapel. They like
you to come back.
One. man that donated had
come back 36 times. G.W. Bruce,
on the staff at the Engineering
Building, gave his 3?th pint to
the Red Cross today.
The Spring Blood Drive earlier this year fell short of the
objective set for it. We can make
i-thcxrifference this year if
everybody gets out.
Enthusiastic Crowd
Hears Singer Carawan
By DENIS STANLEY
Folk Singer Guy Carawan
won over a packed house in
Brock Lounge Monday with
rousing renditions of the old
standards.
The crowd reacted cooly to
the first half hour of the program but broke loose and joined
Carawan as he swung into the
old favorites.
A two-way man on the banjo
and the guitar, he was brought
back for encores by the students
and displayed his guitar ability
in a number called "Meadow
Man."
He will perform in universities in Saskatoon, Winnipeg, Toronto and Montreal and then
through to the East Coast.
For an hour and a half he
entertained with renditions of
American folk songs, contemporary ballads such as "Atom"
and old favorites such as
"Joshua 'fit the Battle."
He stressed Negro Spirituals
which were familiar to him because of his southern background.
Called the "Minstrel of Sit-
ins" he participates in the Civil
Rights rallies in the south, Carawan is to act as song leader for
two of these later this month in
Louisiana and Atlanta, Georgia.
He perfonmed in a club in Los
Angeles till midnight Sunday
night and then jumped a plane
to make his noon appearance
here.
He was one of the 41 students
Who spent six weeks in Red
China and six weeks in Russia,
under the Ministry of Culture, Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 4, 1960   ~
THE UBYSSEY
Authorized as second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Published three times weekly throughout the University year
in Vancouver by the Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society,
I niversity of B.C. Editorial opinions expressed are those ot tne
Editorial Board of the Ubysey and not necessarily those of the Alma
Mater-   Society   or   the   University   of   B.C.
TELEPHONES: CA 4-3242, locals 12 (news desk), 13 (critics-
sports),  14 (Editor-inChief),  15, 6 (business offices).
Editor-in-Chief: Fred Fletcher
Associate Editor Sandra Scott
Managing Editor Roger McAfee
Nfews Editor Derek Allen
Features Editor Ed Lavalle
CUP Editor Diane Greenall
Photography Editor Ray Grigg
Senior Editor     .   Ann Pickard
Sports Editor Mike Hunter
Critics  Editor Mike   Sinclair
LXYOUT: Nick Close
[ ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR: Keith Bradbury.
NEWS: Joe Bouldue, Denis Stanley, Malcolm Wilkinson,
!       Duane   Berezowski,   Edward   Home,   Susanne   Clarke,
Sharon McKinnon.
FEATURES:   Ruth   Robertson,   Susanne   Clarke,   Dave
Taylor. 	
Blood!
That's what we're after.
Yours, too.
Twice a year on this campus the Canadian Red Cross
appeal for donors, and while this appeal does not go unnoticed, it is sometimes short of it's total objective.. There
is no reason why,, on a campus of lj.,500, 32§ students per
j. day cannot take the time to walk over to the Armoury
|    and, donate one pint of, their, blood.
.Many ask what, the blood is usecl for. The answer is
f simple and straight-forward. It" is used to save human
[ lives, and, in some cases enormous quantities are used in
j   an effort to save a single life.
, Last summer after a mining accident a crushed, and
I, mutilated miner received 127 pints of blood in an effort
I to save his life,. With, the local supply exhausted, donors
\ came from distances of over 200 miles to answer the plea
1   for more Tyfie O.
P»ur.ing national and international disasters thej. Red
I    Cross is almost .always the first on the .scene and more
of the precious-fluid is transfused. It is, during this type
! -   of an emergency,   when  willing   donors   are   not   easily
available, that the blood bank is, the life saver.
1 Your support is needed to make this; drive^ a success.
i Almost all the faculties on.thecamipus, are'embroiled
'    in the Bloody War to decide thisf„j>riye's .cliampion,,Why
i    not participate in-this pleasantly: painless contest?
tetters To
The Editor
• • •
The "moan and groan" time has rolled around again
this year.
.The gym office is like a squirrel cage. Everyone going
'round and 'round and none getting very far.
"Have you got anything available Monday and Wednesday morning."
"But I can't possibly fit that into my timetable. Are
you sure you have nothing else?"
"Now listen fellows, Can't you get it through your
thick skulls that you have to take P.E. whether you like
it or not. Also you'll not be able to get exactly what you
want so you'd better get something. Now on Friday I
have ..."
And so it goes. Then always-renewed battle against
compulsory P.E.
Why is it necessary? Why should the student not be
able to decide for himself whether or not he wants to be
burdened down with another course? Who are we trying
to catch up with? There must be a reason.
Some of the P.E. classes are a farce. The total length
of time on the playing floor sometimes amounts to less
than half of the allotted hour. For this the student is
obliged to change, shower and be late for his next class.
Surely better use could be made of the time spent in such
a manner.
If two years of P.E. is going to be forced upon the
student he is entitled to get more out of it than two or
three romps around,the gym floor twice a week.
A look at the list of P.E. courses is very stimulating
ball room dancing! How nice. Very athletic too. This course
is attractive no doubt but perhaps it would be more at
home in Sociology!
If we must have compulsory P.E. let's get down to
business and take the matter seriously. Either put forth
a decent P;E. program or pack it up all together.
Incompetence
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
Filmsoc have started off
their new year as they finished the old — abysmally. Then-
first presentation, "Paths of
Glory" dissolved into darkness on two occasions and.the
dialogue at times was distorted to the point of unintelligi-
■bility. The reels did, however,
follow in sequence; so I suppose we should be thankful
for small mercies.
But why do we have to put
up continually with the bumbling incompetence that characterizes Filmsoc? Will the projectionists ever learn their
job? Somehow they manage to
make the most modern films
look like classics by producing
them so poorly.
This matter has been
brought up before but no im-
provement has ever followed.
Could it be that Filmsoc is incorrigible-—a microcosm of Canadian culture, mediocre,
bungling and supremely complacent? Now heaven spare us
from the frenetic soul-searching of our great neighbor to
the south, but must Canada in
general' and Filmsoc in particular be so completely, so bo-
vinely uncritical and so downright inconsiderate of the cash-
paying audience who have a
right to a competent performance.
Alas, I feel that the complacency that surrounds Filmsoc like an aura cannot be dispelled by criticism, verbal or
literal. Physical or financial
force are the only possible
answers and I don't really believe they will work. Still it
might be worth trying. '
Ars  G.   Artis
Confusion
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
NFCUS?  VOC?  AMS?
ASUS? What is it all about?
I can readily remember my
own confusion of last year. To
enlighten this year's Frosh,
perhaps the Ubyssey could occasionally spell out in full the
meaning behind these abbreviations. Don't let us delude the
Frosh into thinking that FUS
means Free-love for Undergraduate Students or that
VOC stands for Virgins Only
Club. Let's straighten out any
confusion .   .  .
Bryan Belfont
Arts II
A  Correction
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
Re editorial of Sept. 29:
Mr. Nixon is NOT technically committed to pacifism.
Unlike the Catholic Church,
the Quakers have no set
dogmas which are binding on
members everywhere. Many,
many Quakers are not pacifists at all, and several have
fought in the various wars. I
am not a Quaker and I do not
care for either Nixon or Kennedy, but I have heard this
Quaker pacifist bit so often
that I think it needs correction.
Jay Delkin
Dept. of
Mathematics
As We Were
Reprinted from the Manchester Guardian
Mr. Khrushchev's speech to the United Nations Assembly
left the world no nearer to peaceful agreement and no farther
from it than before. Mr. Khrushchev is in favor of disarmament, in favor of colonial freedom, and against Mr. Hammarskjold as sole Secretary-General of the UN. His proposals on
disarmament, while well worth discussing, still provide only
ambiguously for verification of control. His declarations on
colonial independence, although openly aimed at Ruanda
Urundi and Nuasaland, plainly are not intended to apply to
freedom for Uzbekistan or Eeastern Germany. His plan for a
three-man executive to replace Mr. Hammarskjold is simply
the Security Council introduced in another form, with the veto
to frustrate action. The Americans, of course, are still branded
as "aggressive"; but Mr. Khrushchev is ready to hold another
Summit conference "in a few months' time." So the prospects
are as before: neither good nor bad, but unsettled.
On disarmament Mr. Khrushchev's proposals are worth
pursuing. But why was he not willing to let the ten-nation
disarmament commission, under the UN, look at them? Having
torpedoed the Summit in Paris, he caused the Soviet delegation to walk out of the ten-nation meetings in Geneva in June
this year. The Soviet suggestion that the neutral and non-
mitted nations also should be represented is reasonable, so
long as the negotiating body does not become too large. But
the essential purpose must be to secure effective discussion
between Russia and the three Great Powers in the West.
These are the countries with the means of delivering nuclear
weapons—means which Mr. Khrushchev now wants to eliminate in the first stage of his disarmament plan. These are the
nations which must negotiate. They were negotiating in the
Geneva meeting, but Mr. Khrushchev broke away. If he is
ready for serious discussion again, in a larger context, that is
good. Is he, after his erratic behaviour in the past? It is doubtful.
The difficulty with any. disarmament plan is where to
begin .No plan which gives one side a military advantage
over the other can be accepted. Mr. Krushchev's current proposals still contain, at the first, stage, the elimination of all
bases on foreign soil. That gives Russia an,immediate advantage in Europe, since it removes the Americans and diminishes
the effect of their guarantee to. Western Europe through the
North Atlantic Treaty. It is true that in its current form the
Soviet plan eliminated also at the start all rockets, missiles,
bomber aircraft, and other means of delivering, nuclear explosives'.. This, if brought about, would vastly increase the
security of, the US itself—although not of Western. Europe.
But here we are in a blind alley again. No proposals are put
about how the destruction of rockets, missiles, bombers, and
such is to be verified. If it is not verified, it is meaningless.
Either side could have stored away half a dozen spare sputniks or.Titans, complete with warheads. It could then dominate world, But Mr. Khrushchev says, once more, that there
can be "no control without disarmament." He wants no spying but the elimination of arms. So does every right-minded
person. But how is it to be done? Only by finding a fair
starting point—one where inspection can be tried out, without interfering with a country's own affairs.
President  Eisenhower offered   one  way when  he   suggested keeping weapons this side of outer space. The number
of launching sites for space research cannot yet be large	
only a fraction, surely, of the number of military rocket sites
now under construction in Russia and the US. Similarly the
num,ber of launchings is small. Would it be hard to to arrange
for international inspection of every sputnik and every
American satellite before it goes into orbit or out towards
moon? Soon the new radar chain—of which Fylingdales is
one station—will tell the Americans whenever the Russians
fire a missile into space. Mr. Krushchev, if he were willing
to take up the President's proposal on space control, could
fairly ask for facilities for a similar chain to monitor American firings. But he shows no sympathy for Mt. Eisenhower's
idea. He cannot complain that any "espionage" is involved.
Inspection of space vehicles does not mean sending teams all
over Russia. It means only that they should go to firing sites
chosen by the Russians themselves, and nowhere else. But the
chance to start inspection thus is not taken.
Mr. Khrushchev's denunciation of Mr. Hammarskjold
was the ugliest part of his speech (though he now says it was
not a personal attack). It echoes the Soviet assault which
eventually drove Mr. Trygve Lie from office. The position of
the Secretary-General is weakened when he is personally unacceptable to one of the Great Powers. He can no longer
mediate as he must between them. Mr. Hammarskjold has
done nothing to warrant Mr. Khrushchev's attack—for, far
from "siding with the colonialists" over the Congo, he was
not long ago under severe criticism for his own castigation of
the Belgians. To replace his office with an executive of
three, as Mr. Khrushchev suggests, would be to make the UN
powerless in a crisis. It would introduce the veto in another
form. Just because the veto in the Security Council so nearly
prevented the UN from acting to assist South Korea, when
the invasion by North Korea began ten years ago, the special
procedure for emergency assemblies was created. Mr. Khrushchev is trying to limit the effectiveness of that procedure, and
to weaken the UN. He must be sore, of course .after the resounding defeat suffered by Russia only last week in an
emergency assembly. That was a defeat brought about not
by the West, but, if perhaps reluctantly, by the Afro-Asian
group. With that group, too, rests the decision on the office
and future of the Secretary-General. Tuesday, October 4, 196TJ
THE      U BYSS'EY
Page J!
New Men's
Residence
Now Open
By   RUTH ROBERTSON
UBC students were congratulated and thanked Friday at
the opening of the new Sherwood Lett building, the fourth
addition to the men's dormitories.
President MacKenzie, Chief
Justice and Mrs. Lett, and Dave
Edgar, president of the Alma
Mater Society, all stressed the
unusually active role the student body has played in building the university.
The motto, "Tuum Est," said
Chief Justice Lett, for whom
the residence had been named,
"is more than fitting, because
the campus had been founded by
students and largely fostered
through their support."
In his address to the students
and faculty prior to the opening,
the President had used Justice
Lett as an outstanding example
Of a good citizen of his country,
his province, and a friend of
the university.
13 Is Not
So Unlucky
Thirteen $2,000 War Memorial scholarships have been offered to Canadian University graduates by the International Order of Daughters of the Empire.
The awards will be used for
post graduate work at any British University approved by the
scholarship committee.
Nine scholarshps in History,
Economics, or Constitutional
government or any subject vital
to the interests of the British
Empire; and four in Humanities,
are offered.
Candidates for the awards
must be Canadian citizens, 19
to 27 years old, or if ex-servicemen up to 34 years old; hold a
degree from a recognized Canadian college or university and
have dohe or be doing post
graduate work.
Applications must be submitted to the IODE War Memorial Convenor ,Mrs. Charles
Stewart, 101-9031 Hudson, Vancouver, before October 15.
DOES THIS MAKE you bleed? Happy UBC sports car clubber
proudly shows oft car and pretty passenger, in yesterday's
Blood Drive Parade.
Bevy of Pretty Nurses
Help Bid For Bleeders
A cavalcade of nurses perched on sports cars and followed
a loudspeaker around campus Monday noon as the Fall Blood
Drive made its first bid for bleeders.
The  nurses   came from Wes
nurses came
brook, starch white in their uniforms, smiling winnngly at
Engineers and holding posters
asking for blood.
Africa, An
Adolescent
A lormer African missionary
worker Monday described,
Africa as an adolescent requiring patience and understanding.
Dr. A. T. Schofield, said large
nations of the world must give
more than just technical aid and
economic imperialism to the
countries of Africa and help
without demanding claims of
devotion and loyalty.
They prohibited re-entry of
Congolese who left the country
to go to university and would
not set up a secondary education
system in the Congo, he said.
This condition existed until
two years ago, when they set
up a "window-dressing university."
In many areas, he said, countries feel that they are not ready
for independence, but look toward South Africa and decide
they must achieve independence
now or face similar difficulties.
Special  Discount to University Students
DISPENSING OPTICIANS
• Georgia Medical-Dental Building
• 424 Vancouver Block (upstairs)
• 2178 West Broadway
• 5818 CamMe (Oakridge)
• 1700 West Broadway
• Royal Medical Building (New Westminster)
• 1940 Lonsdale Ave., North Vancouver
• Fairmont Medical Building (opening September)
Bring your doctor's prescription to your nearest
Prescription Optical office and be sure . . .
"ask your doctor"
Prescriptions precisely filled since 1924
The automobiles were supplied by the UBC Sports Car
Club, complete with one driver
properly proud of his passenger
and his car.
Both fell in behind a lead car
equipped with driver and announcer, the latter making distracting noises while the former guided the procession up
and down the malls.
The parade ended at the Armory where all who had been
attracted were hustled inside
to make their donation.
The Blood Drive lasts until
Friday, and 325 donors per day
axe required to meet the target
of 1625 pints of blood.
Commerce and Nursing are
sponsoring the Drive.
"PERFECT MILDNESS
-HhmrrHV
... Brahadi's smoking
"tobacco is a special
"Cavendish" blend of
Mild tobaccos. Comfortably satisfying... a mild
smoking tobacco with a
delightful aroma.
Brahadi's is available
at select tobacco stores.
S3* for 2 ounces
Suggested price, all taxos Included
R.D. Wells
COUNCRFLASH-
r
The common, unreflective
opinions of men are insufficient
to meet today's needs, a Christian Science Lecturer told a student audience here Thursday.
We must challenge these opinions, both spiritually and scientifically, said Robert Dolling
Wells of Seattle, Washington.
He said there is a practical
answer to human needs, an intelligent answer which is indicated in the Lord's Prayer.
"Christ Jesus taught and practised from a standpoint which
challenged many of the common1
opinions of his era," Mr. Wells
said.
"And because of it he was
able to heal the prevalent sick-'
ness and sins with what the
biblical record indicates was remarkable success."
Mr. Wells spoke at the invitation of UBC's Christian
Science Organization on the
subject "Christian Science Challenges Common Opinion."
To Go?
An irate victim of Buster's
spoke to Students' Council last
night urging the removal of
Buster's towi trucks from
campus.
John Fulford said his car was
removed from a residential
parking lot before parking
stickers had been issued.
He said he received no satisfaction when he appealed the
$5.00 fine with Buildings and
Ground's.
Apart from the injustice suffered, Fulford said, he resented
his money going off campus, especially to Buster's whose operators were, he felt,, "extremely
rude" and "slapdash".
Council appointed a committee with Fulford as a member,
to study the question and decide
what action should be taken.
PLAYING THROUGH TO SATURDA4$TjS0CT. 8
nmtm maria mmarqvm
A TIME TO LOVE
**tJ0HN GAVIN UIX) POLVER
odw** JOCK MAHONEV • DON OeFQRE • KEENAN WYNN  _	
'CmiMftgrih^^y^*^'"-^* A U^IVgftSAL INTERNATIONAL PICTURE
Times: 7 and 10:30
Plus:
2nd Feature in Color
"SMALL TOWN GIRL"
with
Jane Powell, Farley Grange
Jane Powell,
Farley Granger, Ann Miller
8:45 p.m.
3123 W. Broadway
RE. 8-3211
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quarterback? Your wonderful Kitten
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"Geelong" lambswool, identical in
yarn and colour, as perfectly match
as your cultured pearls . . . exclusive
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Full-fashioned, hand-finished pullover
contrast-ribbed collar and panel,
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Autumn colours, exciting as a last
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, Without this label \/tit&H, ^A\ it is not a genuine KITTEN gone 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 4, 1960
Frosh Delegates     Retreat Gives New
Ideas, Impressions
At Work
At Play ....
At Study
lilllltftllli
Conference
Orientates
Freshmen
By FRED FLETCHER
Frosh Retreat is an intensive course in how to be a university student.
Its purpose is to transfer the
allegiance of 140 high schoolers
from their high school to UBC—
and to do this in two short
days.
As an immediate impression,
I would say that this purpose
had been achieved. The delegates left Brock Hall at 5:30
p.m. Friday, and sang high
school songs most of the way
from the university to Camp
Elphinstone. On the return trip,
they sang university songs.
This superficial change is, I
think, symptomatic of a deeper
transformation.
It is stretching credibility a
little, to say that these people
gained maturity in two days,
but it is not erroneous to suggest that they underwent a fundamental change in attitude.
They gained an understanding
of the intricacies of student activities and student government
on this campus.
They gained an appreciation
for the work that goes, into
these activities.
There is only one problem.
Only 140 could go. And there
is no guarantee that the right
140 were chosen. It is up to
them to justify the more than
$700 that the AMS spent on
them.
They seemed to be informed
and they seemed to be inspired.
But, it may have been a superficial reaction, or an emotion of
the moment, that will flit away
without bringing the AMS any
return for its money.
Was the Retreat worth the
money? There is only one way
to find out—-watch this year's
Frosh Council, and the rest of
the active members of this
year's Frosh class. Their actions
will determine the value of the
retreat. It's up to them.
,:
At Rest
—-Photos   by   B.   Hender
Conference
High Lites
The Second Annual Frosh Retreat Conference as well as being a period of serious discus
sion gave various impressions on
the lighterside.
The Wakey-Wakey squad . . .
the Wakey - Wakey booming
voice . . . The Gestapo Squad
. . . The Meekison Boys . . .
"This is an AMS Function."
Girls . . . Cabin 13 . . .the
Goon Squad . . . Girls . . . This
is a dry conference . . . This is
an AMS function.
The Faculty ... the Shah of
Persia . . . the garbage detail
. . .• Don't wake me up, just
'roll me over' . . . 'E' Lodge . . .
so what if this is an AMS function.
Cabin parties ... girls . . .
Judi ... the prize fluttering on
the the flag-pole ... Take me
to your ladder.
This was an AMS function.
By SUZANNE CLARKE
New ideas and impressions returned with 140 Frosh delegates from a "perfect week-end" at Camp Elphinstone.
The   Retreat,   which   gathers
together former high school
leaders and introduces them to
life at UBC, revolved around the
group discussions.
Several discussion groups
were formed and spent each day
with student councillors discuss-
ing student government, the
frosh orientation program, athletics, publications, communications, and clubs.
Informal dances and singsongs were held both nights. One
delegate, referring to the latter
said, "Even if I don't pick up
another thing from this, at least
I've learned the second verse of
'On Top of Old Smokey'."
Saturday night was climaxed
by a faculty-student debate (no
one is positive of the outcome)
and a faculty skit on joining the
Faculty Club.
Many of the group discussions
were held on the playing field,
on the beach, on the docks.
During one discussion the
subject of campus coffee was
raised.
"I'd like to recommend that
the grounds in the pots be
changed at least once a day,"
said one participant.
"Oh heck," said another, "it's
just like ice-cold water. After
you've had a bit you just get
numb anyway."
Clubs Day was also discussed.
One group felt that while the
affair was good entertainment,
it was too big and noisy to let
any prospective member find
out much about a club.
"It was too crowded. For one
display I stood in line because
I was interested; yet another
one was completely over when
I came back," was one comment.
Most of the frosh are content
with Clubs Day as it now is and
enjoyed the spectacle.
Another group discussing publications touched upon the
"Tween Classes" column in The
Ubyssey.
It was felt that while many of
the notices inserted interested
only a small number of students,
the paper should be used for
such publicity.
One delegate suggested that
the first paper each week carry
a special insert with all the club
notices for the week printed on
it.
"That way anyone interested
would have all information at
their fingertips," she said.
One suggestion, raised time
and again, by the non-athletes
present was that if cars were
banned from the campus, compulsory physical education
should also be abolished because
of the exercise one receives
from walking.
Discontent was expressed concerning the method of electing
frosh council members from the
English classes. Most delegates
felt election were held before
anyone got to know anyone
else.
It was suggested that these
elections be put off until after
the Frosh Council executive had
been named.
The Retreat committee was
headed by Nick Omelusik.
All delegates agreed that the
"Retreat" was successful and
that they had profitted greatly,
"It certainly unified us," said
one delegate. "Going to the
docks on the busses we all sang
our old high school songs but
returning on the boat everyone
was singing "Hail UBC" and
"UBC, Brother, UBC".
A. M. S. CARDS
PLASTICIZED 40c
ONE WEEK DELIVERY
Drop in from 12:30 - 1:30
Monday to Friday
LOST AND FOUND
LOCATED IN THE BROCK EXTENSION
HOURS: 11:30 - 2:30 DAILY
Owned and operated by the Alma Mater Society "~    Tuesday, October 4, 1960
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
* * .
IRENE  FRAZER,  UBC   graduate,   heads for  France  to  study
French and teach English. I
Paris Is New Home For
Ex-Pubster Irene Frazer
JASPER PARK LODGE, Alta.—Waitressing at Jasper
Park Lodge for the summer will provide a ticket to France
and a better understanding of modern French writers for a
U.B.C. graduate, Irene Frazer.
"It is impossible for an
English-speaking person to completely understand French writers without living in their environment," Irene says. "I've
been waitressing at the Lodge
for three years to earn money
to go to Paris and have a trip
planned for this fall."
The pretty 21-year-old student
who was chosen "Queen of the
Crystal Ball" at Chatham, Ont.,
a couple of years ago, majored
in English and French at the
University of British Columbia,
where she graduated last June.
She has been reading various
styles of French novels for the
past two or three years and
intends to -teach French Literature.
Teaching nas for her a very
broad and very deep meaning.
"I have been interested in, the
works of authors concerned with
the basic problems of happiness,
love, loneliness and death," she
says. "As a teacher, I will try
to share my discoveries with
others."
Her position at Jasper Park
Lodge enables her to meet people of different races. "Quite a
few," she says, "have already
visited Europe and they
strengthen my confidence by advice or a word of encouragement." The trip she will make
to France in the fall is, for her,
the normal corollary to her decision to teach French Literature. "No matter what other
people might think," she declares, "I consider that the understanding of the French mentality is a prerequisite for the
understanding of French Literature and for discovering what
is hidden in the depth of a different language."
She does not like theories unless they are deeply rooted in
experience. "Camus and Mal-
raux, for instance," she says,
"Try to reach the bed-rock of
human life, and they are so
close to our experiences that
their insights give a meaning to
the periods of temporary darkness we go through.
"This trip," she admits, "will
not be my first one, but it
should be the most rewarding.
I was born in Edmonton, but
my family moved afterwards to
Winnipeg, then to Chatham and
Sarnia, Ont. We have been living Vancouver for the past two
years and I do not know yet
where I will be teaching on my
return. This does not matter too
much, since what is true remains
true wherever you go."
In her third year as a waitress
at the renowed summer resort
in the heart of the Canadian
Rockies, Irene enjoys this change
between her winter and. summer seasons. "Long hours and
heavy trays sometimes get longer and heavier," she says, "but
I know next year will not be
easier, since I will be teaching
English while I study French
Literature."
University
Pharmacy
5754 University Blvd.
(In the Village)
What did
Confucius Say?
One thing he said was: "Do not
unto others what you would
not have them do to you." . . .
and he lived in China 500 years
before the birth of Christ! Read
in October Reader's Digest the
words of one of the greatest
teachers who ever Jived . . .
ancient wisdom as meaningful
today as it was then. Get your
Reader's Digest now — 44
articles of lasting interest.  .
NFCUS Questions
USSR Student Council
HALIFAX (CUP)—Delegates to the NFCUS Congress
have decided to ask the Student Council of the USSR why
a Canadian University student was refused entry to the Soviet
Union last month.
Walter Tarnapolsky, a past president of NFCUS, was to
have attended an international preparatory committee meeting, Sept. 15 to 17, for the World Youth Forum to be held in
Crimea next year.
In a special session the delegates voted for the motion
which noted, "with surprise and
dismay the difficulties encountered by its official representative Walter Tarnopolsky."
The Soviet student council indicated to  NFCUS earlier  this
CLASSIFIED
LOST—Valuable brooch. Small,
round garnet ringed with turquoises. Please contact Hilary
Brown, CA 4-4298.
FOR SALE—1947, 500 c.c. Velo-
cette motorcycle, $75.00 or
best offer. See Bill in Hut 4,
Room 15, Fort Camp or call
CA 4-9853.
LOST — Valuable Swiss-made
Huginen wrist watch between
Lot C and Library last week.
Black leather strap. Contact
Scott Douglas, RE 3-8774 or
at Locker 977 Buch. extension
—reward.
OPPORTUNITY for ambition
Arts student with more time
than money on his hands. A
1951 Prefect can be seen for
sale at the garage on 10th and
Sasamat. Needs work, but
body and motor are in first-
rate condition; $55.00. Phone
Gordon, CA 4-7364, or call in
at garage.
WANTED —i Desperately, one
driver for_ a West Van car
pool, preferably British Properties, Sentinel Hill area.
Phone WA 2-7844.
WANTED — Ride from Bur-
quitlam area, Monday through
Saturday, for 11:30 lectures
or earlier. Denis Howarth,
WA 9-7508.
GUY CARAWAN
8:30 tonight
Admission  $1.00
Question Mark
Coffee House
3484 West Broadway
month that a Canadian representative would be allowed to
attend the meeting and that the
Soviet Embassy in London had
been informed Of his application
for a visa.
The embassy said that they
had not been informed of Tar-
nopolsky's intended visit, and
that he would need an invitation
to go to the meeting.
"We had hoped very much to
arrange a conference with the
Soviet students," NFCUS President Jacques Gerin stated, "as
we consider this an important
meeting.
"We wonder if anything can
be taken from the fact that Tarnopolsky is a known anti-Communist,- is well experienced in
internatonal student affairs, and
speaks Russian. The matter will
be investigated carefully."
TUXEDO
RENTAL & SALES
• Full Dress
• Morning Coats .
• White and Blue Coals !
• Shirts and Accessories
• $1.00 discount to
UBC Students.
E. A. LEE LTD.
623 Howe    MU 3-2457
Apathy
In Frosh    *
Only three students have been
nominated for the eight positions on this year's frosh council.
No nominations have been received for secretary, men's athletic representative, women's
athletic representative, executive mmber, and special events
chairman.
Campaigning will take place
October 10 and 11.
Prospective candidates should
get 10 frosh to sign their nomination slips and pin the slips to
the notice board in the AMS
office.
SAIL BOAT
18-ft. National Class, fibre-
glass bottom, fixed keel,
Egyptian Cotton Sails, Evin-
rude outboard motor. Mast
repairs needed. Sale $350.
CA 4-1870.
Sale of Paperbacks
and Prints
at:
H. K. BOOKS
750 ROBSON
MU 3-4723
U. B. C. OLYMPIC   ROWERS
WILL   BE   HONORED
ON   STAGE  WEDNESDAY
OCTOBER   5th   at   8:30
f3flN© Lxa bjMOJity a, yUm^ uKtfc.  |
HIGHTIME
fcv
SCREENPLAY 8V
eASCOONASTORVS
MIHMf 111 -1 111 > 11 111 • II KM
QNBMaScOPE* COLOFi by DE LUX6
CAPITOL THEATRE Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 4, 1960
Rowing Recruits
UBC's Olympic silver medal crew will show slides and
discuss rowing with prospective oarsmen and coxwains Friday.
The main idea of the meeting
is lo interest first and second
•year men in the sport. The UBC
boat club needs new men to
continue its eight-year domination of Canadian and Commonwealth rowing. Only a handful
of medal winners will be back
with the crew this fall, making
it imperative to get new men.
TRIP TO HENLEY
The hope for the crew this
year is a trip to the Royal Henley Regatta in England. Once
before, in 1955, a Varsity crew
competed in this Thames River
classic, placing second to the
University of Pennsylvania.
This year the crew hopes to win,
but it can only do so if enough
new members turn up.
Crew manager Dave Gillanders hopes for a turnout of at
(least a hundred interested men.
"We need a hundred at least,"
-he said, "because experience has
those who show up in the fall
will stay with us until May. We
will need twenty oarsmen at
Henley — one Varsity eight, one
lightweight eight, two coxswains, and two spares. If we
don't have more than 25 oarsmen at the beginning of the
summer, we won't be able to
manage such a trip."
MORE EVENTS
As well as the Henley trip
there will be two races in Seattle against the University of
Washington, one in the Western
Sprint Championships in California,  and two  in Oregon.
FOR THE BIRDS
By MIKE HUNTER
KEN WINSLADE, who led last
year's Thunderbird basket-
bailers to WCIAU title, was
named New Westminster's
Athlete-of-year last week.
VARSITY OUTDOOR CLUB
General meeting, Wed. noon,
Bio. Soc. 2000. Final long hike
plans. All new members must
attend.
rf.     rft     *f>
Girls Gymnastics Team practice, Thurs. 12:30 in Apparatus
shown  that  only  a   quarter   of  room, Memorial Gymn.
Does Your
include
COTC TRAINING
For a limited period vacancies are available for suitable
candidates^ medically fit, with average academic standing.
Among the many attractions are:
(a) SUMMER EMPLOYMENT
Sufficient monetary  benefits to cover most of your
winter expenses.
(b) TRAVEL IN CANADA AND, IN SOME CASES, EUROPE
;c) BROADENING EXPERIENCES
(d) DEVELOPMENT OF LEADERSHIP QUALITIES AS WELL AS
TECHNICAL SKILLS
REMEMBER—A few minutes of investigation now may reap
unforeseen benefits for you in the future.
VISIT THE G.O.T.C. OFFICE NOW
ARMOURIES
or phone CA. 4-1111, ext. 378
JIM' BECK, an outstanding
lineman with last year's
WCIAU champion footballers,
returned to the team Saturday after registering late.
Beck's arrival greatly aided
the 'Birds, who recently lost
standout tackle Denny Argue.
Soccer Birds
Tie United
UBC's soccer Thunderbirds
fought North Shore United to a
2-2 tie in Saturday's opener at
UBC's Maclnnes Field.
Although leading two to nothing at one point in the struggle,
the Varsity squad failed to cash
in. A last half slack allowed the
North Shore men to score once
and a penalty shot was good for
the second. A desperate last
minute attack by the T'birds
failed to alter the situation.
On the whole, the Birds looked promising under their new
playing coach Roy Nosella. They
have team spirit and enthusiasm
and will probably be strong
contenders in the first division.
Being in the first divison, the
Bird soccer squad will play all
their matches Saturday afternoons.
From time to time, and especially during Olympic years,
groups of well-meaning patriots, most of whom haven't done
a pushup or a deep-knee bend in twenty years, get together
to expound upon the theory that the youth of today is going
to waist.
"They stumble that run fat," they reason. "Youth isn't what
it used to be. We have become a nation of spectators—lazy and
apathetic."
"Look who's talking," argue the younger set. "That marvellous generation of yours has certainly gone to pot in a hurry."
(I have seen many elder courthouse-types with quite of degree
of Lb. And some of those middle-aged critics carry a lot of weight
about town.)
*        *        *
The elders point with disgust to Canada's showing in the
Olmpics, blast athletic apathy, and demand something be done.
Nothing is ever done, and except for occasional outbursts, the
argument lies dormant for another four years.
I personally cannot see exactly what is gained by athletes
who make the Olympics their goal. Successful athletes, yes but
everyone can't be a winner. Defeat brings .heartbreak, and scorn
from a general public which expects only victory.
Granted, the moral strength and self-satisfaction acquired by
an Olympic success is something to be desired and' envied. But
for the average young Canadian, the biggest appeal of sport is
the enjoyment he gets from playing the game as recreation.
*        *        *
Times have changed, friend. Track and field, gymnastics,
and other such Olympic-type sports which stress physical perfection don't hold the same appeal as they once may have. Intense
dedication and self-discipline are required of the Olympic athlete.
He must spend hours, indeed years, training for that ten or
twenty seconds of glory.
It isn't fun.
Olympic coaches and officials blast the so-called "halfhearted" attitude held by many athletes. "They just come to have
fun," they criticize. They are then amazed by the poor showing
the athletes make.
What can they expect? Loading an unprepared youngster
with so much pressure and expecting him to come out on top of
the world is too much. This kind of pressure cracks even the
most hardened professionals.
What about the rowers, you say? They were ordinary youngsters in the beginning. But they were fortunate in having a coach
whose inspiration and leadership prepared them—mentally and
physically—for the task. There aren't many Frank Reads in the
world: And there aren't that many kids, especially in Canada,
who are willing to go to such lengths as the rowers did to achieve
athletic success.
*{• ^fi Sf.
The average Canadian wants to have fun. He wants to be
able to go down to the local park and have a game of scrub
football, or tennis, or just watch.
If he loses, he laughs and arranges another game next week.
He isn't hounded for being "lazy, apathetic, and mentally unprepared."
"You can't make a silk purse out of a sow's ear," echo the
critics. Canadian athletes aren't sow's ears — but they're not
Frank Reads either.
Perhaps it's just as well.
New Field Started
Claustrophobic athletes will
be overjoyed to hear of the construction of a much needed playing field on the south end of the
UBC campus.
This five - acre area, to be
named Wolfson Field, will ac-
commodate rugby, cricket,
grass-hockey, soccer and lacrosse. Athletic Director Bus
Phillips expects the field to be
ready for use in September,
1962.
A grant of 5,000 pounds
(about  $13,450),  obtained
through the U.K. Playing Fields
Association and B.C. Playing
Fields Association, is making
possible the construction of this
field.
The new field, has been
levelled and drains have been
laid, but it will take over a year
to grow a tough, substantial
turf.
Shortage of playing area has
necessitated a reduction of Rugby sides to four, from the previous six. Other sports, and Intramural activities have also been
seriously hampered.
FILM SOC
Presents
>>
(The Baker's Wife)
RURAL FRENCH ATHLETICS IN "SINEMASCOPE'
Auditorium, Tuesday, October 4 - 3:30-8:00 p.m.
35c
OLD TIME COMEDY WEEK
Charlie Chaplin, Laurel and Hardy
Showings in the Auditorium at 12:30 Oct. 3-7. 15corpass ~   nTuesday, Qctpber 4, 1 S»60
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
Birds AAush
Past Huskies
Underdog Saskatchewan
Gives UBC Machine Fight
By BERT MacKINNON
The T-Birds "Hamer of Thor" thundered on Saturday, and
when the smoke had drifted away they had defeated the University of Saskatchewan by the score of 8-0.
Coach   Gnup   estimated   that
ACTION LIKE THIS will be seen at the next UBC Thunaeroira home game.
Junior Football
Move Unsuccessful
By HERB WALKER
Negotiations to get UBC Jayvees into the Junior Big Four
Football league this fall have broken down.
The Jayvees are  now  competing in the Fraser  Valley
Junior league, where they played in  1959.
The   possibilities   of  entering
future Junior  competition took-
a turn for the worse as, after
three meetings with Junior Big
Four officials, an a g r e e m e n t
could not be reached.
The cause of the breakdown
arises from the player eligibility
question. The-. ;CRU ruling
states that university students
do not need a release in order
to play for any outside team;
Also, anyone now playing in the
Junior JBig Four must remain
the property of his respective
team until he is released or obtains his release from the coach
of that team.
Students now playing in the
league, and wishing to play for
the Jayvees, would be required
to produce a release which, undoubtedly, would be tough to
acquire. The junior  coaches
releases which would allow their
players to play against them.
Another problem arises from
the players who would rather
stay with an "outside" team instead j of playing for UBC. The
embarrassing situation of Um\
versity students playing against
a University team would be
created. Such players are pro^
tected by the new CRU ruling.
As the situation now stands,
the Jayvees will play the winners of the Junior Big Four, if.
they win the Valley title. They
are now undefeated ana leading the league.
Last year, the Jayvees ran off,
with the league honours, but
were ineligible for the playoff
with the Big Four champs because they had used several
players over the Junior  age
would be very reluctant to issue ' limit of 21.
SPORT
Editor: Mike Hunter
Birds Beat Braves
rr
In Rugger "Practice
The Thunderbird rugby side fended off their seconds, the
Braves, by 12-0 in a casual league opener Saturday afternoon.
THE BIRDS
BLEED FOR
YOU-NOW
YOU TOO
MAY BLEED
! Six of the regulars were missing from action — practicing
with the B.C. Reps, who play
the touring Japanese team Oct.
8.
The Braves, hoping for positions on the U.B.C. first team,
held the Birds for most of the
game, but on three occasions
the superior backfield of the
Birds broke through for tries.
A devastating scrum attack added another. No tries were converted.
The game was attended by
managers, injured Rugby players, coaches, sportswriters, and
early-coming families of B.C.
Reps, whose practice followed
the game. Better attendance is
expected however, in future
games.
BADMINTON  CLUB
The Badminton Qlub plays
tonight in. the , Memorial Gym
from 8:30 to 11. Skill is unimportant, and if you enjoy the
game, come out and play.
GYMNASTICS
The UBC Gymnastics Club
will • hold a meeting today at
12:30 in Room 214 of the Memorial Gym. Anyone interested
in gymnastics is welcome.
GRASSHOCKEY
Men's Grasshockey practire
12:30 noon Thursday,- October
6, on the Grass • Hockey Field
All interested* juease. turn, outfall gear is supplied. Anyone
wishing, to. sign u» should phone
Chris, at CA 4-47ift8„?or. Dori, at
CA 4-4860.
CURLING
Everyone  .planning   to   curl
this year is ^requested to attend'
a meeting of the Curjing Club
Thursday    12:30   in   Buchanan
202.
AQUArSOC
First meeting of the year will
be held at 12:30 Wednesday in
Buchanan 217. All new members please attend—a film will
be shown.
WOMEN'S  CURLING
There will be a meeting Wednesday 12:30 in Buchanan 212
of all girls interested in curling.
ROD  AND  GUN   CLUB
General meeting of all members and other interested persons in Buchanan 214, Wednesday 12:30.
SQUASH CLUB
General meeting Wednesday
at 12:30 in Buchanan 319. All
old and new members please
attend.
Men's Intramurals
Start October!!
Attention, all you would-bc-
athletes!
Men's Intramural sports get
under way October 11, a week
from today. Touch football,
volleyball, swimming and bowling competitions begin then.
Other competitions start later.
The Intramural program offers every student the opportunity to play a spoilt. Events
are held both noon and evening.
Any questions may be directed to John Sutherland or Dick
Arkjey.
the Huskies "had improved
300% over last year," and this,
combined with poor offensive
play by the Birds, accounted for
the^ close, score. Concerning the
lack of offense, Gnup sighed, "I
don't know what the hell to say.
I just don't know."
WIDE OPEN GAME
Despite the low score, the
game was a wide open one and
Gnup thought the Birds lost
two touchdowns due to poor
officiating.
Jim Olafson and Roy Bianco
were standouts on offense but
they were the only ones whoi|
brightened the dis m a 1 scene.
The rest of the offense was slow
and seemed, lost. They can be
besti.symbolized by Tonis Tutti,
Who,, was; found three times.on
the bench /yyrheriyhe should have
been on the field. The Birds
found themselves with only 11
men on the field on three different occasions.
DEFENSE. tGOOD
On the other side of the,f£jnce,
the Bird defense was brilliant.
They.pjayed as a,unit, and the
line stopped the Husky backs,in
their tracks. But as Gnup said,
"You can't depend on the; defense forever." The way the
Birds' offence is going, they .may
have to.
Right now coach Gnup is the
most w o r r i e d man on the
campus. He talks to himself and
if you listen closely you can
hear, "I don't know. what, the
answer is."
Let's hope he finds out before
the next game, this Saturday
against the hard-nosed men from
the University of Alberta.
Crew To Be Given
Plaques at Ceremony
The general public,, .and^ especially UBC students, are:in-:
vited to attend a reception-
and presentation ceremony
for the victorious UBC rowers.
The rowers will be honored •
with   plaques «t- the* Capitol^
. Theatre, 8:3ft Wednesday evening.
Of course we can't guarantee an "A" in every subject
as a result of enjoying Coke, while, studying fortests
and exams. We do, however, claim most emphatically,
that you'll tackle each complex problem completely
refreshed, by that cold crisp taste of
Coca-Gola. Worth thinking about—
don't you think? Remember Coke—
Regular or King Size—refreshes
you best!
DRINK
FGR THE PAUSE THAT REFRESHES
SAY "COKE" OR "C0CA-C0LA"-B0TH TRADE-MARKS MEAN THE PRODUCT
OF COCA-COLA LTD.-THE WORLD'S BEST-LOVED SPARKLING DRINK.
(m(wB Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 4, 1960
"B.C." Goes la College!
£»!<&> BEOWeK.
RUSHEE.
u
il
IVY LEA&UER.   I      THE RRsT O-lEER LEAPER.
'tween  classes
Busy Week Ahead  On  Campus
CARIBBEAN STUDENTS
ASSOCIATION
General meeting and election
of Social convener, Oct. 6, 12:30,
Bu. 202.
«{•     vft     Sp
UNDERGRAD WRITER'S
WORKSHOP
Organizational meeting ira Bu.
202, 12:30 Wed.
*r    •*•    •*"
BOOSTER CLUB
Opportunity to Boost. General meeting, Bu. 100 noon Fri.
V     •**     V
DEBATING UNION
General meeting, election of
officers, Wed. 12:30, Bu. 202.
V     **•     "I*
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Meeting today of all club
members and anyone wishing to
join, 12:3Q, Bu. 222.
* A..    . ^    V    ^
CONSERVATIVE CLUB
Itrst general meeting Wed.,
12:30, Bu. 205.
LIBERAL CLUB
General meeting Wednesday,
121:30, Bu. 220.
•*•     Tt*     "I*       I
CCF. CLUB
All members and prospective
members, please attend.
St.   St.   X.
BAPTIST STUDENT UNION
Devotional meeting Wednesday 12:30, Bu. 220.
•J*     •**     •*•
BRIDGE AND CHESS CLUB
Meeting 7:30 p.m. Brock Card
Rood,   Wednesday.   Coffee
served.  Bridge  instruction for
beginners. All welcome.
V V    *p
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
"This Canada Series" lectures
at International House, 12:30
Tues.
V V    v
CHORAL SOCIETY
All members are reminded of
first practise, Wednesday, Oct.
5, 6:00 p.m. Physics 202.
■Tr     T*     V
PRE-MED SOCIETY
An outline of the Medical
School, Wesbrook 100, Wed.,
12:30 p.m.
•P     •*•     T
U.N. CLUB
"Africa — Black or White,"
Prof. Davies and Dr. Conway
discuss constitutional structures,
Thurs. 12:30, Bu. 102.
•f*    •*•    T*
W.A.D.
FILM SOCIETY
Old-time movies series continues daily at noon in Auditorium.
V V     *fi
UNIVERSITY STUDENTS*
WIVES CLUB
U.B.C. students' wives meeting Oct. 11, 8:00 p.m. Mildred
Brock Room. Phone CA 8-8337
for information.
Sfr    •**    v
PHOTO EXHIBITION
First Annual Brock Hall open
Photography Exhibition will be
held Nov. 7 to 19 in Brock Extension.
UNIVERSITY BOOR STORE
HOURS:   -
SATURDAY:
9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
-   9 a.m. to Noon
LOOSE LEAF NOTE BOOKS
EXERCISE BOOKS AND SCRIBBLERS
GRAPHIC ENGINEERING PAPER, BIOLOGY PAPER,
LOOSE LEAF REFILLS, FOUNTAIN PENS and INK
DRAWIG  PAPER
Owned and Operated by   .   .   .
THE UNIVERSITY OF B.C
Damn Yankees Auditions
SINGERS-THURSDAY, OCTOBER 6
7:00 in Mussoc Clubroom
DANCERS-SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16
Sign up in Mussoc Clubroom
U.B.C. RADIO
General meeting today at
noon in Buch. 205.
V     Tr     •*•
DANCE CLUB
Official instruction has started at Dance Club in Brock Extension.
*p v *p
GERMAN CLUB
All members — former and i
prospective meet   Friday  noon
in Buch. 204. N
•P     V     •*•
CHINESE VARSITY
General meeting Wed. noon
in Bu. 203, everyone welcome.
**•    V    •«•
ARTS AND SC
ELECTIONS
Nominations close Wed. for
Council.
Late AMS Photos
Late registrants, who have
not had their AMS card photographs taken, are asked to go
to Room 163A Brock Extension, between 12:30 p.m. and
5:30 p.m. Wednesday and
Thursday.
The teacher was talking about
fur-bearing animals. "Tell me,
Michael," she ordered, "do we
get fur from skunks?"
"We sure do," responded
Michael. "Just as fur as we kin."
Matz & Wozny
548 Howe St     MU 3-4715
Custom Tailored Suits
for Ladies and Gentlemen
Gowns and Hoods
Uniforms
Double breased suits
modernized in the new
single breased stules.
Special Student Rates
Private lessons & coaching
for examinations in French
and German
MRS. DANZIGER
401, 2726 Alder. RE 1-8783
TAKE IT TO
SPOTLESS
SHIRTS 191
5 or
More
ea.
Varsity
Theatre
4375 West   10th
CA 4-3730
HELD OVER
Oct. 4-8
The Year's Brightest Comedy
"I'M  ALL  RIGHT JACK"
Golden Laurel Award Winner
Starring
PETER SELLERS
Starts Tuesday Oct. 11th
The Best Seller Novel
"FROM THE TERRACE"
Starring
Paul Newman
Joanne Woodward
RESTRICTED — No one
under 18 will be admitted.
FiRST  NIGHTER'S  PREVIEW
MONDAY 8:15 P.M.
SPECIAL STUDENT RATES
COMPLETE OPTICAL SERVICE
Glasses Fitted
24-Hour Service OPTICAL Repairs
VANCOUVER BLOCK
Main Floor
734 GRANVILLE ST.
Immediate Appointment
NEW WESTMINSTER - 675 COLUMBIA STREET
LA 6-8665
Cinema   16
PROGRAMME
fall term 1960
EVE   WANTS   TO   SLEEP       (T- Chmielewski, Poland 1957)
CRANES ARE FLYING      (M. Kaiatazov, u.s.s.r., 1957)
LE   SANG   D'U   POETE (Jean Cocteau, France, 1932)
SEVEN   SAMURAI        (Akira Kurosawa, Japan, 1954)
BEST AMATEUR FILMS FROM GREAT  BRITAIN
M        (Fritz Lang, Germany, 1931)
FILMS OF HATE AND HORROR
PA NIQ U E        (Julien Duvivier, France, 1947)
ON   THE   BOWERY        (Lionel Rogosin, U.S.A., 1955)
A   SUNDAY   ROMANCE       (Mr. Feher, Hungary, 1958)
plus-Supporting programs of experimental and avante
garde films
Membership passes (admitting holder to the above 10
programs) at $3.30 will be available at our first showing
on October 6th
ALL SHOWINGS IN BUCHANAN 106 AT 12:40 P.M.
Oct.
6th:
Oct.
13th:.
Oct.
20th:
Oct.
17th:
Nov.
3rd:
Nov.
10th:
Nov.
17th:
Nov.
24th:
Dec.
1st:
Dec.
8th:

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