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The Ubyssey Jan 28, 1960

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Full Text

 FILL
OUT
FORMS
THE UBYSSEY
SEE
PAGE
EIGHT
VOL. LXVII
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, JANUARY 28, 1960
No. 40
Spirited Sopron, students highslepping over wine   bottles   in  exciting "Chardas"   Dance,  are
 doing their part to raise funds for world refugee year. — Photo by Earle Olson
VARIETY SHOW IN AID
OF WORLD REFUGEES
_;   Performers from the  corners
of the globe entertained World
' Refugee Supporters at the Variety Show* yesterday noon.
The show was held to raise
funds as part of the UBC World
Refugee Week. Refugee Week is
supported  by   NFCUS,  Student
I Christian Fellowship, WUS and
AMS, which works in affiliation
with the International World
Refugee Year sponsored bv the
UN.
Chuck Connaghan, last year's
AMS president, was the MC.
Two well-known folk singers.
Rod Smith and Gordon Green,
presented a lively and spirited
repertoire. The audience responded wholeheartedly to a
Scottish whaling song, an Irish
railroad song and an American
song, "Mow That Cabbage
Down".
After a short wait for some
performers who did not materialize, two of the female Sopron
dancers filled in with a colourful
folk dance.
"Captivity" was next in the
form of congo drums and West
Indian dancing. It was the well-
known West Indian Dance Club.
After their dance, "Captivity",
and a series of drum rhythms,
the dancers were rewarded with
enthusiastic applause.
At last the missing party had
been found and the Sopron
dancers, six males and six females, flew on to step their lively
Hungarian dance. The girls were
in the traditional white and red
ribboned dresses while the men
were striking in white shirts,
slim black pants and tall leather
boots.
The folk singers returned to
lead a singsong. They sang such
songs as "Dr. Freud", "Jesse
James" and the "D-Day Dodgers."
The proceeds from the show
will go to help the more unfortunate students in the refugee
area of the world: Algeria, Hong
Kong, and Europe. The money
will help them to continue their
studies.
The committee urges all students to support World Refugee
Week.
Cards Now Available
For Student Discount
Student Discount Cards should
be made available to all students
by the end of this week. NFCUS
Discount Chairman John Auld
hopes to distribute, the cards
through faculty and class representatives.
When accompanied by the student's AMS card, the discount
card may be used at the following stores:
Maxwell   Artists   Materials
White Dove Cleaners
E. A. Lee Limited
Varsity Jewellers
J. W. Kelly Piano Company
Sparling Sports
Tip Top Tailors
Max Shoes Limited
MARDI GRAS WINNER
MUST PICK UP PRIZE
. Winner of a fur stole at the
Mardi Gras still has to pick up
the prize.
Dave McGrath of lhe Mardi
Gras committee said the winning number is 12308.
If the person who holds this
ticket does not come forward
to claim the stole the holder of
the second ticket drawn will
be allowed lo have the stole.
'tween classes
Frosh! Sing Now!
FROSH SONG TEAM
All members of the Frosh Song
Chorus please attend an important organizational meeting in the
Men's Club Room, Brock Hall,
today, Thursday, January 28th.
All must attend.
* *       *
SPORTS CAR CLUB
R.C.M.P. Corporal, R. A. M
Crawford, Police Magistrate M.E.
Ferguson, and Insurance Agent
J. M.'Jones, speak on killer urges
and traffic safety today at noon.
Physics 200.
* *       *
PSYCHOLOGY CLUB
Essondale field trip today. Bus
leaves coffee shop at 1 p.m., returning at 5:30. A few seats are
still available. Members 25c,
non-members 50c.
* *       *
BIOLOGY CLUB
"From Ghana to Kenya with a
'TWEEN CLASSES
(Continued on Page 6)
UBC Hosts
3rd NFCUS
Seminar
By DEREK ALLEN
"Rejoice, seminar will be held at URC."
n
Salon Entries
Due Feb. 3rd.
Fine Arts Committee and the
UBC Camera Club are again
sponsoring the annual competition  for  salon photography.
The competition is open to all
students and Faculty and is held
annually in commemoration of
B^h Hill-Tout who was for many
yjaars associated with the Extension Department,. and whbs^"
early death cut short a rapidijr
growing international reputation
in the field of salon photography.
Categories of competition ar«
black and white, and colour.
Black and white will be further
divided into faculty and student
sections. All entries must be in
by Feb. 3. Entry forms and competition rules may be obtained
from the Camera Club offices in
the Brock Extension any noon.
Medals and some cash as well
as material prizes will be awarded.
■         J
AMS President Peter Meekison received this message in
a telegram Wednesday morning from Andre L'Heureux, International Vice-president for the National Federation of' Canadian University Students.
This means that the Third
Annual NFCUS Seminar — with
150 delegates, the largest NFCUS
Seminar to date—will be held on
this Campus in the first week of
September.
The Seminar topic UBC suggested, will be "Research, Education and National Development".
L'Heureaux' message came in
response to a telegram Meekison
sent to the Ottawa headquarters
of NFCUS Tuesday morning.
, The seven voting membersof
the national executive cast; ballots by telegram over the weekend, and chose UBC over Ontario
Agricultural College at Guelph,
Ont., as host college for the I960
Seminar.
Raise $20,000
Meekison was elated at getting
this opportunityi which Council
and the locaL NFCUS Committee
have been fighting for. But he
pointed out that there is a big
job ahead if the Seminar is to
be a success.
"The first thing UBC has to do
is raise $20,000," he said. "And
then we can get to work."
The greatest single expense is
that of transporting the delegates
across Canada to UBC, and getting them home in time to register for the next year at their own
universities.
Meekison has been talking to
local CNR officials who "would
be most pleased to handle this."
About $22,000 will provide return rail fares for all the delegates;
New Buildings
The delegates will stay in the
new Men's Residences, eat in the
new Common Block, meet and
discuss in the new Buchanan
Building, and attend luncheons
and banquets in Brock Hall.
A new committee will organize
the whole affair at this end.
Members of the to-be-elected
Students Council, the local
NFCUS Committee and the
Faculty will work through the
■summer on the project.
Two senior faculty members
will organize the academic side
of the Seminar. Instead of having one professor from the host
university and one from an Ottawa area college as in the past,
both professors will be from
UBC.
The 150 delegates represent
proportionally the number of
students attending their respective universities, with a minimum of two students from every
NFCUS member college.
Meekison has been assured by
the Administration that he will
UBC HOSTS
(Continued on Page 6)
Supporter of
Lily Pond
"What we need on this campus
is a more real, honest-to-goodness
Love!"
So said Hartly Dent yesterday
to about 400 students leaving
classes at 12:30. Hartly spoke
(after the style of Hyde Park)
from atop a wooden box placed
between the Buchanan Building
and the Library.
He startled the lunch-hour
crowd by saying that Errol
Flynn, in his memoirs, stated
that he had found it hard to love
people.
Hartly also mentioned the
Free Love Society on Campus.
Do they really LOVE?
"What about the Fraternities?
Their name implies brotherhood
and love, but do they really
LOVE.'
He also mentioned the Christian organizations which claim to
love people and t ofollow the
commandments of Christ. Do
they really LOVE?
Then came the pitch: "World
Refugee Year."
He demanded that these organizations should give one dollar
per member to prove that they
really love.
The crowd was no longer
amused. "Lily Pond", someone
said. Instead of argument or
action the people, as usual,
walked quietly away. PAGE TWO
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 28, 1960
DtMtWtiStil LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Authorized as second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
(Published three times a week throughout the University year in Vancouver
by the Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society, University of B.Q.
Editorial opinions expressed are those of the Editorial Board of The ubyssey
and not necessarily those of the Alma Mater Society or the University of B.C.
'i'eiepliones: Editorial offices, AL. 4404; Locals 12, 13 and 14;
Business offices, AL. 4404; Local Id.
Edftor-ih-Cnief: ft. Kerry White
Associate* Editor  „ Elaine Bissett
Managing Editor -___  Del Warren
I *"       News Editor ___ John Russell
C.U.P. Editor Irene Frazer
Cllife's Editor Wendy Barr
'      featuresEditor Sandra Scott
Head Photographer Colin Landie
Photography Editor Roger McAfee
f SENfOR EDtTdRS: FHnk Ftndeniirgi Irene Fr'k_er
ftepdrters and Debk:
"' Derek   Allen, Tan   firown,   Brad   Crawford,   Diane
1 Greenall,   Bob   Hendricksbn,   Allan   Chernov,   Pete
McLaurin, Farida  Sewell, and all other underpaid
Ubyssey informers.
Canada Needs Immigrants
(An editorial in The  Daily Standard-Freeholder,
Cornwall, Ontario.)
One of the most important facts in the world from the
point of view of world business is the increasing" prosperity
of Europe. This has its effect on many things. "For instance, it
will make it" difficult" for Canada to attract as many immi-
g¥6ht_ as we have been able to do in recent years.
; This triens an important change for this country. AltfaoSgh
there has been some chronic complaining about immigrants
taking jobs that should have been going to Canadians, experience shows the newcomers add£d far more to our prosperity
titan they took away.
•, For one thjng, a great many' were not people who sought
jobs at all, but were dependents of others already here, or
coining here to establish themselves in some way. Almost
eyaptly half of those entering Canada in 1958 were dependents,
and thus consumers of Canadian goods, rather than seekers
of,;employment.
Another substantial proportion were people whose skills
are so badly needed, that any number available could have
come here to our mutual advantage. Most professionl people
aye in this class. Other thousands are in the self-establishing
category, many of them farmers. Thousands of acres of land
wkuld now be vacant and weed-grown except for the effort
and capital of European farmers recently established in
Canada.
1 In 1958 only 183Q6. out. of 124,700 were actually seeking
jobs in the ordinary tabor market. The possible change, with
fewer people than before coming in, will mean a substantial
group of consumers is no longer available. It will have its
effect on both the retail and manufacturing trades.
Canada needs and could use a great many more people.
This is our great good fortune and a national asset. But
reduction in immigration will slow our further expansion
and hurt us severely, rather titan making, more jobs available
as would be the_ case if the complaints so common a couple
of years ago had any "basis in fact.
THOUGHTS
AND THEMES
By DANIEL   OSTROVSKY
Adair Crawford, 1748-1795
"Free communication is neces- of communication, which are the
sary    to    the    advancement   of °nly .impersonal agents of criti-
knowledge, yet   it   is   of   much cism of this body now in exist-
£reater importance to the inter- 'ence.
est of science that facts should As you undoubtedly are aware,
be   well   ascertained  than   that this is not the case. My conten-
Dear Sir,
In aswer to Mr. Warren's editorial: Let us draw a parallel:
suppose that the Government of
Canada was able to control all
the newspapers and other media
theory should be speedily published."
tla_-k
"As with his theological convictions so now with evolution,
his undue regard for the praise
and blame of men made simple.
tion is that this should not be the
case here. The Ubyssey is the
only organ of criticism of the
AMS and as such should have
the right to be free from all
possible interference.
Let us draw another parallel:
fearless action impossible. The what broadcasting company do
ambition to be esteemed by 'my y°u know of whlch is <in exceP"
fellow naturalists' was, as he tion) under the auspices of the
himself said in later years, his  Canadian Government?
Object in life.   Naturally, therefore, he was tortured by unend
Is  it not the  same  company
which will not present and inter-
ing doubt, unending uncertainty. view wlth a well-known French
Remarks such as the following authoress, Simone de Beauvoir,
(written to Hooker in 1844) are and an excellent play by Jean
common in his letters. 'At last Anouilh because the Canadian
gleams of light have come, and Pe°Ple are not ready J° hear
I am almost convinced (quite thelr vie"*s? Not that either of
contrary to the opinion I started these ltems are iconoclastic; they
with) that species are not (it is  merely Question and suggest.
like"  confessing  a   murder)   immutable.
: "In June, 1858, a letter from
A. R. Wallace, then at Ternate
in the Moluccas, arrived asking gdjtor
Darwin for advice on the M.S.
enclosed. Darwin read the M;S.
and was startled to find that it
I also contend that obscenity
ahd slander  do not necessarily
follow freedom of the press.
ALICE HOTCHKISS
Dear Sir,
It  has  been  brought  to   our
coasted of "an "epitome of the attention that the Alma Mater
views that -he himself had for '5_?£$f;— Particularly Student's
so long withheld from the World.
"Darwin was put to the test
The honourable thing had to be
Council — has taken over Mamooks. Mamooks was organized
in  1939  with the original pur-
Betters to the editor
He the Stimulus:
Sirs,
;.A criticism has been levelled
against the Ubyssey which many
iitad valid. Contrary to the opinion of Mr. Lum, this was not a
private "bellyache" of Messrs.
Nixon and Vickery. In my opinion there is far too large a proportion of the newspaper "devoted" to sports. The turnout at
sport events is indicative of the
student body's interest in these
activities. The articles on "Barf"
and "Thunder" are so trashy that
I cannot believe that any member
of the Ubyssey staff could bring
himself to defend them. I agree
that there is no need for pictures
in the Ubyssey. As the process
of printing these pictures is, I
believe, more costly than an
equal area of print it would
seem logical that, by eliminating
all or part of them, costs would
be reduced as well as space provided for more articles. Those
connected with and who have
trie figures on the costs of the
newspaper are the best judges
as to whether advertising is
is needed. In line with this the
critics have given no proof of
their assertions that it is necessary.
Contrary to Mr., turn's mis-
done. The M.S. would have to P°ses °f controlling campus
he sent to a scientific journal, ™t.ce boards organizing pep
Charles wrote piteous. wavering..£«** ^cheerleaders and
letters to Lyall and Hooker. One * *™h majorettes, as well as its
day he was writing to say he present duties of rendering serv-
was willing to let Wallace have i,»*' and. asfestanee on showcard
all the credit, the hext time that-a™* banner advertisement. In
he wanted recognition for all the 1953 there was a split and the
vears of labouT that he himself Thunderbird Booster Club was
ri d d formed.    The   Alma  Mater   So-
%nThe end Hooker arranged ciety at the suggestion of the
for fragments of Darwin's earlier Investigating Committee of Sep-
Writings-his draft of 1842 and tembet, 1959, has now taken
a letter sent to Asa Gray the controL The committee present-
vear before — to be combined ed a brief recommendmg that
With the Wallace M.S. Before Mamooks be removed from the
long a paper purporting to have University Club's Committee and
been written by Wallace and P^ced directly under the juris-
Darwin jointly, was read before diction of the A M.S. Because
the Linnean Society by the secre- this was the only brief presented
tary and published before the it was accepted by Council. But,
end of 1858. Henceforth the die in an actuality, there were two
was cast
Leonardo da Virfci
proposals.   Why,  then, was this
second    proposal    blatently    ig-
guided opinion the fact that
Vickery and Nixon used trite and
hacknied phrases does not detract from the validity of their
arguments. The phrases, "prejudiced with pride" and "high and
mighty" that were used by Mr.
Lum bear a striking resemblance
to the titles of certain novels.
Certainly Mr. Lum is not indulging in cute cliches! And to say
that any free expression of opinion is "illegitimate" is an indica-
ton of Mr. Lum's state of narrow-
mindedness. It would be more
profitable if he investgated this
rather than trying to psychoanalyse Messrs. Nixon and Vickery in print.
I would suggest that the Ubyssey print a form in the next
several issues upon which the
student body can express its
opinions of the paper, the type
of articles that it likes to see in
the paper, and suggestions for
improving it. •
Messrs. Vickery, Nixon and
Lum; the Ubyssey; and many
others have been arguing over
what constitutes a cross section
of interest. None of them seem
to know for sure. Let us, therefore, allow the students to settle
the question.
GERALD MERCER
Poor is the pupil who does  nored?
not surpass his master."
Adair  Crawford
Such speculations (about Na-
Five students, who felt they
were capable — and above that,
were willing to  devote time to
ture) have a direct tendency to  the  reorganization of Mamooks
influence   the   moral   character  as a  club-were ignored.    Two
of man. It is this indeed which
stamps them with their principal
value; for all other improvements which may be  supposed
of the five held executive positions in previous years. Under
the present system of scheduled
office hours, Clubs are finding it
. _i_        !+• ,„+;^-, „f  awkward to get signs and ban-
to arise from the cultivation ot . &        &
ners painted.   Two hours a day,
Nature, if they were unaccompanied with a corresponding advancement in morals, could
scarcely be considered as blessings . . . Could the increase of
power be deemed a benefit if it
were used as scourge; or of
wealth if it were made an instrument of corruption; or of
knowledge if it were employed
to deceive?"
Professor Sedgwick
"Origin of Species is a dish
of rank materialism cleverly
cooked and served up merely
to make us independent of a
Creator. If Darwin's teachings
are accepted, humanity would
suffer a damage that might brutalize it, and sink the human
race into a lower grade of de-
graduation than any into which
it has fallen since written records tells us of its history."
(TO BE CONTINUED)
four days a week is not sufficient.
Therefore, there is less campus
advertising,   and,   as   a   result,
STATEMENT OF POLICY
The Ubyssey is at all times
glad to print provocative editorial material as long as it is
signed and typewritten. The
deadline for such material is
12:30 p.m. any day.
Opinions expressed in guest
editorials, letters to the editor and editorial columns are
hot necessarily those of the
Ubyssey.
The Ubyssey will not publish letters to the editor unless they are signed and typewritten. Pseudonyms will be
used on occasion, but not unless the author's identity is
known to the Ubyssey.
clubs are facing losses because
of the reduced numbers attending club functions. Use of the
Club Room at any time other
than the scheduled hours costs
the organization additional
money. Under the old system,
Mamooks was open all day wtih
at least two members present.
This in itself has great advantage
over the newer system. The
present system is costing the;
Alma Mater Society and the
students more than previously,
because of the cost of the overhead and the salary of the business-manager. Prices to the clubs
have been raised to compensate
for this but because there is n6
turnover there will be greater
loss.
Mamooks had one bad year
and Council took it over. What
would happen if other Clubs had
a similar bad year . . . loss of
club autonomy would result.
They no longer have a voice on
UCC. In fact, Mamooks is no
longer a club, it is a business.
Interested students with a talent
are not allowed to further these
. talents.  Is this fair?
Why was the second proposal
kept from Council, or was Council looking for an easy out? Is
Mamooks in its present state
serving its purpose? We feel that
it is not!
HARVEY KEK
The Editor,
Dear Sir,
You, the average student, devote 23 hours weekly to lectures
and labs. But, how and wherft
do you spend the remaining time?
(Studying! Ha! Ha!)
Brock dwellers . . . how relieving it must be to leave your books
and wade through the rabble and
the litter of thechai rOscuric
lounge or the pillar-obstructed
cafeteria (especially designed for
bottle-necks). Brock is comfortable for cattle but it certainly has
nothing* on the Aggie Bam.
Dancers ... if you like a really
romantic atmosphere your answer is the Armouries (also ideal
for blood-letting, examinations,
U.N.T.D., pep rallies, Registration week, and car racing). In
this morgue-like hall you must
keep warm somehow, and drink
is out of the question. Furthermore, unless you are beneath a
glaring light you are in total
darkness.
Swimmers . . . you have at
your fingertips a 165-foot, six-
laned, ideally - equipped pool
(which is unfortunately incapacitated in the winter time.)
Theatre-goers . . . your auditorium hosts some mighty fine
shows, but only the first 700 see
them.
Bookworms . . . you've been
looked after.
Wake up you nooncalves of
UBC-ville. It is time to replace
your barn-like structures with
pleasant, practical facilities for
recreational purposes.
JILL HARKER ,
ANDWIN WRIGHT
The
Raven
at
Brock Halt Thursday, January 28, 1960
THE     U BY S S E Y
PAGE  THREE
FIVE - THIRTY M
By FRED FLETCHER
Did you go to Mardi Gras last Saturday night?
Or did you go to the UBC vs. U of Manitoba basketball game?
Or did you go to the Theatre Department Production
of "Arms and the Man"?
Or did you go to the dance marathon to see the blisters
develop?
Or were you like poor Herbert? He was so frustrated
because he wanted to go to all three that he ended up
in Wesbrook.
At any rate, here were four events, put on specifically
for AMS members, competing with each other.
The result of such clashing of dates is that none of
the events get the attendance that they might otherwise
expect.
* * *
Men's Athletics didn't bring a basketkball team all
the way from Manitoba to play to a sparse crowd of died-
in-the-wool basketball fans. This was tcr be a general
student event.
For some reason these events were not co-ordinated
properly.
Events of this' importance should not be competing
against each other.
There should be some cog in the machinery of student
government whose job it is to prevent such clashes.
Perhaps the logical man for the job is the co-ordinator
of activities.
A little investigation, however, will show that he is
overloaded with work already.
A practical solution might be the creation of an assistant co-ordinator to plan events involving AMS students
in such a way that events that are of general interest or
great importance would not conflict.
. * * *    -
This particular clash brings another evil to light.
This is the general ignorance among councillors regarding athletic affairs.
Considering the large percentage of the AMS budget
that goes to athletics, one would think that some, care
would be taken to see that athletic events were successful.
At present athletics seem to be regarded as something
quite separate from other AMS activities. It is kicked
into a corner and ignored.
It seems obvious that some alMndusive- ca-ajsdsna^n.
scheme is needed to* integrate athletics and other AMS
events to insure each activity the greatest success possible.
'   *,    "       * *
To be closed or not to be closed, that is the cardxoora
question.
Dave Edgar, AMS Treasurer, summarized the arguments against closing it.
"We as student councillors," he said, "have an obligation to find a solution; by closing it we are just turning
our backs on the problem."
Various solutions were thrown out for consideration.
PRO Marilyn Bernard suggested that more women
would play "there if the room was not directly adjacent to
the entrance to the men's lavatory. She suggested a partition be erected.
MAA President Ian Stewart agreed and added that
the presence of feminine (or even just female) card sharps
would encourage the men to keep the place cleaner.
USC Chairman Ross Husdon countered Edgar's
charge that card-room inhabitants are "unreprimandable"
by stating "we aren't dealing with baboons."
The inevitable result finally occurred, however.
The room was closed for a week on First Member
John Goodwin's motion and a committee was set up to
study further measures.
* * *
Elsewhere on the discipline front, the chicken mystery
is still a mystery.
A committee has been set up, however, to study
student discipline at UBC and to try to bring methods up
to date.
Most of the problem in this department stem from the
fact that the university was much smaller when the machinery was set up.
It is hoped  that  some  more efficient  setup  will be
devised.
* * *
COUNCIL QUICKIES
It was pointed out by Dave Edgar and JohnJVIadden
that Jim Meekison has now joined them as a charter mem-,
ber of the foot-on-the-desk club.
Publications co-ordinator Jim Horsman has been appointed Returning Officer for the upcoming AMS elections.
WAD has voted to have no connection with the AWS
Sadie Hawkins day.
Housing Comjmittee is gathering statistics to back up
a brief to city council asking for some exemption for students that will enable them to remain in their west end
rooms.
There is a definite lack of information regarding Council affairs available to the studentry. If some sort of
monthly bulletin on council activities was issued perhaps
the average student would be in a better position to evaluate his student government.
Gerald Topp, David Brown, Todd Garrett and Chris Huntly, UBC's Athlone Fellowship
winners, look happy at fhe prospect of two years in the U.K. The Fellowships pay travelling
expenses, living costs, fees and books. Winner's can go to university or do practical work in
industry.     (Photo by Earle Olson)
Thirty-Day Ufctft
Occupancy
By DERBK ALLEN
A Vancouver Province story
stating that zoning by-laws applying to student housing would
be enforced within 30 days has
been termed not entirely correct.
Dave Edgar reported this following his meeting late Monday
afternoon with the chief of the
city's zoning inspectors.
Some 30-day notices have been
given, as stated, but the planning
department is waiting for a
"formula" from City Council before over-all enforcement of the
by-law is attempted, Edgar
found.
The  notices  which prompted
the Province story are temporary, and those who received
them can re-apply for an extension after the permanent policy
of the department is set.
The "formula" waited for is
being drawn up by the city Planning Office and wilj.be submitted to. City Councillor approval.
Until it comes, the, inspectors
act only when they receive complaints from home-owners.
This "formula" will regulate
the length oJ time a present installation which contravenes
the law can stay in use. It will
take the quality of the dwelling
Cinema T6 Presents
Controversial Films
Don't bring your lunch to BU 106 to-day at noon.
Cinema 16 presents three short experimental films directed by Georges Franju featuring the controversial 'Le Sang
des Betes.'
This is the film which portrays
in simple, unemotional documentary style the methods currently
in use in slaughterhouses. It has
been widely praised for its realism as well as condemned for
what many critics consider to be
a senseless and morbid pre-occu-
Modelling Tryouts
All coeds interested in
modelling for the spring
fashion show to be sponsored by Eatons on February
25 please turn out for the
tryouts today at 12:30 in
Mildred Brock Room of
Brock Hall.
pation with brutality towards
animals. It is undoubtedly the
most startling film shown this
year anywhere in Vancouver.
Also on the program:
"Hotel des Invalides", an outcry against war and the insensitive rehabilitation facilities for
returning soldiers.
"Le Premier Nuit", the most
experimental of the three, incorporating many startling camera and lighting effects to produce a dream-like atmosphere
which pervades the whole of the
film.
and the "amenity" of the district
into consideration.
Under it, all home-owners in
the Point Grey area having basement suites or more than two
boa.rders will be notified that
they have a. period, ranging from
a few months to ten years, in
which to conform to the by-law.
It is the position of the AMS
Housing Committee that this will
work a hardship on students,
said Edgar.
He said that these regulations
are being drawn within the
framework of a long-range plan
for city development. This plan
is conclusive and cannot be easily
changed.
Edgar speculated that it might
be possible to arrange for some
special concessions for students.
"We will have to find the attitude of the community," he
stated.
The Committee is considering
the advisability of running a
form-letter survey of the University Area student housing
district to find out how residents
feel about the presence of students and suggest some possible
changes in the by-law to test
home-owner-reactidn.
Do Yon Get
Enough Sleep?
What happens when you don^l
get enough sleep? How does it
affect your mind? Will "one
night's good rest" make up the
difference? Read in February
Reader's Digest about new
studies which show that when
you lose sleep, you actually
poison yourself. You probably
need more sleep than you think.
How much? Get your February
Reader's Digest today — 32
articles of lasting interest.     'j
WONDERFUL
TOWN
mmmmm
PAN AMERICAN PETROLEUM
CORPORATION
CALGARY, ALBERTA
Offering Career In:
ACCOU NT I NG
We would like to interview graduating B.Com. students
with an" Accounting -major for permanent  employment.
Third year undergraduates also welcome for interview.
Recruiting personnel will visit the campus on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, February 1, 2 and 3,
1960.
See University Placement Office for further particulars. PAGE FOUR
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, JanusBBj/
Teaching Opportunit
Jjcwd 0$ &ppoAiumiy
In the City of Prince George there are 9 Principals of
Schools having six or more rooms and there are 5 Vice-
Principals. The average stay of these administrators
before being promoted to these positions is two years,
in the elementary schools, ranging in size from 6 rooms
to 18 rooms the average age of Principals is 32 years.
The average age of Principals of secondary schools is
37 years. This School District wants young administrators and obviously encourages good teachers by promoting them rapidly.
."V ■, v «v ^v»  $«.,. ^    jSfe*\N.^F'-S-Ste-*.   ^ \v '       , 4
Gateway to the North
WfaaiMikcjjututeof (p/rinj& *jsoh£j&}
A. conservative estimote places Prince George as the
fourth largest city in B.C. within 10 years. At present
the population is 14,000 and it serves another 14,000
people in the immediate vicinity. Being in the Geographical Centre of the Province, at the confluence of two
important rivers, at the crossroads of two main railroads
and two main highways it is obviously the gateway to
the north. It is served by the Greyhound Bus, the C.N.
and P.G.E. Railroads and the CP. Airlines with two
flights a day-so that it is far from being isolated.^The
gas fields, oil fieids, mineral deposits, power potentials,
lumber reservoirs are all accessible through this city.
Prince George has been truly called the "Edmonton of
B.C." It should hardly be necessary to suggest to-all
young people that if they want to get in on a good thing
early for their own future security and prosperity they
should go to Prince George.
District No. 57 (Prince George) Principals will be a>
UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, Feb. 3, 4 & 5
(Contact U.B.C. Employment Service)
South Fort Elementary School
'::"-:iW-   <$$$-.\%,
Swimming Pool Prince George, B.C.
fi&cAfuriion 3>aaJtttiM foh fco&ty cYbi&d
There are two indoor picture shows and two outdoor
theatres and the city is served by television. A large
coliseum provides hockey- and skating in the winter
months while a six-sheet curling rink has a coffee bar
and a cocktail bar. There are two centres of bowling in
the city and a nine hole golf course as well as a ski hill.
For the children there are four playgrounds with equipment, a large heated and supervised swimming pool,
and a number of Softball diamonds and skating rinks in
different parts of the city. The civic centre is used for
badminton, basketball, and square dancing. Besides the
Public Library Commissi on, Prince George has its own
lending library, Along,cultured lines are a Players Club,
a Light Opera Society, Choral Society ^ Alaska Music
Trails, and- a Music and Drama Festival. i86fr
THE     UBYSSEY
PAGE FIVE
ies in Prince Geor
fcAp&ricdkj 3>oA ths XadtM
The shopping centre in Prince George is second to none
n the interior of B.C. At least five modern supermarkets, three of which were completed in 1959, serve the
leeds of the population in the line of groceries. To illus-
rate how up to date these are three of them have coffee
)ars for the convenience of customers. The Hudsons Bay
Company has a modern three storey department store
ind Woolworths have a new building with a coffee bar
:ompleted in 1959. In addition, there are at least five
adies ready-to-wear stores, five men's clothing stores,
hree shoe stores, three dry cleaners, five beauty salons.
:or those last minute emergency purchases small grocery
tores are situated in every residential area of the city.
able for interviews at the following dates:
VICTORIA COLLEGE
tesday and Wednesday, February 9 and TO
Connaught Junior High School
The Bay
(fa& you in WmdofSattiftg fUpadiomsi ?
Prince George has at least four main residential areas
three of which are quite new with attractive modern
homes. These are served by sewer lines, electricity,
water, gas, garbage pick-up, house to house mail delivery and paper delivery. Transportation to the main
shopping centre is provided by an inter-city bus system.
There are six elementary schools in the city, two Junior
High Schools and one Senior High School. These are
modern buildings providing all the educational facilities
of a large city. Every church denomination is represented
in. Prince George as well as all service clubs and a large
variety of Fraternal Lodges. A new modern hospital will
be completed before the summer of 1960. There are 16
Physicians and 8 Dentists practicing in and out of Prince
George. There is a daily newspaper published locally as
well as a weekly paper. In addition to the CBC booster
station in Prince George there is a local radio station
and a local television station.
lAnw&hAify at fihinai ^aohqsi?
Yes, that's right. For the past three years University
courses in Education have been offered to teachers in
the Prince George School District in order to enable them
to improve their qualifications. The courses offered so
far have been Education 566, Education 411 and Education 410. Well qualified instructors have been available
for these courses. By this means teachers in Prince
George have the same opportunity as those teaching in-
the lower: Fraser Valley to continue their studies while
teaching;
High' School Library PAGE SIX
TH.EV   U.I^S.S^X
Thursday, January 2&, 1960*
Quebec
To Get Govt. Aid
Through the services of the
National Federation of Canadian
University Service you may
travel to Europe this summer at
cheaper rates.
By Writing the NFCUS Travel
Department, 375 Rideau Street,
Ottawa, or visiting the NFCUS
Office, Room 165, Brock, you
may obtain further information
and application forms for the
following four tours:
1. 84 days in Central Europe
1. 84 days in Central Europe  (including  England, Hol
land, Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Italy and France)
costing $1,050 and sailing from
Montreal on August 25.
2. A summer course at the
Institute of Political Science,
July 15—July 31, cost $665.
The topic, "Contemporary
France."
3. 42 days in the Soviet
Union and Eastern Europe,
costing $1,050 and sailing from
Montreal on June 6.
4. Ship travel to Europe at
reduced rates.
UBC HOSTS
(Continued from Page 1)
have full support at UBC for the
venture, and intends to contact
heads of provincial government
and industry for assistance, both
monetary and personal.
The President and Chancellor
of the University, the Mayor of
Vancouver, and the Premier and
members of the Provincial Cabinet will be asked to speak to
the delegates and sponsor a banquet for the Seminar.
Both local-and national industries will be approached for more
direct gifts of money, especially
those to be visited by the delegates.
Another potential- source of
funds is the Canada Council,
Which gave monies necessary to
sen4 a train load^f high school
students to the Staatfo# JSkiakey
pearean Festival last summer.
The suggestion,, that the delegates cross Canada by train, instead of by air as-formerly, came
from UBC and was a factor in
getting this university the Seminar.
The train will be, made up in
Montreal of all the Quebec and
eastern delegates and will move
across the country to gather in
the remainder.
Stops in Toronto, Winnipeg,
Saskatoon and Edmonton will
allow local NFCUS Committees
to show the travelling delegates
the cities and campuses they are
passing through.
The delegates will see at first
hand the rapid industrial development of the westerp provinces,
and can discuss what they see
with reference to the geminar
topic, "Research, Education and
National Development".
It is hoped that a friendly, informal atmopshere will have developed by the time the train
reaches Vancouver, an atmosphere that will help the large
grpup get acquainted and down
to work immediately they arrive.
Social events will not be forgotten at this largest Seminar
yet held at UBC. A night at
Theater Under the Stars will
probably be arranged, as well as
dances and parties.
n__r*V
DEAN F. H. SOWArtD, associ-
aie dean of graduate studies
and head of history department, will deliver his annual
"International Outlook: the
year in review" on Saturday,
at 8:15 p.m., in Buch. 106.
He will be co-sponsored by
the United Nations Associa-
' lion and the Canadian Institute of International Affairs.
—Photo by Earle Olson
The Mkhfeveus
mm
is HIRE!
ON SALE AT...
• BROCK
• BUCHANAN
• BUS STOP
• QUAD
• AUDITORIUM CAFETERIA
35c
ALSO AT PUBLICATIONS OFFICE
'TWEEN CLASSES
(Continued from Page 1)
Biologist" is the subject of a talk
and film presented by Mr. Bristol
Foster, world traveller and zoologist. In Biological Sciences 2000
on Thursday noon, January 28th,
at 12.30.
•k -k ic
INDIA STUDENTS
ASSOCIATION
I.S.A. celebrates India's Republic Day op the 30th at 8:30
p. m. in International House.
Everybody welcome. Non-members please contact or leave a
message for Hari Mittal, AL.
9850—Room 31.
* *       *
FROSH UNDERGRADUATE
SOCIETY
Important Fasosh Council Meeting tomorrow noon, Bu. 320.
* *       *,
UBC SOCCER TEAM
Team pcactie^Jtoday at 12:30
on Mclnnes Field. All players
out, ple^%e.
"■'."*      *      *
SAILING CLUS
Genera- _v$eeting to^ay at
12:30," Bu. 217. Elections, Films
*of Mayflower Crossing. Import-
'ant, so eve?yWs»-_»i«s^"*t!tend,
* *       *
LIBERAL CLUB
The Liberal Club Oratorical
Contest is being held today in
Buchanan 212 at noon. Liberal
Club members will speak on the
subject, "Emotion versus Reason
in Canadian Politics". All persons interested are invited to
.attend.
* .   *      *
CAMERA CI<UB
Meeting on Friday noon in BU.
203: Dr. I. H. Warren of the
Metallurgy Department will be
speaking on Exhibition Photography and showing some of his
work.
CU fiollcvidi   DRIFTWOOD ROOM
CAPACITY UP   TO   500
We will cater to all FRATERNITY and SORORITY
BANQUETS and FORMALS in our new DRIFTWOOD
ROOM.
AL POLLARD'S
OSCARS   RESTAURANT
1023 W!EST GEORGIA
OPEN—7:30 till Midnite — Monday through Friday
7:30 till 1:00 a.m. Saturday
... Ids. CUao (Bo OuiALck Qabuwq
For Reservations
MU 1-6157
TODAY
Algerian- Students
May Get NFCUS Aid
A much needed and enthusiastic campaign to raise Canadian
scholarships for Algerian students in exile, fostered by the
National Federation of Canadian
University students has been set
in motion.
Jacques Gerin, NFCUS president, said today that individual
students' councils across Canada
will conduct the fund-finding
campaign.
"The federation hopes that
Canadian students' councils will
raise as many scholarships as
possible to allow Algerian students to study in Canada," he
said.
The money or scholarships
raised by the councils would
pay for travel from North Africa to Canada, plus tuition fees.
The scholarship committee cf
the Union Generale des Etudi-
ants Moslem Algerian (UGEMA)
—the Algerian student union in
exile—would choose the students.
This campaign is part of an
official one now being conducted by the International Student
Conference (ISC) of which
NFCUS is a member.
"It is simply the case of one
student union helping another,"
Mr. Gerin said.
"It is hoped that accommodation will be provided for by
foster-committees in the cities
whicji will receive the stu-
dentfj," he said He added that
these, d& not hegg^rUy, have to,
be university people.
Already a member of the
faculty of medicine at the University of Ottawa .has indicated
that he is interested in offering
accommodation for one student.
In Montreal a committee of
university students has been
formed to investigate the problem of  accommodation.
Plans for the campaign followed a motion passed by the
last NFCUS annual congress to
set up a "symbolic scholarship"
for one Algerian student.
The last Canadian University
Press national conference passed
a motion supporting this motion,
"in  principle."
This week, Peter Meekison,
president of the Alma Society
at the University of British
Columbia, expressed the desire,
in an editorial in the campus
paper The Ubyssey that, "some
funds will be raised to help one
or two Algerian university students to continue their education."
During the Christmas holidays, Messaoud Ait Chaalal,
president of UGEMA, visited
Canada in search of bursaries,
and scholarships for students
now living in refugee camps in
Morocco, and Tunisia.
He stated that there are 250
students in Morocco, and 750 in
Tunisia studying in these refugee camps. Another 500 are scattered in universities throughout
Europe.*
About 130 scholarships have
been granted by the East German government for study in
Eastern European countries. The
United States has granted 23
scholarships, 17 of which came
from the United States National
Student Association (USNSA).
Some of the students have commenced their studies there.
Mr. Chaalal said he hoped he
Would find similar support in
Canada.
ARCHITECTURE
UNDfeR«S9APVATE SOCIETY
Mr. J. Peter will speak on the
topic, "Where are we headed in
Architecture Ethics". Ho 17,
School of Architecture at 1 p.m.
* *       *
CARIBBEAN STUDENTS
ASSOCIATION
The CSA presents an evening
of fun and gaiety on Saturday,
January 30th, in the Dance Club,
Brock Extension. Admission is
35c. You just can't miss this one.
* *       *
NISEI VARSITY
General meeting at noon in
Bu. 205. Constitution revision.
* *       *
GRADUATE STUDENTS
ASSOCIATION
There will be an important
meeting at noon today in Arts
100, for Graduate Students to
discuss AMS fees. Peter Meekison and Dave Edgar will answer
questions.
* *       *
EAST ASIAN SOCIETY
Three films on Japan—gardens, marriage, scenery. Bu. 217,
12:30 Friday, All welcome.
* *       *
SOCIETY OF BACTERIOLOGY
Presents   two   films   on   the
wonder  drugs,  the   Antibiotics.
And the Earth Shall Give Back
Life", and "Antibiotic Progress".
Friday,   January   20,   Wesbrook
100, Members free, non-members .
10c,
* *      *
Al.PKy. QHHg€H- SpeiETY
General Meeting on Friday at
12:30 in Bu. 216. Very important
matters to* be discussed ,so please
attend. *
* *      *
P.E.U.S.
Meeting Women P.E. and Education — P.E. Students, Friday,
January 29th, at 4:30, in the
lounge of the War Memorial
Gym.
* *       *
CCF CLUB
CCF presents "Canada's Role
in the Commonwealth", the first
in a series of discussions on international affairs. Friday noon, in
Room 363, Brock Extension.
chimin Iff
FEMALE HELP WANTED
Employment early May to after Labor Day
Ability to type essential. Prefer students who are per-
manents residents in Greater Vancouver area and are
completing first year. Apply by letter to J. F. HUGHES,
Executive Vice-President, Greater Vancouver Tourist
Association, 596 West Georgia St. Thursday, January 28, 1960
-£___ : __
TBI  '^Sf SS E Y
New Concept From AflcG ill
PAGE SEVEN
STUDENT COURT OF JUSTICE PROPOSED
MONTREAL (CUP)—A, new
concept of student" government
has been evolved by several
prominent McGill students—a
Student Court  of Justice.
The idea resulted from an informal discussion in which the
people present felt that situations might occur on the campus
where "the representative body
0$ the students, namely the
Students' Executive Council
which is responsible to a constitution is interpreting that cons-
tituition and thus determining
the extent of that responsibility."
APPEAL FROM SEC
This Student Court would be a
court of appeal above the SEC
j on certain issues which fall into
the above categories. Doing this,
I the originators pointed out,
would produce a separation of
powers leading to a much more
effective form of administration.
This new conception of student
government -would give it a
higher degree of prestige and
thus a deeper meaning.
The people who developed the
plan have proposed a skeleton of
basic principles and are waiting
to see if student reaction warrants their going further.
COMPOSITION PROPOSED
The court would be made up
of five members: four from the
fourth  year law class and the
President of the Students' Society. Law students were suggested
because of their familiarity with
the functioning of the courts and
fourth year because they would
be detached enough from the
issue at hand to render a completely impartial judgement.
The inciusloin of the President was suggested because it
was felt that the Court should
not be completely divorced from
the Students' Executive Council.
In this way he would be able to
present a clear-picture of the
issue to the other members. He
would have the deadlock-breaking vote-balloting to be held in
secret.
It was proposed that the law
students be . appointed by the
fourth year class itself and then
have to be approved by a two
thirds vote of the SEC. Once
accepted their position would be
irrevocable. At the same time
the idea was thrown out that
the counsel for the SEC be its
law representative.
The main purpose of the court
would be to interpret the constitution of the SEC either on the
request of the SEC or on appeal
from an individual disputing
with the SEC after first being
rejected by that council. These
people, however, would require
one hundred signatures to have
their  appeal  heard.  The Coui-t
would also   be   empowered   to
hear appeals on major disciplinary measures.
OTHER DUTIES
Apart from these duties, the
Court could be called upon to
judge punitive measures taken
as a result of a dispute between
the SEC and an organization recognized by the Student's Society.
If adopted, the originators declared, the court would not only
produce a more effective student government'but also enhance its prestige as establishing
a precedent soon to be followed
by other universities.
filmsoc Gives First Showing
Of Orwell's "Animal Farm''
UBC Filmsoc will present the
film version of George Orwell's
^Animal Farm" Sunday in the
feidge Theatre.
This will be the first Showing
b'f this film in western Canada,
and probably the only showing
ip Vancouver.
Filmsoc has brought it from
Toronto at ■& cost <Jf oyer $l,00Ck.
As it is only available in
35mm, it must be shown off
feampus at the Ridge Theatre,
16th at Arbutus.
The film has received excellent reviews in "Time", the
"New Yorker"-and the British
fcilm Institute Bulletin, and is
described as a faithful adaptation of Orwell's brilliant political satire on the Russian Revolution.
There has, however, been one
'criticism made, the fact that the
producers thought it necessary
to add a somewhat happier ending than Orwell had in mind.
RAVEN
Filmsoc has decided that this
ending can be cut out without
damaging the film in any way.
The program will also include
two special cartoons, "Tell Tale
Heart", narrated by James Mason, and "Juggler of Our Lady",
narrated by Boris Karloff, and
the brilliant comedy short, "Two
Men in a i#ardrdbe", produced
by two Polish students.
•Any jprtrfits from this showing will go to leasing a print
of Orson Welles' "Magnificent
Ambertons", presently unavailable in Canada.
Tickets for Sunday's show
are on sale, at $.75, at the AMS
office.
There will; be no tickets
available at the door.
Foreign cartoons scheduled
for last Tuesday by Filmsoc
will be shown Tuesday Hoon in
the Auditorium.
FilmSDc members said the
distributor in Eastern Canada
had hot sent the film.
Bob "Hope's first movie and
several cart6on commercials
were shown instead this Wednesday.        "■'.'.
Now on Sale!
35c
flv
ridge
theatre
Jan. 25 - 26 - 27, T., F., S.
Held  Over
"SOME CAME RUNNING"
Color
(Adult Ent. Only)
FRANK SINATRA
SHIRLEY  MacLAINE
DEAN MARTIN
plus Africa Today in . . .
"MARK OF THE HAWK"
Color
Sidney Poitier, Ertha Kitt
Cartoon
One Complete Show 7:30
Doors 7:00
Feb. 1 - 2 - 3. M., T.. W.
We present with pride the
winner of the Grand Prize
Cannes Film Festival
The Miracle 6f
"MARCEUNO"
with Pablito Calvo
Plus
Albert Lamarisse's Multiple
Award Winner . . .
"THE RED BALLOON"
Color
NEWS
Complete Showings at 7:00
and 9:10
DON'T MISS
A
NIMAL
F
K%#'*^
GEORGE ORWELLS BRILLiANT POLITICAL SATIRE
ON COMMUNIST TYRANNY
# ;
There will also be the much acclaimed  Shorts
TELL TALK HEART, THE JUGGLER OF OUR LADY
and TWO MEN IN A WARDROBE
This Sunday- The Ridge Theatre
At 3:00, 6 and 9 p.rrt.
Advance Tickets at A.M.S. Office 75c
SEE CINEMA 16
ALL FINAL YEAR
UNDERGRADUATES
INTERESTED IN
PERMANENT
EMPLOYMENT
INTERVIEWS ARRANGED THROUGH
PLACEMENT OFFICER PAGE EIGHT
•THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 28, 1960
Our Housing Questionaire
Finally Right—We Swear!
PARDON ME, SIR! I CAN SEE YOU ARE AT WORK,! ARE
YOU AN ART THIEF? No, I only do this in my spare time.
Really, I'm a pubster. DO YOU THINK EVERYONE SHOULD
BE A PUBSTER? I think everyone should think for himself.
Pub-crawling is a thinking man's job.—Photo by Earle Olson.
•P
CLASSIFIED ADS
WOULD the person who acci-      RIDES offered from West end
dentally picked up my Briefcase
in the. Mem. Gym washroom,
please call CY 8-2928.
RIDE offered from West End
f<J>r 8:30 lectures. Also return
Monday and Tuesdays, 5:30 —
MU 3-1570.
;|llDE wanted from 26th and
J^nb^- Mon,, Thur., Fri., for
*;# and 4.30 or5: 30. Phone Jo
Reeve? RE 1-3523,
WfLL student who. lost Silver
t^ing, see janitor of Buchanan
Hall, Room ^53, Office Block.
for 8:30 lectures. Also return 5:30
Mondays and Tuesdays. MU-3-
1570.
UBC sweater for sale, $10.00.
Engineers sweater, brand new,
for sale. Call RE 3-0783 after 6
p.m. or Sat. and Sun.
APPLICATIONS are invited
from married students for the
position of canteen manager W
set up and run the new canteen
in the common block or the permanent residences. Apply to H.
Bradford, Robson House, by Jan.
25.
The Ubyssey profoundly
apologizes for its latest goof.
Twice we have printed a
housing questionnaire without proper instructions to the
faithful as to where said questionnaire may be left so that
the proper authorities will
have full benefit of our
readers words of wisdom'.
As a direct result, reports
the Wesbrook Hospital they
have admitted five Ubyssey
readers suffering from nervous exhaustion, three complaining of malnutrition, and
one with a sprained ankle.
Apparently these eager
souls had run around all lunch
hour trying to find someone
to give their forms to. Much
of the ' frustration currently
observed on campus by Department of Psychology workers is attributed to the same
cause.
The Ubyssey. apologises for
being the cause of so much
trouble—latent and actual. So
today we will try to undo
the damage we have caused.
Read on, now!
If you are one of the 3,000 .
odd UBG students living in
- .off - campus: boarding houses,
and rf your landladyhas been
ordered to get rid of you, fill
in the charming little form
below, -feverishly tear it from
the beloved Ubyssey and dash
*~-3mW
GEOLOGISTS REQUIRED
Career opportunities as p geologist for graduating or
postgraduate geological students. Summer employment
-for third year geological undergraduates.
RECRUITING PERSONNEL WILL
VISIT THE CAMPUS ON
MONDAY, TUESDAY AND
WEDNESDAY
February \, 2 and* 3, I960
S.EE UNIVERSITY PLACEMENT
OFFICE FOR FURTHER
PARTICULARS
madly over to the AMS  Office in the Brock.
Taking due care not to
crumble said form in your
grubby little paw, drop said
form carefully into one,of the
two conveniently located receptacles to be found in or
around the AMS Office.
Then run off with the satisfaction that you have done a
Good Deed.
And listen buddy — if you
have been tossed out of your
pad, come and cry on Dave
Edgar's shoulder. He will comfort you and see what can
be done. He will make you
feel wanted at UBC—even if
the City of Vancouver does
not.
Hurry now—and tell ALL>
your friends to fill out their
forms   immediately.
HOUSING QUESTIONNAIRE
NAME       FACULTY. _. J. _ YEAR..
LANDLADY'S NAME .	
ADDRESS .... ____-_ — -
Has your landlady received notice lo convex! her house? -
If so. how long was she given lo do so? _;	
Did she appeal? If so, what was the result	
Further particulars	
Do you know of any other student with the same problem?
Please fill out these forms and drop them in the boxes left
and labeled for that purpose in the AMS Office, South Brock,
and in lhe hallway near the back door to lhe AMS Office.
IJBC STUDENT HOUSING COMMITTEE
PAN AMERICAN
Petroleum Corporation]
UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE
HOURS:   -   •   •
SATURDAY:   -
9   a.m. to   5  pan.
'   9 aan.  to  Noon
LOOSE LEAF NOTE BOOKS
EXERCISE BOOKS AND SCRIBBLERS        \
GRAPHIC ENGINEERING PAPER, BIOLOGY PAPER,
LOOSE LEAF REFILLS, FOUNTAIN PENS and INK,
DRAWING PAPER
Owned and Operated by . . .
THE UNIVERSITY OF B.C.
SPECIAL STUDENT RATES
COMPLETE OPTICAL SERVICE
GLASSES FITTED
24-Hour Service OPTICAL Repairs
VANCOUVER BLOCK
Main Floor
734 GRANVILLE ST.
Immediate Appointment
NEW WESTMINSTER - 675 COLUMBIA STREET
LA 6-8665
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