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The Ubyssey Sep 27, 1960

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 THE UBYSSEY
Inconvenience
Vol. XLIII.
VANCOUVER,  B.C., FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER ^4?   1960
43
No. 5
FROM HALIFAX
3T
Brink Elected To
New NFCUS Post
RUSSELL   BRINK   is   the
holder of a brand new NFCUS
post, that of vice-president for
Educational Affairs.
Brink, AMS Co-Ordinator at
UBC, was last year's V.P. for
National Affairs. He was elect
ed to the new post Wednesday
at the National Federation of
Canadian University Students
Congress in Halifax.
NEW COMMITTEE
A Congress resolution to seek
10,000 scholarships of $600 each
I from federal and provincial gov-
I ernments will affect the work of
Brink's department. To assist
[ him in this task a new commit-
! tee has been struck.
NEW  FROSH QUEEN Chela Matthison  shows  radiant
winning smile after being chosen belle of the freshettes at
last Saturday's dance.
Chela Matthison
60-6Vs Frosh Queen
NFCUS Delegates
Return Inspired
Four UBC delegates have returned from the 24th annual
NFCUS Congress enthused and inspired.
Peter Meekison, AMS Past-President and Chairman of
the NFCUS Seminar held on campus this summer, spoke hap
pily of the spirit of co-operation and good fellowship that
prevailed among the delegates.
Russell Brink, who was given a new post on the National
Executive by the Congress, called it, "By far the most successful that I have attended." He has been to three NFCUS
Congresses.
Chela Matthison, crowned
ception Saturday night, is the
crop of fresh men and women.
Eighteen-year-old Chela, a
graduate of Lester Pearson
High, plans to major in Theatre.
She was one of 32 candidates
chosen by the Frosh Orientation Committee on registration
day.
The field was later narrowed
Frosh Queen at the Frosh Re-
beauty choice of UBC's 1960
Cinderella Story
In "Gam Gazin'"
An ambitious Arts student
who wanted to make sure he
got into the Frosh Reception
free, entered the Ubyssey's
Gam Gazing contest 52 times.
His scheme worked.
Terry Gardy, Who piled up
about five times as many entries as the whole engineering
student body, was one of ten
students to win passes to the
dance.
Another Arts student, Lynn
Spragg (he's a he) attached the
following note to his entry:
"I will accept a date with any
of the girls with an arrow
pointing to her hair."
Then, on the picture of the
girls, in ball point, were arrows
pointing to the head of each
girl.
A total of 300 entries were
received by contest editor Fred
Fletcher.
down to ten contestants.
Voting on these ten took
place at the Big and Little Sister Banquet and the Men's Big
Brock Smoker last Thursday
evening.
In an interview, Chela said
she was "very pleased and honoured" at having been chosen,
and added that she was grater
ful for the opportunity of meeting so many wonderful and interesting people.
"Chela" is an East Indian
word meaning "disciple".
PRESIDENT SPEAKS
FRIDAY MORNING
The President's annual address to students and faculty will
be given in the Armoury on Friday, September 30, instead of on
October 6 as stated on the calendar.
Eleven-thirty lectures will be
cancelled for the event.
A brief ceremony to open the
new Sherwood Lett House will
follow the President's address.
Faculty members and students
will proceed down the West
Mall and through the Gardens to
the dormitory.
Faculty members will attend
in academic dress and join the
faculy procession, which will assemble at 11:30 a.m. in the
C.O.T.C lounge immediately
above the main entrance to the
Armoury.
A great deal of work was
done, he said, because student
leaders from accross Canada
were informed and prepared
for the meeting. They got to
work  immediately.
MORE  FAITH
Meekison commented that
the member universities and
colleges seemed to be placing
more faith in NFCUS then formerly.
UBC has always taken a
stand on matters of national
and international importance,
he said, but other universities
have not always shared this
feeling.
At this meeting all members
seemed ready to join in and
.plan decisive action together,
he said. He offered the accomplishment of setting a voluntary
fee increase as one which demonstrated this new spirit in
NFCUS.
DISCUSSION  VALUABLE
Russell Brink outlined some
major issues that were considered by the Congress.
Much valuable discussion, he
said, came from the attempt to
reappraise and update the International Affairs Folicy followed by NFCUS and used
especially by delegates to the
International Student Conference.
LEADING ROLE
Brink pointed out that Canada has taken a leading role
in this conference and other international exchanges. Brink
was a delegate to three student
meetings in Europe during the
summer.
The proposed executive expansion and consolidation, to be
financed through the voluntary
fee increase,, will mean a great
deal to the organization,' Brink
said.
'tween classes
SOCIAL  CREDIT
Highways Minister Gaglardi
speaks noon Brock Lounge.
DANCE    CLUB
Brock Dance Lounge open
every noon for jiving.
•*• *p •*•
PRE-MED SOCIETY
Film "Journey into Medicine" noon toworrow West-
brook 100, Free, frosh welcome.
v   v   t*
FROSH RETREAT
Important meeting of delegates Bu. 104 tomorrow.
FILM SOCIETY
First film this year: "Paths
of Glory", Auditorium 3:30 and
8 today% Frosh free.
V    *fr    T*
VARSITY DEMOLAY CLUB
First meeting, noon tomorrow in Bu. 219.
T"    •*•    V
S.C.M.
Hear Dr. James Edicotte on
"Germany Rearms" tomorrow
noon Bu. 100. _. -
•P    •*•    V
VARSITY OUTDOOR CLUB
General meeting, noon Wed.
Summer slides. New members
welcome, Bio. Sc. 2006.
•*•     T*     V
SAILING CLUB
General meeting, noon today
Bu. 203.
SKI  TEAM
Interested parties for Men's
Ski Team meet noon today, Bu.
218. ^
**•    T*    TV
MATH CLUB
Bu. Penthouse  Wed. 8 p.m.,
(Continued on page 4)
S*» 'TWEEN CLASSES
It will consist of the NFCUS
President and Executive Secretary, the Canadian University
Press President, and one member chosen from NFCUS leaders.
This committee will work to
awaken public interest in problems concerning university education.
PREVIOUS   RESPONSIBILITY
Education had previously
been the responsibility of the
Vice-President for National Affairs.
Elected President of the national body was former Western
Regional President Bruce Raw-
son.
Challenging the delegates in
his acceptance speech, he told
them that the congress was the
place to legislate and plan but,
"When you leave, do so with a
firm resolve to fight with all the
dynamic energy at your disposal
to obtain the many goals of our
Federation."
"Laziness can make the most
enlightened  legislation sterile,"
he added.
GERIN RETIRES
Retiring NFCUS President
Jacques Gerin of Montreal was
elected Vice President for International Affairs as other posts
on the Executive were filled.
Becoming National A f f a i r s
Vice-President was Brian Fleming of Dalhousie, completing the
roster.
Regional presidents are: Atlantic, Peter Green, former Atlantic Regional Vice-President;
Quebec, Gilles Blais, of Laval;
Marc Sommerville, of Toronto;
Western, Dale Smith of Manitoba.
NFCUS Passes
Edgar's Motion
A fee increase motion presented to the NFCUS Congress
by AMS President David Edgar,
Chairman of the NFCUS Finance Committee, was carried
unanimously at the Dalhousie
University meeting.
No one spoke against the
motion, which calls for an additional assessment of 10 cents
per student accross the board,
,and would {bring $78ou into
NFCHJS coffers if all 34 members subscribed to it.
The increase is on a strictly
voluntary basis, and is intended
to narrow the gap between the
potential and the financial positions of NFCUS.
It would be used to hire a
comptroller and a part-time
secretary for the national office,
thus freeing Executive Secretary Andre L'Heureux from the
bookwork which keeps him
"from doing the task for which^
he is best suited," Edgar said. THE VBYSSEY
Authorized as second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
ruhlished three times weekly throughout the University year
in Vancouver by tl* Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society,
University of B.C. Editorial opinions expressed are those ot the
Editorial'Board of the Ubysey and not necessarily those of the Alma
Mater   Society   or   the   University   of   B.C.
TELEPHONES- CA 4-3242. locals 12 (news desk), 13 (critics-
sports),  14 (Editor-inChief),  15, 6 (business offices).
Editor-in-Chief: Fred Fletcher
Associate Editor Sandra Scott
Managing Editor Roger McAfee
News Editor Derek Allen       .
Features Editor Ed Lavalle
CUP Editor    .... .   .    Diane Greenall
Photography Editor Ray Grigg
Senior Editor Ann Pickard
Layout: Nick Close
NEWS STAFF: Dick Arkley, Luke van der Horst, Jerry
Pirie, Sharon Rodney, Denis Stanley, Don Malms,
FEATURES: Dave Taylor, Arthur Saul.
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 27, 1960
Have you ever lost an argument to one of those people
who look at the world through lenses that transform everything into black and white, with no colors or shading; to
that mass mind that grasps a slogan or concept and holds
onto it for dear life.
If you have, you will sympathize with the  writer of
the following letter. ;•"
My Dearest Edward:
I am very disappointed with life here, Edward. It is
impossible to carry on an intelligent political discussion.
They have a way of defeating all your arguments
without even arguing. You and your soapbox friends
wouldn't have a chance. They're especially deadly on liberal
Suggestions. Just let a man advocate socialism, nationalization, or even-advanced social welfare, and they'll let
him have it. Sympathize with the eastern bloc, and you're
black-balled for life.
The secret weapon is a single five-letter word: pinko.
Here's how it works? A speaker advocates social reform,
for instance, and they don't bother to argue with him, they
just let him have it with the word.
"Pink," someone hollers. If others take up the crew,
the mob's likely to chew the poor devil to bits.
If by some stroke of luck, he escapes urimasticated,
somebody will probably sic this group of vigilantes they
have here, on- him.
This watchdog organization is apparently charged with
the task of keeping democracy pure in this country—and
they have a sure-fire formula. They harry and humiliate
all the "dirty lefties, pinkos and commies," as they call
them. They have blacklisted thousands of people for holding leftwing views.
This group-is called the "Committee for the Investigation of Unamerican Activities," and it was founded by
some national hero named Joe McCarthy.
At any rate', I'll be seeing you soon, Ed. I'll be arriving home next month, tourist class. I've been deported.
It seems some of my neighbours got the wrong impression about this club I joined. It was- a group of red-
haired Englishmen, who called themselves The Reds . .  .
Sotie Dtrtrbts Dobrey
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
Alan Dobrey concluded his
column of Sept. 22 With . . .
"what do you think Of Mathis,
Goodman and Armstrong" . . .
well, I'm going to tell you
what I think of Dobrey and
his column.
It stinks!
} Obviously, he does not
know what he is talking
about, since he contradicts
himself on so many occasions.
On one such occasion, he says
Goodman's show was very
well done, and that it was
Benny "at his very very best."
You note that he does not
tell why Goodman was good.
Two paragraphs later, Dobrey,
in referring to Goodman and
Armstrong, says . . . "neither
seemed to me to have the
show for which he gained
fame." This is a direct contradiction of his previous statement praising Armstrong  and
Goodman to the skies.
Dobrey should also note
that it is rather unfair to say
that Mathis had a much better
show just because he received
thrice the number of curtain
calls that Armstrong and
Goodman did. The audience
for Mathis no doubt included
many bobby- soxers who
•would probably cheer if Dobrey stepped out on stage. On
the other hand, the Armstrong
and Goodman audience would
include many jazz who are, as
a rule, undemonstrative.
I am sure that the thirty
column inches devoted to Dobrey's trash could be better
used, even if it were left a
blank. I believe that a majority of Ubyssey readers (if
there are any left) would concur.
Out with Dobrey. Let's leave
criticising to -better-informed
critics.
Michael Sone.
Letters To
The Editor
Editor's Note: The follow-"
ing opinions are in response
_lo a leiiei in Friday's paper
by Allen Graves. Mr.
Graves hopes these replies
will convince UBC Radio
of the interest in classical
music. Your comments can
reach him c/o The Ubyssey.
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
It is a telling diagnosis of
the sickness of a modern university that one should have
to ask that there be good
music on the University radio
station.
It is an epitaph when so
few people do.
G. B. Nixon,
Arts IV
*  *  A
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
Bravo for Mr. Graves!
Yes, by all means, let the
world of UBC be filled with
the sound of good music.
Ralph Henderson
•I*    •!*    *&
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
I would like to hear the
program '"Works of the Masters" continued.
C. A.  Vahdergugher
Arts I.
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear  Sir:
Please continue the hour of
classical music. Can't you give
us more than an hour? I work
in the building, and that continuous   yammering   is   tiring.
Alumni Association
F. Tucker,
Editor,
The  Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
I would like to hear the
"Works of the Masters" program on the air and in my
ear.
Ni Parker-Jervis
•T*    •*•    **•
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
I would like to see the continuation of "Works of the
Masters".
I Lynne  Newman
Education  I.
•T*     *T*     *T"
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
I, too, would like to see a
continuation and expansion of
various good classical music
programs by UBC Radio.
M.  P.  Sinclair.
*T*     "I*     *V
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
I would like to see more
classical music shows on UBC
Radio. I feel I am not one
with "degraded  tastes."
Doug   Sheffield,
Arts I
Ubyssey Polity
The Ubyssey welcomes
provocative criticisms and
comments from readers on
matters   of student  interest.
Letters   to   the   editor
should  . not    exceed    150
words.
The Ubyssey does not
guarantee publication of all
letters received, and reserves the right to edit
letters. ■- - -«—
Truth on Disarmament
(Reprinted from The New Statesman)
Up to May 1955, it could fairly be argued that the West
was making the running on disarmament. After 1955 the opposite has been true. In 1952 the US delegate laid before the
Disarmament Commission a document embodying six impeccable and far-reaching principles of comprehensive disarmament starting with the assertion that "the goal of disarmament
is not to regulate but to prevent war."
This was backed by western proposals to cut the forces of
the three major powers (America, Russia and China) to "at
most" 1.5 million men, with lower ceilings for Britain and
France, and corresponding reductions in conventional armaments. In 1954 the UN set up a Disarmament Sub-Committee
to try and break the deadlock which Russian obstruction of
these plans had caused.
It was to this committee that the famous Anglo-French
proposals were submitted, calling for "the total prohibition
of the use and manufacture of nuclear weapons and weapons
of mass destruction of every type, together with the conversion of existing stocks of nuclear weapons for peaceful purposes", as soon as progress had been made towards the reductions in manpower and conventional weapons already proposed. This sweeping program of disarmament was to be carried out in the first disarmament treaty, subject to proper inspection and control, and followed by further steps.
Later, to meet Soviet objections, the western powers
agreed that the 'cut-off of new nuclear production should begin as soon as 50 per cent of the first reductions in conventional weapons had been made and that, when 75 per cent of
conventional reductions had been effected, the complete pro-
' hibition of the Use of nuclear' weapons to which the Russians
attached so* much importance should begin. By the time the
full conventional reductions proposed in the first treaty were
completed,, it wasj proposed that "all atomic materials shall
then be used only for peaceful purposes." It was a fair offer
and in May 1955 the United States delegate challenged Russia
to say Yes or No to it.
It is at this point tnat the picture changes. We can speculate
endlessly about the reasons. Certainly Stalin's death in 1953
seems to have brought to the top in Soviet councils those who
believe that a nuclear war would destroy all states and not
merely ■ capitalist ones. Whatever the reason, on 10th May
1955 the Soviet delegate announced that he not only accepted
the western first-stage proposals, but the six principles. He
even put in a paper outlining in detail the inspection system
he proposed: the setting up of an International Control Organ
with an international staff and far-reaching powers of control, including "unimpeded access to records" and "unimpeded
access at all times to all objects of control." As a safeguard
against surprise attack he suggested the establishment of international control posts at large ports, railway junctions,
aerodromes and on main motor highways.
The western delegates could hot believe their ears. M.
Moch said "the whole thing looks too good to be true.' The US
delegate, after consulting his government, said: "We have
been gratified to find that the concepts which we have put
forward over a considerable length of time . . . have been accepted in a large measure by the Soviet Union." The British
delegate said that the western proposals 'have now been largely, and in some cases entirely, adopted by the Soviet Union'
and added: "We have made an advance that I never dreamed
possible on Monday last." Then, to Soviet dismay, the western
delegates insisted on going into recess for three months.
During the recess the Summit meeting was held at Geneva at which Eisenhower put forward his proposal for an
'open skies' policy to prevent surprise attack and said that
its acceptance by Russia would be the 'curtain raiser' for disarmament — in other words a test of Russian sincerity. This
was destructive enough. And when the Disarmament Subcommittee met again in August 1955 the U.S. shocked Russia
by announcing that it placed a 'reservation' upon 'all its pre-
Geneva substantive positions.' In other words, the Anglo-
French proposals were withdrawn and have remained withdrawn to this day
In 1956 the Russians made further efforts to meet the
West's change of front — and were again rebuffed. In 1957
they again put forward the agreed program of May 1955, having added to the list the total abolition of all missiles. To this
the West replied that it was now clear that no agreement on
comprehensive disarmament could be reached and that the
powers should try to reach agreement on partial disarmament
instead. In these partial proposals the permitted ceiling of
manpower for Russia and the United States was raised to 2.5
million men. Further reductions were to be made conditional
on 'progress towards the solution of political issues.' The reasons for change in the American attitude were given by Mr.
Stassen in 1957 when he said: 'It is our view that if an effort
is made to reduce armament, armed forces and military expenditures to a level that reflects weakness it would not be
conducive to stability in the world.' For Britain Commander
Noble said: 'We, the western powers, in the present state of international tension, regard the possession of these (nuclear)
weapons as the best detergent to aggression.' In disgust the
Russians rejected the West's partial proposals and for two
' years general disarmament talks effectively lapsed. Tuesday, September 27, 1960
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  3
B.C. Leading in
Social Problems
CCF MLA-elect Dave Barrett Friday described B.C.'s
social problems as the worst in Canada.
"There is not one area of social problem that B.C. does
not lead Canada in," he said, "and if there is an area, we are
in   hurry to catch up."
"We have the highest rate
per capita in Canada of suicides, drug addiction, alcholism
and juvenile deliquency," Barrett told a capacity crowd in
Bu.   104.
Barrett is the CCF member
for Dewdney who defeated
former Socred member Lyle
Wicks, Minister of Labor.
A social worker with a master's degree, he was fired from
his position at Haney Correctional Institute when he announced his  CCF   candidacy.
"I have never Telt better
in my life since I have had an
opportunity to test my principles," he said when asked about
the loss of his job.
BLAMES SOCIAL PROBLEMS
Barrett blamed B.C.'s social
problems on "political apathy"
ajnd professional immorality",
charging the social workers
who have become civil servants
with a lack of "intestinal fortitude".
< They have become "status-
quo seekers" he said, blaming
professional conformity for the
reluctance of members of his
profession to call for reforms.
He   said   that   once   we   had
our degrees we could, "Go out
and conform; you'll be a success professionally but you'll
he a damn poor addition to
society." I
Asked   if   democracy    could
survive under a "planned economy",  he  replied,  "We do not
have   democracy.     Do   not   be i
under that illusion."
He issued a call for domestic |
socialism, saying,  "There is no
threat to democracy under soc- j
ialism. None " j
"Does the doctor care who |
pays the bill?" he asked in re-
j plying to a question on socialized medicine. He said the CCF
plan was for a prepaid, state
financed program that would
not interfere with the doctor-
patient   relationship.
Education Gets New Gym
The college of Education will soon move into a new gymnasium being built just north of the Stadium.
Construction-of the gym was necessitated by the inability of
the Physical Education department to provide facilities for the
College of Education.
Frosh Will*
Vote Soon
1 Campus freshmen will go to
the polls October 14 to elect
their   Frosh   Executive.
! Positions to be filled are:
president,  vice-president,   secre-
| tary, treasurer, executive mem-
! ber, chairman of special events
! and women's and men's athletic
j representatives.
' Freshmen interested in running must post nomination
sheets, bearing signatures of
ten other freshmen in good
standing, on the bulletin board
in the AMS office, Brock Hall,
before 4:30 Oct.  5.
The body of the Frosh Council will be determined this
week with the election of a representative from each freshmen
English class.
VOC APOLOGIZES
VOC apologises for the delay,
caused by technical difficulties
with Radsoc equipment, in the
early part of the annual "Splash
and Dance" held Friday.
LEATHER PORTFOLIO
AND BOOK BINDER
Phone CA 4-5091 between
8 and 11 mornings
S.C.M. Fall Camp
Theme "Morals Without Religion!"
LEADERS:—DR. DONALD BROWN
Dept. of Philosophy
DR. JOHN ROSS
Dean St. Andrew's Hall
Friday, September 30 - Sunday October 3
Any student at U.B.C.  welcomed
Register a   S.C.M. office Hut L-5 — Cost $5
SPECIAL STUDENT RATES
COMPLETE OPTICAL SERVICE
Glasses Fitted \
24-H*>ur Service OPTICAL Repairs
VANCOUVER BLOCK
Main Floos
734 GRANVILLE ST.
Immediate Appointment
NEW WESTMINSTER - 675 COLUMBIA STREET
LA 6-8665
Does Your
CAREER PLANNING
include
-
C01C TRAINING
For a limited period vacancies are available for suitable
candidates, medically fit, with average academic standing.
Among the many attractions are:
(a) SUMMER EMPLOYMENT
Sufficient monetary  benefits to  cover  most of your
winter expenses.
(b) TRAVEL IN CANADA AND, IN SOME CASES, EUROPE
(c) BROADENING EXPERIENCES
(d) DEVELOPMENT OF LEADERSHIP QUALITIES AS WELL AS
TECHNICAL SKILLS
REMEMBER—A few minutes of investigation now may reap
unforeseen benefits for you in the future.
VISIT THE C.O.T.C. OFFICE NOW
ARMOURIES
or phone CA. 4-1111, ext. 378
-BOOKS WANTED-
The Bookstore requires up to
500 copies of
(Brown and O'Donnell)
"Manual of Practical
Chemistry"
As Used In
Chemistry 155-200-285 last Yew Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 27,  1960
Wear Out Tires Will
Create Employment
In these days of growing unemployment, the Ubyssey feels
every automobile operator
should know how to contribute
his full share to keeping the
tire-makers busy. As a public
service, it offers these gems of
advice from the Rubber Association of Canada on how to wear
out the tires on a car:
1. Always travel at the highest speed.
■    2.   Turn   corners   as   fast   as
possible.
3. A 1 w ay s  use   jack-rabbit
starts.
4. Make  every  stop   a  panic
stop—lock   the brakes.
, 5. Ignore recommended tire
pressures.
6. Slam over pot-holes rocks
and curbs. Don't miss any.
7. Never rotate the tires.
8. Maintain  wheels unbalanced or misaligned.
' 9. iSpin wheels whenever
possible on gravel, in mud
or snow.
!    Careful   attention    to    these
nine points will yield big dividends in shortening tire mileage, increased gas and oil consumption and rapid deterioration of brakes, front-end, transmission and other parts of the
car.
 Courtesy Canada
Safety Council.
Morrow Will Upset
Homecoming Plans
Homecoming plans have been
upset by the decision of Buddy
Morrow not to bring his group
to campus for the two dances
October 28 and 29.
"Buddy Morrow has broken
his agreement with us," Mike
Sone, Homecoming Public Relations Officer announced Friday.
He was reacting to a Ubyssey
announcement in Friday's issue
that Morrow would play at the
dances.
HON. P. A. GAGLARDI
TODAY 12:30 BROCK LOUNGE
SOCIAL CREDIT   CLUB
FILM SOC
Presents
A SPECIAL
KIRK   DOUGLAS
Ralph Meeker - Aldophe Menjou
"PATHS of GLORY"
TO-DAY
3:30 and 8 p.m.
AUDITORIUM
FREE
FOR
FROSH
Bach Cantata Scheduled
In Choir's Second Season
The university choir, a choral group sponsored by the
Music Department of the university, is embarking upon its
second season.
The choir, under the direction of Dr. Robert B. Morris, a
vocal professor of the department; is open to all students
and fills a great need in the
campus musical life.
Practices are held in Buchanan 106, Monday through
Thursday from 4:30 to 5:30, and
Music majors are required to
attend all four rehearsals. Non-
music majors may elect to eome
to either two or three of these
practices, though a very high
percentage attend all four days.
FACULTIES REPRESENTED
Students from nearly all faculties are represented in the
choir and there are openings for
additional numbers in all parts.
Dr.  Morris,   its   director,   re
ceived his B.S.M. from Capital
University, Colum bus, Ohio,
and his Master of Sacred Music
from the Union Theological
Seminary in New York City.
His Doctor of Vocal Pedagogy
was earned at Indiana University.
Dr. Morris has taught .music
at Hanover College, Indiana;
Northern Illinois University,
and the Women's College of the
University   of   North   Carolina.
During the first term, the
Choir will present the Bach
Cantata "To Us A Child Is
Given", a double chorus selection by Giovanni Gabrielli with
Brass Ensemble, the Madrigal
Opus 35 by Gabriel Faure.
There will also be a number of
minor selections.
GIRLS
WITH
THE
RIGHT
FASHION
ANSWERS
KNOW THE
STYLE QUOTIENT
OF A
GLENAYR
Maybe you don't rate "A-plus" in math . . . you'll still
create a fashion furore in this exciting "girl-on-the-go"
Kitten jumbo-knit "Shetlantex" Shetland and mohair
. . . grand for sports car jaunting, wonderful for
weekend skiing, fabulous, on or off campus.
Coiffure-protecting hood forms cowl collar when down . . .
vibrating young colours . . . silhouette relaxed and
easy as fashion dictates, for Fall and Winter.
Sizes 36-40 . . . $14.95
Concerts
To Start
Tomorrow
The first concert of the Vancouver Woman's Musical Club
iifty-f if th series on will be
liven tomorrow afternoon at 2
i ;<.mi in the Queen Elizabeth
Theatre. Boyd Neel will open
this season conducting the Hart
House Orchestra.
Boyd Neel, Dean of the Royal
Conservatory of Music came to
Canada with an impressive
musical background.
With the Boyd Neel Orchestra, which he founded in England in 1932, he helped establish a great tradition in string
orchestra playing. In recognition of his services he was
granted the C.B.E. by the
Queen the 1953 honors list.
APPEARED AT BRUSSELS
The Hart House Orchestra
was founded in 1954, and is the
Canadian equivalent of the
Boyd Neel Orchestra. Dr. Hart
and the Orchestra appeared at
the Brussel's World Fair, and
have toured Eastern Canada
and the United States.
The Women's Musical Club
has made available to students
one hundred and twenty tickets
to this concert, at a nominal
price of one dollar each. In addition, student series passes may
be obtained from the club at a
cost of only three dollars. This
pass permits students to attend
sll eight concerts that the club
is  sponsoring.
Tidkets for the Boyd Neel
concert may be obtained today
and tomorrow at the cashiers
wicket in the AMS offices.
'TWEEN CLASSES
(Conlnued  from  page   1)
new members welcome. 3rd and
4th yrs., 2nd yr. Honours. Prof.
Melzak speaks "Every interger
is  the sum  of four squares."
V    V    V
BIRDCALLS
Change of address and .phone
number, Publication Office until Friday.
rf$       iff       fift
AMS  CARDS
AMS card photos will be
taken in two weeks. Watch for
notice.
1S55   VAUXHALL  -   Perfect
Condition
Low Mileage
$995.00   or   Offer
Phone   REgent   3-6521
or REgeni 3-9101
Without this label \/&tffi!i%&\ it is not a genuine KITTEN
Varsity
Theatre
4375   West   10th
CA 4-3730
LAST TIMES TODAY
Michael Todd's
"AROUND   THE    WORLD
IN 80 DAYS"
One Complete Show 7:30
WED   THRU   SATURDAY
Sept. 28th — Oct.  1st
The Year's Brightest Comedy
"I'M  ALL  RIGHT  JACK"
(Golden   Laurel  Award
Winner)
starring
PETER SELLERS
FIRST  NIGHTER'S   PREVIEW
MONDAY 8:15 P.M. Tuesday, September- 27, 1960
THE      UBYSSEY
ROBERT DOLLING WELLS
Wells To Speak
Here Thursday
"Christian Science Challenges Common Opinion," will be
. the topic of an address by Robert Dolling Wells Thursday
noon in Buchanan 104.
Wells, sponsored by the campus Christian Science Organization, is from Seattle, Wash.,
and is on an extensive tour as
a member of the Christian
Science Board of Lectureship.
This is the biggest eve^t; of
the year for UBC's Christian
Science Organization.
BROCK BASEMENT
HIDES FURNITURE
Furniture removed from
cluhrooms during the- summer
to eliminate fire hazard is
stored in   the Brock  basement.
It may be re-claimed by seeing the Coordinator before
September 30. All furniture not
claimed by then will be destroyed.
WAA MEETS
WEDNESDAY
BU 317
Matz&Wozny
548 Howe St.     MU 3-4715
Custom Tailored Suits
for Ladies and Gentlemen
Gowns and Hoods
Uniforms
Double breased suits
modernized in the new
single breased stules.
Special Student Rates
Men's
Harris Tweed
TOPCOATS
New Olive Shades in
Continental Patterns
$59.50
RAINCOATS
Popular Bronze  and
Charcoal Shades
V2 price
$16.95
.
United Tailors
BRITISH WOOLENS
549 Granville
9/rM ttfykter
Page 5
BY ALAN DOBREY
AN OPEN LETTER TO MR. MICHAEL SONE
(See letter to the Editor Column)
Thank you Mr. Sone for your compliments, your perscicacity in recognizing talent, and for your inestimable assistance. Your letter is just
like manna from the sweepstakes; it is just the fuel I've needed 10
launch my pencil from my scratch pad to orbit the high empyreans of
the "Fourth Estate".
Seems like The Editor thinks so too. Guess that is why he showed
me your letter and wanted the student body to see it!
For one long week I have laboured as a cub reporter, Brooking my
ears for student opinion on current entertainment, nefariously studying
theatrical trade journals in class, then in the shadow of night, watched
my pencil beat out this profound column. Butt all that has changed, I am
no longer a cub reporter, for thanks to you Mr. Sone I now have STATUS.
Today I am a Columnist and Critic.
Not just a Critic, but a "critic" whose head you would have; whose
colun 'stinks"; who is "contradictory"; who does not give the "why"
of his comments; who is "unfair" to veteran entertainers! Man, whatta
man! He must be good to be that bad. As our friends the politicians
would say, "Let's look at the record."
"Stinky?" If you've got the guts to miss a future column, your curiosity will kill you.
"Contradictory?" A reader who knows what "column inches" are
should know enough never to read out of context.
"Not tell why?' 'Funny, but just two weeks ago an Entertainment
"Critic"(?) in one of the daily newspapers had to write about those who
criticized him for not telling "why". Must be a bug getting around. Anyhow, thanks for the compliment. After one week of a journalistic career,
in faults at least, I am on a par with a professional entertainment writer.
"Unfair?" A reporter reports facts and a reviewer expresses his
opinion. The very distinguished critic, the late Mr. Heywood Broun was
once sued by an actor because of Mr. Broun's very unfavourable review.
The actor lost the suit. The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that a reviewer's
opinion "need not be intelligent or accurate." Are my reviews intelligent
and accurate Mr. Sone, or do my reviews have something in common
with those of Mr. Broun?
The constructive criticism in your letter, Mr. Sone, brings to mind
another letter written to. the Baggage Master of an American airline by
a Japanese passenger whose baggage had repeatedly been mis-routed.
"Mr. Baggage Man, United States of Los Angeles, Gentleman Dear
Sir: I dam seldom where suitcases are. She no fly. You no more fit a
baggage master than for crysake out loud. That all I hope. What the
matter you?"
•n   *x*   v
If this column really stinks, and you wantt to go "way, outtt" . . . Don't
miss Mort Saul when he comes to Vancouver, November First.
Pritchett States    *
USA Misuses UN
The secretary of the Vancouver Communist Party, charged
Friday that the U.S.A., is using the U.N. as an instrument to fur
ther the Cold War.
The secretary of the Vancouver Communist Party, charged
Friday that the U.S.A. is using
HAROLD PRITCHETT
the U.N. as an instrument to
further the Cold War.
Harold Pritchett, who spoke
in Bu. 100 said the objective
of the United States is to turn
the U.N. into an organization
"to legalize criminal adventures" such as the Congo.
He urged Canada to withdraw from NATO and NORAD
and join with all peace loving
nations and neutral nations. By
doing so, he said, Canada could
become a powerful voice in the
U.N.
Prichett said the tendency for
peaceful co-existance is a
powerful force for peace and
Soviet Premier Khrushchev is
trying to "rid mankind of all
armaments and con solidate
world peace," he stated.
PLAYING THROUGH TO SATURDAY, OCT. 1
aj.i iiiimibmiii 1 From ^e most grjppfng. ^jm
dramatic be'st-seflerl
Iudrer Hepburn
m FRED ZINNEMANN'S «wua»«or
fhEMUNSlTORy
TKHNKOtM
One Showing Only: 8:15 P.M.
Plus:     "ISRAEL"
"Its ancient glories, Its wonders of today!"
Narrated by     Edward G. Robinson
tj   WARNER BR0i
HOLLYWOOD
3123 W. Broadway
RE. 8-3211
Always The Favorite
Choice of Campus Queens
Your New Frosh Queen
Chela Matthison
Shown with her own
Sport-Pa Is
Buy Brand Lines-Buy With Conf iden
Available at all leading stores in B.C.
ce Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 27, I960.
Sport Shorts
1meeting of the volleyball
team will be held Friday, Sept.
30 in room 211 of the Memorial
Gym. Anyone interested is welcome.
WOMEN'S TENNIS
First practice will be held
Thursday Sept. 29 at 3:30 on
the outside courts behind the
Memorial Gym, weather permitting. All interested women
please turn out.
TRACK
Track   and   field   and   cross-
Sjerial Mm to
Male Students
The 111 Shop, headquarters
for Authentic *1W" Clothing, offers financial assistance by abserbiijg the 5%
Social Services Tax en any
purchase made in the shop
by .any bonafide UBC Student from this date until
October X, I960,
THE  711  SHQP
LTD
783 OSANWfcLE STREET
MU 5-6018
natural college
clothes for men
country meeting for all men
interested in competing on
UBC's extramural team, Thursday noon, Sept. 29, in centre
room of the Stadium.
CURLING
All interested in curling are [
asked  to   attend   a   meeting   at j
12:ao   today  in  Buch.   212. Beginners are welcome.
ARCHERY
First archery practice will be
held Wednesday 4:30 behind
the Field House. Beginners welcome.
WEIGHTLIFTING
There will be a meeting for
all those interested in competing on the UBC weightliftihg
team in room 211 of the War
Memorial Gym, Friday at noon.
W.A.D.
Managers are required for
Tennis, Basketball, Fencing
and sychronized swimming. Interested women should contact
Sidney Shakespeare at RE
,3-5956 by Friday.
Women To Elect
Secretary Tomorrow
There will be a WAA General M e et i n g Wednesday,
Sept. 28th in Bu. 317. A
new WAA secretary will be
elected.
Nominations will be
accepted from the floor, but
candidates should contact
Sidney Shakespeare before
Wednesday. RE 3-5956. Candidates must be in 3rd or 4th
year. All women are urged
to come out and support this
meeting.
STATISTICS
First downs 18
Yds.  rushing 134
Yds. passing 124
Passes   tried 22
Passes comp. 10
Fumbles lost 1
Yards penalized 75
rr
6
80
75
15
5
1
78
SPORT
Editor: Mike Hunter
STAFF:
Dieter Urban, Herb Walker, Chris Fahrni,. Judy Sewell,
Bert MacKinnon.
"Only the choicest
Virginia Tobaccos
are used in
du MAURIER
says FRED DAVIS
TV's top panel moderator
"There's something extra special about a
du MAURIER cigarette; two things, in fact.
One is the choice Virginia tobacco. The other is
the "Millecel" super filter. Together, they give
you the best cigarette ever."
du MAURIER
a really milder high grade Virginia Cigarette
wyt
FOB THE BIRDS
By MIKE HUNTER
Up in the press box, you see and hear a lot of things at
a football game. Ypu get a completely unobstructed view of
the field, and a reasonably unobstructed earful of sporting
talk.
Saturday, the cramped quarters of the box held between two
and three times the alleged load limit of people. Beside me, an
efficient-looking gentleman in a snap-brim hat, obviously a PLU
spy, dictated statistical information to another fellow, who jotted
it down in a little brown book.
Early in the game, a fourth-down punt by the Birds was
blocked by the fast Lutheran line. Frank Gnup, the Thunderbird
coach, began pacing back and forth in front of the UBC bench.
"Attaboy," the PLU spy beside me yelled.
Gnup stopped pacing, and the fellow beside me lowered his
voice as Al Bianco picked up a Lutheran fumble on the Bird 3£.
Then big Wayne Osborne and PLU's Bruce Alexander played ping-
pong with a long pass before Alexander intercepted, and the sidelines action began again.
"Let's really go out there you Birdies," hollered the perennial
leatherthroat from the back row of the grandstand. But the encouragement was to no avail. The Lutes recovered a fumble deep
in Birds territory.
Flashy quarterback McClary hit Bill Lennon in the end zone,
and PLU went ahead 6-0. The dapper little man in the snap-brim
hat wriggled gleefully. "McClary to Lennon for 23," he certified.
Down on the field, the Lutes were moving again. Coach Gnup
grimaced as the Americans charged to a first down on the Bird 10.
The UBC line held, and the Birds took over on their own two.
Gnup danced a jig on the sidelines. "Shoulda used a sweep," muttered the PLU scout disgustedly.
The Birds were getting nowhere against the fast PLU defence.
Bird spotter Ian Stewart was busy on the phone to Bob Hinmarch
on the bench. "We gotta go wide and open 'em up," he droned.
McClary rifled a long strike, and PLU led 13-0. The half ended with a dubious interference call on an out-of-bounds pass.
"That was about the gosh-awfulest call I've ever seen," grumbled
Stewart, the phone still glued to his ear.
The PLU man, who had stood impassively through the half-
time antics of the Frosh and Engineers, returned to his lively self,
as the Birds were forced to kick. Doug Piteau got hold of one, and
it rolled 45 yards to the PLU end zone.
"Single point," someone thoughtlessly offered.
"Touchback," snapped Snap-brim. "Twenty-five yard kick,"
he dictated.
In response to two dozen raised eyebrows, he continued, "the
kicker is only credited with the yardage to the 20 yard line on a
touchdown.
This is another quirk of the capitalist's game. These delays
allow commercials to be squeezed between plays on TV.
A voice shouting "go go go" brought my attention back to the
game. Snap-brim's team had just run the ball to the Bird three-
yard line. A few seconds later it was 19-0. He bubbled with joy.
The Birds come back to score 13 points on a couple of good
plays by Jim Olafson. Snap-brim slowed down noticeably. But the
Lutes held the ball until the final gun, and Snap-brim looked relieved. He filed down the steps, and hurried toward the PLU dressing room, I presume to join the victory celebration.
^  Faculty Pins and Jewellery
■& Mugs
•fo  Umbrellps (Automatic and Manual)
■fc Faculty Sweaters
■jif Coutts Hallmark Cards
"jjf School Supplies
fe  New Line of Penguin Books
& UBC Jackets and Sweat Clothing
fa Attention girts!  ! ! New this year, Ladies' nylons in all
sizes. . . Three shades $K09
LOST AND FOUND
LOCATED IN THE BROCK EXTENSION
Owned and operated by the Alma Mater Society Tuesday, September 27, 1960
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
Lutes Dump Plodding
Argue Injured As
Birds Drop First Game
By BERT MacKINNON
A slow UBC backfield and poor line play helped Pacific
Lutheran to a 19-13 victory in the first home game of the 1960
season.
Besides the game, the Birds lost the services of first-string
lineman Denny Argue, probably out for the season with a shoulder
dislocation. He was carried from the field in the second half after
being chipped.
PLU's superior speed became evident from the starting
whistle.
On the first series of plays UBC bulldozed down the middle
to the PLU 40. Then on the fourth down, PLU's Louis Blaesi knifed
through the Bird's line and blocked the UBC kick.
From this point on it was the Gladiators game all the way.
Quarterback Doug McClary and halfback Bruce Alexander,, standouts in last year's game, returned to pluck the Bird's feathers. On
his first carry, Alexander took the ball from McClary and plowed
over tackle for 9 yards.
PLU's march was stopped when Al Bianco recovered a Lute
fumble on the UBC 36 yard line. But the Bird's weak offense was
unable to ril the ball.
Once again is was Alexander who was the thorn in the Bird's
side, intercepting a pass off Osborne's hands to break up UBC's
short drive.
Then with four minutes left to play, PLU picked up a Bird
fumble on UBC's ten yard line and it was only a matter of time.
On first down, Lute's McClary dropped back and with two UBC
tacklers hanging on to his boot tops threw a perfect strike to Bill
Lennon for six points. The convert was wide, and at the end of
the quarter the score stood at six to nothing in favor of PLU.
PLU started the second quarter with a roar. They began a
sustained drive on their own 35 yard line and steam rolled down
the field to UBC's two yard line.
With their backs to the wall, the Bird line reared up and held
the Gladiators on a fine play by Al Bianco.
LUTES   DOMINATE   FIRST   HALF
Again the lack of a UBC offense showed, when in three plays-
they made three yards and were forced to punt. Ron Ratcliff took
the punt for the Gladiators on the UBC 40 and swivel-hipped 35
yards to the Bird five.
Then with three minutes and 41 seconds left to play McClary
rolled out and flipped'^ pass to halfback Dave Reynolds for another-
six points. On this play the Birds lack of speed was again evident.
Reynolds left the Birds picking up his tracks as he cut into the end-
zone. The convert was good, and at half time the score was 13-0
in favor of PLU. "
During the first two minutes of the third quarter the two
teams battled evenly but the Bird line sOOn returned to mediocrity. This fact was best illustrated when McClary fumbled on
fourth down and still was able to get the kick away.
Suddenly PLU was at it again. Ron Ratcliff took the ball on
a draw play and rambled 20 yards through the centre of the line
to the UBC eight. Then after two plays that netted three yards,
PLU's starry Alexander knifed over guard for the Gladiator's
third major. The Bird line roared through to block the convert
attempt.
The Birds came to life as Jim Olafson took the kick-off back
27 yards to his own 43.
UBC realized that their only hope lay in the short pass and
Quarterback Knight started to toss them into the flat.
The first pitch, to Piteau, went for a first down. Tom Andrews
kept the drive going with a spectacular diving catch on the Lute
35 yard line.
OLAFSON SCORES TWO TOUCHDOWNS
Roy Bianco took the ball on a draw and plowed over centre
for 7 yards to the PLU 14 yard line. Knight then lateraled to Jim
Olafson, who streaked around left end for 12 yards and the T.D.
The next ten minutes of the game was a tight defensive struggle, with neither team making much headway.
Suddenly the Birds were flying high again. This time it was
Gordy Olafson who got the ball rolling. Then a quick toss over
centre sprung Jim Olafson loose for 44" yards and the Bird's second
major. This time Roy Bianco split the goal posts for the extra
point.
The Birds were now desperate and tried a short kick-off. The
gamble failed when the officials ruled that the Birds had never
got control of the ball.
Time was against them and before they could get another
drive organized the final gun had gone and they had lost by the
score of 19 to 13.
Later, in the dressing room, Coach Gnup barked, "We gav?
the game away by throwing deep against their fast backs. We need
a lot of work ."
PLU coach Jim Gabrielsen agreed whole-heartedly with Gnup.
"If they'd thrown short they'd have killed us. They were really
knocking."
Even in this dismal picture, however, there were rays of sunshine. These included Al Bianco, who was outstanding on defense;
Mike Williams, Roy Bianco and Henry Johns, who were continually breaking up PLU plays.
On offense, the big guns were Doug Piteau, Jim and Gordy
Olafson, and QB Stan Knight, who showed he had what it takes
to run a ball club. The game can best be described by the words
of large George Turpin: "We were patsies."
UBC TttUNl>tottUiltJL>S (dark jerseys) jam u p the middle of the line to thwart a  PLU
running   attempt.
W.C.I.A.U. NEWS
National Union Endorsed
A Canada-wide Athletic Union, mandatory participation in
major sports and player limits:
these were the highlights of the
Western Canada Inter-Collegiate Athletic Union meeting in
Saskatoon   last   spring.
This was revealed in the'
M.A.C. minutes of last Thursday.
An athletic union in which
all major Canadian colleges
would compete was advocated.
This would bring UBC into
competition with such Eastern
teams "as Western Ontario and
McGill.
In the 1961-1962 WCIAU Season, Football, Ice Hockey, Basketball,   Badminton,   Cross
country, Curling, and Swimming will be compulsory. Colleges must also choose three of:
golf, tennis, volleyball, wrestling, gymnastics, and fencing.
A maximum and minimum
number of players" for each
sport was established, and the
number Of * Basketball games
per se^asori was limited to 26.
In other athletic news, a proposal to set up a Frank Read
Foundation for the purpose of
raising funds to subsidize the,
MAC budget was set' forth by
Dean Matthews. It was suggest!
ed a p'ublic campaign, carried
on by Development Fund,
should be started while Olym-
newspapers,   and   students,
pic Rowing success is still fresh
in the public mind. He stated
that special names could no
longer be expected to contribute the funds needed.
The crew, hampered by April
exams has three meets in May.
Against Oregon State on May
13, the Seattle Regatta on May
20th, and against Washington,
May 27th.
FAST SERVICE CENTER FOR
TEXTBOOK SALES CLOSES
OCTOBER 1st
Avoid the Rush —
BUY YOUR BOOKS TODAY
at the
FIELD HOUSE
Operated by-
University Bookstore Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 27, 1960
NICKEL ALLOY STEELS • NICKEL PLATING
NICKEL STAINLESS STEEL - vital to the
appearance and performance of today's cars f
Nickel alloy steels are stronger, tougher and more-
durable than ordinary steels. That's why nickel
alloy steels are used in automotive transmissions,
engines and other parts that must withstand hard
wear and severe abuse.
Nickel plating is used under chrome for the
"brightwork" on cars. On bumpers, grilles and trim,
it's this heavy coating of nickel beneath the surface
layer of chrome that provides the real protection
against rust, corrosion and wear ... for lasting
beauty in depth
Nickel stainless steel is used for wheel covers
and other trim. Nickel helps give stainless steel its
strength and corrosion resistance, providing resistance to flying gravel and to the corrosive action
of de-icing salts, tar and asphalt.
QUALITY CANADIAN PRODUCTS CONTAINING QUALITY INCO NICKBL
THE
INTERNATIONAL NICKEL
COMPANY OF CAN ADA. LIMITED
55 YONGE STREET, TORONTO
I ■ k • t    «**«

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