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The Ubyssey Oct 30, 1924

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 Issued Weekly by the Students' Publications Board of The University of British Columbia.
Volume VII.
VANCOUVER, B. C, OCTOBER 30th, 1924
No. 5
crowd hears
Woodsworth
Place of Education in Labor
Movement Explained
Students Are Logical Leaders
Last Thursday at noon, Mr. Woods-
worth, labour member for Winnipeg
centre, graduate of the University of
Manitoba and of Oxford, gave an intensely interesting talk on the great
social and industrial problems of the
day, and of the part college men and
women are destined to play in them.
In this connection he pointed out the
significance of the fact that in the
Federal Government, both labour members, of which he is one, are college
men. In Britain also, university graduates are utilizing all their training to
further the cause of labour.
All over Europe, undergraduates are
rallying round Labour's standards and
indeed the strongest organization in
Oxford at present is that of the Labour
Club. On November 24, the students
of the old and new world meet to discuss the relations between Capital and
Labour. Great changes are expected
and it is the Universities and colleges
of the country that must supply the
leaders.
Mr. Woodsworth warned the students not to forget that the main purpose of higher education is to give a
universal viewpoint. If we are to regard ourselves as a citizen of a city or
country only, and not as a citizen of
the world as well, we are defeating
the main purpose of our institution,
it follows, the speaker declared, that
if we are all citizens of the world, the
present restrictions on necessary articles, in their passage from one country to another, are ridiculous and harmful.
Students are the natural leaders continued Mr. Woodsworth. They are
able to take a dispassionate, unbiased
viewpoint, to look at Capitalism impersonally. Not that the mass of
labour supporters are radical in their
views, but they are a little closer
to the conditions we wish to improve.
Canada is a land of vast resources,
tut the manufacturers produce only a
limited supply and the prices remain
up. As a result, Depression rules
supreme facilitated by the superficial
optimism of returning prosperity. The
manufacturers export our necessary
products and the financiers are even
exporting capital.
The time for change has come, said
the speaker, who appealed to the students to wake up, to forget self and
to carry the cause of the masses. Is
it not better, he asked ,to have your
grandchildren speak of you in tones of
respect than to shine in the reflected
glory of your own ancestors? To the
past we should give due reverence but
the problems of to-day demand all our
attention. Let the present undergraduates become pioneers, blazing
new trails across the injustice of the
world to peace, prosperity and perfect
understanding.
U. B. C. INTER-COLLEGIATE TRACK TEAM
jjjMjsBft™ —■■issii   iTiipffrrW '■*-     'nimi
Al                            i   ■ xeellent showing at the
Weste __  ■       .._:._ ,     _.  „_   _ij!__i_!   ..__ lv.
Left to right—Coach Jack Buchanan, Les Buckley, H. Thompson. C. Henry, J.
Ramsell, C. Mottley, P. Demidoff. ir. Warren, Dr. ,1. G. Davidson, Faculty Jtepresen-
tative.
UNIVERSITY JOINS
/WXU.A.A. UNION
U.B.C. Now On Equal Footing
Wiih Prairie Colleges
The University of B. C. has joined
the Western Canada Inter-Collegiate
Amateur Athletic Union. The importance of this step, and the obligations
and benefits which will fall to the University from this action, may be understood from the summary of Dr.
Davidson's report. Dr. Davidson attended the meeting of the union the
night of the track meet at Edmonton,
and was instrumental in bringing
U. B. C. into the association on the
most favorable terms. His report embodied the following considerations
and recommendations.
There are some difficulties to be encountered. Owing to the distances
between the Western Canadian Universities travelling is an important
factor to be considered, both on account of the cost and the amount of
time consumed in travelling. Then
owing to climatic differences the University of B. C. specializes in different sports than the prairie colleges.
Soccer is on a higher plane in B. C.
while hockey is a major sport on the
prairies; B. C. plays the English game
of rugby, throughout the whole term,
while Canadian Rugby is played by
the Universities over the mountains in
the few weeks that their season lasts.
But the advantages of this affiliation
are great. In the first place national
organization of sport constitutes a
strong bond of national unity. By
linking itself with other Canadian Universities, Varsity shows that the policy
(Continued on Page   7)
MUSICAL SOCIETY
O HOLD RECITAL
second Duo-Art Recital Planned
For November 5th
The faculty and all students are
cordially invited to the Duo-Art recital to be held in the auditorium on
Wednesday, Nov. 5th at 3:15. The
admission is' free. A splendid programme   has   been    arranged.
The   programme  is  as follows: —
1. Erotiken, Opus  43, No.  5— Greig
Reproducing  playing  of
Percy Grainger
2. Polonaise, Opus 46, No. 12	
   McDowell
Reproducing playing of
Carolyn   Baldwin
3. Vocal   Solo Selected
Sung  by  Miss   Dorris Wilbers,
Accomp. by   Duo-Art
4. Jeux    d'Eau Ravel
Reproducing playing  of
Robert  Schmitz
5. Rhapsodie  Hongroise  No.   2..Liszt
Reprod. playing of Paderewski
6. Litany  Schubert
Reproducing playing of
Alfred   Cortot
7. Vocal   Solo     Selected
Sung by Miss Dorris Wilburs
Accomp.  by Duo-Art
8. Rhapsodie Opus 11, No. 13,
Key  of  C.   " Dohnany
Reproducing  playing of
John Thompson
9. Danse des  Elfes, Opus 3
 Sapelimikoff....
Reproducing Palying of
Gabrilowitsch
10. Concerto,    G.   minor,   1st
Movement      Saint-Saens
Reproducing Playing of
Harold Bauer
RECORDS FALL
AT BROCKTON
(^/Inter-Class Meet Draws
 Big Crowd.
Arts '27 Wins Faculty Cup
Arts '27 won the Faculty cup and
six records were shattered in the most
successful inter-class meet held to
date at the Brockton oval last Wednesday. The sophs collected 16 points
but were run a very close second by
Science '25 who garnered 15% counters
to their credit. Science '2G grabbed
third place with 14.
The two outstanding stars of the
meet were J. L. Ramsell of Science '25,
and Harry Warren of Science '26.
There was no all-around champion this
year, and if there had been one chosen,
the selection committee would have
had a hard time judging between the
two rugby stars, each of whom won
three firsts.
"Ramy" hurled the hammer for a
record of 99 ft., 11 in., and copped the
discus and shot events with little
trouble. Warren beat Garret Livingston's hundred yard record when he
broke the tape in the century at 10 2-5
seconds. The diminutive rugby star
also equalled his own 220 yard record
of 23 3-5 seconds, besides winning the
quarter mile.
Harold Thompson upset the dope by
breaking the broad jump record when
he made 19 ft., 9 in. Thompson has
never jumped much before and with a
little practice should make a name for
himself in the event. Thompson also
figured prominently in the sprints.
Charlie Mottley, Les Buckley and
Balmer of Arts '26 divided the honors
in the distance races, each winning an
event. The competition was keen and
the new records hung up in the half
and mile are the source of considerable
satisfaction to track officials.
(Continued on Page  S)
Oxford Debaters
y/    Meet First Test
Hunter and Telford Debate
Advocates of Socialism
Last Sunday night, at the Jftoyal
Theatre, two of the University's ^Oxford debaters were giveiWtneir first
serious test, when Mr. M. Hunter and
Mr. G. Telford &upportTBg~eaTrttalism,
met"Dr. Telford ah^Mr. Mclnnes, sup* /
porting socialism. ntr^Dal Grauer (]'P
acted as chairman, and kept the large t/
audience in order. Some very pointless heckling took plaee during the
first few moments of Mr. Hunter's
speech, but this subsided after an appeal from one of the opposition speakers. Mr. Hunter dealt very generally
with his subject, stressing the impossibility of centralizing and controlling
manufacturers and labor, two essentials of socialism. His speech was
rather loosely hung together, and he
sacrificed precision to include many
(Continued on Page 8) THE   UBYSSEY
SEAt H? H 655 ASST'D.
HALLOWE'EN
That is the Night
for a Party
A night when mystic
spirits are abroad; a night
when witch and goblin (so
they say) mingle with mortals in revelry and games;
a night when solemn owls
stare and radiant Jock O'
Lanterns peep from windows. Dennison's Bogie
Book simplifies your party
plans and helps you with
arrangements from invitations to refreshments. We
carry everything in the Dennison line to make your
party a success, and also
give free instructions on
how to decorate and make
favors, etc. Remember the
d-ite of Hallowe'en, Oct. 31.
—-Stationery Dept.,
Main   Floor
David Spencer
Limited
October 30th, 1924
LUNCH      TEA      SUPPER
Household and Vegetarian Cooking
Phone, Seymour 2940
The Cosey Corner
MRS. DANBY SMITH
Rooms for Private Parties, Etc.
116 EMPIRE BUILDING
603 HASTINGS ST., W.
Opposite Bank of Nova Scotia
From all standpoints, the part which
the women played in the Track Meet
last Wednesday was a great success.
Formerly the only event which the
women staged was the relay. But this
year under the efficient supervision
and training of Mr. Jack Buchanan
they were able to add four more
events. Mrs. Boving, Honorary President of Women's Athletics took charge
of affairs at the Point. The races and
jumping were run off in true sportsmanlike style, and the rivalry between
the different classes lan high. The
winners of the events are as follows:
High Jump—Clara Gould, '26; Grace
McCallum, '28; Isabel Russell, '25—
Height, 4 ft. 1 in.
Broad Jump—Dorothy Murray, '25;
Elsie Tighe, '26; Edna Pettipiece, '27—
Distance, 13 ft. 5 in.
100-Yard Dash—Jean McDonald, 28;
Doris Wood, '28; Laura Mowatt, '25—
Time, 13 2-5 seconds.
440-Yard Dash—Clara Gould, '26;
Doris Shorney, '25; Francis Gignac,
'25—Time, 1 min. 15 4-5 seconds.
Relay—Arts '27; Arts '25—Time, 2
min. 2 2-5 seconds.
 O ■
CITIES OF INDIA
The Gym. Club has been fortunate
in securing the services of Mrs. Heat-
ley as instructor, and the work of the
club will now proceed without further
delay. The time has been changed
from Monday at 4.15 to Thursday at
3.15. There is still room for a few
more members, and girls wishing to
join are advised to see Miss Doris
Shorney or Miss Frances Gignac.
 O	
The Women's Grass Hockey Team
suffered a defeat last Thursday when
King Edward beat them 2-0. However
the individual play was very good and
more practice seems to be all that is
needed to work up a better combination. Another game is scheduled for
Wednesday at 3 o'clock, when the
players hope to make a good showing
against Westminster High School.
JOKELIT
Freshette—How dare you swear before me!
Soph—I beg your pardon—I didn't
know you wanted to swear first.
Smart Styles In
English Worsteds
This group reveals the very latest in double and
single-breasted effects, especially tailored for young
men who appreciate the acme of style with quality.
^H The materials are fine imported English Worsteds
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Remarkable value  at  our    4J^/^CT   ft/t
feature price of only   -   -    %P^Oiv/\/
WILLIAM DICK LIMITED
45-47-49 HASTINGS STREET, EAST
Major Davies gives interesting
Lecture'
Major K. C. J^Davies, M.A., F.R.
G.S., who for ~many~years was an officer in a Ghurka regiment of India
presented before the Vancouver Institute last Thursday night an illustraTed
lecture on "Cities of the Moguls."
The speaker brought with him a varied
selection of beautiful lantern slides
which he made from photographs taken
by himself. Several thousand feet of
motion picture film were also used to
reproduce actual street scenes in Delhi
and other cities.
The Moguls were an ancient nomadic
race, roaming through central Asia.
They were exceedingly warlike and
after having conquered large portions
of Asia, including China, Persia and
India, they founded the Mogul dynasty
which remained in undisputed control
of India until the British stepped in.
Akbar the Great, one of the founders of the dynasty, was a wise and
tolerant emperor. He encouraged
painting and sculpture in spite of the
opposition offered by strictly orthodox
Mohammedan teaching, and he was so
loved by his people that they called
him the "Guardian of Mankind." His
tomb at Agra is a fine structure of
gold-veined white marble.
The ancient Mogul palace at Delhi
ir; perhaps the most sumptuous relic
of its kind still standing. The walls
fairly glitter with precious stones. The
pillars of purest white marble are
rich with delicate sculpture work
which excels in sheer beauty anything
which the patience and skill of modern men can achieve. All the chambers are cooled in hot weather by a
double stream of circulating water
which emerges from the palace over
a bed of flashing stones.
The famous Taj Mahal erected by
Shah Jahan as an everlasting monument to his beloved wife is the loveliest building in the world. More than
20,000 men were employed for 17 years
in its erection. Standing on a red
sandstone foundation 300 feet square,
the magnificence of its architectural
design together with the richness of
its interior decoration would suggest
that it was "designed by Titans and
finished by jewellers." The solid gold
trelliswork around the cenotaph was
later removed by the rebellious Aur-
ung-zebe who erected a screen of carved marble in its place.
The gardens of India are a mass of
symbolism. Each flower is dedicated
to a God and every plant has a secret
significance. It is interesting to note
that a genuine Oriental carpet is a reproduction of a miniature garden
paradise with its ziz-zag water-courses
symbolical of everlasting life, rows of
yew trees, the emblem of mourning,
and the various flowers sacred to the
gods.
To-night in the Physics lecture room
at 8.15 p.m. the Rev. R. G. Macbeth,
D.D., representing the B. C. Institute
of Authors will speak on "The Romance of the Royal Mounted." Students
and their friends are invited to attend.
Rack—Why is the Notice Board?
Ruin—Because they Letter, Rack.
—- <.i —
SCIENCE '28 NEWS
At a meeting of Science '28 on Friday, October 24th, Dr. Buchanan of
the Dept. of Mathematics was unanimously elected Honorary President.
The class also decided to hold its class
party on Tuesday, November 4th at
the Promenade, Beach Avenue.
Remarkable
Last Minute
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Everybody turn oat and root for Var-
sity, Saturday! The first soccer team
ara playing: the Westminster United at
Con Jones' park.
econd Team Loses
Vancouver Engineering Works soccer team defeated the U. B. C. seconds
2-0 at Trimble Park on Saturday. The
game was featured by the clever, short
passing of the winners.
Engineering Works took the offensive from the start but were considerably handicapped by the loss of their
inside right who took ill shortly before
the start. This seemed to unnerve the
Varsity boys who, being of a gentle_-
manly disposition and not wishing to
kill more than one man in a game, refrained from scoring in either half.
Reid, Gibbard and Robertson worked
hard in this half but Evans and Alsbury were the only forwards to take
the ball up within shouting distance
of the V. E. W. goalie. Half-time found
the score sheet blank.
Shortly after the resumption of play
the right back of the Vancouver Engineering Works converted a penalty
awarded against Hunter. Before the
end they scored again on Sutherland
who had no chance to save either of
the goals. Varsity has a start in Frank
Robertson who played a great game at
right-half. It was regrettable that certain Varsity players descended to
crabbing at referee Anderson who
knows the game better than they do.
Varsity line-up—Sutherland, Warden
and Hunter, Gibbard, Reid and Robertson, Fanning, Newcombe,»Cant, Alsbury and Evans. October 30th, 1924
THE   UBYSSEY
BARRAN'S English Overcoats
THE   BEST   ALL-ROUND   COAT
THAT THE WORLD PRODUCES.
LATEST STYLES BEST MATERIALS
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Look for the "two little owls" on the label.
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SATURDAY   EVENING   SOCIAL
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Private Lessons by Appointment
Seymour J 689
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Write for
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I   SPORT NEWS
First/Soccer Team
\y     Lose to. Saints
Varsity first soccer men emerged on
the short end of a 3-2 count before
a large crowd at the Con Jones enclosure last Saturday when they met
the Saint Andrews eleven in what
proved to"FJe~ a torrid encounter. The
Saints had more than their share of
the breaks and on the run of play did
not deserve their victory, although
poor shooting on the part of the students vanguard was largely responsible
for the U. B. C. defeat.
Varsity forced the play from the
outset and their efforts were soon rewarded when Auchinvole got the ball
in the net in some mysterious fashion
during a mix-up in front of the Scotsmen's goal area. The students continued to have the edge, and their one
goal lead at the interval was a fair
indication of the run of play.
After the oranges the Saints came
back strong and began to bombard
King from all angles. Crute made a
penalty and the Varsity custodian was
called upon to save a hard shot, which
he did, in a manner that would have
made Mosher envious. Campbell
caught the students' defence napping
shortly after, however, and tied the
score.
This reverse seemed to put new life
into the collegians and Tommy Wilkinson put the "rah rah" boys in the
lead with a beautiful shot into the
corner of the net that had Hogarth
beaten to a standstill.
Varsity sharpshooters passed up
many golden opportunities to get further in the lead, however, and their
one goal lead seemed pretty slim
when the aggressive Davie Greig sent
in a low deceptive shot that cannoned
off the post into the net and completely fooled the Varsity net-minder.
Little Billy Bradshaw put the Saints
in the lead shortly after when he outguessed the Varsity backs and beat
King with a shot that gave the young
custodian no chance to save.
From then on until the final whistle
the collegians seemed to become more
and more erratic, the forwards tried
too hard to score and were wild in
their shooting, although they gave
Hogarth some anxious moments. Phillips and Cameron, although the injured members on the Varsity line-up,
gave a better account of themselves
than most, but everyone worked hard.
Varsity line-up—King, Baker, Crute,
Buckley, Phillips, Ledingham, Wilkinson, Jackson, Auchinvole, Butler, Cameron.
^Junior Soccer
Playing on their home enclosure and
having a decided advantage in weight,
the league leading South Hill soccer
team cleanly outplayed the Varsity
Juniors, and outscored them 4-0, in
spite of the neat performance of Stewart in the visitors' goal.
Varsity's forwards were off form,
and never settled down against their
heavier opponents, throwing the hulk
of the work on the defence, and making it a game of defending the goal.
The goals came fairly regularly, the
first resulting from a scramble, giving
Stewart no chance. He failed to hold
the greasy ball on a high shot for the
second. Two more goals were added
in the second half.
Any students wishing- to secure copies
of last year's Annual may purchase same
at the Business Office of the Publications Board, at the price of one dollar.
THROUGH SPORT LENSES
At last Saturday's feature soccer encounter between Varsity and Saint
Andrews the sympathy of the crowd
seemed to be with U. B. C. although a
very small percentage were students.
The fact that a University team has
more supporters outside its own
circle than within it, as the soccer
men have always had, reflects considerable credit upon them.
Even the most hard-boiled among the
crowd realize that Varsity's pigskin
chasers are playing for the love of the
game and for their Alma Mater. The
University does not, obtain its players
through holding out bribes or remunerative employment to them nor are
her players given credits on their
exams like some of the football stars
of the Universities to the south of us.
A soccer crowd is cosmopolitan, but
in the main it represents the labouring classes, and probably the only connection that the University has, with
a large number of last Saturday's
soccer fans, is through the Varsity soccer teams.
The excellent records made at Wednesday's track meet are a source of
considerable satisfaction to track officials and to coach Jack Buchanan.
The breaking of records proves conclusively the improvement in track at
U. B. C. in the last couple of years.
For the first time in its history the
University is developing track talent
of its own. McWilliams, Mottley and
Balmer who starred in the distance
races, are this year's products of U.
B. C. In the past the Varsity track
club has had to depend entirely on the
high schools for her talent and in most
cases the High School stars were not
as good at U. B. C. as at High School.
Will the two hundred or so interclass enthusiasts who turned out en
nasse at the Semi-Annual meeting of
the men's athletics in order to perpetuate the competition, take part in
the games or turn out and support
their class mates with the same enthusiasm when exam time comes
around?
If neutral spectators will go
miles to see the Varsity soccer men
perform surely more students of this
University should turn out to root for
their own team. There were not
enough U. B. C. men and women at
Saturday's game—turn out everybody
for the next game on Saturday against
Westminster United.
A ruddy jovial faced old gentleman,
a Yale graduate of '82, who happened
to be staying at the same hotel in Edmonton as the U. B. C. track squad,
insisted on paying their hotel bill,
gave them the use of his own room
and bath, and then finished by driving
the boys down to the station in taxis.
VARSITY   SWEATERS   FOR   SALE
Tuesdays  and  Thursdays,  Noon
C.   J.   TIMLECK   (Curator)
In ILiterary  and Scientific  Offices
(There are no Varsity sweaters obtainable down town.)
SPORTS APPAREL
Is at the Height
of the Mode
Technically called sports apparel,
but appropriate for so many occasions, that one's expenditure is
repaid many times over in satisfaction. Simple in the extreme, yet
possessing dash and nerve. Practical, without sacrificing smartness.
Ours possess all these qualifications,
and whether you choose a coat,
suit, frock or ensemble costume, it
will be distinguished by smartness
in styling and economy in pricing
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CAKES, SANDWICHES
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2415 GRANVILLE STREET
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ex
tend
s con-
A"™ v/ gratulations
to the seven athletes who so
successfully competed against
overwhelming odds.
It  is  the  spirit  of   men   like
these which makes a country.
Lisle Fraser
Sporting Goods
1 AO A   GRANVILLE
1UZU  STREET THE   UBYSSEY
October 30th, 1924
UJ1)£ ItujBBnj
(Member   Pacific   Inter-Collegiate   Press
Association)
Issued  every   Thursday   by   the   Publications Board of the University of
British Columbia.
Extra  Mural  Subscription,   $2.00  per
Session.
For Advertising Rates,  apply
Business Manager. Phone Fair.  2093
EDITORIAL STAFF
Editor-in-Chief T. W. Brown
Senior Editor Miss Helen MacGill
Associate Editors Miss Sadie Boyles
A. Earle Birney
William C.  Murphy
Exchange  Editor John  Grace
Literary  Editor Miss  Doris McKay
Sporting Editors- __H. Les. Buckley-
Laura Mowatt
Chief   Reporter .Kenneth   A.   Schell
Reporters—Florence Williams, Marion
Smith. Dorothy Arkwright, Mary Esler,
Jean Fraser, Janet Watson, Margaret
Smith, Les Graham, Donald Gillingham,
David Warden, Francis Stevens, Robert
Wright, G. W. Ashworth, James Dunn,
Dave Taylor, T. S. Byrne. F. W. Dimmick, Peter   Palmer.
BUSINESS   STAFF
Business  Manager H.  A.  Thompson
Circulation   Manager  E.   J.  Eades
Business  Assistants....II.   G.  McWiiliams
J. Stanley Allen
Leslie   Hardie
V
EDITOR    FOR    THE    WEEK
Earle   Birney
-/OUR TRACK REVIVAL
Track makes greater demands on an
athlete, possibly, than any other sport.
It requires perfect condition, endurance, ability, hard work and intensive
training as well as expert coaching.
On the other hand the track man's performance is individual and sensational.
Nothing grips a crowd more intensely
than a keenly contested race-hence the
popularity of track and world over.
Track is one of the three major
sports that has made tremendous headway at U. B. C. in the last two years.
The records being made in our own
meets show this improvement clearly.
The raising of track standards at
U. B. C. is the direct result of intercollegiate competition. Never until
this year have athletes forsaken the
football fields for the more arduous
task of training for track. Only this
year have we developed track stars
that we can call our own, having relied on the high schools in the past.
Track men trained this year as never
before, due largely to our coach it is
true, but with the incentive of making
the inter-collegiate team before them.
They would not have worked so hard
for the Inter-class Meet.
Two year's inter-collegiate competition have resulted in six track men of
this college more than holding their
own against Eastern college teams
containing twice as many men, who
were more experienced and in their
own climate.   .
Our track men did not compete
merely as individuals; in the eyes of
the eastern colleges they represented
the University of B. C. and their fine
showing reflected credit on their Alma
Mater. Varsity track men have paved
the way for competition in other
branches of sport with our eastern
neighbors. Hence every encouragement should be given inter-collegiate
athletes by the conferring of letters,
and any other honor that we have in
our power to give, as well as devoting
finances for the promotion of such
competitions, that act as a binding link
between the colleges of the West.
VARSITY   SWEATERS   FOR   SAM
Tuesdays and Thursdays, Noon
C.   J.   TIKLSCX   (Curator)
In Literary  and  Scientific  Offices
(There are no Varsity sweaters obtainable down town.)
A NEW TRADITION
Last week saw the commemorating
by the senior year of the anniversary
of the death of Dr. Wesbrook, first
president of the University of British
Columbia. This is the first time since
his death, six years ago, that any official commemoration has been observed by students. The very brief
and simple ceremony of the placing of
a wreath on his grave, makes but a
momentary pause in the whirlwind of
activity that marks our session, yet it
is significant as one of the very few
occasions which we devote to the
honoring of those who paved the way
for us in a struggle which we ourselves, in our own day, have been
carrying on. Our pioneering days are
too close to us to be viewed with the
romance which customarily envelopes
the period of foundation-laying, yet
with the rising at Point Grey of the
stately buildings for which our first
president toiled, we should take
thought, lest the efforts of the fathers
of the University be forgotten.
X.
PETTY THEIVING
Each week a number of students
go without their copies of the Ubyssey
because the supply runs out before
everybody obtains one. Enough copies of the paper are printed to allow
one copy for every student, with a
slight surplus, if no student takes
more than one. Certain students,
however, are in the habit of absconding with as many as five copies. While
the Publications Board appreciates
the compliment expressed by these
actions, it cannot afford to print the
extra copies necessary to satisfy such
admirers. It is hoped that this reminder will be enough to cause those
concerned to be more thoughtful in
the future.
X
OXFORD UNION SOCIETY
In view of the fact that the three
men who will debate here on November 24, are members of the Oxford
Union, some facts as to its founding,
purpose and organization may be of
interest. Malcolm MacDonald is the
present head of the Union, while J. D.
Woodruff and M. C. Hollis are both
past Presidents.
The Oxford Union was formed in
1823 as the Oxford Debating Society,
but two years later was re-organized
as the Oxford Union Society. Its sole
purpose in those days was to discuss
"any subject not immediately involving theological questions." Since that
time, however, the constitution has
broadened, until today the society
maintains reading and writing rooms,
a library and a luncheon and tea-room
department. It holds debates once a
week throughout each of the three
terms.
All students of the University are
eligible for membership, their names
being proposed and seconded before
their admittance.
The position of President is one of
the greatest, if not the greatest of
Oxonian honours for non-scholastic activities. Gladstone occupied the chair
in 1830 and since that time such
names as those of H. H. Asquith, Lord
Curzon, Lord Robert Cecil and John
Buchan have been associated with the
office. Only one Canadian, the late Sir
George Parnin, has held office in the
Society, but within recent years two
Rhodes Scholars, both Americans, have
been elected President.
First Student: "Let's break up the
game, the sun is rising."
Second Student: "Goodnight, I
should have been in bed an hour ago."
Any students wishing' to secure copies
of last year's Annual may purchase same
at the Business Office of the Publications Board, at the price of one dollar.
PROGRESS
Stanford, everybody will admit, is
moving forward. In practically every
line the University is advancing so
swiftly that the bewildered student is
hard put to keep up with it. But the
student does pretty well, neglecting
only a few sides of his potential improvement.
One of these overlooked areas, however, seems at first blush—and then
some more, for that matter—to be
rather startlingly incongruous. Last
year the Spectator struggled along in
great adversity and finally, with a pitiful sigh, gave up its little ghost.
Spectator was the nearest approach to
an ''intellectual" publication that the
campus could boast. And it was a
hybrid, with sports and other so-called
"popular" material including for the
sake of circulation.
Perhaps that is why it died. But
the old "Cardinal," which made no
such concessions to student tastes,
died much earlier and more extravagantly. It looks very much as though
the Stanford resident, in the bulk,
cares very little for student effort to
produce literature. Frequently the
wail is heard that the citizens of the
Farm pay no attention to problems and
movements of national significance.
Often we are accused of neglecting the
finer things in life. Are we, or aren't
we? We allowed two "thoughtful"
magazines to telescope into one, and
then we allowed that one to starve to
death. Perhaps it is too much trouble
to think, or perhaps there is not
enough time.
Several plans for new literary periodicals are under way. If the student body possesses an inclination for
literature, some one of these plans will
undoubtedly mature and bring back
this evidence of undergraduate appreciation. If not, it will be proof
positive that we are neglecting something. -^-Exchange.
/w. S. C. ORGANIZES
The Women's Swimming Club is
hard at work. On Wednesday at
4:30, candidates are trained for the
team. This year a water-polo team
will be included. Mr. Charlie Hills
of the V. A. S. C. has been engaged
to instruct a large class of beginners
in the art of crawling, at 5:30 on
Wednesdays. Members of the life-
saving class meet on Wednesday at
3:30 in the gym for a few minutes
practice on land before proceeding
to rescue each other from the briny
waters of the tank. An extra hour of
life-saving and team practice is given
on Fridays, from  3:30 to 4:30.
Nearly a hundred members have
paid their fees, but there are a few
vacancies in the life-saving class. The
beginners class in the crawl is full
up, but anyone who can crawl a hundred yards or swim a long distance
by any other stroke is welcome to try
out for the water-polo team. Please
apply to Sylvia Thrupp, Frances Gig-
nae or Jean Gilley.
Come to the big Mass Meeting on
Friday noon. The band will be there
as well as a song-leader.
Everywhere
It'sVearls!
Paris tells us that pearls have an
unprecedented vogue. Worn in
three or four strands, they add
lustrous daintiness to every costume. A good example of the
mode is the three-strand necklet
we are now showing—essentially
smart, gracefully charming. Gall
and see these.
WEAR   A   MANN'S   SHIRT
ENGLISH
HOSE
For Fall
Our stocks are now complete
with all the newest importations in English Hosiery —
CLOX, TWO-TONES, SILK
AND WOOLS AND FANCY
EFFECTS,   LOVATS,   ETC.
50c. to $2.50
MANN'S MEN'S WEAR
Shirt and Hosiery
Specialist
TWO   STORES:
411 and 474 Granville St.
WEAR   A   MANN'S  SHIRT
Phone, Seymour3369
Charlton $ Ratbbun
PHOTOGRAPHERS
Specialists in Colour  Portraits
711 Holden Bldg., 16 Hasting St., E.
(Juil Easl of B. C. E. Rly. and Carrall St.)
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Note Our New Address.
BREAKFAST
LUNCH
AFTERNOON TEA
DINNER
Open 7:30 a. m. to 8:00 p. m.    Closed Sunday
ARGYLE TEA ROOM
717   DUNSMUIR   STREET
Just around the corner from Drysdale's
MRS. AGNES ORR ROBINSON,    -    -    Proprietress
AFTERNOON TEA PARTIES FOR U.B.C. STUDENTS by arrangement
Phone Seymour 8403
Entire Staff Canadian Women Home Cooking: October 30th, 1924
THE   UBYSSEY
POPULAR
FOOTWEAR
For U. B. C. Students
Men's Brogues,
Black or Brown,
$5.85
UP
Dancing Oxfords d* A   AC
or Pumps, ^rt«*l»J
UP
Ladies' Brogues    (TC A C
and Sport Oxfords,      ^nMrnTTnl
Evening Slippers,
Satin, Patent,  Suede,
Gold and Silver,    -
-••••-•-•« .#•••«•.
$4.95
UP
WILSONS
TWIN SHOE STORE
157-159  Hastings  St., W.
^».*>«»«*n«)..,
!..S)..S)..«..f)..«,t$*
Central Public Stenographers
Foreign Translations
Miscellaneous Typewriting
Phone, Sey. 5078
414 Dominion Bldg.     207 Hastings St. W.
4,..-._.-._...„._........^..............-....-......._.-.....4.
Evans & Hastings
-:-     -:-      PIONEER      -:-      -:-
BETTER QUALITY  PRINTERS
Prices Right
A     34-YEAR    SUCCESSFUL     BUSINESS     CAREER
IN     VANCOUVER     PROVES    CONCLUSIVELY
THAT   WE   ARE    FAVORED    MORE   THAN
OTHERS BY THE EXACTING  PUBLIC
WHEN    THEY    DESIRE    THEIR
HONEYS   WORTH.
o#
We make a specialty of
Magazines, Annuals.
Dance Programmes, Legal Forms
and
General Commercial Printing
See us before ordering etsewhere.
Phone, Sey. 189       576 Seymour St.
\
Players' Club Reception
The Player's Cluh Reception takes
place on Hallowe'en night, October
31st. Although the various committees are decidedly secretive as to the
details ot the affair, it is rumored that
it will be "bigger and better than
ever." Several novelty features, and
decorations in keeping with the spirit
of the evening, are being planned for
the entertainment of the fortunate
guests.
Rehearsals for the Xmas plays, under the direction of Prof. P. G. C.
Wood, Dr. A. F. B. Clarke, and Mr.
P. H. Soward, are proceeding busily
The members of the various casts are
working hard in order that the performances, which are less than a
month distant, may come up to the
previous standards set by the club.
"Oswald   has   certainly  been  going
to class regularly."
"How do you know?"
''Everytime I see him he looks like
his clothes had been slept in."
—West Virginia Moonshine.
'•-•-•-•..•-••.••••-•H^.
j    Correspondence     1
This column is maintained for the use
of students and others who wish to express themselves in moderate language
on any topic of general interest. The
"Ubyssey" does not assume responsibility   for   any   of  the  views  expressed.
All contributions must be signed and
written legibly in ink, on one side of
the paper only. They must not exceed
two hundred words in length, and must
reach this office not later than noon
Monday, in order to appear in the issue
of the following   Thursday.
7<
Victoria  College,
Toronto, Ont,
Oct.   20,  1924.
Editor of   Ubyssey,
Vancouver.
Dear Sir: —
Permit me, through the columns of
your paper, to express the greatest
pleasure in the reading of an article
appearing in to-day's issue of Toronto
"Varsity." This was to the effect
that the barbarous and senseless custom of hazing has been abolished at
U.B.C.
As a member of the class who
"turned down" Doctor Sedgewick's
plea for common sense away back in
1920 (though personally in accord
with him—on this point), permit me
to offer congratulations to all those
who have had the courage to eradicate this relic of barbarism'from the
customs and traditions of our common Alma Mater.
Would that this, and other universities, might follow the splendid lead
which you  have  given!
With best wishes for the continued
prosperity of both U.B C. and Ubyssey, I am, etc. /
E.A'.P., Arts   '23.
Discord Planned
y  By Varsity Band
In spite of the fact that the rainy
season has set in, J. Hockin, Bill Turpin, Gaundry Phillips, et al, are not
the least bit damp—that is, in spirits
(not the govt.-sealed kind). In fact,
they are very optimistic, and the ever
growing list of applicants, responding
to the call of the glaring posters, is
the cause of their ebulition. It is
denied that Mr. Quigley declined to
perform upon a saxaphone, because of
a supposed resemblance to an instrument of that degrading art supposedly
pursued before the ladies in the main
hall.
There were 30 noisy undergrads at
the first meeting held last Thursday,
the President estimates that the number at present is about 40, so he is
very hopeful that the magic "57" will
be reached before the first public performance. Thursday noon the musicians and others will practice, and on
Friday will make their public debut.
The officers violently argue that "no
knowledge of music is required or
expected." It would be unkind to say
that we believe them.
Brick McLeod and Bert Smith are
seldom seen these days, so we presume
they will trot out several dark-horses
at Friday's Big Pep Meeting.
\ "OUT OF TOWN" TEA
7 Next Wednesday afternoon, from
three to five, the Women's Undergraduate Society will give a tea for out-of-
town girls, in the Auditorium.
(/Varsity girls win
varsity girls won a decided victory
in basketball when they defeated St.
Mark's Intermediate B team at the
NonHaT Gym. Saturday evening. At
half-time the score stood 20-0 in U. B.
Co's favor, and 30-0 was the final
score. The players were: Centre—
Flora Musgrave; Forwards — Doris
Shorney and Marjorie Bell; Guards—
Gay Swenciski, Jenny Wilkinson and
Winona Straight.
S.C.M. ADDRESSED
BY MR. HARKNESS
Great Social Problem
Outlined
"Give every child a square deal"—
this sums up the message given to
the students by Mr. Harkness when
he spoke last Mond^noon, und<*r the
auspices of theLS'xi.M Mr^^farkness
is the present secretary of the local
Kiwanis Club and a well-known worker in social and child welfare.
"The child problem is by far the
most important social question we
have to deal with," he said. "All
other social phenomena result, directly or indirectly, from the neglect of
the child." He then went on to show
how this was due to the inherent
closeness of the present-day life of
the community. We suffer for the
"sins" or incorrect manner of living
of not only ourselves and our parents,
but also of those about us. We should
combat, or rather prevent these evils
by giving the child a chance to make
good.
The speaker went on to say that
there are great potentialities in every
child, potentialities which, though hidden, will with proper care develop and
make the child a beneficial factor in
society. "But if we leave him in
vicious surroundings, he will, very
probably, be a detriment to society.
For his sake and for your own, give
him a chance!"
"We must help the child physically.
We must, to the utmost of our ability, take care that he is born into this
world with health, and that he is given
every chance to retain and improve
that health."
"We must help him morally. We
must see to it that his environment
is as good as possible. Heredity has
blighted many lives, environment has
ruined many more. They are helpless, we must protect them!" At present an individual case here and there
is helped, but the masses are as yet,
untouched.
CLASSICS CLUB
The newly formetrClassics Club held
its first regular .meeting Saturday
evening, at the home of Prof. Robertson, with an encouraging attendance
of twelve members. In a few opening
remarks the president set forth the
aims of the club and stressed the
necessity of willing co-operation on the
part of all the members. The evening
was occupied with Mr. Robertson's
paper on "Some of the Oracles of
Greece," setting forth in a clear and
investing manner the origin and
peculiar characteristics of three of the
major oracles: Dodona, Amphiareus
and Trephonion. This was followed
by considerable discussion and refreshments.
Come to the big Mass Meeting on
Friday noon. The band will be there
as well as a song-leader.
([
COMMENCING
NOVEMBER 1st,
Library Membership
Fees to be Reduced.
From this date forward our
patrons have the  privilege
of borrowing from our
LENDING LIBRARY,
on the 3rd floor, any book
 FOR 	
2c. Per Day Per Book
50c. Per Month
$5.00 Per Year
These  low   rates entitle you to
choose any book on our shelves,
representing the works of choicest
authors, at a minimum cost.
Hudson's Bay Company
Vancouver, B. C
YOU WILL FIND IN THE
s
OF
PROTT
HAW
CHOOLS
COMMERCE and TELEGRAPHY
Courses of Instruction which are
advantageous for almost everyone.
Not only have we prepared many
University Students for fine Secretarial positions, but we have a
first-class
ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT
in charge of J. B. Fleming, M.A.,
in which we coach students of the
first and second years in Languages, Mathematics, Science and
Economics.
If we can be of any service to you,
give us a call.
pi„„„ | Seymour 1810; Fairmont 41
rnones -> Seymour 7125; Seymour 7451
R. J. SPROTT, B.A., Manager
For Your Dance or Party
take the Promenade
2094 Beach Avenue
Excellent Floor, Heating and Ventilation
Fire-Places and all Accommodation.
AMBASSADOR  CAFE
610 Seymour Street
  Headquarters for Service 	
Club Luncheons, Dinners, Banquets and Conventions
Private Dining Rooms for Private Parties.
Suitable for Meetings and Socials. Fraternity Banquets a Specialty.
music, Dancing, Entertainment
EVERY EVENING
9:00 p.m.  to 1:00 a.m. THE   UBYSSEY
October 30th, 1924
PERSONAL CHRISTMAS
CREETINC CARDS
PHOTOGRAPH AND
AUTOCRAPH ALBUMS
X
■H I
CLARKE
AND
STUART
CO..    LTD.
550 SEYMOUR ST.
Phone, Sey. 3000
Hallowe'en Special Rates
STOP!    LOOK!    COME IN !
Iris Beauty Parlors
1464 Broadway, W. Phone, Bay. 5666
JUST THINK !
YOU CAN TRAVEL IN Of
A YELLOW CAB FOR **«*C.
One-third Mile.
Each additional One-third Mile    -    -    10c.
Special rates for Shopping and
Business Calls.
Buy a book of coupons and save a further
10 per cent.
For Christmas Parties, Dances, Social
Functions—Closed Heated Cars.
Prompt, Safe and Reliable Service.
It is cheaper to ride in a Yellow Cab
than to drive your own car.
You pay only from the time you step into
the Cab until you reach your destination.
yellow em eo.
Phone, Sey. 4000
Phones: Pair.  77, Fair. 5660-A*
WILLOW HKLL
806 17th AVENUE, WEST
One Block  West of Heather Street
This Hall is for rent to Clubs and
Private Parties.
For terms apply to F. S. LOCKETT,
Proprietor.
4»*."*...*~."...«>.."«>.«»........>."o...........«..~....-«~.»g»
The Palm Garden
FRUIT, CONFECTIONERY,
ICE CREAM and TOBACCO
HOT LUNCHES SERVED,
Also, AFTERNOON TEAS.
Phone, Fair 377
Cor. 10th & Heather St.
A. M. U. S. HOLD
PEPPY MEETING
Plans for Dance and Smoker
Arts Men to Stage Revival
The semi-annual meeting of the Arts
Men's Undergraduate Society was
held in the auditorium on Monday
noon, H. B. Smith presiding. In a
few preliminary remarks Mr. Smith
stressed the importance of the society
to every undergraduate.
The first item of business was the
election of a secretary to replace
Jack Sills. Nominations were in order,
which resulted in the unanimous election   of   Alex.   Maxwell   of   Arts   '27.
Mr. Smith then called the attention
of the meeting to the forthcoming
Arts Dance.
The dance committee have been
fortunate in securing the co-operation
of the women undergraduates and for
the first time in the history of these
affairs the women will have charge of
the decorating. Dance devotees may
therefore look for something decidedly
high-class and artistic on the night of
Nov. 7.
The next item was relative to the
annual smoker and it was moved, seconded, and carried that the customary
smoker be held, the fee for which will
he thirty-five cents per member. The
meeting also decided to have a song
and yell king to instil pep into the
society. Charlie Mottley and Bill Bryson were nominated and Mottley, the
Arts '27 president, was elected. Bert
Smith then told the meeting that the
society was on the eve of a great revival, that Arts men were soon to rise
up and run riot over the prostrate
corpses of Aggies and would-be Scientists. As a preparatory move, a song
and yell practice is to be held tomorrow noon. A theatre party may be
indulged in later. Mr. Smith emphasized the fact that he was always at the
service of all undergraduates.
As a result of the recent agitation
for benches in the Men's Common
Room, those very useful and necessary
articles will be placed there soon.
In connection with this the President
called for written suggestions as to the
furnishing of the two Men's Common
Rooms at Point Grey.
The meeting finally degenerated into
a song and yell practice, the chief purpose of which was to show the "heck-
ishness of Science and the "hickish-
ness" of Agriculture.
WANTED—
1. Mules for the class draws.
2. Props for the upper years.
3. A cow for the caf.
4. Feet for the student body, and—
5. A footrail for the Pub.
-   LETTERS CLUB
The second meeting of the Letters
Club was held on Tuesday, October
21st, at the home of Mr. R. K. Chapman, New Westminster. Miss Kathleen Dodds read a paper on "The
Novels of John Galsworthy." The
manner in which she dealt with the
novelists, philosophy, style and characters, and the stress she put on his
absorbing humanism, showed great
originality of judgment. A delicacy
of touch characterized her treatment
of the style and presentation. Miss
Dodds, in summing up the authors accomplishment, and in endeavouring to
place him among the modern writers,
emphasized the individuality of Galsworthy's philosophy, and his literary
personality.
Everybody turn out and root for Varsity, Saturday! The first soccer team
are playing1 the Westminster United at
Con Jones' park.
/JIGH1
Moon, and the sheen of placid moonlit
waters,
Star, and the tranquil beauty of the
night.
Hope in  the heart of one  of earth's
own daughters:
Joy in the silent wonder of the sight.
Peace  in the  fragrant  grove  of  pine
trees yonder,
Calm, in the pleasant smell of dew-
damp earth,
Rest, in the woody dell through which
we wander
And   contemplate  the   smallness  of
our worth.
Beauty,   the  whole   of  God's   beloved
creation
Exemplified in her, who by my side
Is far away, in transports of elation.
A slave to this world's beauty, far
and wide. /
vfe.B.G.
Campaign Once More
It will doubtless have been noticed
by all who frequent these halls of
pedantry that the campaign which was
flourishing so lustily when the session
broke up last spring has ceased to occupy a prominent place upon the campus. No longer do facetious freshies
black the boots of supercilious sopo-
mores for the good of the cause. No
longer can aesthetic seniors buy fragrant nosegays from the fairest in the
land. In short, nothing has been done
this year towards carrying on the
campaign to raise money for a gymnasium building at Point Grey.
It will be remembered that when it
was discovered last year that the government had made no provision for a
gymnasium among the new buildings
at the point, a good deal of indignation, dismay, and similar emotions
were expressed, and a campaign was
initiated, of which Percy Barr, Bob
Hedley, and Jack Grant, all of whom
have since pursued their respective
ways to fame and fortune, were leaders, to raise enough money among the
students themselves, and among the
business men of the city, to build the
necessary gym. and playing fields.
Several somewhat stormy mass meetings were held, and a good deal of
opposition overcome before the combined caution fees of the thousand-odd
students then present were voted as a
nucleus to this fund. The Alma Mater
Societys Ceilidh was also held to swell
the bank balance, to say nothing of
other projects too numerous to mention.
This year's council, however, has
not adopted the policy of actively encouraging the campaign. Dal Grauer,
when interviewed by the Ubyssey, said
that, although the matter has not yet
been officially brought before the council, he does not believe that the present executive will endorse any movement towards erecting a gymnasium
building without the financial assistance of the government.
A definite statement may be available shortly, however, since a committee of the council, the faculty, and
representatives of various other interested parties meets within the next
two weeks to arrive at some conclusion as to the best course of action
under the present circumstances.
VARSITY   SWEATERS   FOR   SAKE
Tuesdays and Thursdays, Noon
C.   J.   TIBCLECK   (Curator)
In  Literary  and  Scientific  Offices
(There are no Varsity sweaters obtainable down town.)
Vliotographs
distinction
Made by
BRIDGMAN'S
"The Kiddies' Studio"
413  GRANVILLE  ST.
Midway ^
Pharmacy
Cor. Broadway "and
Heather Street
W. H. Caldwell, Proprietor
Phone, Fair. 840
DRUGS
LOOSE-LEAF SUPPLIES
WATERMAN'S PENS
EVERSHARP PENCILS
KODAKS
Make Our
Soda Fountain
Your
Meeting Place
Burns Drug Co., Ltd.
Opposite Hotel Vancouver
The Heather
Formerly Cusick's
Try us for
FRUIT
CONFECTIONERY
ICE CREAM
TOBACCO
AFTERNOON TEAS
Phone, Fair. 2881
Cor. Broadway & Heather St. October 30th, 1924
THE    UBYSSEY
J. W. Foster Ltd.
7^5 Hastings Street,   West
FIT REFORM CLOTHES
All the Newest Models in
College Suits and Overcoats,
at Prices that are Right.
BURBERRY  COATS
See  US Before Buying
MOUNT PLEASANT
METHODIST CHURCH
10th Ave. and Ontario St.
Minister,  REV. O. M. SANFORD
Out-of-town Students
Specially Welcome
Good Music, Interesting Sermons,
Friendly Greeting.
G
eorgia
Lod
ge
690 BUTE ST.
(Corner of Georgia and Bute Sts.)
A very fine
BALLROOM
(newly decorated) with
accommodation for about
thirty-five couples.
For further informalion apply :
Mr. R. H. BATT,
Proprietor.
V AT THE DOMINION
An evening of laughter with Constance Talmadge in "The Goldfish."
If you have a keen appreciation of
the ludicrous you will enjoy seeing
this feature and if you haven't you
will enjoy it anyway. If Miss Talmadge fails to make you see the
bright side, then Walter Hiers in
"Short Change" won't fail.
Next  week  Rudolph  Valentino  will
be   viv.i us asrain in "M.   Beaucaire."
X TENORS WANTED
There is a great demand for tenors
in the Musical Society. Surely there are
some tenors among the men in the
University. The try-out isn't at all
alarming, and your presence will be
heartily welcomed. Come aiong to
a practice on Tuesday or Thursday
at noon in the auditorium and Mr.
Grant will be very glad to test your
voice after the rehearsal.
j*..".".".».".">w......»...«.-.......w,.<...........>M>w>..>.^^,
1 •
•
r   Straw from the Stacks   !
!«/ f
^•■••■•••••••••••••••••••■•••••••••••-••••••••^.•-•-•••••.••••.••••••••hJ,
More Intelligent Tests:
1. The first track-meet was run off
by Esau, who was a hunter.
2. The ''Stacks" is the name of the
Aggie Community House.
3. Alma Mater is an Italian soprano.
••-•<§>•••■••
No  Eustacia,  all  Economics  Honor
students are not of Scotch descent.
AN   l-SCREAM   TRIOLET
I gently kicked his shin beneath  the
table,
I didn't think that he'd say "Ouch!"
And draw inquiring stares from Jane
and Mabel.
I gently kicked his shin beneath the
table—
He'd  urged   "another  sundae",  hence
my cable
To warn him of my flattened pouch.
I gently kicked his shin beneath the
table
I didn't think that he'd say "Ouch!"
......3>......
"The boy that gets this job must be
fast."
"Mister, I'm so fast that I can drink
water out of a sieve."
••-••<*>-•-•■
"But, darling, don't you want to
marry a man who is economical?"
"I suppose so; but its awful being
engaged  to one."
>•«>••'
WE   RECOMMEND  THIS
A college boy walked into the Ritz
the other day, sat down at a table, and
a waiter approached him.
Waiter—Can I do anything for you?
Dapper—No thank you. (He takes
sandwich out of his pocket and starts
to eat.
Waiter—Can I get you anything to
drink?
Dapper—Oh! No! Thank you (takes
orange out of his pocket, and squeezes
it.)
Waiter (surprised, goes to Head
Waiter)—Do you see that fellow over
there, he isn't, ordering, but he is sitting at a table.
Head Waiter (determined to oust
him, goes over to him)—Do you know
who I am?   I am the Head Waiter.
Dapper—Fine, thats who I was looking for—It's 4 o'clock; why hasn't the
music started.
MUSICAL SOCIETY HIKE
The Musical Society hike on Saturday last was a most successful
one. Although the weather during
part of the week was decidedly dampening to the spirits of those who
thought of hikes, it changed its mind
just in time, and smiled most encouragingly through the best part of Saturday. They took the 1:15 ferry to
West Vancouver, whence they hiked
to Cypress Park, a distance of about
six miles. After a meal on the beach
all joined in a rousing sing-song
under the very able and artistic
leadership of Mr. Carl Barton from
the exalted position of the picnic
table.
Although the turnout was not quite
as great as was expected there were
just enough present to make a lively
party   and a good  time   all round.
Any students wishing to secure copies
of last year's Annual may purchase same
at the Business Office of the Publications Board, at the price of one dollar.
University Joins the
\\V       W.C.I.A.A U.
' (Continued from Page 1)
of fostering British and Canadian
ideals of sport has been definitely
adopted. It will be clear to all that
Varsity can and will have inter-collegi- «
ate competition with universities to
the south, but the point is that the
organic connection of the University
of B. C. will be Canadian.
In anticipation of the entry of U.
B. C. into the association, arrangements have been made for a workable program. These are now actually
adopted in the W.C.I.A.A.U. constitution. B. C. when competing in Track
meets on the prairies may send less
than eight men and compete for the
championship and vice versa. In other
sports B. C. may challenge the prairie
winners for a game, either on the
prairies or in B. C, and if mutually
satisfactory arrangements can be made
the winners will be W.C.I.A.A.U.
champions for the year. But it must be
realized that U. B. C. cannot hope to
compete in more than one or two
sports a year on account of the expenses involved.
For all these benefits, the University
pays, on joining, the purely nominal
fee of five dollars, and its share of
office expenses, which will amount to
about ten dollars a year. It is the
general feeling that the University has
been very wise in grasping this opportunity of linking itself athletically with
the other Western Canadian Universities, this being the first definite intercollegiate connection that Varsity has
made.
THE  CAPITOL
Is now showing a programme as
varied as it is interesting. "The Border Legion" by Zane Grey, is a real
thriller in itself. Add to this a second edition of the third dimension
movie "Plastigrams" with the free
glasses for keepsakes, followed by a
trip across the Atlantic with the ZR3
and finally a comedy by Mack Sen-
nett and you have all the ingredients
for a  real  night's  entertainment.
Next week ano'lier of Elinor Glynn's
successes  "His  Hour."
Smart, Stylish
Young Men's
Overcoats
IN
Tweeds, Chinchillas,
Etc.
$25.00 - $29.50
$34.50
C. D. Bruce
LIMITED
Cor. of Hastings and Homer Sts.
The PRESENT
The FUTURE
Your PHOTOGRAPH by
rf
STUDIOS
553 Granville St.
Dr. L.F.MARSHALL
DENTIST
CONVENIENT TO THE UNIVERSITY
WORK CAN BE ARRANGED
IN STUDY PERIODS
BETWEEN CLASSES
AND IN THE EVENINGS
2520 LAUREL (Cor. Broadway)
Phone. Fair. 896-Y
Overcoming
Nature
WHEN a high tension line breaks
in   the   mountains, then  comes
the test of brawn.
Up hill and down dale, over precipice
and mountain, linemen must go, packing on horseback the materials to repair the line.
There are no wagon roads through
these mountains. Yet not for a day can
the high tension lines remain broken.
The service these men perform is no
casual employment. They work for
you to maintain electric service on
which you depend so much.
British Columbia Sfl EiECTRicRfliiw/iy Co.
HEAD OFFICE
VANCOUVER, B. C.
57
jUSfijijiiifiajHiaii^ 8
V
THE   UBYSSEY
October 30th, 1924
ff9/C TRADE ^>0§»\
ICO
iLDll
MARK
Tfyl
Skating Season
Is On !
Have you seen the new
Spalding SKATES
and SHOES ?
Also, the warm
OVER-SWEATERS
for this Season ?
\\., >«aSWJ
OF CANADA/LIMITED
339 Hastings Street, W7?
VANCOUVER, B. C J
LEARNED
MORE HERE
Many of our students
maintain that they learned more here in two or
three lessons than they
believed possible, because
of the highly efficient
instruction in gracefulness, leading and following-.
Instructing the gentleman to lead and the lady to follow with
ease has always been the feature of our
tuition.
Investigate the merits of this school—
Winners of Valentino Dance Trophy, also
silver cup in  San Francisco,  1924.
Learn here. Dance anywhere. Beginners may start any time. Private lessons or class practice.
VAUGHN MOORE
Private Dancing School
518 HASTINGS ST., W.        Seymour 707
"The  School   with   the   Reputation"
BAGGAGE
XO       FROM
ALL. TRAINS AND BOATS
ROYAL  TRANSFER
PHONE,  SEY.  6
DANCING
Private and ("lass Lessons
Lady and Gentlemen
Teachers
W. E. Fenn's School
COTILLION HALL
Seymour 3058-O or Seymour 101
CANDY SALE
The Women's Athletic Association
held a sale of candy and peanuts at
noon on Thursday. The sale was to
have taken place at the Track Meet
the day before, but had to be cancelled
because a selling licence proved unobtainable from the Parks Board.
There was no difficulty, however, in
selling the candy in the Varsity corridors and the amount of $49.00 was
realized.
The Association wishes to extend its
thanks to Thorpe & Co., Ltd., for the
donation of five cases of "Squeeze."
Oxford Debaters Meet
First Test
\ i (Continued from Page 1)
different angles of the question. However, with a few more facts at his disposal, he will acquit himself very well
against the English debaters, as he
has an easy and confident platform
manner. Both Dr. Telford and Mr.
Mclnnes proved themselves good
speakers, but rather surprised the University part of the audience by dealing entirely with statements of fact,
not bothering to back them up or show
their definite bearing upon the subject in hand.
Mr. Telford also showed a very
creditable coolness in his manner, and
will go far as a public speaker. His
arguments revolved chiefly around one
point, the need of competition to keep
output at the highest point of efficiency. With socialism this competition
would go, and the value and quality
of goods would greatly decline in
consequence. The speaker dealt with
this point very well, but did not venture to enlarge his subject matter.
One or two pauses in his speech made
it clear that it was either partially or
wholly memorized. This is a great
mistake, and is discounted heavily under the Oxford System.
On the whole, the University boys
acquitted themselves very well and
created a favourable impression in the
face of considerable heckling. It will
be necessary for them both to become
better acquainted with each phase of
their subject, and have facts and figures ready for all emergencies. They
will then have not only a much better
grasp of this great economic problem,
but will also be enabled to speak
smoothly, and never be at a loss for a
word.
/a
THE  ORPHEUM
A program selected with adroit discrimination from the vast amusement
treasures of Orpheum Circuit Vaudeville will open with a matinee on
Thursday at 2:20. Ethel Grey Terry,
famous ^star of stage and screen, will
be the headline attraction, presenting
a one-act play by Willard Mack, called "Sharp Tools." Miss Terry while
new to Vaudeville, has been on the
legitimate stage since childhood, playing her first part at the age of three
in the famous old time melodrama
"Hearts of Oak." Tom Smith offers
"An Artist, a Gentleman and a Scholar," which is said to be a deluge of
nut comedy.
America's foremost exponents of
the Apache, Deno and Rochelle, supported by Van Adley's Orchestra offers a big whirlwind act of music
and dancing. Ethel Waters and Earl
Dancer, are exponents of the folklore
of the negro. They have a worthwhile collection of sayings, songs and
dances Anderson and Burt present
"The Dizzy Heights," a comedy sketch
presented in unusual surroundings.
Achilles and Newman offer "Old
Greek Pastimes," a combination of
the broadest humor and athletics.
"Jesters of 3000 years ago," presented
by Murray and Alan is another laugh
producer of merit, the jokes they
spring, though on an ancient subject,
are of modern make.
>     ARTS '25 PARTY
Mere adjectives fail to express the
excellence of the Arts '25 party last
Friday. The familiar Auditorium was
unrecognizable in its gay and tasteful
Hallowe'en decorations. Even the
cafeteria had fallen under the spell of
witches, cats and pumpkins, especially
the latter, since the excellent eats included luscious individual pie-lets of
that delectable vegetable. The Criter-
ion orchestra was unanimously voted
the best that had ever played in those
grim halls.
The patrons and patronesses were:
Miss Bollert, Dr. and Mrs. Sedgewick,
Prof, and Mrs. Wood and Dr. Boggs.
\_ Inter-Class Meet
\J'  /(Continued from Page 1)
Lea Buckley started the record
breaking when he clipped one and two
fifths of a second off his own half
mile record, negotiating the distance in
2 minutes, 6 3-5 seconds. Charlie
Mottley ran the Agriculture man a
close second.
Charlie Mottley proved his right to
the title of the best distance runner
in the college when he beat Carl
Barton's mile record by over four
seconds and copped the Dr. Bricker
Cup. The Arts '27 President had lots
of oppositiion from his class mate Mc-
Williams, who is a potential star in
the distance races.
Balmer won the three-mile event in
great style, and the-young marathoner
came within a second of breaking last
year's record, and from present appearances will make a name for himself on the cinder track next year.
Demidoff and Henry staged a pretty
stiff argument in the pole vault and
neither could come to a decision after
clearing the bar at ten feet. The two
inter-collegiate stars decided to split
the points and hold the record jointly.
The results of the men's events follow:
120-yard hurdles—Henry, Arts 28;
Winn, Sc. '28; Hatfield, Arts '27, 19 2-5
seconds. Half mile—L. Buckley,
Agric; Mottley, Arts '27; Arkley, Arts
'25, 2 min. 6 3-5 sec. record. Broad
jump—Thompson, Arts 26; Henry, Arts
'28; Hatfield, Arts '27, 19 ft., 9 in. record. 100 Yards—Warren, Sc. '26;
Thompson, Arts '26; Gordon, Arts '27,
10 2-5 seconds, record. Hammer—
Ramsell, Sc. '25; Kania, Sc. '26; Lange,
Arts '28, 99 ft., 11 in., record. High
Jump—iWinn, Sc. '28; Hatfield, Arts
'27; King, Arts '27, 5 ft, 2% in. Pole
Vault—Demidoff, Sc. '25 and Henry,
Arts '28 tied; Stewart, Arts '28, 10 ft.,
record. One Mile—Mottley Arts '27;
McWilliams, Arts '27; Barton, Sc. '26,
4 min., 49 1-5 sees., record. 220
Yards—Warren, Sc. '26; Thompson,
Arts '26; Brown, Sc. '27, 23 3-5 sees.,
record  tied.    Shot  Put—Ramsell,  Sc.
6^5 ifa a$5 ifc> a^6 &ty> &JJ6 6J6 ij6 6$5 i§6 £jb 6§6
556 Granville Street
Phone, Sey. 5330
ACCESSORIES
You'll Need To Complete
Your Outfit!
Smart, new Pouchette Shape
or Envelope BAGS, with
inside pockets; of durable
beaver calf-skin, in brown,
tan, navy or grey.   Special at
$3.95
PULLOVERS of silk and
wool mixture ; short sleeves,
tie ; shades of tan and green,
tan and blue, grey and blue,
grey and mauve, tan and
brown   -    -    -    $2.95
French Crepe HANDKERCHIEFS have just arrived.
Are in fine quality crepe de
chine, with newest fancy
blocked designs—all shades.
$1.50
"it Costs No More to Shop
at Sommers"
'25, Pottinger, Sc. '27, Lange, Arts '28,
33 ft. even. 440 Yards—Warren, Sc.
'26; Buckley, Agric; Thompson, Arts
'26, 56 2-5 sees. Javelin—Lazenby, Sc.
'26; Arkley, Arts '25; Winn, Sc. '28,
120 ft., 6 in. Half Mile Relay—Arts
'28, Arts '26, 1 min., 43 2-5 sees.
Discus—Ramsell, Sc. '25; Winn, Sc.
'28; Demidoff, Sc. '25, 104 ft, 6 in.
Three Miles—Balmers, Arts '26; Barton, Sc. '26; McWilliams, Arts '27,
16 min., 38 2-5 sees.
VARSITY   SWEATEES   FOB   SAI.E
Tuesdays  and Thursdays,  £Toon
C.   J.   TIMI.ECK   (Curator)
In litarary  and Scientific  Offices
(There are no Varsity sweaters obtainable down town.)
Come to the big Mass Meeting on
Friday noon. The band will be there
as well as a song-leader.
ilWrfi> invite him, lie doesn't Dance?"
If it is YOU they are talking about, it is time
you remedied this AT ONCE. We can
teach you during the day, between classes, or
at night. We specialize in BALLROOM
DANCING.    Latest steps taught.
Studio to Rent for Parties.
Mr. and Mrs. S. J. Broadhead
Broadway Dancing ftcademy
1400 BROADWAY, W.       (One Block East of Granville St.)

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