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The Ubyssey Jan 9, 1958

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 " -■
RAVEN
ON
i'. I
-•■j
SALE
!fo\WtfiH*4f
BUY
TODAY
VOL. XL.
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, JANUARY 9, 1958
No. 33
Research
Council
Formed
Dr. Joseph Katz, of UBC's
Faculty and College of Education, has announced the formation of a British Columbia Educational Research Council.
Purposes of the council, which
is headed by Dr. Katz, are: to
promote research in education
in the primary and secondary
fields with general reference lo
adult, higher and special education as thc need arises.
RESEARCH FINDINGS
To collect and organize the
research findings of educational
elements of the province; and
to make available the findings
of research studies deposited
with the council and lo seek and
distribute funds for educational
research within the province,
Member organizations of the
council arc: the University and
its Faculty and College of Education, Victoria College, the
Vancouver School Board, thc
B.C. Teachers' Federation, and
thc Department of Education.
MAKE SURVEY
The Council's first project
will be to make a survey of past
educational research made by
member organizations.
Council Vice-President is Dr.
C. B. Conway of the Provincial
Department of Education. Other
members are: Mrs. B. McDonald
of the Parent-Teachers Federation;. C. D. Ovans, of the B.C.
Teachers Federation; and IVI. R.
Beder, of the School Trustees
Association.
Dr. Robin Smith; of the College of Education al UBC, is
Secretary.
Present emphasis will be on
the provision of repository service for educational research
studies having special relevances to the need of B.C.
SECOND TERM FEES
MUST BE PAID SOON
Second term fees must be
paid by January 18.
Students  whose   fees  are
not  paid   by  this  elate   will
be barred from classes and
. wdll have their registration
cancelled.
B.C Development
Open House Theme
DEAN  G. ANDREW
.  represenis  humanities
DH. GORDON SHRUM
. . . Canada needs him
New Course
Is Offered
A new communications program, the first of its kind offered in Canada, will begin January  13 at UBC.
The British Columbia Association of Broadcasters will donate SI0,000 a year for five years
to establish the program which
will include an introduction,
along vvith practical experience,
to most aspects of film production.
The two-year course, intended
primarily for persons wiih professional experience, also lea-
ckm; diction for broadcasting,
commercial writing for broad-
easih'i); introduction h> television, film production, communications and mass media.
Instructors will include Dr. P.
Read Campbell, instructor in
speech and drama. UBC College
of Educatinn; S. R. Fogel, creative director, Cockficlcl Brown
and Company Limited; James
Patterson, assistant director of
CBL'T;   and   Robin   Pearce,  Uni
*-• J. J   V-       i    . I.1IIO J. I V 1 /I I  1 i     Vill   CV,, Ul
versily   Extension   Department
dr. c. a. Mcdowell
j       ... Speaks for Chemistry
Science
*
Education
Discussed
Science and Higher Education
was the subject of a panel discussion of distinguished Cana-
cian scientists in the Georgia
Auditorium  last  night.
Visitors on the panel were
Dr. John Stuart Foster, professor of Physics, McGill University; Dr. W. Bennett Lewis, Vice-
President of Atomic Energy of
Canada Limited; and Dr. Garnet
A. Woo.nton, Director of Eaton
Electronics Laboratory, McGill
University,
UBC SCIENTISTS ON PANEL
Scientists from UBC on the
panel were Dean H. C. Gunning,
dean of Applied Science; Dr. C.
A. McDowell, head of the Chemistry Department; and Prof. F.
A. Forward, head of the department of Mining and Metallurgy.
Moderator of the forum was
Dr. Gordon Shrum, head of the
Physics Department.
Other guests at thc forum
were Paul Cooper, Chairman of
tho UBC Development Fund;
Leslie R. Peterson, Minister of
Education; Vancouver Mayor,
Fred Hume: A. Grauer, Chancellor of the University; and Dr.
N. A. iW. McKenzie, President ot
tiie University.
QUESTION PERIOD
Following the forum there
was a question period, with the
audience participating, and finally a reception in the Cedar
Room in the Georgia Hotel.
"This is most certainly a prescience era," VV. B. Lewis of
the Chalk River Project fold the
capacity audience at the Georgia
Auditorium  Wednesday night.
One of the three speakers for
trie panel on "Science and Education," Dr. Lewis said, "Whatever altitude we take toward
higher education one essential
is that we must get ahead in
the sciences."
In a question period following Ihe panel discussion Dean
Forward slated lhat. he imped
"no speedup wa.s occuriug at
UBC in scientific education."
This he said would be detrimental to science, although extension of scientific education
would help,
PROF. F. A. FORWARD
. . . to take stand
DEAN  GUNNING
. . . represenis Engineering
Editing
Mistake
Editing of Tuesday's Ubyssey
left out a few paragraphs of a
story concerning Student Council's report on Buildings and
Grounds.
As originally written by the
reporter, the story contained the
lol low ing tacts:
1. There is .some possibility
lhat in the future small jobs
around the campus will be contracted  to  students.
2. Full evaluation of Council's
investigation cannot be made
until Council learns what alleged complaints Buildings and
Grounds   has   rectified.
Buddine.s and Grounds assistant director Tom Hughes declined   further   comment.
Winners
Quit At
McMaster
HAMILTON (CUP) — Dec. 3
— Editors of the McMaster University's weekly, The Silhouette
recently resigned en masse because "nobody cares" about thc
job they're doing.
The resignation was announced
in the final issue for 19o7. They
planned to fill it with advertising and material left over
from  previous  issues.
"I don't want to resign," edilor Doug Parkinson saido. "But
I've got my year to worry about.
"Editors were doing reporters jobs. We haven't got time to
do any thinking on features and
editorials."
No move had come from the
Students' Council to fire the
staff. But "nobody gives a damn
on I has campus," Parkinson said.
The Silhouette was recently
awarded the Jacques Bureau
Trophy for excellence among
papers publishing twice a week
or  less.
MOCK PARLIAMENT
TO TRAVEL FIRST
WEEK \H MARCH
UBC'.-s Mock Parliament is
iioiiiu  to  travel.
Jack Giles, president of the
Parliament, has announced lhal
plans have been approved for
Ihe presentation of the Parliament to American students a I
ihe  Cuiver.-ily of Washington.
Tim dap' has lu'en set for ilm
first w ivk in tYLireh.
Raven
Sells
Today
Raven goes on sale today
in ihe Brock, the Quad, the
Library, the Cafeteria, and
the Bookstore. The price is
thirty-five  cents.
Author, critic and lecturer,
Earle Birney, praised Raven,
sic-.itr;, "Posh in appearance
and quality of material it
soenm lo be Ike leading undergraduate literary journal of
Canada and a good deal better than most, curr'nl inagn- j
zincs thai [ have semi in the
United  Sud.es."
The first edition of Raven
acted as an "apertif" for the
now edition, now on sale. The
new Raven inelud' s a review,
poetry (esoteric and otherwise), short stories, and an
essay on subliminal prajec- j
lion.
And for those who are in-
lermst'd. ||ic new edition a.lso
contains a mu'ti-colored organic   illusl ration..
Editors are at sires-sent mak-
in;.', plans fur anoihcr issue
which will come out later
this  term.
Directory
Prepared
A placement directory has
been prepared in Brooklyn as
an aid to teachers, college students and professors who-need
employment during summer
vacations.
The director:.-, .19.38 World-
Wide Summer Placement Directory, describes work available,
salaries, names and addresses
of employers. It lists governmental positions, steamship opportunities, service projects,
methods of earning free passage
lo Europe, and many other openings.
Copies of the iw-'W directory,
now published annually, can be
obtained from Ihe Advancement
and Placement Institute, Box
!)!)G, Green point Station, Brooklyn, New York. They sell for
32 each.
' »UEC's Open House will ob-
! serve two anniversaries with its
i celebrations this year — British
'Columbia's centennary and
| UBC's 50th anniversary.
Gordon Armstrong, vice-president  of  the  Open   House  Committee says that the main theme
1 of the event will be the growth
' of B.C. to date, and its projoc-
j lion into the future.
Spectators will gel a glimps'e
into the future in Ihe central
point   of   the   displays,   a   large
: model of the projected campus
of the university constructed by
i the Architecture Faculty.
: A "Festival of Clubs." to be
held in the Field House, will
feature displays of campus clubs
imd organizations, many of
which will reflect the Centennial
celebrations.
Mike Jeffery, clubs co-ordinator,   anticipates   over    50   such
j displays, including the Parliamentary  Council  opening,   with
| the presence of Lieutenant-Governor   Frank    McKenzie    Ross.
i who has been invited to attend.
Thc Totem staff may create a
nostalgia in old alums vvith their
; display of all the Totems published in the last 50 years.
The Civil Liberties Union will
portray the social progress made
by the B.C. Indians through
the past 100 years.
There will be many other displays in the two-day exhibition,
several of which will deal with
the main centre of attraction to
British Cplumbians this year--
our Centennial.
FROSH COUNCIL
There will be an import-
ani   meeting   of   the   Frosh
Council   ai  noon   Friday   in
the Club Auditorium, Room
354 of thc Brock Extension.
Gymnasium
TrainingRoom
To Commence
Students' Council had informed
The Ubyssey thai a sum'of money
intended for completion of a
training room in the Memorial
Gym was used to build two
staff rooms for Physical Education faculty members.
Profits gained from the use
of Ihe Memorial Gym are entered in a fund slated for the furnishing and painting of a training room in the gym.
This fund is controlled jointly by the Students' Council and
President MacKenzie, and cannot be used without their consent.
Council President Ben Trevino believes tiie misappropriation was due lo an error in the
accounting office. He said that
the moey had been replaced and
plans to go ahead with the training room would be resumed as
soon as Buildings and Grounds
had submitted a cost estimate.
SPECIAL EVENTS CHAIRMAN
NEEDED BY CO UNO
* i*f
CHRISTMAS   IMPROVEiVIPNTS
main   ea let mmi   w as   iusl s; I te, |    mm
I lie  sir, ii-r  ,i 1   die  ciu.nl m
,* t < & '
isis   new   rmhim   in   i:m
\ s u',' 11 11111    in   help   speed
'Ilm Students' Council has iV(|UOs(od n>;p!ieat ions
l-m tim position of Special Kvonis Chairman for the balance
di   lim  term.
It i.s Imped ilm! the pmsen .'elected could ivl.im. (he
po- ,| ion for i he   lh,)X...")!) m,i!oL',o .was
A :n ■ Iie,i! inns sluiii Id in. si ihmi t le 11 in wrilum in i'umhsnsi
l.eilh.   Sludenis'   Conned   merolarv
Jhre  two   intellectual   sliiefiils  peruse  and   critici/m   the   latest
edition  n(  K.WK.V     In  order  lo  make your own  criticisms
f) 11 \   one.
TED HUNT, prominent in
UBC athletic circles is now
in the lead position to receive
the coveted award of B.C.'s
athlete of the year. Thc annual contest and award is
sponsored by thc Vancouver
Province.
Tween Classes
Filmsoc to Present
Lollobrigida Today
THURSDAY
FILMSOC will be    showing
Gina  Lollobrigida in  "Beauties
of the Night'' at 12.30 in the
Auditorium.
tf.      tf. tf.        i
UBC SYMPHONY Orchestra
— Attention all old and' any in-
•■ lerestcd new members. The
UBC Symphony Orchestra resumes  practices tonight at 7.30
j p.m. in thc Brock Music Room.
t tf.      ff.      tf.
DANCE CLUB — Offers lessons in Two-Step, Mambo, Val-
eta Waltz and Polka, Friday at
noon — Cha-Cha-Cha and Charleston.
ff.       ff.       ff.
!     GIRLS' TENNIS CLUB --For
; girls   interested   in   playing  tennis,  the  practices and  coaching
resume today  and  on  Mondays
at 4.30 in the Field House.
ff*      ff*      tf*
INDIA    STUDENTS'    ASSN.
general meeting will be held at
!! p.m. tonight in the International House.
tf.       tf.       ff.
FRIDAY
PHRATERES   —   An   all-Phi
meeting at noon in Physics 202.
.v. ff. ff.
UNIV.   BAPTIST   CLUB   will
meet, in Physics 302. Don Holiday of Ontario will challenge us
with the needs and opportunities for Evangelism in Canada.
Come and hear this dynamic
young man who is just commencing an evangelistic campaign amongst some of our Bap-
list Churches in B.C.
tf.       tf.       tf.
MUSIC CIRCLE will hold its
first meel ing of the new year at
noon in the Music Room in Ihe
North Brock. The program will
consist ot Stravinsky's LVlavra.
tf.ff.ff.
SQUASH CLUB - For anyone interested in playing squash
on week-days at the Van. Racquets Club, tin re will be a meet-
in;.', in Arts 104 al 12.30. If III"
mod ing cannot be attended
phone Geoff a I. KE. 3(J4 I.
ff* -¥• -f*
SUNDAY
UNITARIAN CLUB There
will be a meeting al f! p.m. al
m>;>4 West 4th Avenue. Mem.
tiers   please   attend.
PUBLIC   FORUM
The significance :if Ihe Sloan
.■ppointmeiil will be discussed
•il a puhlie lorum January 12 by
'Malcohi; P.ruce and 15c rt Price.
:\t I, ,\
'I ia' 11 iI'iom is sponsored by the
SSuiili \ Park Cl'P Club, and
will I si he place oi the ch ibroomn
at    late   pnbson   SI I eel   sit   !!   p.m. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, January  9,  1958
THE UBYSSEY
Authorized as second class mall. Post Office Department, Ottawa.
MEMBERS CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Student subscriptions $1.20 per year (Included ln AMS fees). Mall subscriptions $2.00 per
year. Single copies five cents. Published in Vancouver throughout the University year by
the Stm ent Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society, University of British Columbia.
Editorial opinions expressed herein are those of the editorial staff of the Ubyssey, and not
necessarily those of the Alma Mater Society or the University. Letters to the Editor should not
be more than 150 words. The Ubyssey reserves the right to Cut letters, and cannot guarantee
publications of all letters received.
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF	
LETTERS to the EDITOR
Managing Editor  Al Forrest
News Editor    Barbara Bourne
Assistant News Editor     Bob  Johannes
 PATRICIA MARCHAK
CUP Editor Laurie Parker
Features Editor  Barbara Bourne
SENIOR EDITOR.--- TERRY O'BRIEN
'Reporters and Deskmen:   Audrey Ede, Wayne Lamb, Helen Zukowski and
Kerry Feltham.
TELEPHONES:  t
Editorial and News Offices AL. 4404, Locals 12, 13, 14
Business and Advertising Offices * AL. 4404, Local 6
e^HeaaMMOkkiHa^Mai^BMteHi^a^^^^^Hj^^^^^^^^^^MiiMeaHa^^l^^HBsa^H^MiaaHH^Hi^^B^^HH^HMaaMaM^nH^BaMMHMHfli
Next Step - A Ministry Of Truth?
Jt has been suggested that Prime Minister Diefenbaker should be giving serious
study to the setting up of a "Ministry of
Science."
Although the combination of words Suggests an Orwell horror, the need for .co-ordination between scientific endeavour and
government is depressingly evident.
Also evident — so much so that it has
shouldered most of the blame for the
American Flopnik — is the need for another look at our educational system. The
Industrial Foundation on Education in its
recent report termed this as a need for the
production of highly-trained people at a
rate "more consistent with the requirements
of a highly technological age."
What the report calls for is "a marked
change in Canadian attitudes toward education, research, and technological advancement."
It stresses the need to "anticipate performance required of our educational system related to a planned program and
"determine goals for future performance
in education on the basis of future rather
than present requirements."
In other words, a planned education
program.
Planning such a program on the basis
of a possible future would at least have
the virtue of arms for self defence, just
as would the establishment of a "Ministry
of Science."
But neither a Ministry of Science nor a
planned educational program can stand
alone.
If Canadian attitudes are to be changed
— and it would appear that the change
is already occuring — they cannot be limited to a new outlook in regard only to one
branch of endeavour, science.
If Canadians desire planning in the
sphere of scientific training, research, and
development of technological materials relating to the armaments race, they must
question a system verbally honoring private
enterprise, minimum governmental control
and unfettered competition.
Planning in the military-scientific sphere,
means elimination of dozens of manufacturers each trying to produce a saleable
weapon — a natural product of a free enterprise system. It also eliminates the un-
co-ordinated efforts of the armed forces,
unco-ordinated because of competition.
And if Canadians willing to see what
they consider the freest of all pursuits —
education — put on a basis where it exists
primarily for the benefit of a country
rather than an individual, they must realise
that whether or not they like, they are
embarked on the road to a planned society*
A planned society goes one step further;
a major step, granted, but one fully consistent with the two already being considered all across the country. That step
is a planned economy.
It is ironic that such a deliberately Left
policy should appear likely while a Conservative Government holds popular approval.
But it is a distinct possibility. While
teachers are often labelled "frustrated socialists," the demand for planning in such
spheres of Western life as education, is
arising from far more "true blues" than
there are CCF'ers on high school staffs.
These "true blues" are most reluctant
to admit that what they are calling for is,
in fact, the basis of the Regina Manifesto.
But the name for attitudes really matters
little, and the government which recognizes
public opinion in its legislation can go under
any title.
If "planning" sounds sweeter coming
from Diefenbaker and the Conservative
newspapers, then let them sing on.
The public may go on singing the same
words to a different tune. Free enterprise,
competition, and that magic word, "individualism," do indeed sound pretty, but like
a popular tune, the words don't mean a
thing.
Disgusting!
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Madam:
I think the treatment given
the Education 404 Christmas
exam was disgusting. To even
suggest that the Department
was purposely making exams
easier so that more Education
students could get through was,
in my estimation, a typical example of /pubster' egotism.
If you 'pubsters' think you're
such fine scholars, see how
many in your ranks spent sixteen hours STRAIGHT studying for exams, as I did, or failing that, see if* one of your
number takes a course involving the exhausting amounts of
memorization we must do.
Yours truly,
IRKED, Education IV
*
A Little Learning
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Madam:
"A little learning is a dangerous thing." Certainly this is
true if we should judge Mr.
Fulford on the basis of his
astonishingly insignificant and
inappropriate article, "Irl Defense of Imperialism" in which
he made an adulterated attempt to criticize and castigate
the student speaker, of the discussion on Africa.
Mir. Fulford, whose privilege
it has been to drink from the
overflowing fountain of the
speaker's experience, claimed
to have seen the Africans in
all walks of life, but his claims
have left many native and
faithful sons of Africa nonplussed by his refragable effrontery.
Perhaps Mr. Osifo has done
justice to his country in belittling Mr. Fulford's claims by
his overt attack in an open
letter to him, challenging the
impetuosity of his disparaging
remarks against the speaker
and his native land.
After all, one must realize
that Mr. Osifo has had ocular
proof for a number of years in
a place where he had spent
the better years of his life with
a people that are his people,
and is therefore in a capable
position to repudiate Mr. Fulford's clumsy display of ignorance.
The general trend of the
speaker's remarks were, in all
probability,    more    authentic,
UBC  Co-ed  Finds 'Western'
Has  Spirit,  Friendliness
I tried to compose a florid
literary composition to entitle
"My Impressions of the University of Western Ontario,"
but gave up. Instead, I decided to scribble down my
thoughts in the same inconsistent manner as they came to
my mind.
"Are you glad you came to
Western?" "What's it like at
UBC?" "Which campus is
really the prettiest?" — these
and more are questions I have
been faced with ever since my
arrival in London.
One thing is certain, I am
glad I came to Western. It is
quite an experience to leave
"your" university with its familiarity and old friendships
and to be thrust into a whole
new nucleus.
Everyone told mo that Western was a small, friendly university and how true il, is. It
certainly didn't take long to
make new friends, partly because everyone is in the same
situation, being from out of
town, and partly because being
friendly just .seems to come
naturally.
Friendliness seems to stem
from smallncss, and smailncss
seems to breed spirit.
One thing Western h a s
which UBC lacks is Spirit! I
have never seen anything like
it, for example, last week's
football game when Western
played McGill for the Yates
Cup. 1 woke up Saturday
morning to a real snow blizzard.     The   wind   was   howling
and the day was absolutely
miserable. I thought no one
would be crazy enough to sit
through a football game in this
weather, but how wrong I was.
It never entered anyone's mind
not to go to the game. Layers
and layers of clothes plus
blankets were in evidence and
the stands were packed. Not
only did everyone come, but
everyone cheered — a combination of "Western U", "Jingle
Bells" and feet stomping to
keep warm, spurred the team
on to become undefeated champions of the year.
I can't speak about football
and spirit without telling you
that fantastic, fictional football weekends really do oxi;,
Team, band, majorettes, cheerleaders and spectators (complete with raccoon coats, chrysanthemums and crocks) invade a train, and on arrival
lake over the city.
Spirit is predominant on the
train, at the station, in the
street, during the game, and
throughout the football dance
— Western's song is sung over
and over again. During the
football season, football is second to nothing.
I was so impressed with this
fact that il seems natural to be
tho first tiling I tell about.
As for the campus, Western
boasts of having thc only Canadian campus comparable to
UBC's. But take away the
mounlains and sea from UBC
and Western is prettier. There
is   a   certain   charm   abov.it   the
uniformity of the traditional
limestone buildings.
The new Richard Ivey
School of Business, opened up
this year, is of the same type
architecture as the original
towered University College
Building. This unified effect
is far more appealing than
UBC's conglomeration of old
buildings, army huts and ultramodern superstructures.
As the buildings at Western
are fairly well centered, two
of them connect with the library by underground tunnels
which are popular on snowy
winter clays. But of course,
such a convenience eliminates
the fun of cross-campus treks
between classes.
Much to my surprise the library here is really used to
study in! It didn't take very
many dirty looks for tne to
realize that table-hopping and
gossiping just weren't the thing
to do. So I still have not
found a substitute for the Rid-
ington Room.
But there is one thing I can
do here in the library that you
can't do at UBC and that is,
fill my pen with free ink.
One radical difference between the two universities is
the status of the engineers.
Western engineers seem to be
a meek, studious group whose
presence is hardly known. This
fact, plus their lack of Aggie
students, plus their lack of lily
ponds, greatly minimizes the
daily excitement,
However,   Western   students
can not be trod upon, as a recent Rielist Rebellion is proving. In protest to action taken
by the Board of Governors a
group of students banded together to form "The Rielists."
Through organized demonstration and mass publication
they "aim to maintain student
autonomy." The full effects of
this campaign are not yet
known, but at least it is evident that Western students
have the audacity to stand up
for their rights.
Speaking of standing up
brings to mind the cafeteria
and its line-ups. A caf lab is
just as much a required course
at Western as at UBC, but the
atmosphere is slightly different. Somerville House harbors
both a main floor coffee shop
and The Great Hall, an upstairs dining room. First class
food is served at very cheap
rates feoffee is only eight cents
a cup) on white and purple
dishes decorated with the
Western crest.
Although the building was
just opened last year it is already too small to accommodate the onrush of students at
lunch time. Because of this
lunch hours are staggered and
there is no set noon hour.
This results in rny having
no lunch twice a week as 1
have five classes from 10.30 to
3.30 inclusive. It also results
in having no noon hour programs or meetings so that most
club activities are held in the
evenings.
more reliable and above all,
were founded. Here also, let
me remind Mr. Fulford of the
well-known Italian proverb —
"Se non e vero e ben trovato".
As one who could draw
many, many parallel instances
of such treatment of natives in
other parts of the world, it is
my firm belief that the speaker
was trying in a very real sense
with all sincerity, to illuminate
what is dark in a dark continent. Yes, "dark" to such men
as Mr. Fulford.
Of course, Sammuel Johnson was right when he said:
"Every man has the right to
utter what he thinks the truth"
— but let me remind Mr. Fulford that he went on to say
something which makes Mr.
Osifo equally proud, "And
every other man has a right to
knock him down for it."
This type of insolence to
one's country, if unpunished,
goes on increasing, hence I feel
it incumbent upon me to impose on your columns to sound
a note of warning to these
starry-eyed imperialists who
criticize the peoples from other
parts of the world, to think
twice before they do so, as
they will no longer be tolerated in the hearts of those affected, and at the same time to
save their own faces of invidious embarassment.
In this respect also, I wish
to congratulate Mr. Osifo for
his prompt and just attack on
Mr. Fulford.
Well done, Mr. Osifo!
N. B. SURUJNATH,
Arts IV.
Campus Radio?
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Madam:
The announcement of a campus radio station comes as a
surprise.
At the present. time when
there is a dire need for additional and better lecture rooms,
adequate residences on campus and improved food services, it is wrong to even suggest
spending $15,000 capital for
an initial layout and an additional $13,000 yearly for the
operation of a radio station.
Where will this money come
from? The AMS has suggested it will bear the cost. This
means the students.
Student fees have just been
raised $5 toward the construction of campus housing. Is the
money to be taken from existing AMS funds? Or will we
be asked to vote another fee
increase to finance a radio station which will provide us
with "higher calibre" music
and "educational programs as
a supplement to correspondence courses"?
If financed by students, it
should serve students primarily, but how many can afford
the time off from studies to
listen to a station providing
"services that no commercial
station can now provide."
Is this planning in the right
direction? Are we putting
first things first? I cannot
agree with spending $28,000
on a radio station on a campus
where you no longer can find
a place to study or even a decent place to eat your lunch.
Yes, Mr. Trevino, "what logical line of division is there
that makes university education something we should pay
(more and more) for."
Yours sincerely,
W. LITVEN, Arts I
*r v v
Not The Case
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Madam:
In reference to the column
"Colleges Lack In Russian"
that appeared in Tuesday's
(Jan. 7) issue of The Ubyssey,
I would like to point out, that,
unfortunately, the statement:
"This university has a course
specifically named Scientific
Russian 100" is completely erroneous. The calendar states
that several sections of Russian
100 are designed for science
students, but in actual practice
this is not the case. I attempted last year, and this year to
register in scientific Russian;
each time I was told it was not
being offered. We do have a
Slavonic Studies Dept., however, that is second to none in
Canada.
Yours sincerely,
SCIENCE   STUDENT
Thanks!
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Madam:
I would like to express my
thanks to t\\e person who returned my wallet. It contained valuable, irreplaceable personal property, and I am very
much indebted to whoever
turned it in.
That is one of the things that
I like about this campus.
Yours truly,
J. H. WRIGHT,
Arts I.
Ready To Spout
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Madam:
After reading Raven No. 5,
I arrived at a conclusion which
I had previously hesitated to
make without a greater store
of typical UBC publications to
my reading credit. Now, with
Raven and Pique behind me
I'm ready to spout.
The point I wish to make
stems from my observation of
the way certain of the literary-
minded students express themselves when the called-for
word exceeds their grasps. The
use of the Lord's name in vain
is universally accepted as the
ultimate in bad taste and the
appearance of such usage, even
in only one selection can bring
down the disapproval of the
reading public upon the entire
publication.
This may sound like the
common complaint one would
expect from a follower of the
"Three Sacred Monkeys," but
sttch is not the case. I have a
select vocabulary composed
entirely of words shunned by
even the most hard-pressed of
Lexicographers, upon which I
constantly rely to meet the
every-day needs of self expression. It is with me, however,
a matter of pride in being able
to create a similar effect to
that intended by these masters
of "psychology in literature"
without reverting to a deliberate display of what is morally
unacceptable.
If it is sensationalism which
these perverted individuals are
perhaps grasping for might I
suggest that they employ some
of the more familiar expressions like the ones they use
among themselves.
Most humbly yours,
One of the insignificant
FROSH
Shocked
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Madam:
As members of the Greater
Vancouver Insect Lovers' Society we were greatly shocked
and dismayed by the announcement that the United States
intends to use insects in their
first earth satellite.
There is absolutely no reason for this useless and wanton
cruelty on the part of the American scientists.
We are horrified by the apparent lack of action on the
part of the SPCA to remedy
this atrocious situation and
most strongly urge every true
insect lover to join with us in
lodging vehement protests
with the American embassy
and the United Nations against
this sort of torture inflicted on
our fellow creatures.
Yours in outrage,
B. MacDOUGALL,
President
M. C. GODFREY, •
Secretary-Treasurer
SOUS LE TABLE
By  KEN LAMB
An open letter to Dr. A. E.
Sandieson, French Department.
Dear Sir:
I am informed by one who
is your colleague, but in another department, that you
take umbrage at the French in
this column head. I understand your ire. Table is feminine, therefore "le" should be
"la".
All the grammar books say
so.
But there has not been a
grammar book printed that
can teach me to pronounce
French. I could never read
Latin. When I stood up to recite, the Aeneid came out just
like the chart for the seventh
at Jamaica — all monotone.
I'm self-conscious about pronunciation. Even with English, in good company, I'm as
nervous as a boy on a dance
floor for the first time.
You can understand then,
that with a language as romantic, as emotional as French,
I'm all lemon-lipped.
On that rare occasion when
I raise my nondescript head in
a social gathering, there sometimes comes a body inquiring,
"oh, so you write for the Ubyssey?" (this statement is always
accompanied with a look suggesting I smell of brimstone).
I say, innocently enough, —
"yes".
Then she, or some sober he,
asks "what do you write?"
You see, Dr. Sandieson, why
my pronunciation is lax? I can
answer "soozlutubl" with barely a sensory flicker.
But to utter, as it demands,
"sous la table" (please accent
the "la") I would have to start
at the hips and display the tonsils I haven't got.
Such gyrations would drive
people away. And lord knows
I have enough trouble finding
people to talk to at parties. I
like to hold on to what I,get.
I am a star listener.
It all boils down to the fact
that I can't fit the part. I
would look good on the
Champs D'Elysses only as a
flower basket.
Pardonez-mwua, m'sieur?
This seems a day for letters.
So here is another    one,    this
time to people who named the
new arts building.
Dear Sirs:
A week or so ago I had occasion to look up an English
professor. I could not find
him in the new arts building,
so I asked a secretary there
where he might be.
Primly, she drew herself up
and pointed with pride in the
direction of Grouse Mountain.
"Over there, young man, in
the Buchanan Building," she
said.
I thanked her and headed
out the door, the name sticking
in my head like a tumour.
Buchanan Building. I was
not reading the paper the day
the name was announced, and
this was first I'd heard. I don't
like it.
I've nothing against Mr.
Buchanan. He was a fine
chap; nor against#the name. I
have a friend with that name.
It is the conjunction of
names that bothers me. Buchanan Building. Th1? fs the
name of a building erected for
education, for the housing and
rearing of intellect.
Yet the name 'suggests an
office building, with elevators,
water coolers, ticker tapes and
the rest of the paraphernalia
that make up the so-called exciting world of commerce.
I went into the place expecting to be overcome by a
phalanx of managers rushing
out to grab a coffee.
My confidence was restored,
for the moment, when I was
met at the door by three stalwart professors, two of them
instructors in such perfectly
non-commercial studies as languages,
Pan American Petroleum Corporation
Calgary, Alberta
OFFERS CAREER IN . . .
ACCOUNTING
We would like to interview graduating B. Com. students
with an Accounting major for permanent employment. Third
year undergraduates also welcome for interview,
Recruiting personnel  will  visit  the  eatnpus  mt  Monday
and Tuesday. January l.'l and 14, li);>8
See University Placement Office for further particulars. Thursday, January 9,  1958
*■'■.•«♦■'
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Library Improvements
Badly Needed at UBC
CHRISTMAS IMPROVEMENTS . . . reportedly requested
by Radsoc to protect their new Brock club room the
unsightly men's John.
Art Gallery Shows
Italian Collection
One hundred Italian drawings, from the collection ii
New York musician Janos Scholz, are now on display in the
UBC Art Gallery.
The drawings are from Bologna, and cover the period from
1520 to 1800. They arc representative of the contemporary
schools and styles of drawings.
UBC Art Gallery is in the
Library basement, and open on
Tuesday through Saturday,
10.30 a.m. to 5 p.m., and from
7 to 9 p.m. Tuesday evening.
Exhibition is circulated by the
Western Association of Art.
Filmsoc Offers
Lollobrigida
Hedy Lamarr
Two interesting films are soon
to be shown, sponsored by the
Extension Dept. and Filmsoc.
Gina Lollobrigida stars in a
French film — "Beauties of the
Night," tb be shown today from
12:30 to 2:30 in the Auditorium.
Also to be shown next Tuesday, Jan. 14, will be the famous
nude swim of Hedy Lamarr in
"Ecstasy." There will be four
show times — 3:30, 6:00, 8:00
and 10:00 p.m.
Spring Rushing
Starts Today
Rushing registration will begin
on Wednesday, January 8th, and
will  continue  for   four   weeks.
Tb be eligible to rush, a student must have at least 12 units
credit.
Registration forms may be
picked up at the AMS office in
the south end of Brock Hall.
The development of graduate
studies at the University of B.C.
has been hampered by inadequate library facilities hecord-
ing to the annual report of UBC
librarian Neal Harlow.
"Research collections must be
systematically extended in fields
of graduate interest or we shall
fail miserably to cope with impending conditions," Mr. Harlow states in his 1956-57 report
to the University Senate..
The report also .cites the urgent need for a "college library"
for undergraduates with "an
open shelf collection of 40,000
volumes" offering "a variety of
material beyond bare course requirements."
"To proceed with dispatch toward a major program or advanced studies and research, the
annual book fund must be increased over a two or three years
period by not less than $10,000
a year.
"The Library's fund for books
comprised 2 per cent of the total
operational budge\ of the university in 1956-57 and in a very
real sense this critical factor
determines the ultimate course
of higher education in Bri'mh
Columbia," said Mr. Harlow.
In reviewing the extensive
activities of the library in th*
past four years of increasing
enrolment, Mr. Harlow states
that enrolment has risen 43 per
cent, loans * at the main desV
34 per cent. Of 91,700 new
volumes   added,   nearly   44,009
have passed through the library's mer provides a 1100 more study
bindery.
Reporting on alterations to
the library building, Mr. Harlow
says an addition to the book-
stack completed during the sum-
car rells.
The report points out that the
library building is inadequate
for the mass of students which
throng it every day.
The New York Life Agent
on your campus
is a good man to know.
Representative
BOB DIXON
MA. 7364 CR. 8-5321
EXCLUSIVE
Gold Medal
Introductory Special
This week and next week only
'   CASH AND CARRY
SKIRTS, SLACKS, PANTS  48*
COATS (plain)   88*
Delivery on Specials Extra
EXCLUSIVE
Gold Medal Service
Insures Your Garments Against Fire
and Theft While in Our Care
STORE NO. 5
5732 UNIVERSITY BLVD.
THC
BRITISH AMERICAN OH
COMPANY LIMITED
Company representatives will visit the University of
British Columbia January 13, 14, 15 and 16 to interview
all s'tudents who are interested in careers iyv the oil
industry. iJt   <,.....*w
1. EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION—
(a) EXPLORATION GEOLOGY — Graduates in Honors Geology and Geological Engineering will be
considered for permanent employment. Third year,
fourth year and graduate school students in the
same courses will be considered for temporary
summer employment.
(b) EXPLORATION GEOPHYSICS — Graduates in
the following courses will be considered for permanent employment:
Hon. Physics Engineering Physics
Hont Mathematics Civil Engineering
Hon. Math, and Physics        Elecrical   Engineering
Hon. Geology Geological Engineering
Third year, fourth year year graduate school students in these same courses will be considered for
temporary summer employment.
(c) PRODUCTION ENGINEERING — Graduates in
all Engineering courses will be considered for permanent employment and third year students will
be considered for temporary summer employment.
(d) EXPLORATION ACCOUNTING AND PRODUCTION CLERICAL — Students graduating in 1958
, with a Bachelor of Commerce degree will be considered for permanent employment in Exploration
Accounting or Production Clerical work.
2. MANUFACTURING (refining) — Graduates in Commerce, Chemistry, Engineering Physics, Civil, Mechanical, Chemical, Metallurgical and Electrical Engineering
3. MARKETING (Sales, Operations), TRANSPORTATION, ECONOMICS AND CO-ORDINATION,
CRUDE AND PRODUCT SUPPLY, FINANCE —
Graduates in Engineering, Commerce, Economics and
Arts.
Our booklet "Graduates and B-A" is available to
all students at the Placement Office. This booklet is an
introduction to the career opportunities for "You" at
B-A in its various departments.
PLEASE CONSULT YOUR  PLACEMENT  OFFICER
FOR INTERVIEW TIMES     '
—To  be  satisified
—For a better haircut
UPPER TENTH BARBER
European Barbers
4574 West 10th Avenue
Ben-Hill
Contest
AgainOpen
The Ben Hill - Tout Photography compel.il ion is again open
to anyone attending UBC. There
are separate divisions for students and facully in both black
and  white,  and  color .shots.
This year there is a new section for photographs of tech
Hical nature. Substantial eash
prizes and tmphios will bo
awarded to Ihe winners. Last
year's winner was Ubyssey
photographer Stan Triggs.
Contest closes on February
IH, 11).") 8.
■
I
I
I
I
I
I
FilmSoc Presents
I^IURSDAY,  JAN.  9—12:30,  2:30
"Beauties of the Night"
Gina Lollobrigida
Chosen   for   Royal   Command   Performance
TUESDAY, JAN. 14—3:30, 6:00, 8:00, 10:00
"ECSTASY"
Starring  Hedy  Lamarr
STUDENTS — 35 CENTS
I
I
The College Shop - Brock Million
WHERE THERE'S SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE
CRESTS
NUMERALS
U.B.C. BLAZERS
U.B.C. JACKETS
U.B.C. TIES
T-SHIRTS
PINS
RINGS
BEER MUGS
NOTE  BOOKS
RAZOR BLADES
SHOE LACES
PLAYING CARDS
LIGHTER FLUID
FLASH BLUBS rowm*
MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION l-OMB»
BUMPER STRIPS
PING PONG BALLS
CRESTED JEWELRY
SWEAT CLOTHES
SCARVES
UMBRELLAS
CRESTED  STATIONERY
CHRISTMAS GIFT ITEMS
FACULTY SWEATERS
LOST AND FOUND
BOBBY PINS
NAIL TRIMMERS
KLEENEX
COUGH DROPS
TOOTH BRUSHES
BANDAIDS
THE COLLEGE SHOP
NEW BROCK EXTENSION
Open Monday to Friday - 11:30 to 1:30
THE
RNATIONAL NICKEL COMPANY
OF CANADA LIMITED
OFFERS
Career Opportunities
"IN
Headquarters
PHILIPS iiudFLEI
for
IT WOOD
Radio.
Television i
ii d
Hi-Fi
V,
uaranle
Vnd TV
liep;
nlio
irs
iai.r
....
Radio
44;'
Rental
:,  West
Ahnui
and
IDlh
L!2i
Re
A vi
1
ENGINEERING —
V\- MINING
•/.; METALLURGICAL
•// CHEMICAL
•A- ELECTRICAL
V MECHANICAL
y\- 'CIVIL
AND GEOLOGY —
-fa Our  representatives  will  visit  the  university  on
JANUARY Kith AND 17th
■^r We  invite  you  to arrange an  interview  through
YOUR PLACEMENT OFFICE
THE
INTERNATIONAL NICKEL COMPANY
OF CAN/IDA LIMITED
Copper Cliff, Ontario
YOUNG MEN - WOMEN
STUDENTS - TEEN AGERS
Fabulous 45 RPM record offer: All the latest currently popular HI-FI
Quality hit recordings can be yours now at a fraction of their reg,lar retail
price during the HOLLYWOOD RECORD CLUB new membership drive.
During this membership drive in order to acquaint you with our records
we will send you four (4) currently popular hit records of your choice,
eight sides in all, for the low-low price of only $1.00 plus .15 cents to
cover the cost of postage and handling. You must be completely satisfied
with your records, if not simply return to us and your $1.00 will be
immediately refunded. Below is a lost of ten (10) different categories from
u-hich you may choose your first four (4) records. Each category consists of
four records.
( ) Rock-N-Roll
( ) Popular
( ) Rvthm and Blues
( ) Honky Tonk
( ) Latin American
( } The Talking Bible (St. Matthew)
( ) Country and  Western
( ) Square Dance (With Call)
( ) A Tribute to Tommy Dorscy
( ) Family Hymns
Please add $1.00 plus postage for each additional
four records requested. Mail to.
RECORDS
6625 Delmar Blvd., Dept. 313, Saint Louis 5, Mo.
mm
Mfu,
Fashion news, 1958, 1$ In
prl it! Vivacious prints which
will continu* to present livelier
fashion styles from January
through the coming summer.  :
Everything It Ntw
About These Pumpil
The exquisite Italian %i\\*\
floral prints ... the Stiletto,
heels ... the rapier flint
needle toes. Stunning prints in
black and white, blue pni
white,  tangerine and
black- 17.fi
Shoes—Second Hear
Floral Pumps Meet
Their Match In ..»
these elegant hondtwgs. Ats#
flowered prints from Italy , , t
specially imported to match
foshion'i newest pr 1n I • e)
pumps. Block and white, bM
and white, tangerine a«4
black.   Black plastic handlfi.
14.91
SIiom — Saw*' Woo*
An Older Frock Hot
A New Flinf At Ufa
when revived with a smart
printed ascot combined with •
collar.   Predominating   colours
•re red or blue. 2.98
Neekwear—Main Fleer
Head Topper With
A Continental Flair
for sophistication is this clif»«
on cap, with aay printed lining.
Red or blue background. 3.98
Neckwear—Main floor
When Winter WMi
Blow Cold ane* Drear
tuck one's tretfas imdor th*
warm and cosy hootf, tovero
We, and printed an am fide In
the popular ocelot pattern On*
may even oa«y It «t • wwifft
1.9$
Neckwe«*—-M«J* Heajr Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, January  9, 1958
Jazz In Jamaica       Lucky Jim; Unlucky Joey
By  TONY  GAMBRILL
While the strains of "The
Banana Boat Song" lurched
across the lobby of the sumptuous Tower Isles Hotel on
Jamaica's fashionable North
Coast, "Thc A Train" belted
across the stage of the Carib
Theatre in Kingston, 50 miles
away carrying thc island's version of "Jazz '57."
For the concert, musicians
and vocalists had been flushed
out of local clubs and hotels
and dragged willingly from
their more mundane duties
with university, military and
Salvation Army bands. Luckily, the theatre was air-conditioned because when 3,000
Jamaicans and 30 musicians
get together the atmosphere
can   easily   become   explosive.
The jazz review was put on
by two young men about town,
Lloyd Adams and Sonny Brad-
shaw (known by M. C. Fred
Wilmot, late of Vancouver and
eastern Canada, as "Sonny-
bee"), According to the program, only a few years ago
the boys had found currying
interest in jazz "hard sledding" which is quite some metaphor to use in a tropic clime.
However, "Jazz '57" revealed that they had overcome the
peculiarities of the weather
and travelled a long way in
the intervening period. The
Big Band played like they'd
never played before and they
probably hadn't been together
more than a handful of tunes.
Sonnybee conducted in a reel
"after six" tux jacket and led
the boys through a dozen numbers like the man who flags
the cars home in the Millc
Miglia. He got satisfactory results, particularly with a Kcn-
ton-esque raaitibo entitled
"Night in Jamaica" written by
one Carlos Malcolm, late of
Panama. Sonnybee left the
track briefly while Blue
Buchanan took a deep breath
and an alto-sax and made "Harlem Nocturne" feel at home
in Jamaica,
A disappointing trend in song
stylings was introduced early
in the program when a warmed-over Frank Sinatra trotted
out his produce. He was, incidentally, the only white performer in the show. He was
followed by a Sara Vaughn
who did, in one what Les Paul
can achieve after five re recordings. As a result, the song just.
didn't have a chance, hater, a
"Young Satchmo" made a
showing (on hearing him, the
original L. Armstrong growled
mysteriously, "You're mean,
man"). Came the Hi-Fi's, four
men who sounded like the Four
Freshmen but looked like any
four   freshmen    uncomfortable
in an exam they hadn't studied
for. Finally, a young lady with
thc most delightful of voices
proved that you need only to
be 14 to know what "Moonlight in Vermont" feels like.
She made quite clear that' she
had the audience in the palm
of her hand when they followed her breathlessly through "I
Got Rythm."
Four combos that were presented turned up the most original in both composition and
technique. A top-flight guitarist soloed on his own composition in one of three offerings
by the sextet from Kingston's
only legitimate night club.
Vibes — a comparatively newcomer in the range of instruments on the local scene — and
an electric harmonica were the
lead instruments in a quintet
that played an intense number
entitled "Profile." An experimental septet made a brief encouraging appearance, rendering a vaguely classical three-
part "Jamaican Mcnto" (a
mento being a Jamaican equivalent of the calypso from the
point of view of musical construction).
The performance of the University College of the West
Indies Trio, to my mind, was
the most outstanding offering
on the program. Led by a big-
framed pianist from the tiny
island of Antigua, the trio
seemed to examine each piece
as a unit and then individually
and draw from each an exquisite essence. They revealed an
exciting unity that I recall the
Modern Jazz Quartet displayed
when they played at UBC a
couple of years ago.
Item 8 on the program,
"Simms and Robinson — rock
and roll harmonizers," did not
take place. I must admit that
I did have a twinge of curiosity
about their performance.
The Big Band and Sonnybee
(now in a faint pink "after six"
*ux jacket, returned for the
finale   with   a  gluttonous  ver
sion of "The A Train" which
featured every member of the
brass section (including a ten-
year-old virtuoso wielding a
comparatively gigantic saxophone) and perhaps the most
patient congo-drum player on
the island — patient because
there hadn't been a calypso
played all evening.
By MIKE MATTHEWS
LUCKY JIM. as a novel,
was highly diverting, even hilarious. M,uch credit, then, to
Britain's Boultirtg brothers for
capturing so much of its vitality and charqp in their movie
version. More credit to them
for adding scenes and effects
(notably   the   introduction   of
Jim Dixon and the flower debacle) the appeal of which was
primarily visual, without
swerving from the story line.
This latter, of course, is a
trifle improbable, Lucky Jim
Dixon should, by all the laws
of probability, have been
ground under the collective
heel of his legion of oppressors,
should never have escaped
with the lolly (the lolly in this
case being a big-eyed and vacuous Canadian actress named
Sharon Acker — a sort of halfwit version of the girl in the
novel). But Jim is no ordinary mortal. He is Jack-the-
Giant Killer. Literary justice
assures his eventual triumph.
»oooooofloooooo&e
EDITOR, BARRIE HALE
ccecceeGOQoeoQOoeseoQOQooooooeooeosoeeosee^
Charlie In The Brock Caf.
Extension Courses
Art appreciation and painters workshops are featured
among 25 new University Extension Department courses
which  begin in January.
The two art courses will be
given by Fay and Robin Pearce,
a husband and wife team who
have lectured in England,
Africa  and  Ihe Middle Ea,st.
Mrs. Pearce. a painter and
muralist. with wdde experience
in leaching, will conduct three
painters workshops each 12
weeks long.
Beginning painting will be
given Mondays, 7:30 - 9:30 p.m.
beginning January 6.
By   BARRIE  HALE
Our friend Charlie dropped
down the other day. Charlie
has been working for forty
years or so on an autobiographical novel; he's getting on
now, and we enquired how the
book was coming. As always,
it was just about finished.
"Those people upstairs," he
sighed, running his fingers
through his thinning hair, "I
can't fit them in, somehow."
We gave him a cigarette, sat
back, and asked what he
meant. Charlie is always good
for an hour or so of ours; he
seems to have had the happy
knack, for an autobiographer,
of being the most interesting
places at the most significant
times.
He began to pace. "I mean
the blank-eyed Leaders Of Tomorrow upstairs in the Cafeteria. I was working up a piece
on nondescript architecture, so
I came out last Monday to take
a look at the, old Brock. Well,
I decided to stop by the Brock
Caf. for a cup of coffee, and
there they were. So help me
Sloefn Wilson, I was fascinated.
I've been up there for three
clays, just staring. I can't
place it."
"Place what?" we asked, and
gave him a cigarette. We settled back; he continued to
pace.
"Well, to begin with, I can't
place their attitude. Here they
are, the celophane-wrapped
product of a generation with a
habit of labelling their mistakes and selling them to one
another as social heritage.
"Even their socio-political enemies are neatly labelled and
slirnied. All the loose ends are
tied up. They've been left a
checkmate world and instead
of clearing the board and starting a new game, they sit up
there swilling coffee and anecdotes on the interminable position of the pieces on the board,
GEOPHYSICISTS  REQUIRED
If ynuv ;;r;u!iialinj; major is in Geophysics, Geology, Physics, Mathematics,
or Kleelrieal, iVlinin;.', or Geological Engineering, we would like to discuss
career opportunities in Exploration Geophysics with you. Summer employment  opportunities  lor  third  year  undergraduates.
;V'ii#v' ~ *
^y.jj^ iJtm
Recruiting Personnel will
visit the Campus on
MONDAY and TUESDAY
JANUARY 13 and 14
1958
See
U n i ve is i ty PI a cemc nt
Office
for  further  particulars
PAN AMERICAN
Pet rolejyuLCorporaHon
They seem to have passed
straight out of adolescence into
dotage, and don't even feel defensive about it."
"How do you mean?" we
inquired, immediately defensive.
"I mean they're cynical," he
said, "in the same way that the
Fascisti were cynical. They
look at the world and say:
'Well, there it is. If I say these
things and do these things I
get these things back, and the
things I get back will, in turn,
get me these things.' And they
do it indiscriminately. The
decadent, the valueless, the expeditious, are lumped together
with the ethical, the rational,
the humane, and the choice is
determined by a two-way desire to fit into things as they
are, and to be the best at it."
"Well, what's so notable in
that? Individual responsibility isn't the only deterrriinate
in . . ."
"Yes, yes, yes," he said-impatiently. "There's more. You
see, they know what they're
doing. They take the responsibility.    You see,    they'll    say
anything, mouth any value at
   .. i
all; they know they do it, but
the thing that protects them is
that they all do it."
"But," we began.
He waved us silent.
"But the most frightening
ones are the ones who* have
picked it up just because it
was there to be picked up.
There are so many of them.
The place is full of them, the
ones who have picked it up by
osmosis; they're the ones who
use it as a reflex, and they're
usually better at it than the
ones who have thought about
it. They can't be educated, because they haven't reached this
position by any discernable rational means."
He was silent for a moment.
After a while we asked, "Well,
just who are THEY? They
seem to have got you fairly
wrought up."
He laughed, shortly. "\es, I
know. I'm beginning to sound
like something Scott Fitzgerald
cut out of "This Side of Paradise." He began to pace again.
"The, 'they' I mean, are pretty
easy to pick out. They all examine you closely, You can
feel  them probing your exte
rior for some button to press
to provoke the proper response. I guess that's the most
notable feature they have in
common: that cautious, constant hunger with which they
examine you for any sign of
deviance, any tendency you
manifest that might interrupt
their chanting of the litany of
right-thinking."
"And they're all upstairs in
the Caf?" we asked.
"God, they're all over the
place. If they just stayed
there it would be all right."
"Well . . ."
"You see," he said, "once the
non-thinkers, the feelers, get
hold of it, it'll sp»ead. Everybody will be trying to be
everybody else and at the same
time watching everybody else
to see that they don't change."
Another silence filled the office. We felt a little dizzy,
and shook ourselves.
"Well," we said, spreading
our hands, "what'll we do?"
He shook his head, and then
sniggered. "We could always
go upstairs for a cup of coffee," he said.
I
TODAY 35c
Custom Tailored Suits
for Ladies and Gentlemen
Gowns and Hoods
Uniforms
Double breasted suits
modernized in the new
single breasted styles.
Mafrz and Wozny
SPECIAL  STUDENT RATES
548 Howe St.      MArine 4715
ATTENTION STUDENTS
for good reliable transportation   you   can   afford   .   .   •
Contact
HARRY PRYKE
at
ZEPHYR   MOTORS
130 W. Broadway — EM 2191
Exclusive British Ford
Dealers
Phone me now about how you
can earn spare cash.
For the latest and most up-
to-date reference books on
Canada, compiled by its
most eir.minent authorities,
and covering all fields of
Canada's development, write
79 Oriole Walk, Vancouver.
lAdvvi'tlseniont)
Graduating In '58
Shell    Oil    Representative
Will   Visit   Your   University
January   13,   14*   15*   16
We will interview Chemical, Mechanical, Geological, Elictrical
and Metallurgical Engineers for career openings in: Petroleum Refining and Marketing; Petrochemical Manufacturing
and Marketing; Transportation and Supplies; and Purchasing
We will interview Arts and Commerce graduates for Treasury
i<n<! Sales careers.
IF YOU ARE GRADUATING  IN 45)58 IN ONE OF THE
COURSES MENTIONED ABOVE IT CAN BE TO YOUR
ADVANTAGE TO REQUEST AN INTERVIEW.
Here's What To Do:
1. Kill our the Personal Inl'ornuilion
form available in your Placement
Office,
2. Select a convenient time for your
interview on Ihe timetable provided,
Ask your Placenienl Office lor a
copy of the booklet "Opportunity
with Shell in Canada," This booklet and our career poster provide
information about our company ol
interest lo you.
Shell Oil Company o£ Canada, Limited ^HELL^
He is also the strange pastiche — sensual, yet sensible,
sensitive and lovable —which
serves as a model for Britain's
angry young men. He is win-
ningly portrayed by Ian Car-
michael of Private's Progress
and Brothers-In-Law fame. His
many faces are highly entertaining although his shifting
accents — from a mild Oxford
to what would seem to be a
Midlands or semi-Welsh, is
somewhat disconcerting.
Other ept performances arc
by Hugh Griffith as a disoriented academic to end all disoriented academics, Maureen
Connell (no one remembers
her in "The Rising of the
Moon") as the revolting and
neurotic Margaret Peel,, and
Terry Thomas as Bad Bert-
rand, the intellectual, and thc
scapegoat.
What's that, Bunky? You
say you're getting tired of
adult westerns? Then nip down
to the Studio and catch Lucky
Jim.
PAL JOEY proves mainly
two things. 1. Even a John
O'Hara story can be ruined by
Hollywood. 2. Frank Sinatra
is capable of carrying a movie
completely unaided.
iavei
Sold in the Brock, Quad, Cafeteria,   Raven  inspires  artistic
deleria.    Thirty-five   coppers,,
coupon-croppers.      Buy    one,
try one, yum yum.
CLASSIF1EP~
LOST—One red leather wallet in cafeteria on Monday. Contents: money and identification,
etc. Please return. Reward.
Phone MA. 2695.
WANTED— Photograph carrier wanted for Ubyssey. Job
pays well and takes up three
afternoons a week for two hdurs
each day. Call in at Publications
office at North Brock basement
this afternoon.
WANTED—Room and board,
laundry; boy to share, $55. Phn.
AL. 1004-L.
ROOM and BOARD for three
male students in Fraternity
House, $65 per month. 4506 W.
9th. Ask for Roland Gilbert.
WANTED — To join, car pool
or riders from New Westminster ('55 Plymouth) Phone Larry
at LA. 1-6303 after 5 p.m.
WANTED — Ride from 30th
Ave. and Alma St. Phorie AL.
2685-L.
WANTED — Ride from vicinity of 21st Ave. W. and Quesnel
Drive, 8.30 - 5.00, if possible.
Phono CH. 9785.
ROOM and BOARD—For two
students, sharing home, private,
good meals. CE. 0714.
WANTED — Riders, starting
j Boundary at Broadwfly, and go-
i ing either 12 Ave. or 1st Ave.
j and 4th Ave., Mon. through Sat.
I to 8.30 lectures. Phone HA.
4593-L.
WANTED — Ride wanted urgently! from Victoria Drive and
59th, 8.30 lectures. Please contact Mars al ELgin 9357.
FOR SALE — 1951 Austin,
radio and heater, 4 new tires,
low mileage, economical transportation. Phone CE. 2551.
NOTICE — Typing Thesis,
Essays, Term Papers, etc. Call
Mrs. Woodward, AL. 2C30-L,
WANTED — Ride wanted
from vicinity of 54th and Flcm;
ing St. to vicinity of Brock Hall,
UBC. Contact Andrea at ALma
4404 during day.
ROOM and BOARD, male,
$60 per month.   Ph. KE, 9103,
TUXEDO
E.
A.
LEI
M3
How* m.
MAr.
I4«
RENTALS
W'HITtt   COATS  —   TAILS
MIlKMMi   COATH
IIIKKC'TORN  COATS
HHIKTS  AMI ACSCENHORim
Complete   StoHi  of   I.atem   U:)dil<
$1 discount to all UBC
students
WANTED
Y'Hir old double breasted suit
, . . to be made into a smart
now single breasted model
ivilh Ihe new trim notch lapel,
UNITED TAILORS
■VI!) Granville
PA 4(549

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