UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Oct 6, 1960

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0124663.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0124663.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0124663-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0124663-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0124663-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0124663-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0124663-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0124663-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0124663-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0124663.ris

Full Text

 ,-^reSZ,
s p-
rgs NOT
M VAIN
7rVF
5^'™ Of   -
i960   .£„• '
TO^fcAjN
Vol. XLI1I.
VANCOUVER,   B.C., THURSDAY,   OCTOBER   6,   1960
48
No. 9
Secretary Quits
As Scandal Grows
AMS VICE-PRESIDENT JOHN GOODWIN preparing to make
an early start for Elphinstone, where Leadership'Conference
is being held this weekend. He's well prepared.
i   ■
Leaders To Confer
in stone
Student leaders will meet at Camp Elphinstone this week
end to discuss current campus activities.
The sixth Annual Leadership
Blood Donations
Near Deadline;
Foresters   Lead
Forestry leads all faculties in
UBC's annual fall bleed, according to latest available statistics.
Tabulations   after   Tuesday's
blood - letting    session    showed
Forestry out in front in the faculty race with 77.4 percent of
its   quota.   Fort Camp  was the
top Men's Residence having bled
to 64 percent of its quota. Acadia
(41.4   percent) and   New  Men's
Residences (23.3 percent) trailed.
Total   of  396 pints   was   collected in the first two days of
the  drive,  which ends  Friday.
This is 28.7 percent of the quota
of 2300 pints.
With 40 percent of the drive
completed, officials have expressed fears that the drive will
fall short of  its  quota.
Top five donors in the faculty
race are: Forestry (77.4%), Law
(60%), Nursing (55.3%), Home
Ec (42.2%), Engineering (34.1
%). Architecture <8.7%) is running last."        ^
Free tickets are being given
to donors for Filmsocs Old Time
Comedy Series which ends Friday.
Elections Upset
Manitoba Students
WINNIPEG (CUP) — Charges of election manipulation
have resulted from the recent University of Manitoba student
presidential election.
Conference is designed to provide an opportunity for discussion of campus plans and problems, offer guidance in leadership, and generate interest and
spirit in activities for the year
to come.
Only students who have received invitations may attend.
Delegates who have been invited
and have not yet registered
should do so immediately at the
AMS office.
Buses leave this Friday, Oct.
7, from Brock Hall? Delegates
should bring sleeping bags and
warm clothing.
Dr. MacKenzie  On  Speaking  Tour
UBC president Norman MacKenzie will leave Saturday
on a one-week speaking tour in Northern British Columbia.
Dr. MacKenzie will speak on the future of higher
education, in B.C. at Fort St. John, Dawson Creek, Prince
George, Quesnel and Williams Lake.
Arts Gallery
Features Grad
A one man show of paintings
by UBC graduate Joe Plaskett
is now on display in the Fine
Arts Gallery.
Also on view is a display of
(photography of Europe and the
Middle East by Donald W.
Buchanan, former associate
director of the National Gallery
of Canada and editor of Canadian Art Magazine.
Plaskett, who was born in
New Westminster andt graduated
from UBC with honors in his-
otry, studied art and was one
time principal of the Winnipeg
School of Art. He now lives in
Paris. -
Visiting hours for the Plaskett and Buchanan shows are
10:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays
through Saturdays and from 7
rto; 9vjum. Tuesdays.
Rhodes, Commonwealth
Scholarships Now Offered
Application forms for graduate and postgraduate scholarships are now available t Dean Gage's office.
The Rhodes Scholarship, to be
awarded' the generally outstand-1
ing man in B.C. with at least
two years previous university
experience, must be applied for
by November 1.
Worth $2100 the award sends
its recipient to England's Oxford
University for two or three
years.
Various Commonwealth governments are giving scholarships
covering all living expenses and
tuition fees for post graduate
work in Great Britain.
They are intended for persons
whose countries could benefit
from their foreign training and
applicants must graduate by
1961.
Under the plan, federal post
graduate scholarships tenable at
the Universily College of Rhodesia and Nyasaland for two
years are being offered.
Applicants must be Commonwealth citizens or British protected persons, and should be under 28.
Further information is available at Dean Gage's office.'
Cecelia Lrioergan, one of the
two candidates for the presidency of the University's Student Union accused treasurer
Allan Darling of telling her not
to challenge the other candidate,
Roy Mackenzie.
Student's Union Secretary
Dave Humphreys later resigned
charging the election had been
manipulated by a "one-man executive show."
OVERSTEPPED
Mackenzie was acclaimed
president after Miss Lonergan
withdrew because of what she
termed student union and university pressures.
race, he extended the deadline
for another day, consulting only
the vice-president, Duncan Wallace on the matter.
"This should have been an executive decision. Darling should
not dictate policy," Humphreys
said.
It was pointed out during the
campaign that required changes
in the student constitution to
make the election possible have
not been made, and all actions
by the executive and the deputy
returning officer concerning the
election may be unconstitutional.
Had she stayed in the race,
Miss Lonergan would have been
the second woman candidate for
Th# el«^bn"tiad'--l)*^t^led---^»-;P'esideil^'-to-'*te"h^or?; of
Student Caught
Red-Handed
A motoring student's attempt
to shorten his walk from parking lot to class has ended in
failure.
The enterprising student
fashioned an imitation blue and
gold faculty parking sticker and
began to use the faculty lots.
His   scheme   went   unnoticed
until a faculty member saw th'
number on the student's sticke
was the same as his.
Result: the student who':
name has not been released hag
been referred to the dean of hi.
faculty with the recommendation
that the case be referred to the
Faculty Council for any further
action.
after Lindley Abdulah who was
elected this spring failed his
year.
There is still some question as
to the legality of the election as
the constitution permits only
spring elections.
The entire council executive,
except the vice-president favored a new election instead ol
raising the vice-president to the
presidency.
INTERVENTION
A few senior members of the
UMSU council were reported to
have approached Dean of Women Marjorie MacKay for her intervention. Miss Lonergan said
that Dean MacKay phoned and
advised her not to run.
The dean allegedly said, 'It
would not be fair to yoursef, to
UMSU or to your sex."
Meanwhise Humphreys said
that he learned from reliable
sources that Mr. Darling had
told the deputy returning that
he, as treasurer, was "running
the show."
DEADLINE
The ex-secretary stated that
the original deadline for nominations had been set for noon
of Sept. 26. Later, when the
deadline was not advertised suf-
iciently, Darling conferred with
lumphrys, and executive members to extend the deadline one
day.
But, Humphreys contended,
that Miss Lonergan was in the
when  the  treasurer  discovered
the university.
MAYBECK  EXHIBIT ON VIEW
The Ralph Vernard Maybeck
cormmorative exhibition of the
work of the fathers of American
architecture will be on view in
the Fine Arts Reading Room in
the Library from October 11 to
I 29.   ■ ■ ' • ••
School Meeting
There will be a meeting fox
all those interested in working on the High School Conference committee, Friday.
October 7, at noon in the
Music Room. Brock Hall.
DR. MOORTEN ROOG
. . . speaks
Dutch Professor
To Discuss Mass
Communication
A noted Amsterdam professor
and journalist will discuss responsibility in mass communication at 12:30 Friday in Bu. 104.
Dr. Marten Rooy who first
established himself as a lawyer
in Rotterdam in 1929, later
moved to journalism and worked no various editorial assignments and organizations among
journalists.
In 1956 he received his doctor's degree in Economics and is
now a professor at the Univer?
sity of Amsterdam.
Professor Rooy's studies, and
international work will provide
background for his talk on mass
communication, ; Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 6, 1960
THE UBYSSEY
Authorized as second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Published three times weekly throughout the University year
In Vancouver by the Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society,
University of B.C. Editorial opinions expressed are those of the
Editorial Board of the Ubysey and not necessarily those of the Alina
Mater   Society  or   the   University   of   B.C.
TELEPHONES: CA 4-3242, locals 12 (news desk), 13 (critics-
sports),  14 (Editor-inChief), 15, 6 (business offices).
Editor-in-Chief: Fred Fletcher
Managing Editor   ......   Roger McAfee
Features Editor Ed Lavalle
CUP Editor   ...     . .   .   Diane Greenall
Photography Editor Ray Grigg
Senior Editor Ann Pickard
Sports Editor    .......    Mike Hunter
Critics  Editor Mike   Sinclair
r Layout: Clarence Buhr, Larry Kent
j ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR: Keith Bradbury.
NEWS:    Susanne    Clarke,    Sharron    McKinnon,    Denis
Stanley, Dick Climie. Joe Boulduc, Ian Brown.
FEATURES:   Ruth   Robertson,   Susanne   Clarke,   Dave
Taylor. ^____	
A Character Study
(Ed. Note: The following is an excerpt from the Alumni Association Report on the slate of the University, published in
the Autumn edition of The U.B.C. Alumni Chronicle. This por-
,    tion deals with the character of U.B.C.)
What is the present character of UBC?
Character, it has been said, is a subtle thing, and is not
much talked about. A great British editor once described
it as "the slow deposit of past actions and ideals." A noted
Canadian educator said recently that University should
be known as "the powerhouse of freedom."
Committee members had difficulty in defining the present character of UBC. One said candidly that it was impossible. Another submitted that it was "cosmopolitan,"
citing its welcome to the Sopron faculty after the Hungarian revolution; the establishment of International House;
the high incidence (10 per cent) of foreign students; the
formidable number of Commonwealth, European and
American scholars who had lectured in our halls.   .
Another praised UBC as "the only University in the
■world where a student could go out for English rugby,
soccer, Canadian football and American football." Still
another alumnus described UBC as nouveau riche, with a
few of its attendant vulgarities (Le., too great a concern
for money) and added: "I just can't get .used to those
damned buckets of wine in the Faculty Club."
However elusive, of definition UBC's character may be,
Committee members who discussed the subject agreed unanimously that it was there in the beginning, and in the
"Hungry 30's," and again in the student-veteran days of
fhe immediate post-war period.
They were not so sure about todays They were disturbed by reports from .the Students' Council that undergraduates of the 60's were "apathetic." It was noted that
stjudent offices were hard to fill, for a lack of candidates.
Many outstanding meetings were ill-attended. The Ubyssey
advertised desperately for help.
Thus has arisen the anomaly of poverty amidst plenty-
■—a poverty of the spirit in a plenty of creature comforts.
What made UBC great, the Committee felt, was the
yeasty, rambunctious, do-it-yourself ethos which marked
the Great Trek and is summed up in the words: "The
Cairn Spirit." It re-occurreci in the great Petition Drive
of the early 30's, when the University was threatened with
closure; and again in the post-war period, when diapers
Appeared on the clotheslines outside the Fort camps, and
(Professors exclaimed, with reverence and awe, at the keen
attention they were accorded in the classrooms.
■T* •** •*•
Some of this spirit seems to have vanished; and if so,
the University has lost some of its character. Perhaps it has
"merely shifted venue.
It was the strong, conviction of your Committee that
the most privileged person on the campus today is the student living in residence—and ^particularly, the 300 men and
2.70 women who live in "new" residences, as distinguished
from the Fort camps. Here he is afforded an opportunity
to learn the most useful lesson of all, a lesson not always
taught in the classrooms: of learning to live with other
people.
Sharing a bedroom, eating in a common dimng-hall
consulting with a friendly don, indulging in the "bull sessions" which contiguity inspires, he has a sense of belonging
and of purpose which seems to make the whole thing
worthwhile. One student in a residence of 96 may, by this
strange alchemy, become one well-adjusted student on a
campus of 11,000.
Evidence that this was so was encountered frequently
in field trips made by Alumni Association officers, and
reported to your Committee. Parents of students who were
described as "lost" or "lonely" while billeted in a grubby
Sasamat basement now told of letters home, enthusiastic in
their praise of the residential life.
Paradoxically, the students who may be getting least
out of University life are the native "commuters"—men
and women who spend up to an hour or two each day just
driving to and from the campus. This is study-time lost. It
also precludes, for many of them, the possibility of taking
part-time work to help finance their education—a liability
not suffered by those in residence. It was noted by your
Committee that many "commuters" are compelled to use
their cars as study-cells and even as lunch-rooms. We
sympathize with them.
—-Stuart Keate.. The, U.B..C. Alumni Chronicle.
General
Assembly
Comment
Reprinted from the Manchester
Guardian
P r e s i d en t Eisenhower's
speech to the UN Assembly,
(while heavy with platitude,
contained mulch sound sense.
He has given his fullest support to the UN in Africa, has
restated proposals for keeping
outer space free from military
weapons, and has again sought
measures against surprise attack. His speech contained
nothing 'unexpected; but it was
one to which Mr. Krushchev
could give a constructive answer—if he wished to.
A valuable passage in President Eismhower's address was
his restatement of the need
to keep outer space free from
military weapons. Outer space
at present is an area where
neither East or West has any
military advantage. Neither,
indeed, is yet making direct
military use of space—though
both, with the Russians acting first have put into orbit
cameras which can take photographs and give other information of military significance.
Mr. Eisenhower's proposal is
that no one should try to appropriate celestial bodies, that
no one should put into orbit
weapons of mass destruction,
and that there should be international co-operation in such
tasks as weather forecasting
and better communications.
His plan could require the inspection of satellites and other
bodies before they are launched, . but this might well be
easier than other forms of joint
inspection. It is worth discussing.
President Eisenhower's five
proposals to "protect the newly emergent nations of Africa
from ouside pressures that
threaten their independence"
stand in sharp contrast to
Soviet actions and ambitions
in the Congo. The point will
not be lost on the African delegates, many of them attending
for the first time, and it is one
which few statesmen could
resist driving home. The
American record in the Congo
will bear scrutiny, the Russian will not. Apart from the
celebrated Detweiler Agreement, a private comimercial
transaction of which nothing
more has been heard or is likely to be, there has been no attempt at direct intervention.
Some of the five proposals
will, however, need more precise definition. "Non-interference in the internal affairs
of Africa States' is open to
'many (interpretations. Is the
provision of C z e c h o Slovak
technicians to Guinea an interference in internal affairs?
If so, is the provision of American mission teachers to Nigeria,
who can influence young minds
in a anti-Commuist direction?
The President went on to suggest ways in which the UN
could itself provide some of
the technical help needed, and
this may prove a readily acceptable suggestion. If the UN
can relieve new countries of
some of their huge administrative burdens it will certainly be
one sure way of enabling them
to expand their economic and
educational   program.
Hell No!! I Am An American
JABBERWOCKY
By DEREK ALLEN
The glorious motto of this wonderful university, that
same "Tuum Est" you hear repeated ad nauseum, is being
disregarded in a frightening manner by the School of Physical Education.
As every frosh /knows from his avid perusal of that
AMS publication titled imaginatively by said glorious motto,
the ancient Italian quote is designed to promote individualism,
self-reliance, courage and forthrightness in the student body;
not only in the mob, but also individually in you and in me.
That one is goaded with it to get out and do things that one
would much rather see someone else do is, only incidental.
We must do our duty and maintain student morale, as according to the aforementioned book, "The spirit embodied in this
maxim is the essential theme in the vigorous history of our
university."
Fresh and dewy-eyed from high school, the average freshman is hit by all manner of new, even novel ideas when
first coming to campus. Many things he protests. Some are
good for him — shock him out of his youth and naivity while
maintaining his unrepressive spirit — others are of doubtful
value.
* * *
But it is in the things that he accepts that one finds
reason for alarm. The rigidly conformist background of high
school leads first year types calmly into the gymnasiums to
sign up happily for physical education courses. They don't
protest. They don't complain. They go quietly, even enthusiastically, having been propagandized into believing the
the claims of various individuals regarding the excellence of
of the program offered, the variety of courses available and
the opportunity to choose something that suits their timetable and convenience, as well as something that suits
their taste.
Physical education is all very well in lower schools
educating children who need to stretch their growing muscles
in a play period every once in a while. Even in high school,
however, the grade twelve students are adjudged sufficiently
mature — physically at any rate — to be excused from this
program. Why then must it be again imposed at this supposedly higher institution? Why should we do what we were
once thought to have outgrown? Well, we are told, we
must get exercise.
Were this true — and, since the War Memorial Olympians
sabotage their own theme by allowing things like Ballroom
Dancing to invade their healthful exercise lists, we may be
inclined to doubt this — that would still leave no reason
for the powerful influences exerted upon infant minds to
insure conformity and colorless obedience to instructorial
edict.
This is where the contempt of our glorious motto comes
in. They want to see conformity.
•T* •** •!*
It is bad enough that the reputation of this university
should be tarnished by having to support the burden of compulsory physical education classes. It is too much that that
much strained reputation should have to have also on its
conscience the guilt of trying to produce uniformed automatons in these compulsory physical education  classes.
The sight of many healthy and, from a distance, indistinguishable yOung bodies — uniformally clothed in identical
short and  singlet  sets  — doing   exercises   or  other   group
movement  of some sort, is one  which  gladens the eye  of
an armed forces instructor.
That it also brightens the life of a university instructor
is not amusing, it is tragic. ■ _ Thursday, October 6, 1960
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
FIVE-THIRTY CLUB
By IAN BROWN
A horde of visitors descending on Monday night's Council
meeting made last week's "public" session seem as quiet as the
Armouries during Blood Drive week.
Some dozen USC members looked on while new Director
of Student Activities John Haar introduced himself to Council,
and five other visitors spoke on subjects ranging from parking
to reporting.
* * *
Acting on a request from WUS Chairman Ruth Kidd, Council
decided to send President Edgar to the WUS National assembly
at Queen's this weekend.
He will be one of three  delegates  representing UBC.
Miss Kidd said that the UBC Committee was possibly the
most important one in Canada, and was running the largest
scholarship programme.
* *        *
A programme for Leadership Conference was outlined by
Phil Lower and Merv Hanson. An interesting detail is that, while
three buses will leave here Friday night, only two will come
back Sunday. A high mortality rate is obviously expected.
3£ *& S£
The question of who pays what in connection with the
Engineers' building project last week was referred, after much
discussion, to the Disciplinary Committee. For all you legal
eagles, here's the pitch: The Engineers, while willing to pay
for transportation of the bricks, feel they are not responsible for
the damage which occurred when "some clod" pushed down their
wall. On the other hand, it was pointed out that there would
have been no damage if they had not instigated the prank in
the first place.
* *        *
Food Services' Eric Ricker reported no new developments
in the lunchroom situation. Administration is working on the
problem, and is expected to come up with a solution "soon".
Meanwhile, as Mr. Ricker said, "it's getting cold outside."
As John Goodwin pointed out last week, this is Administration's
problem, and this column feels that some form of action on
their part is already a little overdue. It was painfully obvious
that eating facilities were inadequate last year, and an extra
1,000 students Haven't helped to improve things.
**••!• Sfi
Students can expect a special AMS General Meeting sometime this fall, when Council will make a definite proposal to the
student body about a new Union building. It is expected that
UBC Rowers will be honored at this meeting.
rfi *f» *fi
Council extended a vote of thanks to Nick Omelusik and
the other members of FOC for organizing a very successful Frosh
Retreat. Though several Councillors seemed to be suffering from
, Retreat Reaction (or Elphinstone Exhaustion), it was generally
agreed that the Retreat had been well worth while.
S£ S£ S£
Student employees of the College Shop can look forward
to a 10c pay increase, bringing their hourly rate up to $1.00.
In spite of this heavy added expense, Treasurer Russ Robinson
reported that the Budget had finally been balanced, and will be
presented to Council next week.
•X* V V
Welcomed to Council meetings was RadSoc commentator Art
Saul, who will be reporting SC business over a new RadSoc
programme called "Monitor" every Tuesday. We feel that a
slightly more reassuring name might have been found for this
series — the word "monitor" comes from the Latin "monere",
meaning "to 'warn".
BARBARA  KWIATKOWSKA
.  . . Bardot?
Polish Bardot
Stars in NewMovie
Poland's answer to Brigitte
Bardotte will star in Cinema 16's
programme at noon today in Bu
106. '
Barbara Kwiatkowska plays
in "Eve wants to sleep," Eve
gets tangled up in her efforts to
find a room for her first night
in a  strange town.
The film was made in Poland
in 1957 and played in London
for many weeks.
VOLKSWAGEN OWNERS!
We have over 250 satisfied V-W owners patronizing our
station. Qualified V-W mechanics make expert repairs and
service a specialty.
Why not give us a try!
UNIVERSITY SHELL SERVICE
10th Ave & Discovery CA 4-0828
FREE PICK UP AND DELIVERY
Of Interest...
Laffl
Photo Exhibit
Photography enthusiasts can
participate in an open exhibition in Brock Hall during the
second week in November.
Last year four students put on
an exhibition and it went over
so well that the Vancouver Art
Gallery with funds from Canada
Council put it on display around
the country.
This year one of the students,
Norman Pearson, Arts 4, took it
upon himself to hold an open
show.
The deadline for all entires is
Monday.
For more information call
Norm at CA 4-6488 early evenings.
Dr. Horry Wolf
A University of Washington
profesisor of history and science
will speak to the B.C. History
and Science Society in Buchanan
penthouse at 8:15 p.m. Friday.
Dr. Harry Woolf will discuss
"The scientific revolution in the
seventeenth century." He is
widely known as editor Of
"Isis," and the author of the
recent work "Transit of Venus.*'
For the girl with the
FLAIR!
Our Fashions are Chic and
Sophisticated
SPORTSWEAR
Dresses  for . Every   Occasion
Formals
JaAhioiuvmj. ShjlsA
4530 W. 10th Ave.
Luff, Dam You!
"Have you heard about the
new college game?"
"No, what is it."
"Button, button, here comes
the house mother."
A bargain is a good buy. A
goodbye is a farewell. A farewell is to part. To part is to
leave. My girl left without saying goodbye. She was no bargain anyway.
if. rf. Sf.
"Who's there?" asked St.
Peter.
"It is I?," came the reply.
"Go to hell," he answered,
"We have too many English
majors already."
Men's Hush Puppies
and
Country Lane
"For girls that '-
are going places"       '
TOTEM SHOES
4550 W. 10th CA 4-1810
ELVIRA'S
Pa I ma de Mallorca
Special selection in
IMPORTED GIFTS
from Spain, French Morroco,
Italy, etc.
"And for the the women who
has Everything," Beautiful
Pearls, Broaches, and Sparkling Amber Necklaces from
Spain.
4479 W; 40th Ave.
CA 4^0848
Sale of Paperbacks
and  Prints
at
H. K. BOOKS
750 ROBSON
MU 3-4723
CAFE DAN DINE & DANCE
Important Announcement to All Students
CAFE DAN welcomes back all our guests
and friends from U.B.C.
Special Rate of $1.00 per person (Fri. only)
Comes in effect October 7, 1960 and
continues throughout the season
(A.M.S. card required)
Hurry and make your resehrvations now
Phone MU 4-4034 352 Water St.
"Come and See Us"
J.1,,1.  .J„„„.„tL
RIDGE
THEATRE
16th and Arbutus
October 3-4-5
Mon., Tues., Wed.
John Osborne's London Stage
Hit
LOOK BACK   IN  ANGER
(Adult  Ent.  Only)
Richard Burton — Mary Ure
Claire  Bloom
plus
Diana Barrymore's
Autobiography
TOO MUCH TOO SOON
Dorothy Malone - Erroll Flynn
News
ONE COMPLETE SHOW 7:30
Oct. 6-7-8
Thurs.,  Fri.,  Sal.
Two Great Pictures!
THE  SEVEN   YEAR  ITCH
Color
Marilyn Munroe — Tom Ewell
plus
THE   RELUCTANT
DEBUTANTE
Color
Rex Harrison — Kay Kendall
Cartoon
CLASSICAL DANCERS FROM INDIA
BHUPESH BUHA AND ARUNI DJEVI AND GROUP
ONE NIGHT ONLY
Saturday, October 8th
Doors open 7 p.m. — Show starts 8:15 p.m.
Majestic Theatre
2A West Hastings St.
Tickets at the door — 2 hour program
BHUPEST _QOHA — renowned Hindu Dancer; acclaimed
3y critics across the U.S.A. He has appeared in "The King
md I" and "Around the World in 80 Days."
A.RUN IDEVI —■ Daughter of the famous Indo-Persian
artist Naoli Aruni; at her best in the Arts and Culture of"
the.East.
ssa^aaai
SMART
FALL SHOES
For Men, Women   &Children
Open weekday from
9 a.m. io 6 p.m.
(Fridays till 9  p.m.)
Wally Presley,
Mgr.
Campus Shoe Store
1442 W. 10th Avenue CA 4-3833
Vancouver's Largest; Most Modern, Suburban Shoe Store   I Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 6,   1960
'TWEEN CLASSES
This Is It For Lunch Hour...
^CARIBBEAN STUDENTS
ASSN.
Meeting scheduled for Thursday postponed to 12:30, Friday,
in Bu. 214.
*t« *t* *£•
BIOLOGY CLUB
Prof. Spencer will speak on
bed bugs, fleas, etc., in Bio.
Sciences 2000, 12:30, Friday.
•P **• •!•
U.B;C. RADIO &
EXTENSION DEPT.
Dr. Martin Rooy, political
science professor at the University of Amsterdam, will speak
in Bu 104, 12:30, Friday.
•*• V •*•
HAMSOC
General meeting in Bu 224,
12:30, Friday.
V *T* •*•
GERMAN CLUB
Meeting Friday, noon in Bu
204.
Sp *j* •*•
UKRAINIAN
VARSITY  CLUB
Meeting of the Alpha Omega
Society in Bu 216 12:30, Friday.
CLASSICS CLUB
General meeting today at
12:30, Bu 225.
UBC CREW
All men interested in rowing
are invited to Arts 100, Friday
for discussion of 1960-61 program. ^
9p iji iji
JUNIOR CHEM CLUB
Combined meeting of Junior
and Senior Chem club, Ch 250,
..ipriday, noon.
,'   •*■ •*• •**
WOMENS INTRAMURAL
BWIM i«EET
Eliminations — Officials and
team managers meet on pool
deck a"t 12:30, races will start
at 12:35.
■{• «jp< Sp
MANAGERS
Volleyball entries due at IAB
meeting, Tuesday, 12:30 in
Women's Gym Common Room.
•f* •?* *f*
INTRAMURALS
There is a position open for
Secretary of Women's Intramural Administrative Board. Anyone interested contact Shirley
Blaikie at CA 4-4708 by Friday.
■ *h        v        **•
FLYING SAUCER CLUB        '
■■   General meeting Friday noon
in Bu 223. New members  welcome.
v       •**       •*•    -
PLAYERS  CLUB
, Tours of the stage facilities,
scene, shop, etc. . . . for all
members. Meet in the Green
Room, Friday 12:30, 2:30, 3:30.
*»• •*• *X"
MUSSOC
All singers, especially male,
are reminded of the Damn
Yankees audition, 7:00 in the
MUSSOC clubroom today.
V •*• •!*
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
Weekly testimony meeting,
Friday 12:30 in Bu 227. All welcome.
^   *ft V V
UNITED NATIONS CLUB
"Africa — Black or White,"
Br, Conway and Prof. Davies
discuss recent political developments and constitutional structures in Africa, today 12:30, Bu
.102.
•*• •*• •*?•
BACTERIOLOGY SOCIETY
General mteeting and elections
Tuesday in Wes. 100 at 12:30.
W.A.D.
Girls gymnastic team practice
and meeting today 12:30 in Apparatus room Memorial  Gjren.
NISEI VARSITY
General meeting today in Bu.
104. All members please attend.
V •*• V
SPORTS  CAR  CLUB
Sports Car Club will meet in
Phy 202 at 12:30 Thursday.     .
V **• ■*•
BOOSTER CLUB
Geneal meeting Friday noon
in Bu. 100.
*ji ■!• *fr
VARSITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Lecture Friday 12:30 Bu. 106.
*T" •*• **•
DANCE CLUB
General! meeting  noon today
in Bu. 100.
EUROPEAN TRAINED
BARBERS
Individually Styled Haircuts
UPPER TENTH
BARBER & TOILETTRIES
4574 W. 10th
EL CIRCULO
Last day today to sign up for
Spanish Weekend. Sign up in
Bu.  222.
*t* *T* •*•
PHYSICS SOCIETY
First meeting and election® today, 12:30 in P. 201. Dr. Russell will speak.
•X* •** *t*
FIMSOC
Old time comedy series continues daily in1 the auditorium at
noon.
•{• iji 9f»
GIRLS  GYMNASIUM TEAM
Practise and organizational
meeting today 12:30, in Apparatus room of Memorial Gym. All
interested please attend.
1ASC WtuAxcaL Satisfy
Damn Yankees Auditions
aoooooppooppoooaoaocooeoecooooeoeoooooooooooa
SINGERS-THURSDAY, OCTOBER 6
7:00 in Mussoc Clubroom
DANCERS-SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16
Sign up in Mussoc Clubroom
ARTS
Quicker, surer stops with
KAUFMAN
— the basketball shoes scientifically designed
to improve your game
Wear the shoe chosen by so many well-known Canadian basketball teams . . . Golden Jets, New non-marking ripple® Soles
lengthen the stride, propel the foot forward for fast get-aways, or
"dig in" for instant, non-skid stops.
Golden Jets let you play longer without tiring because cushion
action of ripple® Soles absorbs shock, reduces foot fatigue.
You'll want these other Golden Jet features too:
* PROFESSIONAL LAST (narrow at heel, wide at ball of foot),
* SHOCK-ABSORBING CUSHION ARCH PROTECTOR
* "BREATHABLE" UPPERS of long-wearing heavy duck
Golden Jets come in white
with golden trim. Ask for
Gulden Jets at your nearest
sports or shoe store.
COUNCIL  MEETS
ON   TUESDAY
Because of the holiday Monday, Council's next meeting will
be on Tuesday—same time, same
place.
Judy Jack announced that
WUS had won the Best Booth
prize for Club's Day. Riotous applause.
JVLAA Athletic Day has been
moved to Oct. 20 to avoid conflict with the Japanese—-Birds
rugby game.
The number of A-Cards sold
so far is reported to be well up
on last year.
Students!
For an evening or after game
treat, try our whipped hot
chocolate.
DEANS
4544 W. 10th
Open 'till 11:30
Made by Kaufman Rubber Co., Limited, Kitchener, Ont.
Laff, Daw You!
They dragged the"* student
down to police headquarters
and took him before the Sergeant.
"What am I here for?" he
asked.
"For drinking," the officer
sternly replied.
"Good. When do we start?"
TAKE IT TO
SPOTLESS
Cornette Beauty Salon
•PERMANENTS    .TINTING
• MANICURING
ADVANCED HAIR STYLING
Featuring:
"Parisian Facial" by Jeri
'Dutch Treat' by Miss Elenore
We also specialize in high
styling   and   razor-cutting
ELLA  CHAMBERS
proprietress
4532 West 10th Avenue
For  appointment  call: ;
CA  4-7440
<iY
VET?..
.W-
, &U«de of
.teSiiewlwwW
ry... If yOU
haven't...
attend—
lOOlfir
Scoundrels
studio
s*
V«)
Granville at Smythe
MU 3-1511
HOW TO WIN
without actually
CHEATING!

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0124663/manifest

Comment

Related Items