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The Ubyssey Mar 6, 1942

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 Victory Week Collects $168.60 To Date
One Man's
Opinion
by ANDY SNADDON
• WHEN members of the
cast of "Her Scienceman
Lover" took their bows after
the final curtain at Monday's
pep meet the author of the
play was also present on the
stage.
For the great majority of
the students in the audience
it was the first time they had
ever seen a fellow student
who has entertained them
weekly, for two years now,
with a column in the Ubyssey.
"Who is Jabez?" every member
of the Publications Board runs Into that question, and most of them
can only give a brief answer. He
is known to few,—a natural shyness is the main reason.
WHO IS JOBEZ?
Last fall the University of Alberta "Gateway" began to print
"The Mummery". At Christmas
we had occasion to visit the Edmonton campus and as soon as
U. of A. studes found we were
from the Ubyssey they wanted to
know "Who is Jabez? I think he's
wonderful".
The influence of Jabez has been
felt throughout our university.
Working on the copy desk of the
Ubyssey editors are consistently
reminded of this when almost
every reporter adopts a fascimile
of the Jabez style for feature'
stories. The percentage of illiteracy among sciencemen has dropped
alarmingly as these worthies have
determined to learn to read, so
that they won't have to wait for
an Artsman to read the column
to them. C.O.T.C. parades are filled with the humor borrowed from
tho column.
JABEZ THE BOY
Now after Monday's success more
than ever the question is "Who is
Jabez?"
Eric Patric (Begorra) Nicol, was
born in Kingston, Ontario, (Queens
Journal please copy) one year before his first birthday. At the age
of six months he had shown little
sign of amounting to anything, although old friends recall that he
had the most expressive way of
saying "goo" as he threw rocks
at his grandmother.
Some years after this he came
to the Pacific coast. There is no
truth to the rumor that the warden of the Kingston penitentiary
has been trying to get him back
ever since. At Lord Byng High
School here he managed to win
the ping pong championship. Lord
Byng, incidentally, is the alma
mammy of Lionel Salt.
COLUTCH DAZE
After hearing some of those
stories about Paris, Eric decided
to come to U.B.C. and study honors
French. While drifting about the
campus one day in his sophomore
year, his innocence lead him to
wander into the Publications
Board. He started to write a column which he called 'Chang Suey',
this appealed to the campus and
editors have been ogering prayers
of thanks ever since.
Last year he switched to the
"Mummery" and the Jabezian era
of literature began at Varsity. Our
hero graduated in the spring, but,
always a sucker for punishment,
he returned to take graduate work.
Modesty is his long suit. He is
always the silent partner in any
group and he rarely appears in
any of the social centers such as
the caf. In conversation he displays the wit which characterizes
his column.
PHONE  NUMBER
For the benefit of the ladies we
might add that little is known of
his private life. Agents from
"Slush", "Gush" and "Mush" magazines have failed to uncover anything regarding secret loves. He
stands about 5 ft., 9 in., has wavy,
black hair, a ready smile and
pleasant green eyes. He is No. 210
in the stacks and his phone number is in the directory.
The name Jabez comes from the
Hebrew and means "He will cause
pain".
He give3 the members of the
Player's Club the credit for tho
success of "Her Scienceman Lover". Those who saw it will agree
with him that the varsity thespians
turned   in   a   dandy   performance.
PUBSTERS: There will be a
meeting in the Pub for all persons
on the masthead, 12:3©, Monday.
NOTICE: Will anyone possessing
a record of "We're Going to Hang
Out The Washing On The Siegfried Line" please bring it to the
Pub, where they will be amply
rewarded.
PUBLISHED TWICE WEEKLY BY THE PUBLICATIONS BOARD OF THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
VOL. XXIV
VANCOUVER, B. C, FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 1942
No. 36
Greisbach Visits COTC Sat.
Inspector-General
To Make Informal
Inspection of Unit
•   EXPECTED on the campus for an informal inspection of
the C.O.T.C. and Basic Training unite is Major-General
W. A. Greisbach, inspector-general, Western Command.
After a short visit of inspection of a special platoon
on Wednesday afternoon, the inspector-general decided to
return this Saturday to observe the whole corps in training.
Ward Speaks
On Democracy
Noon, Tues.
• DR. HARRY F. WARD, prominent United States liberal
thinker and writer, will address u
public meeting on the campus on
Tuesday, March 10, at 12:30 in
Aggie 100. The subject of his
address will be "Democracy and
Social  Change".
Dr. Ward has been noted for his
work as chairman of the American
Civil Liberties Union, national
chairman of the American League
for Peace and Democracy, and
secretary of the Methodist Federation of Social Service. He has
also written fourteen books on
current  problems.
Major-General Griesback C.B.,
C.M.G., D.S.O., a member of tho
Canadian Senate, has a brilliant
war record. Senator Griesback
went overseas in the last war as
a Colonel of the 49th Edmonton
Regiment.
Especially interested in junior
leadership and the place of the
young officer, Major-General
Griesback has displayed great interest in officer training unit?
such as the C.O.T.C.
Major-General Griesback expressed himself as very pleased
with last Wednesday's demonstration and is returning this Saturday
to watch the entire corps in action.
The inspector-general will prob-
tbly walk about the campus and
look on informally as the men go
through their regular training.
It is believed that he desires to
see just how the training Is conducted.
Anticipation for the inspector-
general's visit is running high
among the men of theC.O.T.C. and
the Hay and Montador Shoe Shining Co. is expected to do a roaring
busints^.
"With the presence of Major-
General Griesback on the campus,
there will be a special need for
smartness", stated the two shoe
shine magnats to the Ubyssey
yesterday.
In their fourth week of business
and with a new ::hoe stand. Hay
and Montador have offered a special rate for the cleaning of anklets:
10 cents. They empnasized. however, that the gaiters should bo
brought in before'11:00 to insure
drying.
Dr. Ward
Frosh Object To Final
Examination System
By LORNA McDIARMID
• ANTICIPATING THEIR first
s.t of spring finals, freshettes
and freshmen as a whole regard
examinations as a necessary evil,
random interviews on the campus
revealed this  week.
A"though the majority of students interviewed are reconciled to
th^ need for examinations, they
offer definite criticism of certain
aspects of the system now functioning on the campus.
OVER-EMPHASIZE  FINALS
Objecting mainly to the overemphasis laid on finals In evaluating the year's work of a studen,
their remarks frequently advocated more extensive use of small
exams throughout the year.
Typical of the general trend of
opinion was the reply of Thelma
Coffman: "The final exam should
not be so decisive in determining
your year's grade. Many people
get very nervous when confronted
with a big exam. 1 think dailv
class work alone should count
about half on final mark".
Marjorie Pinton was opposed to
any form of large examination.
"I don't think there should be any
exams, Our year's marks should
be based on class assignments and
small tests".
LAST NIGHT STUDY
Reflected in many of their opinions was the feeling that the present system encouraged students
to leave all their work till the
last part of the term.
Expressing this idea, Doreen
Dougan. Secretary of Arts '45. said
"If frequent tests were given
throughout the term, we would
have lo keep up in our work".
Students whole-heartedly in favour of the present examination
system were in the minority, but
a few expressed entfiusfam for it.
"I've never seen such fair exams
in all my life", said Lucas Michas.
FAIR SYSTEM
"I think it's a better way than
at high school", said Eileen Mc-
Killop. "There I fooled around
all the year. Here I fool around
1 lit I get down to "business at the
end of term. It's a fairer system
too, because you know definitely
when the exams are coming".
Students who had worked under
the recommendation system in
high school, felt that they had not
been prepared adequately for University.
"I think the recommendation
system is crazy", said Margaret
Gibson. "It allows you to get
through without experience of real
exams".
Monro Pre Med
Members On
News Room
•   MONRO    PRE-MED    Society
members will be guests on the
Radio    Society's    program    this
week.
This weekly broadcast, "Varsity
Newsroom" goes on the air over
C.K.W.X.  at  6.15  P.M.  Saturday.
Another university broadcast
over CJ.O.R. at G.00 P.M. Saturdav
will   feature  A!   Miller  on  sports.
PICTURED in the armories as he visited the campus
Wednesday afternoon is Major-General W. A. Greisbach,
RIGHT, with Brigadier D. R. Sargent,, CENTRE, and Lt-
Col. G. M. Shrum, LEFT.	
Men 20-26 Will Go
To Camp April 29
By HUGH COOKE
•   "CAMP FOR THE C.O.T.C. and Basic training groups
will be limited to those men who are between the ages
of 20 and 26," announced Lt.-Col. G. M- Shrum when addressing members of the two groups Saturday afternoon.
He qualified this statement by adding that persons
who were eager to attend the camp but who were not in this
age group would be given special consideration.
Exemption from camp training
which w'.U be given from April 29
to May 12, will be granted to such
persons who can give evidence of
employment or likelihood of em-
in some Natoinnl Defence industry
or some industry which will advance their training in their University courses.
Proof of expectation of such employment should take the form of
a letter from the employer addressed to the Commanding Officer, and must be presented not
later than two weeks before the
beginning of the camp period.
Proof of having been engaged in
such employment must be given
the Officer Commanding in September ater return to the University. Persons granted exemption
from camp training who are un
able to produce proof of having
fcecn engaged in such industries
will not be granted credit for their
camp training.
Unlike last year's camp period,
only one camp will be held and
those Scicncer,; n who formerly
took their surveying field work
before going to the second camp
will, by arrangement with Dean
Finlayson of the faculty of Applied Science, be able to take the
course after their return from
camp.
The problem which confronted
graduating students last year, of
having to leave camp early in order to attennd the Convocation
ceremony has been overcome this
year by commencing the camp
period earlier through shortening
of the examination period.
Manitoba
Editor
Bounced
• HARVEY DRYDEN, Editor-in-
Chief of the Manitoban which
is the official organ of the University of Manitoba, has been
fired by the U. M. S. U. executive
because of their lack of confidence
in him. The action on' the part of
the Executive was taken following
an article by Mr. Dryden which resulted in some difficulty with the
Victory Loan Committee. A new
Editor-in-Chief, Earle Beattie, was
appointed immediately following
Mr. Dryden's removal.
A firm belief is held by Mr. Dryden that the Executive was unjustified in its action. He had confide red raiding a petition for a
special meeting of the U.M.S.U
Council. However 1 ■-> feared that
his staff would be disrupted, they
were all for him. and he wanted
to   see   the   work   continue.     Mr.
Dryden stated that he believed
that Mr. Beattie could handle the
work of Editor-ln-Chid successfully.
Mr. Beattie, recognized the ability of Mr. Dryden, re-appointed
him as an associate editor for the
rest of the term. Mr. Dryden,
concerned only with the work of
the  paper,   accepted.
Similar action was taken at this
University by the President of
U.B.C. in 1931. Ronny Grantham,
Editor-in-Chief at the time, wrote
an editorial criticizing the faculty
for tearing up the Ubyssey paper.
He was consequently fired from
the staff after a meeting of the
Executive.
NOTICE: Annual meeting of the
A.M.S. will be held on Wednesday,
March 25. Reports by Treasurer
and Secretary. Appointment of
the auditors. All students should
atend.
NOTICE: Dr Erra Gunther, Dir^
ector of Washington State Museum
will address the Vancouver Natural History, March 18th, 8 p.m., in
Room 100, Applied Sclonce. Visitors welcome,
Feature Novelties
At Informal Mixer
As 'V Week Finale
•   "ENTERTAINMENT with a purpose" has been the theme
of Victory Week on the campus, with a goal of $200 set
by the Victory Bond Committee of the War Aid Council.
To climax all the money drives during the week, a
Victory Mixer is being held in Brock Hall to-morrow night,
when students will dance to the music of George Reifel's
orchestra, now being rated as one o fthe best jive bands in
town.
Master of Ceremonies will be
Dorwin Baird, CJ.O.R. announcer ^—mm_^,^
and Ubyssey columnist. The program, organized by John Carson
and Elizabeth Hebb, will feature
several novelty dances including
polkas and French minuets as well
as elimination dances.
Admision  prices have  been  set
at 75 cents a couple and 50 cents
for stags.
INFORMALITY
The dance will be very informal
and a goal of $100 has been set
for the evening which may bring
the total Victory week up to $300.
Coke will be sold to dancers.
The pep-meet which launched
Victory Week on Monday realized
$77.60. 	
A skit written by Jabez for the
occasion, entitled "Her Scienceman
Lover" or "The birth of a Nation"
met with such outstanding success
that, following repeated requests,
the Players' Qlub will again produce it today noon. There will
be an admission charge of 10 cents.
The music of Gearge Reifel's
orchestra aroused students to a
high pitch of enthusiasm on Monday, and thc orchestra will again
be in attendance to-day.
SELF DENIAL, SUM
Self-denial day on Wednesday
surpassed all previqus totals with
the sum of $91. Tags with 'A.M.S.
Victory Bond' on them were worn
by self-deniers.
With Victory week  drawing to
a  close,   full  student  support   is.
needed to meet the new goal of
$300 which has now been set by
the Committee.
Ail Faculty
Nominations
Close at 5
• NOMINATIONS    f o r
presidents    of   Arts,
Science and £ggie Men's
Undergraduate Societies
must be handed in to the
A.M.S. office by 5 o'clock
this afternoon.
Up to the time of going to press,
no nominations had been received,
end Charlie Nash urged the importance of getting these in quickly.
Voting will be by ballot on Wednesday, March 11, and will be held
in the rooms to be assigned to
each Faculty.
Other officers will be nominated
from the floor at meetings to be
held later in the week.
Japanese
Students
Evacuated
• AT LEAST two Japanese students, both unnaturalized, have
had to leave the university under
the Dominion Governments regulations providing for evacuation
of B.C. Nipponese.
These two, both males, are leaving through the natural course of
events and, contrary to the belief
felt in some quarters, have not
received any special consideration
as  university students.
P^^
3$?8B8£y'       9£      *^VH
Registrar   C.   B.   Wood   reveals
v * JP
that   any   such   Japanese   under
% N
graduates  would   be   allowed   on
their request to write their final
vli
examinations   at any   other   Can
SSS jf^"
adian  university  centre.   This is
-. -*..
a   customary   procedure   for   stu
-     s       *
*■■ wflp^-....
dents unable to write their exams
during the regular U.B.C. sched
. . Reifel
ule.
Reifel's Rhythm Tops In
Town; Band Really "Feels"
•   VARSITY STUDENTS may not know it, but they have
in their midst one of the best orchestras in Vancouver
dancing circles. %
This, at least, became my contention after "catching"
the band at the I.S.S. Mixer. Never have I seen a band
playing with so much fire, and obvious enjoyment as the
men of George Reifel displayed that night.
Naturally the band has its faults,
but when It is considered that they
are students first, and musicians
after, these faults become insignificant.
Greatest achievement of the outfit is that they "feel" together, are
in obvious sympathy with each
other, and, at times, exhibit thrilling ideas that would do credit to
the best of jazz bands.
At their best when "swinging",
the band is weak on the sweeter
arrangements, lacking a strong
tenor sax, and being too prone to
riff through every piece. However,
under the capable leadership of
George Reifel, they, sensibly
enough, stay within their own
sphere, and never force theii
music.
Outstanding solo men with the
band are Phil Nimmons, lead alto
and clarinet, Kenny Almond, on
trumpet, and Jim McCulloch, on
trombone. McCulloch's fine hot
trombone, a stand-out with Varsity orcks for three years, and Almond's trumpet make the bras;
.section ride like no other section
in town. Nimmons, who plays alto
as Coleman  Hawkins play:   tenor.
has given the reed section a vital
life spark.
The rhythm section, composed of
Reifel, drums, Carl Bingham,
piano, Pat Lane, slap base, and
Bill Peterson, guitar, although
playing together for the first time,
fitted in well with the band's
style, supplying a nice, steady
drive and backing up the solo
work of Nimmons, McCulloch and
Almond.
The addition of Wally Reid's
trombone, and Bill Harrison's second trumpet, fills out a brass section with real "sock", Reid combining with McColloch for many
pretty brass duets.
Although good on ensemble
work, the saxes show a prevalence
for sloppy phrasing, need more
bite. Denny Leong, hot tenor man,
lacks a strong tone but drives well
with the section. Hardworking Len
Korsch. second alto, and Byron
Estey, second tenor, fill out tho
reeds.
By far the test vocalist to sin*',
with the band is Jean Folkard
with a voice q.iality thai is definitely a crowd  pleaser.
—L.H.S. Page Two-
THE   UBYSSEY
Friday, March 6, 1942
• From Thc Editor's Pen » » »
Concerning Camp
Almost all students are agreed that the
offer of the government to grant leave from
army camp to men, providing they will be
engaged in a war industry this summer, is
an excellent one and they appreciate it very
much. It will mean that those men intending to come back to university next year
will have half a month longer to earn the
necessary finances.
However, although the plan suits most
students to perfection, there is one large
group on the campus who fail to see much
advantage in it. This group comprises the
thrid and fourth year sciencemen, those
embryo engineers who always have to attend surxey school or machine shop for two
weeks after the regular term ends.
Last year these students fitted both this
course and army camp into the month of
May by taking Uie science practical during
the first two weeks and going to camp the
last two. But because there is only going to
be one camp this year, during the first two
weeks of May, the survey and machine shop
schools have been scheduled for the latter
part of the month so the engineers may attend after army camp. Thus, an excuse from
camp to work would be of little use to a
scienceman who had to wait around till the
end of May to finish his course out here.
Would it not be possible for the military
authorities to stretch a point and grant these
men leave from camp, on the strength of
their proofs that they will be working in
war industries, so that they may take survey
and machine schools the first two weeks in
May? If they could do this, the sciencemen
would be able to complete their years and
be ready to work the middle of May, thus
saving two weeks, the same as all the other
students who will benefit from the plan.
Theoretically, these men could be obtaining
leave from an army camp to be held the last
two weeks of the month. If everybody got
leave from; it, then there would not have to
be any camp.
Your War Aid Council
Last November Students' Council, acting on a suggestion of the Ubyssey, created
a body called the War Aid Council whose
duty was "To revitalize and co-ordinate
U.B.C.'s war effort." Membership in this
council was fixed at twenty-four, some appointed directly by Students' Council, and
some appointed by the various organizations
who were given representation by that
august body.
Since its inauguration, the War Aid
Council, led most ably by president Dorothy
Hird, has done commendable work. The
Mile of Pennies Drive, I.S.S. Week, and the
current Victory Bond Campaign are products of its energetic efforts for direct money
contributions. The scheme for organizing
category "E" men'as A.R.P. wardens is an
example of its accomplishments in other
directions.
Nevertheless, as the weeks have passed
it has become increasingly apparent that the
brunt of its activities are being carried by
only a few vitalTy interested students. The
other members of the Council seem to have
dropped by the wayside; the average attendance at the weekly meetings is ten instead of twenty-four.
Considering that this is the first year
such a body has been organized, there are
bound to be faults in its construction and
functioning. Criticism from various sources
has claimed it is not truly representative of
student opinion (always a lovely looking
argument to be levelled at any group one
does not agree with.)
Next Thursday noon the War Aid Council will hold its last meeting of the term,
which ALL members are required to attend.
At this meeting suggestions for next year
will be received and discussed. This will be
the time for any1 criticisms to be aired. The
War Aid Council knows it isn't perfect; it
will welcome suggestions for improvement.
The Mummery
by Jabez
• WITH AN EYE to ensuring student appreciation of their spring play, THE
RIVALS, the Players' Club recently unleashed HER SCIENCEMAN LOVER, a
ruptured masterpiece of mine which ran for
six weeks in and around Cloverdale before
its pursuers finally trapped it, panting in a
nearby field.
Last Monday noon, after spending a
pleasant hour tagging around after little
men, watching them put up signs with my
name on them, I decided to float into the
Theatre and find a seat from which I could
easily and quickly reach the stage when
they unexpectedly begged me to come up
and take a bow.
Whistling snatches of "I'll See You
Again", I sauntered up to the door, my
right hand pcjised in my coat pocket, with
the thumb hanging outside in an insouciant
manner, and my eye-lids drooping artistically, to create a general Noel Coward effect.
Unfortunately, as I had also been rehearsing
a keen, steely look, in case *I joined the
Air Force, I ended up with a sort of crosseyed squint, like an ostrich with a bee on its
beak.
In any case, I did not succeed in strolling past the man at the door. On the contrary, he seized my arm and snapped, in
what I thought was a rather brusque way:
"Put a dime in the bottle, buddy!"
I drew myself up, readjusting the carnation in my lapel before I realized I did not
have one there.
"Sir?" I said stiffly, dusting off my
sleeve.  "I am the author of this play."
"You can take that up with God later,"
snarled this unpleasant individual. "Put a
dime in the bottle, Rockefeller, and stop
blocking the door."
"I refuse to pay money to see my own
play!" I roared, whereupon J was consternated to see a number of people shrug their
shoulders in that's-good-enough-for-me fashion, and leave the building.
I strode out into the hall, looped around
the quad, and came up on the other door.
This time I added a dash of weasel to the
Noel Coward routine, and tried slithering
through in the middle of a group of people.
"Where   do   you   think   you're   going,
Shad
o\v
-?'•
enquired a voice, supported by
a foot hooked around my legs.
"1 am tho author of this play!" I cried
unhappily. "I demand to be allowed to go
in for nothing!"
"They all go in for nothing," he chuckled, "but they have to pay a dime to see it."
"I shall inform Johnny Carson!" I shouted, tearing fluff from my coat pocket.
"I am Johnny Carson," he smiled benignly from about a foot over my head.
"What do you want to inform me of?"
I swallowed hard.
"Did you know U.S. Steel was up three
points?" I asked weakly, dropping a dime in
the bottle.
Reassembling my dignity, I stamped
down the aisle, delighted to note all the
people with their heads turned in my direction, smiling, nodding, and waving their
hands.
For some obscure reason they stopped
this when the pretty, little blond who was
walking just in front of me stepped into a
row and sat down. The -light must have gone
bad, I guess.
I found a seat, and was soon listening
impatiently to Mr. Reifel's orchestra. It became evident that this group was good to
the point of being impertinent. A bunch of
mesmerized musicians threatening to overshadow my play completely. I tried glowering at the people sitting around, but they
persisted in applauding in a disgusting display of approval.
When Mr. Reifel finally yielded the
stage, Mr. Salt, and a few other trusted colleagues with me in the Press Row, rose and
prepared to leave, grumbling about only
hearing three numbers.
"You can't get your money back now,
you know!" I said hotly, pushing them back
down as nonchalantly as possible.
When the skit started, I suddenly found
myself prematurely laughing at parts I
thought would be funny, and laughing all
alone. I caught myself breaking into fits of
applause while the rest of the audience seemed to be lost in deep reverie,,        -^
The play finally ended and, yelling,
"AuthoriAuthor!", I leapt up into the wings,
where I waited anxiously for someone to
push me reluctantly onto the stage. Once
out there, staring into a mass of pink faces,
like so many cantaloupe halves, I forgot my
carefully practiced bow and rushed off, wild-
eyod, babbling:
"Don' let them get me! Don't let them
get me!"
That's all I remember.
3he Uhpsru.
(MEMBER C.U.P.)
Issued twice weekly by the Students Publication Board of the
Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia.
Office: Brock Memorial Building
Phone ALma 1624
Campus  Subscription—11.50
Mail Subscriptions—$2.00
For Advertising
Standard  Publishing  Co.  Ltd.
2182 W. 41st KErr. 1811.
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
ARCHIE PATON
Senior Editors
Tuesday  Andy Snaddon
Friday Jack McMillan
News Manager  Jack Ferry
Sports Editor Jack McKinlay
Assistant Sports Editors-
Chuck Claridge, BIU Gait
Associate Editors
Lucy   Berton,   Margaret   Reid,
John Scott.
Assistant Editors
Betty Hem, Vivian Vincent, Hugh
Cooke,   Lorna McDlarmid,   Bill
Myhlll-Jones, Harold Burks.
Staff Photographer  .Dave Lawson
Exchange Editor .. Doris
Fllmer-Bennett
Circulation  Job Menchions
Pub. Secretory „ ....Pat m*lan
• LETTERS TO
THE EDITOR
March 1, 1942
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
An editorial in Friday's issue bemoans the lack of Canadian nationalism. But this is not something that we should bemoan but
something we should be thankful
fo*.
Nationalism has been' the greatest menace to civilization in the
last century and a half. It was
French nationalism that produced
the wars that ruined France in the
reign of Louis XIV., and a century
later produced the frightful carnage of the Napoleonic conquests.
German nationalism awoke in the
wars of 1866 to 1870, led Germany
into the ruinous World War I., and
has driven her again into another
suicidal adventure. Italian nationalism has put Italy into tho
paths of aggression. Japanese nationalism has the same effect. And
it was nationalism, the idea in
every country that it must not
surrender one iota of its national
sovereignty to a World Authority,
that rendered tho success of the
League of Nations, impossible.
Yes, nationalism threatens to destroy our civilization, and unless
this petty regional spirt can soon
be transcended by an all embracing love of humanity, there is little
hope that we will not descend into
a new Dark Age.
There is a patriotism that is
worthy. It says: "This is my
country. I will live and die for it;
live and die to make its contribution to human progress great."
But nationalism says: "This is my
country and my god. Its people
are a superior race worthy to rule
the world. I will lilve and die to
make it powerful." This spirit <a
a curse.
Yours truly,
Leslie E. Drayton.
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
Visitors from other Canadian
and American campuses have often
remarked on the absence of a glee
club on this campus. It appears
that our institution is almost unique in this respect.
Here, however, we have an organization that makes an additional demand of its members:
that they have acting ability as
well as vocal prowess: a demand
which unfortunately is very seldom answered, as witnessed by
most of their productions in tho
past, and above all by the current
debacle.
A convenient and proven solution would be the replacement of
the existing society with a glee
club. This would achieve two
ends: music within the capabilities of the existing talent could
be produced; and numerous students wth vocal talent, but no desire to act, would be able to take
an active interest.
One great disadvantage the present Society has is that the production of a single opera limits the
variety of music that can be sung,
and indeed Gilbert and Sullivan
is not particularly appealing to
many as a musical u?ct. Organization of a glee club in opposition
throe or four year-, ago proved a.
failuvp. Cannot, then, some move
le made to reorganize the present
Society''
Paul Hookings, Sc. '44
After Some
lime
By DORWIN BAIRD
• WHEN the official envelope arrived he had
opened it with a careless
sort of gaiety that betrayed
his real feelings. At last it
had happened, and, like
when a man dies, his whole
life was swirling before his
eyes. By the time that envelope was opened, he would
know that he was in the
army, that from now on some
small part of "the job" was
going to be his, no matter
what he could try to do a-
bout it.
He tore the paper slowly,
deliberately, thinking the
while. Somebody, in a talk
on the radio, had said: this
was a great era in which to
be young. Huh, he thought,
there wasn't anything great
about war.
He tore the paper slowly, dazed
somewhat by the cavalcade of pictures that printed themselves in
quick succession on his mind. Great
to be young . . . wouldn't it be
better to be 16 again ... to be
back in high school? Wouldn't
it be better to go back to a life
where Saturday night shows and
hikes up Grouse on Sundays were
all that mattered?
SUCCESSFUL
Or even ... and this thought
was brighter . . . wouldn't it be
better to be back at varsity again?
Back where life, all told, was far
from serious, and where you were
shielded from the things in life
that could come up and wound
you over and over again till you
suffered, deeply, in the mind.
Things had been different since
"school" stopped. Oh, he couldn't
complain. He had gone places,
done things, met people. He
wasn't thirty yet, but he had what
others called a "respectable place"
in the community. He was a success . . . measured by all those
standards you put up for yourself
before you enter business. Things
had come hi way.
He half pulled the notice out of
the envelope . . . not looking at it
yet . . . still thinking, his mind
moving with the speed that comes
to it onl ywhen some hard blow is
going to strike. He thought of the
girl who was ready, whenever he
gave the word, to share life with
him. He thought of the undefin-
able thing he had 1 nilt up for
himself . . . some called it social
standing.
CATCH WORDS
He thought too of all the catch
words he had heard from others
. . . words about the war . . . words
he had heard so often they no
longer carried sense. Phrases . . .
"our bounden duty" ... "a better
world for all" . , . "where the
weak shall be protected" ... a
lot of phrases. He hadn't worried
much about them.
The notice was out of the envelope. There was no escaping
it now. Three weeks. Not long
for a "busy man" to wind up his
afairs. Not long for a youth full
of the joy of living to make his
last rounds of the places he might
not see for a few years.
In a way . . . not the trite way
... he was sorry for himself . . .
wanted others to be the same way.
CAUGHT IN THE DRAFT
There was no use telling him of
the millions of others like him
who had met the same problem,
the thousands of them who had
it solved foT them, in a way that
was so final. Mass figures don't
appeal to a young man at a moment-like that. It takes something
personal.    That something came.
It was another young man he
knew . . . the same age. A young
man who had gone through the
same university, who loved living
as well. A young man who came
down in flames to be laid in a
churchyard in the same village
where Shakespeare wrote plays
that expressed almost every great
thought that ever went through
the  mind  of an Englishman.
The notice went into his insidj
pocket. His eyes returned to
sparkle as they did before . , . his
mouth spoke the same gay things
. . . only  his heart  was different.
Across the office desk another
man worked. The young man
coughed a bit, smiled, gained the
other's  attention.
"Well Joe, I've been drafted."
NOTICE: To all those who were
scllin gtickets for the Primrose
recital must turn in their books
of tickets with Iheir names written
across tho from to the A.M.S. office as soon as passible.
"1
If THI VIMOI 01 MHO COULD TALK-
/      ., uV R10HT ARM
SWEET CAPORAL CIGARETTES
M*^*^^   ■^■^■^■^af MMMSJ   B^K  gMgM   ^lg^-4   SMSt  SH  Sl^^SkSsSSlT^
S SSe ■Ws1i^P»w ^p**/e»P IPI sjssbbbbbbbj VI^MivW fjs^vtj W sjsbbbb^i^sbj
Commerce Club Hears
Of Airline Progress
• MISS   HELENA   St.   Martin,       —————
United    Airlines    stewardess,
and J. G. Stables, Airline executive, were guests at a Commerce
Club Luncheon in Brock Hall last
Thursday.
Mr. Stables outlined the progress
of airline transprtation in the last
IS years.
Refering to his attractive colleague, M. Stables remarked that
"Stewardesses are possibly one of-
the smartest pieces of selling that
Airlines have done". Several other
means devised to keep the public
intrested In travelling aloft are
the "log entry" and the 100.000
Miler Club.
After the luncheon, Miss St.
Martin spoke about the possibilities of becoming air hostesses.
The girls are required to be not
more than five feet-five or weigh
more than 120 pounds and have
second year university. Miss Martin works eighty-five hours per
month and is paid $130 with a
raise to S150 after fifteen months
of service.
Guests of the lnncheon Included
Dr. Crumb, Proffesor Irving, Dr.
Currie, Proffesor Morrow, Dean
Dorothy Mawdsley and Dr. War»
ren.
ARP Work
May Become
Compulsory
• AT A recent and very
poorly attended meeting of
Class "E" men, it was arranged with Fire Chief Murphy to commence lectures on
civilian protection work.
The lectures will cover bomb
protection, gas, fire, and such conditions as will arise in case of an
air raid. They will be given twice
a week at 12:30 on Wednesday and
Friday. If these times are not
satisfactory to all class "E" students, they will be changed, if this
ii at all possible.
Chief Murphy stresses the complete necessity of all students who
are eligible turning out to these
lectures, So far, it is being run
entirely on a voluntary basis, but
if attendance is poor, it will perhaps be made compulsory, with
the approval of President Klinck.
It is being arranged to obtain
equipment and compensation insurance from the authorities, so
that the students will be able to
go ahead with practical v/oty.
WillAttempt
To Improve
Brock Food
• CONCLUDING that one of the
main reasons why social functions are not held in Brock Hall
during the term is the fact that
catering Is unsatisfactory, Student
Council this week set up a com- ,
mittee to investigate possibilities
of improving the service for next
year.
"The food served in the Brock
for seventy-five cents a plate does
not compare with that obtainable
at downtown cabarets, and that is
the reason faculty banquets and
other functions are not staged
here", said Rod Morries, newly
elected A.M.S. president, in urging that some action be taken to
remedy 'conditions.
The committee, consisting of
Ted McBride, Lob Nicholson, Rod
Morries and Arvid Backman, plan
to consult the Administration with
a view to making food and facilities In Brock Hall more attractive for student social functions.
H. Jessie How, b.a.
PUBLIC   STENOGRAPHER
4629 West 10th Ave.
Essays and Theses Typed
VARSITY SERVICE
STATION
AT THE GATES
'Our Service Means
Happy Motoring"
DINE
AND DANCE
AT
HOTEL VANCOUVER
For your
PRINTING
or
ENGRAVING
Stationery Supplies
Fountain Pens
Slide Rules
Scales, etc.,
for the present term
SEE
The Clarke ft Stuart
CO. LIMITED
550 Seymour St.
Vancouver, B.C.
Phone PAciflc 7311
FIRBANKS LTD.
JEWELERS - SILVERSMITHS - OPTICIANS
Corner Seymour and Dunsmuir Opp. Bus Terminal
m
<• - Special Student Rate at * *
CAPITOL   -   ORPHEUM   -   STRAND   -   DOMINION
By Presentation Of Your Student Pass
Spencer Tracy, Frederic March,
Katherine Hepburn I Loretta Young
in
"WOMAN OF THE
YEAR"
CAPITOL
•A YANK ON THE
BURMA ROAD"
plus
Cesar Romero in
"A Gentleman At Heart"
STRAND
"A BEDTIME STORY"
ORPHEUM
Gary Cooper
In
"SERGEANT YORK"
Plus
"Sucker List"
DOMINION Friday, February 27, 1942
THE   UBYSSEY
-Page Three
Vast New Intra-Mural Plan Looms For 1942-43
Van Vliet's Scheme
Points Way To New
Athletic Boom Here
  ♦
• STRIVING at the same time for fitness and a new enjoyment in competitive sports, the Men's Athletic Directorate, under the direct supervision of Maury Van Vliet,
Men's Physical Education Director, has proposed a mammoth
new competitive sports plan, designed to include every physically fit male on the campus.
It is not at all unlikely that high
physical fitness, with its ensuing
boost in morale in general, will be
an ultimate factor in the successful prosecution of the war. The
ease of Finland's long, heroic stand
against Russia serves us with a
good example.
The success of little Finland,
long known as one of the World's
leading athletic exponents, has
been directly attributed by many
Competition Offered
The vast new scheme will involve
upwards at fifteen tournaments,
with no less than 176-300 individual
matches, and probably upwards of
1,000 men. The use of the Armouries will facilitate training and
playing of the competitions, u will
the proposed playing field to be
constructed North of the Oymnas-
to the high degree of physical fitness in the ranks of its army and
civilian population.
With the view in mind of getting
the students in a wartime condition of physical fitness, and simultaneously supplying them with a
long sought recreational need, the
new, wider, intra-mural plan has
been evolved.
In Every Sport
ium. ""
Everything from snooker, ping
pong, and bowling to rugby, football, and boxing will be included
in the scope of the huge new plan,
to enable every man to have tha
chance to participate in the game
or skill in which he is better at
than others.
Triangle Educational Program Proposed
For those men who feel that
they are not proficient enough in
certain sports to enter, there will
be classes held where he will re-
celv expert instruction on the intricacies of golf, basketball, soccer,
or any other game he may enjoy.
Once a man has mastered his
game in these Instruction periods
and has developed an enjoyment
for playing the game he will graduate to intra-mural competition,
and from the intra-murals will be
selected the men who will repre-
Cups and Smoker Are
To create further a feeling of interest and enthusiasm in the intramural field, there will be cups
presented to the winners in every
competition, and accurate and
complete records will be kept of
winning times, high scorers, and
any other records established in
the competitions. These records
records will be printed each year
in the intra-mural handbook, a-
vailable to all students.
At the end ot each year's competition there will be held a smoker,
where the grand cup will be presented to the winning group, and
sent the University in inter-col-
legist* or other outside games,
(see diagram in Mr. Van Vliet's
column.)
In this new plan there will always be ample material from
which to select full teams for any
■port, and the present, somewhat
tiring process of becoming physically fit will be replaced by a new
and better system whereby enjoyment and fitness are gleaned at
the same time.
Added Inducements
individual cups will be presented
for each event. Exhibitions of
various games and skills will also
be staged, with a view of making
the average male student conversant with as many sports and skills
as possible.
The new plan will be welcomed
by many men on the campus who
have thus far had no opportunities to get good workouts of any
kind, and by those who have always wanted to learn how to play
various sports but have had no
opportunity of learning them.
Intra Mural Handbook
To Appear Next Fall
•   A NEW HANDBOOK will make its appearance on the
campus at the beginning of next year in the form of an
Intra-mural Handbook, available to all male students, especially those in their first year.
This book will contain certain -»—«■«■■»■■■■■—■■■■•■■■■■»
bylaws and rules of the Intra-
Mural sports that were drawn up
this year. Also the book will give
in detail the method of scoring
under the point system that is
being used with so much success
this year among the mural athletes.
Another feature wil be pictures
of the winning team or prson in
each of th important sports run off
this year.
RECORDS STATED
Also included will be a list of
the records established this year
in the various sporting ever*,!.
These records should be of particular interest to those who will
be making their first attempt at
tho Intra-Mural game, giving
them  something   to   "shoot  at".
rosh will be especially interested in this complete handbook
because it will give the first year
men plans on how to organize
clubs, the necesary eligibility rules
for the contestants, together with
a tentative schedule on the year's
program.
This handbook, a completely new
feature on next year's set-up will
be available to all the male students on the campus.
LOST: A trig book, lost last
week. Return to the A.M.S. office
or to Margery Pinton, Arts Letter
Rack.
ITPO
A Sample of What's To Come
e
Easy Eligibility Opens New
Intramurals To All Men
•   THE KEYNOTE of next year's intra-mural plans is the fact that every male will have
the opportunity of participating.
Any group of thirty men will be eligible to compete or to enter competetants in
every sport. Every group will be automatically entered in every event, and if it fails to
turn out a team it will lose points by default.
Unlike this year, fraternities will for... only a small portion of the contesting groups,
teams will be formed by groups from every phase of campus life who will organize into
groups of thirty men or more. -
"""~^——      ATHLETIC CLUBS "■""■■"■■^■«—«—-—■
The groups which will be like
athletic clubs will have no membership restrictions and are easy
to form Suggestions for competing groups have been the estab-
_^   t r_^ m lishment of ex-high school clubs,
1# | |-1 Qf      T   1 I f G or   tlle   Publications   board   might
*   "*©       "   *a»^ even form an entry for the nev;
Intramurals
To Present
Tilts
• VARSITY'S EDITION
of grunt and groaners,
boxers and wrestlers to you,
should find next year's Athletic set-up busier than a rag
and junk business on Main
Street.
M. L. Van Vliet, who has personally coached Tommy Syme to
the North-west Golden Gloves 126
pound crown, has ideas for the
proposed enlarged intramural program.
"All-campus championship will
likely he held in both boxing and
wrestling for those who are interested in cither of these two
sports. This is to lead up to
ments when and if the opportunity presents itself";
WHIMSY
According to M. L. Van Vliet,
Tommy Syme will be on hand to
show the newcomers how it
should be done. Asitsing Syme
wil be  "Southpaw"  Porter "Kil-
intra-mural competitions.
The fraternities of course are already organized, but others such
as the Hyiu-Ow's will probably
form entries. The intra-mural
handbook will give men desiring
to participate in any of the sports
advice on how to get a group together.
Perhaps even the group that
happ-ens to st at the same table as
you in the caf will decide to form
a club, in order to enter the competitions. Their eligibility will be
easy. All they have to do is get
thirty men collected, and petition
the intra-mural committee to have
their club entered in the tournaments. There is nothing more to
it.
!er" Mervln "Lightening" Franklin, fight impressario, man manager with knowledge of the inside
dope, trainer and sparing partner
direct from Jacob's Beach.
ALL WELCOME
These organizations will not be
necessarily composed of only the
stereotyped athletic type, but also
those who wish to learn sports or
who are good at such sports as
ping-pong, snooker, bowling, etc.
Experts in these lines will prove
as valuable to the clubs as huskies in rugger and basketball.
THIS YEAR'S RESTRICTIONS
The main failing of this year's
program has been that many
people who wanted to enter various competitions such as the swim
meet, the cross-country tourney,
and the snooker contest, wero
ruled out because they were not
in fraternities.
Next ycar any one interested in
any of these activities will either
join or form a club, so that he will
be eligible to enter and help his
club, raise his competitive spirit,
end above all, raise his physical
fitness as every patriotic Canadian
should be doing in these times.
INTRA-MURAL
INFORMATION
By MR. MAURY VAN VLUT
•   THE QUESTION has been asked many times during the
last few weeks, "Why all this sudden interest in intramural sports and are they strictly for the fraternitiee?"
The answer to the first point la that the interest has
always been there but needed to be expressed through more
teams representing smaller groups rather than the faculties
and classes. As for; the second point, the program is designed as an intra-mural plan for the pleasure of every male on
the campus who wishes to participate, not any select group.
Elsewhere on these pages will be found a description of eligibility rules and other features for next year.
Since the outbreak of the war we have been aware el
a great deal of crusading for "physical fitness". It is hoped
that the broadening of sporting opportunities on our campus
will not only condition the men taking part, but will develop
more mental alertness. "Physical fitness" is not enough to
strive for, we need fitness in all things, not Just the physical.
Consequently, caiesthenic drills, setting-up exercises, and
other forms of physical sessions with mental naps are not
sufficient, but only a means to an end—when we have no
other means.
Aristotle once said, "The results of physical education
are not limited to the body alone, but they extend even to
the soul itself." It should be noticed that he said "physical
education", not listless arm waving with a full knee bend or
physical jerks (how I abhor that term), or some equally inane expression.
This type of physical education which encourages one's
mind to function during vigorous body movement includes
the intra-mural sports program which is rapidly developing
into one of the most important phases of campus life in every
university on this continent
The facilities available on this campus offer many opportunities which have been enjoyed by a minority group
of motor-minded athletes. Many students have not known
Just what to do about getting into some form of sport and
others have felt that some superman prerequisites were
necessary before heading in the general direction of the
gymnasium or stadium.
In the future, physical education on this campus should
be looked upon as a huge triangle with inter-collegiate and
other outside competition forming the peak, intra-mural
sports making up the center or bulk of the figure and the
base made firm by class instruction in various skills and
fundamentals necessary for participation or ability in the
many phases of Physical Education.
Intercollegiate
Intra-mural
Sports
Class
Instruction
An intra-mural hand-book will be available next fall
for the first time in the history of the University. A calendar
of the year's events will be listed as well as a constitution,
eligibility rules, entrants requirements and a complete record
of this year's activities. Champions declared this year will
remain so until their record has been broken. The intramural director and committee feel that with perhaps a thousand men competing next year every record should be broken.
Here is an opportunity to get mentally and physically
fit for the present crisis in a very enjoyable manner as well
as assisting in developing a program which will be the backbone of campus spirit in the years to come.
If your favorite sport has been over-looked or you
have some worthwhile suggestion for next year's intra-mural
program drop around and let the intra-mural committee
know about it.
This is your program! If it doesn't suit you or is not
completely successful, you will have only yourself to blame.
The tools will be furnished—can those academic bodies
hande the job?
Harry Franklin Gives Referee's Eye View On Intramural Sport Contests
THIS COULD BE a great chance to "kick back" on the
boys who play—in much quicker syllables, the "blind
Tom ref" holds the verbal hand o'er the whistle baiters.
But we waive that opportunity to tell our impressions of
the current intra-mural program.
From our position, we witnessed a smattering of what
went on, and how, and why things turned out as successfully
as they did. Spirit, people, spirit.
True, there was already much potential rivalry before
the competition opened in the form of social ties. But whatever made for the hotly contested matches 'twixt foes, and
friends for that matter, certainly aided to put it over.
ORGANIZATION
Still ( why should a group of twenty to forty men take
such an interest in a sports program that formerly was quite
dormant and whose participants prefered the lackadasical
attitude?
Organization, friend, organization.
Now that last remark is not so much an awkward slap
on the back to the intra-mural director and his assistants as
much as it is a compliment to the intra-mural team representatives  themselves.   In  fact,   those  same   committeemen
HARRY FRANKLIN
outline and organize the entire list of events, consequently,
doing what the majority of participants would want to do.
Quite happily, they have acknowledged the fact that this
is their program.
Since January 6, 1942, team representatives have held
their weekly conclave regularly at 3:30 Tuesday afternoons.
Here, reports on the outcome of various games have been
made, future plans outlined, and comments or suggestions
placed before Chairman M. L. Van Vliet. These in turn,
have been referred to a smaller gathering who submit plans
for the vote.
RECORD GOOD
Yes, it is all democratic and we might add, efficient.
But the success of the program has hinged on the
participants themselves. In approximately 40 basketball
games to date, not one has been forfeited. And the contests
have started on time—at scheduled times.
But why stand back and admire ourselves and gloat
over our accomplishments. Perhaps, they are not so astounding.   If future plans bear any weight at this stage  in  the
;ame, ihL year's activity will be but a drop in the inkwell
as compared to 1942-43. In other columns, you may have
gathered some idea of what is to be expected—pleasant, wot?
Anyway, intra-mural sports as a counter-part to a
gigantic physical fitness program will start in September, not
waylaid 'til January—and the entire shootin' match is open
to every male on this green campus.
ENTHUSIASM
Maybe you can appreciate how enthusiastic M. L. Van
Vliet, Director of Physical Education, feels over the current
outlook. Perhaps, you—who would jump at the chance to
take part in this set-up—are eager toenter the fun. Let me
.tell you here, pal, play "within the walls" will commence
with such vim and gusto next year that you'll hold your hat
and cry, "Gee whiz!"
Basketball with crowded locker rooms and cross
country with gruelling ordeals will be back again. Golf,
featuring hooks and slices, and ping pong with high nets and
short tables, along with swimming and screwy candle stick
racers—all that will grace the list of events. And injected
into the into the lineup will be volleyball, tennis badminton,
bowling—perhaps soccer and handball—(you name it we
got it!) Page Four
THE   UBYSSEY
fFriday, February 27, 1942
Awards Day Cancelled; Smoker Planned Soon
,erCUry sped far above fatiguu
With Picobac to charm hi$ endless leagues.
• Students also muit cover much ground —
academic if not terrestrial. In their arduous
journeys through the realms of learning, they
find that Picobac gives them "wlnaed feet of
thought". For the pick of Canada's Burlej
crop is always a mild, cool, sweet smoke—a
•We mtcum incomparably satisfying and financially undemanding.
HANOy MAL.TMHT POUCH    *   1|«
H-LB."LOK-TOP"TIN   .  6Se
also packed in Pocket Tins
"It DOES taitt good in • pipe I"
M,    M,    M,   .'I.    'h    Mi    Mi    Mi    M>    Ml
m
If • ftCCVMCV Alii V4LUI
CflflLLEnCER
WATCH
Mill
it's time to
think about a
blouie
(or your new spring
Each 1.98
Others at $2.1
^^ Now's when to buy it-
frilly, dainty lingerie types ...
wonderfully-tailored suit styles—
sheers, cottons, smooth crepes ....
plains, polkas, stripes—
white and mouth-watering colors
Blouses, Main Floor
Tumbling and Boxing
To Wind Up Year's
Intra's At Smoker
*   TO WIND UP this year's intra-mural sports program,
and to introduce the enlarged sports schedule for next
year, a mammoth sports smoker will be held some noon hour
early in April at the Gymnasium.
At the smoker, the first of a series to be run off at the
end of each intra-mural season, a complete program, is to be
run off which is guaranteed to be both interesting and entertaining.
Map Reading Jaunts Are Predicted
• AS A NOVELTY FEATURE
of next year's intra mural
sports program, details are being
completed concerning a map read-
*ing cross country race to be held
in the coming semester. The race
will involve racing skill, a cool
head, and a knowledge of military map reading.
Here is how it works. The runners line up some noon hour. Each
one is given a detailed map of the
^OPOBATFI)     ?""    MAV    l«70
Some of the outstanding statists*) on the campus will be asked
to give demonstrations and exhibitions ot their particular skill.
A tumbling show will be presented by a group of hand picked
men who are most capable of
showing the students the fine
points of the sport.
SYME WILL BOX
Tommy Syme, Golden Oloves
Featherweight Champion of the
Northwest, who may have been
National champ had the tourney
been held, will be asked to prove
his skill against any person or persons who can be found to enter
the ring with him. Tommy, one
of the most popular as well as
most proficient athletes that Varsity has ever turned out will be
certain to make the smoker a hit
It is possible that an exhibition
of expert ping-pong will be given
either by this year's intra-mural
meet, or by Bob and Harold Keen-
lyside, City and North-Westero
champions. No other demonstrations have been planned as yet
ANNUAL FEATURE
The Smoker has* been planned
to usher out trie sports for this
year, and to introduce the new
intra-mural program for next
semester. The various exhibitions
and demonstrations will, it is
hoped, have a spurring effect on
the already sport conscious groups
on the Campus, and an awakening effect on those groups not
heretofore Interested in the Intramural activities.
The whole thing has been arranged by Mr. M. L. Van Vliet,
who ls anxious to arouse interest
and enthusiasm In the new intramural plans for next year, which
plans he has fostered and brought
to their present state of completion.
Bowling And
Horseshoes
New Events
• HORSESHOES    AND
BOWLING will be two
events featured in next
year's Intra-mural Program.
These sports are being introduced to secure a full-rounded set-up.
Horseshoe pits will be constructed on the new playing field to be
built during the summer vacation
north of the Gym. This will certainly add to the Interest of game
and really bring the horseshoe™
to the attention of the public.
ALLEYS HIRED
A Bowling League will be formed from the competing Intramural
Teams and will be featured as real
point-getter. The games will be
played downtown where arrangements will be made to reserve the
entire facilities of the alleys.
Bowling has always been considered a popular sport among college men. It not only adds to an
intra-mural program, but affords
an opportunity to engage In an activity which has "carry-over"
value Into later life.
Pix Contest
Entries Due
March 18
• DON'T FORGET   . . .
The big Photography Competition . . . closing date is March 18
. . . submit your entries now and
you have a better chance of winning! Don't delay . . . anything
from nudse to rudes! No picture
is too small or too large!
Banzai! This is the time . . .
the pub is the place and this is
the thing! Get them pics from
your old family album and givo
to us down at the pub . . . don't
be bashful we're all friends together! 	
Come down and tell us about
your worries . . . but don't forget
them pics . . . exit in the form of
a looseleaf.
O SPRING Elections for the new
executive of the Forum will
be held in Aggie 100, Wednesday,
March 3. All interested are invit-
e dto attend.
• This Year's Data
BY HARRY FRANKUN
•   VARSITY sportsdom was not let down this year!
If you doubt that statement, look at the phenomenal
record of intra-mural sports on the Thunderbird campus, and
then contrast the figures with any set of statistics ever gathered in previous years. Then, youmight easily understand
why most male students at U.B.C. have followed M. L. Van
Vliet's successful program.
First, with the opening of the new year, basketball
teams, numbering eleven and consisting of ten players each,
began a hectic schedule that will carry them into the middle
of March. A quick glance and a little arithmetic tells us that
a good 110 men participated. In fact, at a recent game' on
the gym hardwood, a spectator crowd exceeding some Senior
"A" team attendances watched two evenly matched squads
battle it out for a high spot in the standings.
Total of 55 tournament games will have been run off
in the cage competition. Enthusiasm has reached the point
where fifty per cent of the squads have purchased their
own strip equipment. And when a group of fellows will put
out cold cash for the sake of basketball uniforms, then it is
a safe bet that they are taking their court game seriously.
«
Heading the initial tournament in the list of "special
events", a swimming meet at the local YMCA pool late in
January brought out that intra-mural interest once again.
At this exhibition of good swimming and clean sport, 84
individual men, took part in eight different events, and close
to 150 spectators crammed the "band box" 'Y' tank for a
full evening of water frolic. At least, half again as many
on-lookers were turned away because of lack of sufficient
seating capacity.
Then, before the sport scribes could keep up with the
results and schedules that go with an increased program,
nearly 50 campus behemoths pounded the celluloid sphere
in an intra-mural University ping pong tourney, that had
the Armouries in use from 7:45 to 11:30 the same evening.
This also was in the form of a "special events" series. All
points earned going toward the grand intra-mural total for
the year.
All the while, almost daily, various golf squads were
playing their double knockout series on the University links.
With two men from each organization, a total of 24 Varsity
golfers, excluding the local "smoothies", have been chipping
and putting from nigh on two months.
But to top off all expectations of what a real competitive series can offer, 100 huskies ran the gruelling 2%-mile cross
country February 19th over the campus course that saw between two and three hundred persons at the Stadium at the
start and finish of the race and another 200 interested spectators scattered out over the entire length of the course.
Most surprising to M. L. Van Vliet, proponent of
physical condition and especially cross country running, was
that many runners came up after the race and asked that a
similar competition be run in a few weeks time. Time does
not permit another cross country but next year it will be
seen that there will be enough cross country runs to take care
of the aspiring Thunderbirds.
At the present moment, besides a few meddle-some
mid-terms, intra-muralers are caught in the swing of soft-
ball, and once again, from all indications another new high
will be struck in this popular tourney.
In this sport over 150 male students have heard "Play
Ball!" and participated in the current double knockout series.
Games are scheduled so that all 12 teams are playing at the
same field at the same hour, making a sight to behold. In
spite of absence of regular workouts and everything that
goes with "fast" baseball, the brand of ball has been exceptionally good.
Then, thrown in between the various tourneys and
championship competition, a highly technical snooker night
went into history at the homes of two of Varsity's busier set,
Raefel and Carson.
"I've not seen anything like it, since the days of intercollegiate spotrs," remarked Lionel Salt, ex-sports editor on
the Ubyssey.
And that is about the general run of split second interviews. All comments have been favorable from the "hottest"
of sources. And, believe you me, that is an accomplishment
in itself.
Interest has become so prevalent that M. L. Van Vliet
and the intra-mural committee have planner a Men's Smoker
late in March at noon in the gymnasium. More about the
latter point in later editions o fthe Ubyssey.
Of course, interest can become so great that it may
become ridiculous. Picture if you will the Kappa Sigma
quintet challenging the second-string Varsity basketball team
to a basketball game that was played last Wednesday. Ridiculous, you say? No, brother, just good-hearted sportsmanship that has been stirred up by this zealous demand for
some sport activity.
Yes, we can safely say, with little fear of rebuttle, that
Varsity sportsdom has not been let down this year.
surrounding country. The problem then is to get from the point
of origin to the ultimate destination as quickly as possible, and to
reach that point before the other
contestants do so. •
Such a race is planned to give
the men running a chance to de-
velope their military map reading powers and at the same time
take part in an open contest as
part of the intra-mural program.
UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE
Hrs.i 9 a.m. to S p.m.; Saturdays 9 ajn. to noon
LOOSE LEAF NOTE BOOKS, EXERCISE BOOKS AND
SCRIBBLERS
AT REDUCED PRICES
Graphic Engineering Paper, Biology Paper
Loose Leaf Refills, Fountain Pens and Ink
and Drawing Instruments
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Royal Portable
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Four Smart Models
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The Arrow SUM
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Seymour St. PAciflc 7941 Friday, March 6, 1942
THE   UBYSSEY
Page Five
M.A.D. Changes;
Insurance Seen
• SWEEPING CHANGES in the intra-mural program on
the campus are being paralleled by the Men's Athletic
Directorate who are discussing plans to reorganize in order
to administer more efficiently the entire athletic set-up at
U.B.C.
One main topic of the Directorate's last meeting was the reconstituting of its membership. As it
now stands, M.A.D., which is the
controlling body on all campus
sports, consists of two faculty representatives, the director of physical education, the president of
M.A.A., the president of the Big
Block club, and one other student
representative.
NEW MEMBER SUGGESTED
It ls felt by members of the
Directorate that too specialized a
representative system has resulted
in which members of the council
have narrowed, athletic interest
Proposals, as they stand now, are
that a representative be included
from the Ubyssey sports staff.
Appointment of a member from
the Ubyssey sports department,
one committeeman pointed out,
would tend* to break down the
specialization of MA.D. "The U-
byssey sports editor has to know
something about every sport on
the campus," he said, "and we
could use "his knowledge and advice."
Also under discussion by the
Directorate, in line with the proposed changes in the intra-mural
program, is a comprehensive
scheme to provide athletic insurance against Injury.
INSURANCE SCHEME
Over two hundred male students
are participating In this year's program, and the enrolment for next
year should at least treble. This
means that danger of injury is increased three-fold.
At present, no provision is made
to recompense a University athlete, injured while playing for
U.B.C. The cases of Evann Davies,
who sustained a broken ankle
playing rugby in Victoria, (fad of
Art Johnson, who lost a front
tooth playing basketball are good
lllutsrations of the need for some
form of athletic Insurance.
Then, too, Norm Burnett, M.A.D.
committee man spent several
weeks on crutches as a result of
an Injury sustained in the gym.
MONEY RAISING SCHEMES
The Directorate feels that should
a scheme of Insurance be set up,
with a grant received from Council, money raised by the staging
of benefit games, and a committee
set up to administer benefits to
needy cases, it would, in time,
lead to a comprehensive insurance
program for the entire University,
and cover injuries received in laboratory work, and other academic
pursuits.
With this in mind, then, the
M.A.D. have submitted several
suggestions to Students' Council
for their approbation. Results ot
their investigations should be
ready for publication in the near
future.
Richards To
Honor D.U.'s
Alpha Gams
• CONTINUING his policy of
saluting campus fraternities
and sororities, Dal Richards, Vancouver Hotel Orchestra leader, will
feature the sweetheart songs of
Alpha Gamma Delta and Delta
Upsilon over radio station CJOR
tonight at eleven o'clock.
For the president of the Alpha
Gams, Frances McCarthy, the band
wil feature "This Love of Mine".
Barry Sleigh, president of Delta
Upsilon, will also have a request
played.
NOTICE: The Social Problems
Club will retire to Horseshoe Bay
to discuss labour problems this
week-end. The (heme of the camp
is 'Labour and Its Relation to War.'
All those interested are asked to
get in touch with Jack Currie.
• Shopping • • • With MaryAnn
War Note:
• COME in and sec all the new
sprint; fashions at Plant's Ladies
Ready to Wear. 564 Granville St.
It's just like a fashion show to go
in mid see all thc lowly dresses
and coats and suits. A dark Phi
Kappa Pi was jilted just before
the co-ed. His pretty girl-friend,
a well known Phrateres miss, toois
Roses are red
• STANFIELDS   have   all   sorts
of lovely lineerie . . . panties
and vests in brief and bloomer
styles. They come in tearose and
white at $1.00 at Wilson's Glove
end Hosiery Shop, 575 Granville
St. A commerceman drove som?
sorority girls down to Seattle for
their formal last week and for
compensation they got him a cute
Violets are blue
O YOU SHOULD see the "Holy
Mo3es" bag that Lydia Lawrence, 576 Seymour St. in the Arts
and Crafts building has made up
for herself. And it's called that
because she was wearing it one
day when catching a streetcar, and
while opening it she heard an Air-
force lad behind her exclaim
"Holy Moses, look at the size of
it".   The bag is about the largest
Sugar is rationed
• THE   ATMOSPHERE   of   the
Persian Arts and Crafts Shop,
507 Granville St. seems to give the
idea of exclusive merchandise. At
the same time each article is
priced moderately and reasonably.
A dark Players Clubber was carrying a white wig to be used In the
play through town the other day.
It was very delicate so he was
carrying it carefully. Suddenly
out of the crowd on the street a
But not so woo
• I   GOT   a   letter   through   the
mail   the   other   day   with   a
whole column of juicy items. The
letter was signed "love and stuff".
Today I will pass them on to you
but I will not guarantee their
authenticity.. Rao-Sous, (108 Granville St.. have the Inr^o.-.t ninijo of
:lylts on the Rae:: Clever floor
that they have ever b; en able to
pros, lit to the pi! lie. Low heels
and lii'-jh heels and medium heels
in  a  variety  of  colours  .   .   .   blue
a fellow Aggie to the co-ed. It
was all straightened out when the
Phi Kap didn't know whether he
could go or not so she asked thc
Aggie. For spring campus wear.
Plants have lovely sweaters, skirts,
blouses and snappy jackets. Wear
a lovely printed silk under a plain
coat, either dressy or sporty and
be ready for any event.
date. Now he's mooning around
about her end one of the sorority
girls on this campus, and the sorority girl is mooning around about
him and o Sigma Phi Delt. Nevertheless everyone Is quite chummy. Stanfields also make shadow-
proof slips for $1.95. Get a whole
set . . . slip, vest and panties to
match.
in town . . . about 18 inches
across. New romances: A tall
basketball player, Fiji, has given
his pin to a cute little freshette
Players Clubber. A cute Theta
with china-blue eyes has another
engagement ring. It was an Air-
force lad this time last year. Have
Miss Lawrence make one of those
bags for you and attract the eyes
of the Servicemen. She has hers
on display at any time.
women with a small child in tow
bore down on him and asked if
her little girl could look at the
baby. She realized her .mistake
on closer examination and they
both went about six shades of purple. Novelties in the Persian Shop
are priced no higher than the
usual novely lines and yet are
exclusive and different I. have
often priced articles as low as
50 cents.
black, biege. They are all very
new and very snappy. Drop in
and see them . . . they are all
priced at $5.95. A very tall senior
and a very tiny brunette sophomore were seen at the eo-ctl, Tho
writer feels sorry for the boy in
Seattle. lie wrote to the soph
that he was flying hero to go to
tho co-ed with her and she returned a quick r.vVT.ago "TOO
LATE DO NOT FLY AS I MAVF.
FLOWN" or words to that effect.
Institute
Scholarship
For Varsity
• SIR NORMAN ANGELL will
meet this Summer with students from colleges in the United
States and other countries at the
Institute of World Affairs of the
Students International Union to
help then' gain a clearer conception of Allied war alms, the character of an eventual peace, the
psychology of allied nations, and
inter-American relationships.
U. B. C. has been asked to name
one or more students who would
be suitable candidates for a scholarship in the above Institute, and
who would be free to accept such
a scholarship in spite of war obligations.
Further information may be obtained at the Registrar's office.
Success Chances Rated
One in Ten By Bankers
By VIVIAN VINCENT
• THE CHANCES OF success for the average University
student are rated as being one in ten by Mr. E. Scheidel,
manager of the Sasamat branch of the Bank of Montreal, but
as a future investment based on the fact that the students of
today will be the professional men of to-morrow the carrying
of student accounts will prove to be profitable.
Mr. Schledel stated that in the «.mmmmmmmmmmmmmmm^mmmm_^^m
three years he has been manager,
he has never found a student who
has tried to put anything over on
the bank. University students are
100 percent honest.
Graduate students who have required assistance to travel to the
east to fill positions there have
never failed to repay their debts.
M. W. Allan, manager of the
Canadian Bank of Commerce on
Sasamat, although he has only
been there for three months, finds
students very easy to deal with
and it is one of the bright spots
In busines to have them come in.
There is much less risk in dealing with students in banking transactors than with the general public is the conclusion he has come
to.
Mr. Allan said that professors
are prety nice people to deal with
too, although there are a few exceptions Junior members of the
staff find them to be quite a
trial though, because they never
know when the professors are kidding or not.
New Plan Calls
For Tentative
'42<'43 Budgets
•   KEITH PORTER, Treasurer of
the A.M.S., has announced the
formation of a new scheme to facilitate the drnwing-up of the incoming Treasurer's preliminary
budget.
In the very near future, presidents of all campus clubs will be
sent a form on which to estimate
approximately what their requirements for next year will be. This
is to be endorsed by both the old
and new presidents and returned
to the Council member under
whose supervision their club falls.
The fact that much of the red
tape has been abolished in Canadian banking makes it much
more pleasant to enter a bank.
Today an air of cordiality is encouraged, Jie concluded.
Frosh-Soph
Draw Set For
Noon, Mar. 12
• PLANS FOR the combined
Frosh-Soph class party are
now being laid by the executives.
The date for the draw has been
tentatively set for March 12, and
will be held ut noon in tho auditorium.
Frosh president Don Sutton Is
in charge of arrangements for the
draw, and Dr Ralph Hull will
officiate at the actual drawing.
This year the draw will include
the sophmores also.
Soph president Dave Housser
said that plans for the dance are
still rather indefinite, but that it
will be held in the Brock as usual
and that muse would be supplied
by George Reifel and his band.
The date has been set for Tuesday,
March 17.
Campus Friends
More important than ever these uncertain times—classics—good
clothes that you wear and wear because they fit so .well intd
your manner of living—because they have a quality and timeless
charm that makes them last season after season—because you
can make them so individual by mixing and matching!
JACKETS
Shirts
man - tailored by
Tooke
Women's shirts that carry the air of authentic masculine styling—in English broadcloths, striped percales, zephyr and madras
cloths. All featuring either self or white
pique, convertible collar, linked cuff and
pocket.  Sizes 32 to 40.
2.00 to 4.00
SKIRTS
Shoulders easy in indispensible jackets
—shown in donegals, herringbones and
other Scottish tweeds. 3-button fastening, longer length and the
draped shoulder.  Sizes 12 to 18.
16.95 to 18.95
new
The sort of skirts you love because
they fit so well. Pastel wools and tropical cloths in every shade you could
name. Flared and pleated to give you
plenty of variety. Sizes 14 to 26.
2.98 to 7.98
SPORT  SUITS
If you've a flare for simplicity, a feeling for color and a yen
for plaids, choose one of these ruggedly feminine suits.
Classically tailored or dressmaker in cut they are fashioned
of handsome tweeds in soft pastel plaids.   Sizes 14 to 20.
25.00
Sportswear, Spencer's, Fashion Floor
T.
DAVID SPENCER
LIMITED Page Six
THE   UBYSSEY
Friday, March 6, 1942
A rmories May Be New
SoccermenEnd Year
With 1-0 Loss To
Lucky Woodwards
•   THE VARSITY soccer squad ended the season on a sad
note Wednesday as they dropped a hard fought 1-0 battle
to a Woodward team in the last game of the year in the
Wednesday afternoon City soccer league.
By this loss, the game played to determine the finalists
in the league setup, the University Eleven ended their
chances of playing in the City Spalding Finals against the
Police.
Potential Sports Site
Centre For Murals
Could Handle Tennis, Cage,
Ring, Ping Pong, Shuttle
Tilts And Indoor Training
• PLANS FOR CHANGING the armouries into an indoor
sports center for the campus are almost completed, and
the military vortex may become an intra-mural sports field
next term. The idea has the enthusiastic sponsorship of Mr.
Van Vliet, and the approval of Colonel Shrum, assuming that
the proposed plans do not interfere with military requirements.
Holding second place in the
league standing throughout the
year the campus soccermen had
tough luck in losing this game and
the chance of playoff tilts.
The game started with a disconcerting lineup, the Woodsonias
having only eight men on the field.
As a result the seemingly temper-
mental Varsity players couldn't
get started with their offensive
play.
The Woodward team just sat a-
round and kept kicking the ball
clear at leisure.
After haft time, the Woodward
team were reenforced by three
players. Then they turned on the
pressure.   Ten minutes after the
half had started they scored to put
them in the lead an dtake the
game.
The game and hard, fighting Varsity men fought back but failed to
score. With but five minutes to go
until the final whistle, they staged a determined rush on the winners' net.  But no tally resulted.
This was the last game of the
year for the Thunderbird soccer
team.
LINEUP: Young, Roach, Louie,
Green, Todd, Sasaki, Morten,
Oughten, Smith, North, Kermode,
and Tupper.
Varsity Pucksters Take
Sloppy 5*2 Win From
Vancouver Junior Lions
• THE VARSITY Hockey team charged through the defense of the Vancouver Junior Lions for a 5-2 victory in
the feature game last Friday night at the Forum, with a
good turn out of University students to root the boys on to
a win. The game was a disgrace to good hockey, but no
one, seemed to object to it except the one Junior Lions man
who had to be carried off the ice "out cold".
FREE SKATING
After the game, students skated
for an hour and a half, to the
music, not of the Varsity band,
but to recorded disks by courtesy
of the Forum. The crowd on the
ice was not too big, and not \too
small, for there were no adverse
comments.
The game opened slowly, with
the wild playing that was to be
the rule showing up immediately.
Rushing up and down the ice in
a series of drives that served to
confuse the spectators only, the
two teams turned in as ragged a
performance as can be imagined.
But the first period ended with no
score for either team.
...Tho second session sow (he Lions
take a slight lead of two goals
over Varsity in the first five minutes. But Varsity recovered and
drove down the Ice again and a-
galn to ring up three goals in the
remaining time. High light of this
period was the fight that occured
between Billy Husband, second
star of the cross country race, and
hr Throat taty
Mlkh»st—Sm»k$
Buckingham
Cigarettes
Pat Butler of the Lions. Both men
were given penalties.
In the third period, UJ3.C. rang
up two more net counters, but this
was incidental to the nasty accident which occured when Jack
Shilabeer collided with an unidentified Junior Lions man, who was
thought to have sustained a skull
fracture, but who later was found
to be suffering from only a minor
head injury.
Tennis
Tourney
Formed
• LYNN SULLY, newly
elected president of the
M.A.A. revealed plans today
for a campus wide Men's
Only Tennis Meet. Both
Doubles and Singles matches
will be played and cups are
to be awarded to the winners.
The matches will be open to all
men on the campus who have a
tennis racket and a pair of shoes.
Entries must be handed in by
Tuesday afteroon, to Mr. Maury
Van Vliet. Double entries must
have the names of both  men.
Object of the tennis match, according to the genial Lynn Sully,
is to prepare for the newly formed
Inetr-Mural set up next fall,
Girls wil not be allowed to enter
in the matches this Spring but
next year entries will be thrown
open to all male and female members of  the  University.
As son as all entries are In this
week, then the organizers will
draw up a schedule for the proposed matches. This schedule will
be posted up and the games can
get under  way.
•. • Opponents
PROPOSED SITE of the new sports centre for next year. If the floor of the Armories is properly laid out as Maury Van Vliet suggests, tennis, badminton courts and volley
ball courts will be formed. The 50,000 dollar building should prove, if made the new
centre of Mural activity, of more use than merely an Armories.
Canadian Grid Game For
Guns In Stadium Saturday
•   UNIVERSITY CANADIAN Football enthusiasts will have the pleasure of seeing one of
the best   Senior High School teams play this Saturday morning when the championship
Kits squad tackles a VarsjJy-EJE. lineup in the Stadium at 10 o'clock sharp.   <•
Billed as a game for guns, the proceeds will go to buy bonds, the battle js being promoted by Gus Carmichael, playing coach for the Varsity-P.W. team.
. GORMAN, TUCKER wmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmiimmmmmm^
Several other University players
scheduled to appear, on the lineup
are Ray Gorman, backfield veteran of the Thunderbird team,
Jack Tucker, hard hitting end for
the 'Bird grid squad and of course
Gus Carmichael.
The Varsity-P.W. first string team
will be made up of stars from the
High school and players from the
University. Workouts have been
held during the last week and the
squad is in a good spot to give
the highly rated Kits team a fight.
Tho Kits gridmen arc Uie City
Champs as far as High School
play is concerned. With a fast
and shifty running backfield and a
line which weighs more on the
average than the Vancouver Grizzlies they have over-powered any
opposition so far.
Coach of the mighty Kitsilano
team is the Varsity Thunderbird
quarter-back Johnny  Farina.
Game time is set for 10 o'clock
and an admission charge of ten
cents will be charged for the Victory Loan Drive.
JOHN FARINA will direct his
Kits squad from the coaching
bench Saturday morning, against
former team  mates.
RAY GORMAN, Thunderbird
halfback will lead the Varsity-
P.W. attack tomorrow at ten.
Mural Track Meet
Set For March 17-19
•   DETAILS for the huge Intra-Mural Track Meet, to take
place March 17-19 were announced today by Stu Madden,
effH^nt Fraternity sports organizer.
"Over ten events will be run off including a Medle;'
Relay Race." stated Madden.
4t*#*"
Your  Varsity   Pass  Entitles You to a Special
Rate   at   the   Following
Theatres
(Except Saturdays and Holidays)
Gene Tierney, Walter Huston,
Victor  Mature,  Oona  Munson
in 51
"THE SHANGHAI GESTURE"
VOOUI
5      ,      F,dy. «°na MaM y
S   Nelson aW'in
| -BALAIAIKA
C "      plus „
rloo Bridge
-Waterloo
PARADISE
Jack London's
"NORTH TO THE
KLONDIKE"
plus Eddie Albert in
"Treat 'Em Rough"
PLAZA
Rules concerning entries are as
follows; two men will be allowed
to enter in one event from each
fraternity, and no man may enter
in more than two events, including  the Medley  Relay  race,
The Medley Relay race will be
compressed of a 50 yard run then
a 100 yard run, a 220, and finally
a 440.
Points to be alloted to winners
are five, three for second, two for
third and one for fourth.
Over fifty men are figured to
compete in the Meet, and everv
day hopefuls are training over at
the   stadium.
Rated as a winner in the half
mile is D. U. Doug Lee, distance
man who won the Cross Country.
Another couple of fellows who
are rated as tops are Jocko Ryan,
cage veteran, and Ian MacDonald. A close fight is expected
from these two in the quarter
mile  event.
Phi Delts Beat
Betas 31-29
In Close Tilt
• A thrilling last minute rally,
in which Jimmy "Bummy"
Allen scored three points to tie
the score and put the Phi Delts
ahead 31-29, featured the closest
interfraternity basketball contest
of the year Tuesday night as the
up-and-coming Phis downed the
once-mighty' Betas.
George Rush, the Beta's were un
able to show their usual form, as
the Phi Delts led by 'Jocko' Mc-
Kinlay and one-minute-man'Pon-
cho' Paton swept through and
overcame   an   eight   point   deficit.
Jack Cunningham was top scorer
with   12  points,
Frosh tquad
Lose Finals
To Sparling
• THE FROSH basketball
team lost their third
game in the fight for the
Community League Intermediate A Championship
last Thursday night at the
King Ed gym by a close 29-
23 call to the Sparling quintet. This loss winds up the
basketball schedule for the
Frosh for this season.
The Frosh played a great gam.-
and came within two points of
tying the game up in the last five
minutes but here the Sparling
aggregation took control and put
the game on ice.
Standouts for the Frosh were
Dave Haywood, Bruce Yorke and
Don Mann. These three turned in
a sparkling performance for their
last game of the season.
The Frosh basketball squad deserves plaudits for their showing
in the lcagxie playoffs this year.
This is the first time in some years
that a freshman team lias been
able to show up well ; nc1 reach
the finals oC their division in the
playoff.;.
The fro.'h finished second in tlu>
Many advantages are apparent
to such a plan. Showers are already Installed, there is room for
many games, and the light, heat,
and height of the building are sufficient to allow most indoor games
to be run off easily.
FACILITIES
Three Indoor tennis courts, three
volley ball courts, and eight or
ten badminton courts could be
fitted in comfortably. In addition
to these, boxing and wrestling
rings can be set up In the building, and a three wall handball
court can be constructed.
The armories is an ideal spot for
this developement. This year, the
ping pong tourney was run off in
one evening in the building, showing just how fast and easy it would
be to complete other such matches.
The building is centrally located,
and has great possibilities for being
turned into a training center for
any and all sports.
GREAT POSSIBILITIES
"When the war is over, the
armouries could be turned into a
new gymnasium to seat Ave thous
and people, and here the big intercollegiate games could be held."
Harry Franklin, one of the key
men in the new set up stated with
conviction and enthusiasm. "We
hope that the proposed scheme
can be accomplished without upsetting any of the military aspects
of the building." Harry added.
The way this is to be done is
simple. Post holes, with metal flap
coverings, will be drilled in the
armouries floor wherever they are
required. Removeable, / correct
height posts will be quickly
brought out and set up. Tehn the
nets required will be lowered from
the ceiling by a system of pulleys.
The whole thing should take only
four or five minutes at the most,
and even less time will be necessary to put the apparatus away.
Such a training and athletic
centre is badly needed, with, the
gymnasium being in continuous
use by the military gym classes.
This proposed scheme will solve
the whole problem of an indoor
intra-murai playing and training
field.
New Playing Field
North of Gym May
Be Built For Murals
• AS PART of the new intra-mural program for next year,
a small-scale playing field, measuring perhaps 80 by 40
yards may be cleared and constructed north of the Gymnasium. "It will probably be merely a dirt field, at least for
the duration of the war." Mr. Van Vliet said last Monday.
There are two main reasons for
the smaller sized field, In the
first place it woul cost less, and
would be easier to construct. In
the second place, it would give enthusiasts who nre not really good
atheletes a chance to play without
tho severe hardship involved in
playing on a standard field.
Touch rugby, soccer, spcedball,
and many other grid games can be
played on thc field. It can be the
tcene of all the intra-mural
r.ports requiring a field. The Stadium field wil be reserved for the
larger Varsity games requiring a
stnndad gridiron.
All around the field are to bs
located other sporting apparatus
and equipment. Spots for high and
broad jump pits, pole vault layouts, and horseshoe pitches are in
the mind of the promoter of the
scheme Mr. Van Vliet, who hopes
to make the field the sporting
centre for the next year.
It is also hoped to be able to
supply an outlet for interest in
archery, arrangements having already been completed to purchase
tome equipment for the men. This
idea is spreading and it is certain
tiiat many men will be interested
in what has always been considered a girl's sport on the Campus.
Such a development will arouse
the sporting spirit on the campus,
for it will offer a spot for easy
playing in all competitive grid
games.
Baseball Game
To-day 12:30
D.U., Phi Delts
First game to be played during
the week in thc Intra-Mural baseball schedule will be fought out
today noon when the D.U. and the
Phi Deit baseball nines clash on
the upper soccer field.
Both teams have won one and
lost one In the previous baseball
matches. Time set for the tilt is
12:30.
Intermediate A Division of the
Community League and in the
semi-finals of the playoffs defeated  the  "Y"  in  three games.
In the finals against Sparlings.
Varsity took tho first contest but
dropped the lu'xt three to be defeated in their fight for the championship.
NOTICE: Students who are available for teaching positions this
September are requested to leave
their names and details with Dr.
M. A. Cameron, Department of Education, Room V, Arts Building.
Fraternity and Sorority
Printing and Engraving
Oxir Speciatly
DANCE PROGRAMMES
INVITATIONS, 'AT HOME*
LETTERHEADS and
CHRISTMAS CARDS
•
GEHRKE'S
S66 Seymour St.
Full Speed
Ahead
Don't forget the Pep
Meeting (complete with
music) Tuesday, in aid
of the New Victory Loan
— make a date to be
there! And don't forget
•-for real Motor Pep-
always "fill up" with
Home Gas—You can buy
no Better!
y.M?.u Page Six
THE   UBYSSEY
Friday, March 6, 1942
Armories May Be New Sports Centre For Murals
SoccermenEnd Year
With 1-0 Loss To
Lucky Woodwards
•   THE VARSITY soccer squad ended the season on a sad
note Wednesday as they dropped a hard fought 1-0 battle
to a Woodward team in the last game of the year in the
Wednesday afternoon City soccer league.
By this loss, the game played to determine the finalists
in the league setup, the University Eleven ended their
chances of playing in the City Spalding Finals against the
Police.
Holding second place in the
league standing throughout the
year the campiis soccermen had
tough luck in losing this game and
the chance of playoff tilts.
The game started with a disconcerting lineup, the Woodsonias
having only eight men on the field.
As a result the seemingly temper-
mental Varsity players couldn't
get started with their offensive
play.
The Woodward team just sat a-
round and kept kicking the ball
clear at leisure.
After half time, the Woodward
team were reenforced by three
players. Then they turned on the
pressure.   Ten minutes after the
half had started they scored to put
them in the lead an dtake the
game.
The game and hard, fighting Varsity men fought back but failed to
score. With but five minutes to go
until the final whistle, they staged a determined rush on the winners' net.  But no tally resulted.
This was the last game of the
year for the Thunderbird soccer
team.
LINEUP: Young, Roach, Louie,
Green, Todd, Sasaki, Morten,
Oughten, Smith, North, Kermode,
and Tupper.
Varsity Pucksters Take
Sloppy 5*2 Win From
Vancouver Junior Lions
• THE VARSITY Hockey team charged through the defense of the Vancouver Junior Lions for a 5-2 victory in
the feature game last Friday night at the Forum, with a
good turn out of University students to root the boys on to
a win. The game was a disgrace to good hockey, but no
one; seemed to object to it except the one Junior Lions man
who had to be carried off the ice "out cold".
FREE SKATING
After the game, students skated
for an hour and a half, to the
music, not of the Varsity band,
but to recorded disks by courtesy
of the Forum. The crowd on the
ice was not too big, and not \too
small, for there were no adverse
comments.
The game opened slowly, with
the wild playing that was to be
the rule showing up Immediately.
Rushing up and down the ice in
a series of drives that served to
confuse the spectators only, the
two teams turned in as ragged a
performance as can be imagined.
But the first period ended with no
score for either team.
.The second session saw the Lions
take a slight lead of two goals
over Varsity in the first five minutes. But Varsity recovered and
drove down the ice again and a-
galn to ring up three goals In the
remaining time. High light of this
period was the fight that occured
between Billy Husband, second
star of the cross country race, and
For Throat buy
HUhkus—Smoko
Buckingham
Cigarettes
Pat Butler of the Lions. Both men
were given penalties.
In the third period, UJ3.C. rang
up two more net counters, but this
was incidental to the nasty accident which occured when Jack
Shllabeer collided with an unidentified Junior Lions man, who was
thought to have sustained a skull
fracture, but who later was found
to be suffering from only a minor
head injury.
Tennis
Tourney
Formed
• LYNN SULLY, newly
elected president of the
M.A.A. revealed plans today
for a campus wide Men's
Only Tennis Meet. Both
Doubles and Singles matches
will be played and cups are
to be awarded to the winners.
The matches will be open to all
men on the campus who have a
tennis racket and a pair of shoes.
Entries must be handed In by
Tuesday afteroon, to Mr. Maury
Van Vliet. Double entries must
have the names of both men.
Object of the tennis match, according to the genial Lynn Sully,
is to prepare for the newly formed
Inetr-Mural oet up next fall.
Girls wil not be allowed to enter
in the matches this Spring but
next year entries will be thrown
open to all male and female members of the  University.
As son as all entries are in this
week, then the organizers will
draw up a schedule for the proposed matches. This schedule will
be posted up and the games can
get under way.
00*""
Your  Varsity  Pass  Entitles You to a .Special
Rate   at   the   Following
Theatres
(Except Saturdays and Holidays)
Gene Tierney, Walter Huston,
Victor Mature,  Oona Munson
In a
•THE SHANGHAI GESTURE"
VOOUI
fc   Nelson
BALAIA1KA"
.•Waterloo Bridge"
PARAD1*E
(  Jack London's
PLAZA
Potential Sports Site
•.. Opponents
PROPOSED SITE of the new sports centre for next year. If the floor of the Armories is properly laid out as Maury Van Vliet suggests, tennis, badminton courts and volley
ball courts will be formed. The 50,000 dollar building should prove, if made the new
centre of Mural activity, of more use than merely an Armories.
Canadian Grid Game For
Guns In Stadium Saturday
•   UNIVERSITY CANADIAN Football enthusiasts will have the pleasure of seeing one of
the best   Senior High School teams play this Saturday morning when the championship
Kits squad tackles a Varsjly-EJK. lineup in the Stadium at 10 o'clock sharp.   <•
Billed as a game for guns, the proceeds will go to buy bonds, the battle is being promoted by Gus Carmichael, playing coach for the Varsity-P.W. team.
. GORMAN, TUCKER —-—-------—--——.
Several other University players
scheduled to appear on the lineup
are Ray Gorman, backfield veteran of the Thunderbird team,
Jack Tucker, hard hitting end for
tho 'Bird grid squad and of course
Gus Carmichael.
The Varsity-P.W. first string team
will be made up of stars from the
High school and players from thc
University. Workouts have been
held during the last week and the
squad is in a good spot to give
tho highly rated Kits team a fight.
The Kits grldmen arc the City
Champs as far as High School
play is concerned. With a fast
and shifty running backfield and a
line which weighs more on the
average than the Vancouver Grizzlies they have over-powered any
opposition so far.
Coach of the mighty Kitsilano
team is the Varsity Thunderbird
quarter-back Johnny  Farina.
Game time is set for 10 o'clock
and an admission charge of ten
cents will be charged for the Victory Loan Drive.
JOHN FARINA will direct his
Kits squad from the coaching
bench Saturday morning, against
former team  mates.
RAY GORMAN, Thunderbird
halfback will lead the Varsity-
P.W. attack tomorrow at ten.
Mural Track Meet
Set For March 17-19
•   DETAILS for the huge Intra-Mural Track Meet, to take
place March 17-19 were announced today by Stu Madden,
efficient Fraternity sports organizer.
"Over ten events will be run off including a Medley
Relay Race." stated Madden.
Rules concerning entries are as
follows; two men will be allowed
to enter in one event from each
fraternity, and no man may enter
in more than two events, Including the Medley  Relay  race.
The Medley Relay race will be
compressed of a SO yard run then
a 100 yard run, a 220, and finally
a 440.
Points to be alloted to winners
are five, three for second, two for
third and one for fourth.
Over fifty men are figured to
compete in the Meet, and every
day hopefuls are training over at
the   stadium.
Rated as a winner in the half
mile is D. U. Doug Lee, distance
man who won the Cross Country.
Another couple of fellows who
are rated as tops are JocKo Ryan,
cage veteran, and Ian MacDonald. A close fight is expected
from these two in the quarter
mile  event.
Phi Delts Beat
Betas 31-29
In Close Tilt
• A thrilling last minute rally,
in which Jimmy "Bummy"
Allen scored three points to tie
the score and put the Phi Delts
ahead 31-29, featured the closest
interfraternity basketball contest
of the year Tuesday night as the
up-and-coming Phis downed the
once-mighty" Betas.
George Rush, the Beta's were unable to show their usual form, as
the Phi Delts led by 'Jocko' Mc-
Kinlay and one-minute-man'Pon-
cho' Paton swept through and
overcame   an   eight   point   deficit.
Jack Cunningham was top scorer
with   12 points.
Frosh hquad
Lose Finals
To Sparling
• THE FROSH basketball
team lost their third
game in the fight for the
Community League Intermediate A Championship
last Thursday night at the
King Ed gym by a close 29-
23 call to the Sparling quintet. This loss winds up the
basketball schedule for the
Frosh for this season.
The Frosh played a great game
and came within two points of
tying the game up in the last five
minutes but here the Sparling
aggregation took control and put
the game on ice.
Standouts for the Frosh were
Dave Haywood, Bruce Yorke and
Don Mann. These three turned in
a sparkling performance for their
last game of the season.
The Frosh basketball squad deserves plaudits for their showing
in the league playoffs this year.
This is the first time in soma years
that a freshman team has been
able to show up well ; ncl reach
thc finals of their division in the
playoff::.
The fro!-h finished second in tlu»
Could Handle Tennis, Cage,
Ring, Ping Pong, Shuttle
Tilts And Indoor Training
• PLANS FOR CHANGING the armouries into an indoor
sports center for the campus are almost completed, and
the military vortex may become an intra-mural sports field
next term. The idea has the enthusiastic sponsorship of Mr.
Van Vliet, and the approval of Colonel Shrum, assuming that
the proposed plans do not interfere with military requirements.
Many advantages are apparent
to such a plan. Showers are already installed, there is room for
many games, and the light, heat,
and height of the building are sufficient to allow most indoor games
to be run off easily.
FACILITIES
Three indoor tennis courts, three
volley ball courts, and eight or
ten badminton courts could be
fitted In comfortably. In addition
to these, boxing and wrestling
rings can be set up in the building, and a three wall handball
court can be constructed.
The armories is an ideal spot for
this developement. This year, the
ping pong tourney was run off in
one evening in the building, showing just how fast and easy it would
be to complete other such matches.
The building is centrally located,
and has great possibilities for being
turned into a training center for
any and all sports.
GREAT POSSIBILITIES
"When the war is over, the
armouries could be turned into a
new gymnasium to seat five thous
and people, and here the big intercollegiate games could be held."
Harry Franklin, one of the key
men in the new set up stated with
conviction and enthusiasm. "We
hope that the proposed scheme
can be accomplished without upsetting any of the military aspects
of the building." Harry added.
The way this is to be done is
simple. Post holes, with metal flap
coverings, will be drilled in the
armouries floor wherever they are
required. Removeable, / correct
height posts will be quickly
brought out and set up. Tehn the
nets required will be lowered from
the ceiling by a system of pulleys.
The whole thing should take only
four or five minutes at the most,
and even less time will be necessary to put the apparatus away.
Such a training and athletic
centre is badly needed, with, the
gymnasium being in continuous
use by the military gym classes.
This proposed scheme will solve
the whole problem of an indoor
intra-mural playing and training
field.
New Playing Field
North of Gym May
Be Built For Murals
• AS PART of the new intra-mural program for next year,
a small-scale playing field, measuring perhaps 80 by 40
yards may be cleared and constructed north of the Gymnasium. "It will probably be merely a dirt field, at least for
the duration of the war." Mr. Van Vliet said last Monday.
There are two main reasons for
the smaller sized field. In the
first place it woul cost less, and
would be easier to construct. In
the second place, it would give enthusiasts who are not really good
atheletes a chance to play without
thc severe hardship involved in
playing on a standard field.
Touch rugby, soccer, spcedball,
and many other grid games can be
played on the field. It can be the
scene of all the intra-mural
sports requiring a field. The Stadium field wil be reserved for the
larger Varsity games requiring a
standad gridiron.
All around the field are to be
located other sporting apparatus
and equipment. Spots for high and
broad jump pits, pole vault layouts, and horseshoe pitches are in
the mind of the promoter of the
scheme Mr. Van Vliet, who hopes
to make the field the sporting
centre for the next year.
It is also hoped to be able to
supply an outlet for interest in
archery, arrangements having already been completed to purchase
some equipment for the men, This
idea is spreading and it is certain
that many men will be interested
in what has always been considered a girl's sport on the Campus.
Such a development will arouse
the sporting spirit on the campus,
for it will offer a spot for easy
playing in all competitive grid
games.
Baseball Game
To-day 12:30
D.U., Phi Delts
First game to be played during
the week in the Intra-Mural baseball schedule will be fought out
today noon when the D.U. and the
PM DeJt baseball nines dash on
the upper soccer field.
Both teams have won one and
lost one in the previous baseball
matches. Time set for the tilt is
12:30.
Intermediate A Division of th?
Community League and in the
semi-finals of the playoffs defeated  thc  "Y"   in  three games.
In thc finals against Sparlings,
Varsity took the first contest but
dropped the n;-xt three to be defeated in their fight for the championship.
NOTICE: Students who are available for teaching positions this
September are requested to leave
their names and details with Dr.
M. A. Cameron, Department of Education, Room V, Arts Building.
Fraternity and Sorority
Printing and Engraving
Our Speciatly
DANCE PROGRAMMES
INVITATIONS,  'AT HOME'
LETTERHEADS and
CHRISTMAS CARDS
•
GEHRKE'S
566 Seymour St.
!-£
Full Speed
Ahead
Don't forget the Pep
Meeting (complete with
music) Tuesday, in aid
of the New Victory Loan
— make a date to be
there! And don't forget
—for real Motor Pep-
always "fill up" with
Home Gas—You can buy
no Better!
ism
HOME Oil DISTRIBUTORS LIMITED
loo1;  n c   c o m r«11

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