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The Ubyssey Jan 14, 1960

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 MARDI
GRAS    M
SPREE
VOL. LXVII
U8YSSSY
January
22 and
23
■VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, JANUARY 14, 1960
No. 35.
The atmosphere of togetherness evident in this picture may become a thing of the past. The
Senate Library Committee has suggested that students will even be able to study once quiet is
enforced. It is to be hoped that lhe proposed aura of silence will not result in a new problem
for the Senate—mental anxiety on the part of the student who finds the necessity of complete
absorption in  his  work  oppressive. —Photo by Earl Olsen.
Senate Library Committee
Plans Crackdown On Noise
UBC Students
Face Ouster
From Homes
By DEREK ALLEN
Ubyssey Staff Reporter
n-,
By ROSS COLLVER
Ubyssey Staff Reporter
The Senate Library Committee is prepared to take firm
action if students cannot do something about noise in the
library v
The committee is alarmed by the increasing number of
complaints with regard to disturbances in the study areas.
Uniformed commissionaires may have to be employed to
patrol our main library.
Students' Council is naturally
opposed to the commissionaire
suggestion, but they agree that
something must be done • to
establish an atmosphere of quiet
in the library.
Library overcrowding is an
example of the increasing inadequacy of space at this university. This is evident every
time students mount the stairs
and enter the Loan Desk area.
Mr. Neil Harlow, University
Librarian, said that he fails to
see how the completion of the
new wing of the library will
serve to alleviate the conditions
to any great extent. In his
opinion, scarcity of space will be
a problem as long as the university growth continues at its present rate.
The crowded conditions can
be blamed as a reason for noise
in many instances, but the fact
remains that the students themselves have not responded to
the increasing need for quiet in
the library.
One   faculty   member   stated
that it is rather sad that university students must be continually censured for  conduct  more
closely connected with juvenile
attitudes. However, we observe
ijoking, table-hopping, flirting,
and assorted other games,
whether they be in the lobbies,
the Riddington Room, or other
study areas.
The library seems to have
turned fromj the academic centre
of the campus into a cavernous
students union building.
Students may be critical of
the physical attributes of the
building, but they should instead, hcfnestly examine their
own behaviour.
If the students cannot solve
the problem themselves the Senate Library Committee is prepared  to  post commissionaires.
As Library proctors they will
patrol every study area, breaking up groups in corners, groups
at tables, as well as the ever-
present knot of souls who turn
the front lobby into a genuine
echo chamber.
During the past few weeks,
the members of the AMS Library Committee have met with
faculty members from the Sen-
(Continued on page 4)
See LIBRARY COMMITTEE
NOTICE
Attention staffers!
There will be a meeting oi
the Ubyssey staff Friday noon
i|i the 'renovated Pub offices.
All staffers and people
want to write for the Ubyssey
must turn out.
Policy, gripes and the general system will be discussed.
The City of Vancouver wants students to move out of thai
single family homes they board at in the University area.
Complaints from the West
Point Grey Property Owners'
Association have gained the
support and sympathy of Alderman Halford Wilson, chairman
of the committee in charge of
city planning.
The City Planning Board has
announced that the-^ by-laws
which restrict homes within the
immediate vicinity of the "university gates to single dwelling
residences will soon be enforced.
These by-laws have lain dormant since being passed. As a
result many UBC students have
found rooms in homes close to
the gates.
In a brief submitted to the
Students Council at its Monday
night meeting, John Hogarth,
Law III, estimates that 3,000
students will be affected if this
policy is  implemented.
'In fact, if not in law, this
area has never been a single-
family area. It has been a
student area for 30 years," states
the brief.
"Up to very recently no significant protest was made by
any of the homeowners in the
area," says Hogarth, referring
to the presence of students in
the area.
The brief submits that not
only have the students benefited
from the location and atmosphere of the area, but also the
"business and shopping district
relies in good measure on the^
expenditures of (the) students^
now living there."
One of the main arguments o£
the owners against students in,
the area, according to Hogarth,
is that they lower property
values.
' But the brief points out thaj
every   home   «vvner   who .h^
moved into the .area in the pasj
30 years has done so with the
full knowledge that they >were
moving   into   a university  area,
in which students were resident^
Some have   done   so   on  the,
assurance     that     the    by-laws
would not be enforced, and  a
large part of some residents' in-
(Continued on page 8)
See INCOME
—' ;  1
'tween classes
SEE MARDI GRAS CANDIDATES
NOON HOUR IN ARMOURIES
Man! Like today is the day of the really big Pep Meet,
featuring the most of everything, including the candidates for
Mardi Gras Queen, riot to mention the King.
And who would want to miss the notorious and ever-
popular Professors' Skit?
Further entertainment will be provided by the "Four
Winds", a local quartet.
The Queen candidates will be introduced in costume after
which they will circle the Armouries to enable you, the voter,
closer inspection.
King candidates will endeavour to amuse in a series of
skits.
3f* *T* TP
All this is yours for only one thin quarter.
With your quarter you will also receive a ballot on which
you will vote for the queen and king who are most deserving
of the honour in your opinion.
f£l i}ft •£•
Reminder: get your tickets for Mardi Gras early.
They are on sale in the A.M.S. Office in Brock Hall —
$6.00 per couple and $3.00 for the go-it-aloner.
BANTING, BEST
FILMS SHOW
BACTERIOLOGY SOCIETY
Films of th discovery of insulin by Banting and Best will be.
shown noon Friday in Wes. 100.
Members free, non-members 25c.
* *       *
ALPHA OMEGA
Club meeting will be he'd
noon Friday in Bu."216. Members are urged to attend.
* *       *
The   Caribbean   Students' Association will meet noon Thursday in Bu. 216.   Revised constitution will be discussed.
■•*•#■*.
MEN'S GRASS HOOKEY
Practice today in Fieldhouse.
Turn out prepared.
* *       *
ISA _ —
Meeting noon Friday in Bu.
212. Meeting will elect Republic
Day Celebration Committee.
* *      *
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
A general meeting of the
credit union will be held 7:30
p.m. Thursday in the International House.
Officers of the union will be
elected.
* *      *
BRIDGE AND CHESS CLUB   v
Duplicate   bridge   tonight   in
North Brock Music Room. AU
welcome.
(Continued on page 3)
See 'TWEEN CLASSES
PEP MEET TODAY PAGE TWO
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 14, I960
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Authorized as second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Published three times a week throughout the University year in Vancouver
by the Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C.
w Editorial opinions expressed are those of the Editorial Board of The Ubyssey
and not necessarily those of the Alma Mater Society or the University of B.C.
o        Telephones: Editorial offices, AL. 4404; Locals 12, 13 and 14;
Business offices, AL. 4404; Local 15.
Editor-in-Chief: R. Kerry White
Associate Editor „ Elaine Bissett
; Managing Editor Del Warren
News Editor Bob Hendrickson
C.U.P. Editor . Irene Frazer
^Clutfs Editor .___ Wendy Barr
Features Editor Sandra Scott
Head Photographer Colin Landie
"* Photography Editor Roger McAfee
' f '      Senior Editoor: Irene Frazer
' j Reporters and Desk:
John C. Russell, Derek Allen, Wendy Barr, Dianne Greenall,
Allen Graves, Vladimir Elias Romanchych did not woork on
this edition, Skitzie Frenic, Bill Rainer, Bradley Crawfoord.
GUEST EDITORIAL
*.' TMe golden opportunity passed before we saw the challenge
-pearly enough to ask Mr. Green personally, but his plea to be
- friendly to Asian students raised a question we'd still like to
f- suggest to- the Minister for External' Affairs even at this late
date and distance.
,;        Mr, Green and his colleagues have a unique and practical
r,opportunity to set an example 6'n the very potent government
level towards,, the aim he sets for us. If Canada wishes friends
,4« Asia then let us extend to Asians that recognition of their
status as human-beings of eqtial dignity with ourselves which
our present Immigration Act flagrantly denies.
As Jack Scott recently pointed jput in the Sun, present
Canadian Immigration policy is one of the most blatantly racist
laws ,in the world. We can hardly shudder at South. African
apartheid, American segregatiqn|§ni, orj,even that filthy recrudescence, of- anti^semitism ^Germany,, when we selfishly shelter
an;empty land bemiid a race barrier that says "No Orientals
Allowed".
We. are riot foohsh enought to propose that the Immigration Act should be so relaxed that all the homeless of Asia
could pile in here.
That might bring immeasurable good to. Canada if we had
.ithe>'faith to undertake it, ahdto endure and triumph^(as true
liberalism always has)  over the  economic .and cultural and
political dislocations it would bring..But we doubt, of .the Chris-
,Vtia*n faith, of our people  is equal  to  such a  challenge and
-.nothing less could cause such a venture or bring it to the rich
success it might enjoy.
it .Jmniigrants have added bjeyond. measure to the wealth of
^.Canada, but it is the nature of man to doubt if the next boatload
^c6uldndp the country half as much good as the -one that Drought
* him or his ancestors.
It has been repeatedly proven that orderly immigration
creates more jobs than it fills, hut fear is allowed to distort the
.inevitable dislocations inherent, in growth. The! unfamiliar
language on the, street, the occasional lost job, the offences to
tradition^^some health problems, ancient European animosities,
.are all magnified out of proportion. The great gain is lost sight
. of in exaggeration of minor loss.
So might it be with, Canada and the Orient if we had
faith to set aside and really offer some homeless people some
of pur, spare room. .Being realistic, we merely make to Mr.
Green the modest proposal, to end the exclusion on a basis
of race, which now stigmatizes our immigration policy.
... : This, can, be done without inviting a flood of immigration
which might depress our labor standards, simply by applying
.; the same standards to immigration from Hong Kong or Calcutta as we apply to immigration from Rome or Paris or Oslo.
Reasonable standards of honesty, responsibility, English or
French language and education, willingness to respect Canadian labor and other laws, the need for responsible personal
'Sponsorship, and an open joh, checkvalve policies-to prevent
flooding any particularly crowded area, the simple presumption of disloyalty in applicants of communist or other seditious
affiliations, these could quite effectively prevent any "flood of
Oriental, immigration", and allow us to gain great respect in
Asia, which we are now sacrificing to our fears.
i We appreciate your advice, Mr. Green, and will do our best
jto make our Asian friends on campus good friends of Canada,
|nd of freedom, and (some of us at least) of Christ, the only
One who makes freedom possible and practical.
£,:.But you'd make it easier and make your own job of making
friends in Asia much easier if you'd lead to the removal of
thsAjhameful policy of race-discrimination from Canada's front
doolltep. '■->«■■ '-
—GRANT LIVINGSTON.
January 13, 1960.
To the Editor,
The Ubyssey.
Dear  Sir:
The last issue of The Ubyssey
for 1959 (Nov. 26) carried a
most singular letter, over the
signature of G. B.  Livingstone.
This tirade against the officials of the Canadian Department of Citizenship and Immigration was obviously based on
false information and hearsay,
disregard for facts, complete
lack of information; or a deliberate attempt to mislead.
Mr. Chan is not a "refugee",
is not "homeless", and is not
being forced to return "to the
crowded and hopeless shacks of
Kowloon."
The question of Mr. Chan and
his family has nothing whatever to do with "justice, law,
mercy, honor, decency',, or even
"inhumanity". There are no
"wrongs",; in " the strict legal
sense, perpetrated on this man
and his family.
Mr. Chan and his family are
not admissible to Canada under
the Canadian Immigration Act
(enacted by the Parliament of
Canada, and effective June 1,
1953), and such Regulations and
Orders-inCouncil which the
Cabinet has seen fit and proper
to put into legislation up to this
time.     ' ;]Hi
Admission to Canada is officially, and apparently with the
common consent of the people
of Canada, held to be a privilege
and not a right.. There is, for
this reason, no cause for Mr.
Chan to ..seek "redress in an impartial ;court of law", as suggested by your correspondent.
It is most erroneous, and contemptuous of G. B. Livingstone
to refer to Canadian Immigration officers as "border police",
and then to continue the slander
by calling them "arrogant and
lawless Immigration police".
Malice, or ignorance, or both,
would appear to be the only
explanation for such unreasonable and un-Christian remarks.
Our Immigration officials
have a job to do, and the laws
pf Canada to uphold. A little
investigation and enquiry would
show that they are doing their
duty conscientiously, fairly; and
with a good deal of discretion.
They are not "police", since their
main function is to select Immigrants, facilitate travel, and in
Canada to assist the settlement
of newcomers.
In the post-war years Immigration staffs have had to work
long hours at low pay, give up
leisure and conveniences we in
Canada take for granted, and
see first-hand human misery and
STATEMENT OF POLICY
The Ubyssey is at all times
glad to print provocative editorial material as long as it is
signed and typewritten. The
deadline for such material is
12:30 p.m. any day.
Opinions expressed in guest
editorials, letters to the editor and editorial columns are
not necessarily those of the
Ubyssey.
The Ubyssey will not publish letters to the editor unless they are signed and typewritten. Pseudonyms will be
used on occasion, but not unless the author's identity is
known to the lipyssey.
—Hi K. WHITE
the heart-breaking disruptions
of war in refugee camps and
elsewhere. Most of us know
nothing of these things. Our
Immigration officials deal with
people every day and they know
much more about the needs, the
wishes, the hopes and aspirations of individuals, of human
beings, than the average Canadian  could begin to realize.
Our Immigration Department
has done a good job, to say the
least (under the laws of Canada), in the years lj>45 -1958 in
bringing to Canada no less than
1,834,191 immigrants. Then,
after the Hungarian Revolt of
1956, Canada has admitted 37,-
566 Hungarian refugees (approximately 20 per cent of the total
refugees), and paid out $15,000,-
000 to make this possible. I
think that decency, mercy and
humanity were fairly well represented by the immigration
Department and the Canadian
people as a  whole.
This is not a white-wash of
our Immigration Act, but a
desire on my part to ask that
G. B. Livingstone, and any
others interested in these matters, try to get the right perspective. Let us put the blame
where blame is due. Our Immigration laws are wrong and
found lacking, not our Immigration officials. Certain sections
of our Immigration Act are finite
reprehensible, hypocritical, and
discriminatory. We even discriminate against Canadian
citizens, not to mention British
sufbjects ^ and citizens of the
United States. We do this by-
making., certain exceptions, and
creating barriers against "persons of Asiatic, i.e., Chinese,
Japanese, East Indian origin"—
not nationality. Yes, our laws
are in the nature of racial discrimination whether they read
that way, or not.
I hope that G. B. Livingstone
can realize that the duties of
our civil servats must often be
difficult, if not odious. Therefore it is the duty of every citizen, of every Canadian, to see
that the laws are changed.
If enough people in Canada
care enough to want the good
name of Canada maintained
and upheld; if we want to live
by democratic and Christian
principles, we will work to have
our representatives in the House
of Commons press for. equitable
and universally applied Immigration legislation.
It is pointless to criticize officials, and civil servants, who are
charged with the duty of carrying out the laws of Parliament,
and therefore the wishes of the
people. We, the voters, must
see to it that the laws are fair
and justice is served with equality for all. Our repeated expression of liberality should be
matched in deeds.   Yours truly,
GEORGE HARDER.
January  11,  1960.
To the Editor,    •
The Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:
May I put a few facts a little
more clearly and bluntly re the
article on "Education in Malaya" by Ernest Wong. Firstly
he does not make clear what
he means by Malaya. This is
now the peninsula composed of
several states now united under
one rulervchosen as their King
or Parlrftouht Ruft'r—he is a
Malay—and this is quite separ
ate from Singapore Island. Under British rule for a long period
they were considered together
as Malaya now they are both
independent and separate from
each Other with a very different
syste  mof   government.
Racially the states are predominantly Malayan while Singapore is predominantly Chinese
—each have a small proportion
of each other and a smaller percentage of Indians. Therefore
conditions vary considerably
and their ideas of government
and education! While the British
were ruling the whole area the
obyious common ground was a
knowledge of English language
and was therefore the ' one
taught in all government
schools.
The Chinese University in
Singapore (not in the Federation) founded as he states by
Chinese businessmen, in which
Chinese is the only medium of
instruction, is therefore only
suitable for Chinese and as a
matter of fact soon ran into
grave difficulties of administration and standards of tuition. If
English is not to be the basic
language of the schools surely
Malay, the language of the
majority, is the Obvious choice
and this is the medium of most
of the primary education there
today.
. However, no local language
has the necessary technical
vocabulary for, say, engineering
or modern surgery today and I
talked as recently as last August
with educators and governmental officials there, who, while
being fiercely nationalistic were
almost all agreed that English
must remain a basic necessity
in their higher educational
ing ground with most of the
schemes and as a commpn meet-
world.
So while primary education
proceeds mainly in Malay—in
Chinese in some schools in the
city of Singapore—I think the
University of Malaya both , in
Kuala Lumpar, the capital of the
Federation, and in Singapore
city will continue to function
mainly in English—not because
they like it but because of its
usefulness.
H.   HAMPSON,
Department  of  Chemistry.
To the Editor,
The Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:
Let is be known that from this
day forward, I will not be responsible for any debts contracted in my name by Michael
Miller.
Signed, this thirteenth day of
January,  1960.
ALICE HOTCHKISS, Arts I.
To the Editor,
The  Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:
Let it be known that from
this day forward I will not be
responsible for any debts contracted by Alice Hotchkiss.
Signed, this thirteenth day of
January, 1960.
PETER FRASER.
WHY NOT Thursday, January 14, 1960
THE     UBYSSEY
PAGE THREJk
FIVE - THIRTY CLUB
By FRED FLETCHER
Council took 6V3 hours to dabble their way through
their "weekly joke session" Monday night.
The meeting started off fairly quietly with Treasurer
Dave Edgar and Exec Member John Madden lounging half
asleep with their feet on the desk. (Actually Edgar only
had one foot on the desk—he's only half slovenly.)
*
#
Before long, however, tempers flared. *
Council, displeased that WUSC minutes of December
4 had just arrived at the council level, voted to defeat
minute 6, which reads: "That we send Christmas cards to
; our scholars here and abroad."
This is no reflection on WUSC scholars or the sending
of Christmas cards, of course.
It is merely a suggestion that WUSC should be a trifle
more prompt with the minutes.
At this point Pete Haskins, WUSC rep on Council,
leaped into the fray, and after recovering from a fit of
choking brought on by the smoke from his wild Banffian
pipe, charged council with a "damn silly childish" action.
Pete claimed that he had brought up the issue of late,
minutes from WUSC last term and had heard no serious
objections. He felt that council had pushed playing the fool
just a little too far.
^      >{.      tf.
Comrade Husdon of USC became irate when his
motion to have AMS election candidates declare registration numbers was almost defeated.
One of his reasons for wanting the motion passed was
to eliminate "goon" candidates.
When some councillors came out in favor of such candidates, Husdon almost went, through the ceiling. '
The motion was finally passed when Jim Meekison,
second member, pointed out that "There are enough goBhs
here already".
A, little later, Jim Horsman, Co-ordinator of Publications, erupted from his chair to the President's slight of
his home town of Moose Jaw. He was calmed by first
member John Goodwin before any damage was done,
however.
At various times throughout the meeting Editor-in-
Chief White and MAA President Stewart were seen to be
playing poker under the table. Mr. Stewart seemed to be
winning.
It seems that President Meekison is ready to make his
contribution to the rules of procedure.
He has invented a new word: contrarycarried.
r-        The meeting adjourned soon after Jim Meekison stag-
, gered in bearing the anti-anti-semitist poster that has been
' seen around campus. It must be added that he read it with
the force and vigor of a true statesman.
(It must be added, in fairness to council, that much
useful, but unfortunately boring, business was concluded
at the meeting.)
COUNCIL QUICKIES
Ian Stewart charged that student government on this
campus is "too stodgy". He blamed the lack of attendance
at the Grad Class meeting on this fact.
PRO Marilyn Bernard had something to report for a
change Monday night. A committee is being set up to
publicize the university and its needs throughout the
province.
Charging again, Stewart said that part of the reason
that we have no tradition on this campus is due to the
_ fact that we keep few records of honorary awards and
such like.
Pete Haskins, who represents the discipline committee
qn council, reported that he has found out the names of
the members.      —eh?
Players Club is negotiating to enter the playdowns for
the Dominion Drama Festival.
Those advertising for the Mardi Gras have shown
gross inconsideration for valid'notices already on boards.
It is this observer's opinion that it is much easier to
condemn the council for what it has failed to do than for
what it has done. For instance, it has done little, if anything, to get a special income tax exemption for students.
If you have any pet projects that have been neglected
send your beef to the Five-Thirty Club. We will print such
complaints along with councillors' reasons for their inaction.
Clubs, Fraternities Debate
In Legion Cup Debate Series
MATZ & WOZNY
548 Howe St.      MU 3-4715
Special to Students
$20.00 and up
PURE WOOL SLACKS
MEN
TWO BARBER SHOPS
TO SERVE YOU
inside  the  gates
• Brock Hall Extension
• 5734 University Boulevard
By WENDY BARR
(Ubyssey Clubs  Editor)
Teams from clubs and fraternities will debate some very
thought-provoking topics in the
Legion Cup debate series next
week.
The first topic, "Resolved:
that dormitories should be coeducational," will be debated
Monday noon by two 'sets of
debaters in different rooms.
Kappa Kappa Gamma sorority will debate against Delta
Upsilon fraternity in Bu. 102,
and Alpha Delta Phi fraternity
will debate aagainst the Ramblers in Bu.  202.
Tuesday's topic, "Resolved:
that the trend in co-eds' skirts
should be continued upward,"
will be debated in Bu. 202 by
teams from Zeta Psi and Phi
Kappa Pi fraternities.
On Wednesday the topic will
be "Resolved: tha,t ties should
be compulsory for class attendance."   Phi Gamma   Delta will
Raven To Carry
Disputed Story
The Editor of Raven announced to-day thai lhe short-
story which the printer had refused to print has now been
mimeographed and will be inserted into the forthcoming
issue of Ravin.
debate against Zeta Beta Tau in
Bu. 205, and Beta Theta Pi will
debate against Psi Upsilon in
Bu.  214.
Phi Delta Theta fraternity
and the United Nations Club
will debate the last topis, "Resolved: that sex education
should be compulsory for all
first year students," Friday in
Bu.   212.
The Legion Cup was first pre-.
sented by the  Canadian Legion
twenty-two years ago,  in order
to  promote public speaking on
campus.
The winning team in the
Legion Cup debates will go on
to meet the winners of the
Inter - Faculty debates during
Speaking Week, which will be
held  in February.
SCHOLARSHIP APPLICATIONS
OPEN TO ALL UNDERGRADS
Applications may now be received for Leonard Foundation scholarships for the academic year 1960/61.
All interested undergraduate students  who  wish  to
receive information about these scholarships should call at
Dean  Soward's   office,  Room   466,   Buchanan   Building.
Appointments  can   also   be  made   by   telephoning  Dean-
Soward's office, local 253.
F
IT
WILL
SHOCK
YOU!!
JANUARY 31
The Ridge   -   16th & Arbutus
TO ALU THOSE WHO HAVE A MISCONCEPTION THAT
FILMSOC DOES NOT SHOW GOOD FILMS:
HAVE A LOOK AT OUR LINE-UP FOR THIS TERM ...
TODAY—John Huston's RED BADGE OF COURAGE, starring AUDIE MURPHY
and BILL MAUDLIN, based on Stephen Crane's classic of the U.S. Civil War.  12:30
TUES., JAN. 26—JOHN STEINBECK'S bitter story of the Depression—GRAPES OF
WRATH—directed by JOHN FORD,  starring HENRY FONDA.     3:30, 8:00 p.m.
SUN., JAN. 31—ANIMAL FARM—George Orwell's brilliant satire on the Russian
Revolution. This and 1984 are the most important films you will ever see.
3:00, 6:50, and 9:00 at The Ridge, 16th and Arbutus
TUES., FEB. 2—VICTORIO DaSICA'S masterpiece, BICYCLE THIEF. The greatest
film to come out of post-war Italy; ranked among the Ten Best Films ever made
by the Brussels Film Festival. 3:30,  6:00,  8:00  p.m.
TUES., FEB. 9—1984—George Orwell's terrifying look into the future. One of the
most powerful films ever made. 3:30, 6:00, 8:00 p.m.
TUES., FEB. 16—EXTASE—One of the most beautiful pictures ever filmed. From
Czechoslovakia, starring Hedy Lamarr. 3:30, 8:00 p.m.
TUES., FEB. 23—STORM CENTRE—The rarely played film attacking Bookburning in
the U.S. Condemned heartily by the   Catholic Legion of Decency.   3:30, 8:00 p.m.
TUES., MAR. 1—GREAT EXPECTATIONS—For the benefit of En. 200* students.
3:30, 8:00 p.m.
THURS., MAR. 3—A TREE GROWS IN BROOKLYN — Elia Kazan's (director of
EAST OF EDEN and ON THE WATERFRONT) first picture; Academy Award
Winner. i2:30 p.m.
TUES., MAR 8—THE INFORMER—One of the few truly great films made in the U.S.
JOHN FORD'S magnificent film of a betrayal in the Irish Revolution.
3:30, 8:00 p.m.
MON., MAR. 14—INSIDE RED CHINA— A gripping documentary, never before
shown in B.C. T.B.A.
TUES., MAR. 15—WITNESS FOR THE PROSECUTION—Agatha Christie's gripping
courtroom drama, starring CHARLES LAUGHTON, TYRONE POWER, MARLENE DIETRICH. 3:30, 8:00 p.m.
WED., THURS., MAR 16 and 17—PRIDE AND PREJUDICE — starring LAURENCE
OLIVIER. Again, for the benefit of En. 200 scholars. 6:00, 8:00 p.m.
MON., MAR, 21—CITIZEN KANE—Produced, directed, written by, and starring
ORSON WELLES. The most controversial film ever made. The greatest film ever
produced in America, perhaps in the. world. 3:30. 8:00 p.m.
TUES., MAR. 22—MANON—George Cluzot's (director of WAGES OF FEAR) gripping story of the French Revolution. 3:30, 8:00 p.m.
THURS., MAR. 24—We hope to show OR SON WELLES'MAGNIFICENT AMBERT-
SONS. This gripping dissection of a decadent American family, made right after
CITIZEN KANE, caused him to lose his job as producer. We have had to purchase this print ourselves in order to bring it into the country. 12:30 p.m.
TUES., MAR. 29-^JULIUS CAESAR—starring MARLON BRANDO, JAMES MASON,
JOHN GIELGUD and a host of others. 3:30, 8:00 p.m. eAGE FOUR
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 14, I960
LIBRARY  COMMITTEE
(Continued from Page 1)
ate Committee m an attempt to
postpone the appointment of
Commissionaires.
It is considered that a full-
fledged campaign for quiet
would seem rather ridiculous,
Iboth to students and - to the
public. It is hoped that such
a campaign will not be necessary.
Students who use the library
are asked to remember that
there are others around him.
If your neighbour persists in
his noise-making, ask him to
move. If he is bigger than you,
call an Engineer—give the big
boys something constructive to
do.
An appeal is being sent out
'for students  to get away from
ridge
theatre
3131 Arbutus Street
RE 8-6311
Jan. 14 - 15 - 16
CLIFTON WEBB in . . .
"The Remarkable
Mr. Pennypacker"
color
Charles Coburn
Dorothy McGuire
PLUS
The Exploits of a Master Spy
"Spy on the
Wilhelmsrrasse"
'   Jack Hawkins - Gia Scala
CARTOON
Jan. 18 - 19 - 20
Award Winner
Cannes Film Festival
"Compulsion"
Orson Welles, Bean Stockwell
Bradford Dillman
PLUS
'The Horse's Mouth'
color
Alec Guinnes (Best Actor
Award, Venice Film Festival)
Kay Walsh
NEWS
the old idea that the Library is
the place to meet old Joe, or
next Friday's c|ate. Use the
Brock instead. The chairs are
softer and the coffee is said to
be improving daily.
Students are asked to comment on the following questions.
After completing your answers
to these questions could you
please return them to one of
the students on the AMS Library
Commission at the AMS Office.
1. Which area in the main
library do you find best for
study?
2. If you don't study in the
library, why not?
3. Where (if at all) do you
study?
4. Would you use the classrooms and lecture rooms if certain ones were officially designated for afternoon study?
5. Do you think commissionaires could effectively control
noise in the library? If not,
why?
6. What disciplinary measures
would you advise?
The following are students on
the AMS Library Commission:
Ross Collver, Law III; Patti Darling, Arts VI; Tom Annandale,
Arts II; Don Bodell, Commerce
III; David Birdsall, Applied
Science II; Joan McCrimon,
Arts II.
New Froodian Idea:
The Barf Generation
Christmas Marks
Disappointing ?
If your marks were down iri
spite of hard work, you should
check your reading and
study skills.
GOOD READING IS
ESSENTIAL
for   efficient   and   successful
study. To arrange for a FREE
evaluation   of   your   present
reading skills, or for further
information about our courses,
call
The Western
Reading Laboratory
2594 W. Broadway. RE 8-7513
Vancouver 9 - Day or Evening
Register
at the
FRATERNITY
SPRING
RUSHING
Registration Closes Tuesday
January 26th at 12:30 p.m.
Requirements:
12 Units - Senior Matriculation
Information Booklets available
A.M.S. office
No Cost or Obligation
To the Rushee
Dr. Ian McTaggart Cowan
spoke "Wednesday on "Biological
Science in the Union of Soviet
Socialist Republics". Dr. Cowan
has just recently returned from
visiting the Russian Academy of
Sciences.
Barf is good for you!
The complete irresponsibility
of the Moobyssey staff in reporting Barf as "an insidious
disease of the stomach" shocked
the hardened Ubyssey staff
down to the last man, not to
mention the women  (Barf!).
Not since the CENSORED
edition of The Ubyssey last year
has such sacraligious material
been publisRed on this campus.
Barf is a state of mind!
This information was uncovered by The Ubyssey Tuesday
when every editor, reporter and
janitor, not to mention the women (Barf!) were sent out to
investigate Barf.
Staff reporters interviewed
Animal Nutrition Laboratory researchers.
The Moobyssey had reported
Barf to be under intensive study
by these researchers.
"Though we are studying
some secondary effects of Barf
for real information on the subject you would have to consult
Dr. Frood," Professor Belly,
famed UBC scientist, told reporters.
. Dr. Frood, tamed lecturer and
mentor of The Ubyssey, said he
would be glad to aid in a Barl
investigation.
"Barf is a state of-mind," the
famed doctor said.
"However, because Barf is a
physiologically induced psychological aberration you get such
common phrases as Barf-juice
(cafeteria coffee) and Barf-bags
(formerly known as twong
pouches)."
(To Be Continued)
Classified Advertising
LOST — Full - length brown
ladies' coat from Ch 150, Jan.
13, between 11:30 and 12:30.
Finder please return to Home
Ec. Building or lost and found.
APPLICATIONS are invited
from married students for the
position of canteen manager;
to set up and run the new canteen in the Common Block of
the Permanent Residences. Apply to H. Bradford, Robson
House, by Jan. 25.
LOST — Log-log    slide   rule.
Walt., AL 0544.
WOULD the person who took
a brown briefcase by mistake
from the Brock Barber Shop,
Wed., Dec. 6; in the p.m., please
phone RE 3-6851.
APARTMENT—Serious male
student wanted to share basement apartment. Senior or
graduate student preferred.
Phone AL 0519-R, if no answer
try AL 1442-L.
ROOM and board. Fraternity
house has room for two men.
Single rooms with meals. $50.
Phone Ken Dawson, AL 4577-R.
LOST—Log-log     slide    rule.
Essays Typed
20c a Sheet
Phone
CYpress 8-2096'
Walt, AL 0544.
ROOM and board. Single
room, $75. 3792 W. 12th., AL
2163-M.
GOOD room and board for
girl (to share with another student), close to UBC Gates and
buses. 4698 West 4th Ave., AL
3518-R.
LOST—1 overcoat, picked up
in Physics Bldg. by mistake.
Friday 1:30 - 5:30. Phone Dave
at ALma 0834.
URGENT — Wanted a ride
4:30 on Fridays from UBC to 41st
or 49th & Cambie. Phone Jack
FA 7-7490.
WOULD the girl (Point Grey
Rd. who found my slide rule
before Christmas please phone
again after 6 p.m. Audrey TR.
6-4988.        '
RIDE from Marine & Mackay
N. Van. Mon. - Friday. Lynneive
YU. 5-3769.
LOST—Before Christmas, a
gold, flower-engraved cross on
chain, in the region between
Acadia and the Education Bldg.
return to Sylvia Gairns, Hut 43,
Acadia. AL. 9819.
LOST—One Parker "51" pen.
Black barrel and gold top.
Reward. Phone Jim Lewis RE.
1-4385.
RIDERS wanted— 8:30 lectures Mon. to Sat. West End
area. Phone MU. 1-1677.
Chance of a lifetime! Share
car with three girls. Odds 3 to
1. We live in the vicinity of
33rd - 41st and Dunbar, leave
for 8:30 classes, return at 5:30.
All you need is to supply car
one day per week. No cost.
Call Sandra at AM 1-4710.
FOUND—Ronson lighter Buc-
hannan Lounge. Call AL. 0870L.
AT UNIVERSITY—For .rent
2 bedroom apt. Phone AL.
0365-R.
SHORT OF MONEY?
EARN 12% SELLING ADVERTISING
FOR ALMA MATER SOCIETY
PUBLICATIONS!
# NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY
• 5 HOURS PER WEEK MAY EARN YOU $20
Drop in to the* Publications Off ice
Room 201 - North Brock
LAURIE FRISBY - Advertising Manager
2000 Students
Have Registered
So far over 2000 students hava
registered for the next provincial elections.
All eligible students are reminded that today and tomorrow are the last days they will
be able to register on campus.
To qualify you must be 19
years old, a British subject and
have resided in Canada for 12
months and in B.C. for six
months.
Booths are to be set up in the
following places from 10:3t
a.m. to 1:30 p.m., Thursday:
North Brock, Cafeteria, Buchanan; Friday: North Brock, Engineering, Education.
All naturalized citizens are reminded that they must have the
number of their naturalization
certificate.
NEWMAN CLUB 1.
Sir Hugh Taylor will speak
on "Pax Romana, the Educated
Catholic and Human Society",
8 p.m., Thursday at St. Paul's
Hospital Hall.
BRITISH CARS
British  Car   Repairs   by   Old
Country    Mechanic.    Guaranteed work and savings.
ALma 2816-R after 6:00 p.m.
or any time week-ends.
COACHING OF FRENCH
110, 120, 210, 220
by. appointment
PHONE RE 3-8610   ;
I Thursday, January 14, 1560
THE    UBYSSEY
PAGE FIVE
The Dean Speaks
u
Language of the Human Spirit
a
By NEVILLE V. SCARFE
Dean of the Faculty of Education
There are many arguments to prove that teachers gain much
from being educated on a university campus, but there are not
so many statements to prove that a university gains considerable
value from having a teacher education college in its midst.
It has been said by critics of higher education that many
students who graduate with a B.A. today have university credits
but not a university education. They have knowledge but not
culture, they pass in English and Mathematics but fail to achieve
good taste or the habit of thinking for themselves. They have
passed because they were afraid of failure and not because they
were driven by an inner conviction of a worthy purpose.
"University a Thorny Path"
Even the public thinks of the university as a necessary hurdle
in the path to economic privilege. Parents and students alike see in
the university a thorny path, not to culture, but to a secure job and
professional status. The old idea of a generous humanistic culture
has given way to one of servile preparation for making a living.
To help counter this tendency a Faculty of Education has
something very precious and desirable to contribute to the
studium generale. Education is so much more than tricks of
pedagogical practice or the accumulation of specialized knowledge.
Education is the language of the human spirit. Language gives the
mind alleviation and allows it growth through self expression.
What the modern University seems to have lost is this idea of
Education as the sum total of all that frees the human spirit and
contributes to its growth.
UBC Benefits by Close Contacts
The chief reason for having Teacher Education on a campus
is not just because of the benefits afforded by close contacts with
the Arts and Science Faculties, but because the Faculty of Education is able to demonstrate more clearly than other Faculties how
subject disciplines can be the vehicles for freeing the human
spirit and the media of an animating culture. University courses
are not conceived by educators solely as ends in themselves but
primarily as ways of developing judgment, discrimination, good
taste, civilized behaviour and wise action. The intelligent application of knowledge to the business of "living more abundantly"
is called wisdom. Education is an applied humanity and an applied
science. It attempts to develop wisdom and Virtue.
The staff members in a College of Education naturally concern
themselves very much with how the art and science of good
teaching can be learned and improved, but they are also constantly asking the question "What is worth learning?" and seeking
to discover why certain ideas are more significant than others. A
College of Education is always enquiring into the values, purposes
and aims of the various subjects of a curriculum. It tries to encourage every teacher of a subject to make quite clear the function,
purpose and philosophy of that subject This spirit-;of detached and
critical analysis, this attitude of philosophical enquiry should inject
itself into the whole university from a College of Education.
Encouragement to University
The presence of a number of people who, are expert m the
art and science of teaching encourages the whole university to
look to the quality of its teaching methods and the skills of its
teaching personnel.
The presence of more than 1800 students on a campus who are
interested in Education means that there are a large number whe-
seek courses in art, in music and in physical education. Without
the presence of a College of Education interest in art, music and
physical education courses on the campus would be small. Any
campus is immeasurably enriched by an increasing emphasis on
the Fine Arts, Drama and Physical Education.
Public Relations Agent for UBC
A College of Education acts as a good public relations agent
for a university, when, each week, more than 1,000 students go
out to the schools of the province on practice teaching. These
young people have an important influence on the children and on
their parents and are ambassadors for the university to the community which it serves.
The University of British Columbia is one of the few universities in Canada that has tried the experiment of bringing all
teacher education right to the centre of the university campus
and of involving the whole Faculty" of Arts and Science in the
professional enterprise. Few universities have experienced so
boldly with new training plans. Nowhere else in Canada do future
teachers play such an important part in university life. Nowhere
else is there such a distinguished group of instructors to enrich
the life of the university.
CONTRARY
TO FACT.
o^^
UBCL men can  be  aroused
after all.
■ A story appearing in Tuesday's Ubyssey appealed to
male students interested in
escorting young future teachers io a dance on campus
Saturday night.
In less than three hours, 53
phone calls had been received
by organizers of the Future
Teachers' Clubs Conference to
be held at UBC this weekend.
•    Surprising, wot?
Education
Organized
The Education Undergraduate Council serves a two-fold
purpose within the College of
Education.
The council acts as a nucleus for the organization of
various activities undertaken
by education students. It also
functions as a system by
which information from USC,
Education faculty and other
organizations can be communicated to the 1850 students.
Eleven  members   comprise
the group.  Ron Graves serves
as President,  aided by right-
hand man, Bill Elliott
"A   weekly   meeting of   ap-
, proximately  50   students   enables the council to poll student   opinions    Here   council
announcements   and   reports
; are exchanged with the ques--
. tjtpns   and   problems   of   the
»/; fei._;c..-
DUAL ROLE PLAYED by Education students is depicted in this composite picture drawn
up by Ubyssey photography department. The Education student must first receive a broad
general education in order to train the young citizens of tomorrow. His education is guided by
one prime essential—to impart this knowledge in the classroom. More than 1800 student
teachers:.pb5enfst and .***«*• »»_V«n<^*«\sch«»1s* °n the average of one;day .per JT«.«k.  .. :.   „
Future
Teachers
To Confer
More than 120 high school
students from 60 B.C. schools
will   register  Friday  for   the '
Second Annual Future Teachers' Clubs Conference.
Following registration, the
delegates will tour the campus and lunch at the Men's
Common Block. Topics for
afternoon discussion periods
will be "Your Life On the
Campus Next- Year," "The
College of Education'-' and
"How To Have More Effective Future Teachers' Clubs."
After supper on campus,
conference delegates will see
the Harlem Globe Trotters
perform in the War Memorial
Gymnasium.-
Dean Scarfe will will ad-
.dress the Conference Saturday morning, followed by the
last round of discussion
groups.
Delegates will tour Vancouver in chartered buses and be
guided through the B.C. Electric Building, the Queen Elizabeth Theatre and the British
Columbia Building at the Pacific National Exhibition
Grounds.
It is the hope of the Col- -
lege that delegates wHI take
back to their schools not only
the ideas from the discussion
groups hut" also a feeling of
the University life that lies
..ahead £f„them '._.\"V-."1 ■...,-,..•„   '-» EAGE SIX
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 14, 19$).
Question Students
On PSPA Meeting
The Student committee meeting Tuesday agreed to send out
questionnaires to the member
universities of the PSPA in
Order to get a concensus of
opinion on the feasability of
regional PSPA conferences.
The Pacific Students' Presidents Association is an organization consisting of representatives from the 13 western states,
UBC, Alaska and Hawaii.
This group meets the second
week in May in Tucson, Arizona.
The
Christian
Science
Monitor
Good Reading
for the
Whole Family
•News
• Facts
•Family Features
The Christian Science Monitor
prm Norway St., Boston 15, Mass.
Send your newspaper for the time
checked.   Enclosed find my check or
jnoney order.    1 year $20 □
4 motpa $J0,Q       ? months $5 □
Name
Address
The PSPA discusses student
administration, student government, athletics, student union
buildings, publications and other
facets of universities administration.
The chief purpose is to aid
student presidents in executing
their authority in student council  activities.
The proposal of regional
PSPA Conferences to precede
the main PSPA conference is an
attempt to. illuminate many of
the more com|mon problems so
that the main meeting can get
down .- to the more complex
ones. John Goodwin, chairman
of the PSPA Committee, said
that this would make the main
conference more workable.
Some of the benefits that I
UBC has gained by the these
PSPA conferences are the
Leadership Conference and the
Student Accident Benefits.
Philpott Chairs
Panel Discussion
Elmor E. Philpott will chair
a panel discussion at International House Friday at  8 p.m.
The topic of the discussion
will be "The Universal Declaration of Human Rights" and will
cover women's rights, polygamy,
caste problems in India, and the
right to a free education.
Participants from UBC will
be: Olivia Bisnar, Phillipines;
Franco Felicetti, Italy; Roland
Bishop, Trinidad; Beant Singh,
India; and Lief Ostensoe, Canada.
The woman pictured here has every right to be distressed. Mainly because shhe is about to be burnt at the stake
for witchcraft. See it all today when Cinema-16 presents, "Day
of Wrath", (unfortunately not in living colour).
Cinema 16 Continues
Showing Foreign Films
with Canada Packers' representative will be held
January 18th, 19th and 20th, at times arranged
through the University Placement Officer.
A Canada Packers' brochure and annual report,
which will provide further information, are available at the Placement Office.
Cinema 16 continues with its
new program of foreign films,
12:30 today with the showing
in Bu 106 of "Day of Wraijh",
directed by Carl-Theoaor
Dreyer.
The film is set in 17th Century
Denmark and is concerned with
the great social and psychological upheavals of the decline
of Medievalism and their meanings and'possible application for
us today:
In "Day of Wrath", witch-
hunting and religious persecution receive the famous "Kafkalike" treatment, Dreyer attempting through the use of bizarre
settings and camera effects to
give his story a' timelessness
and universality of application.
AH societies hate and fear and
therefore persecute the nonconformist. '..'.'.'.'■
The film was made in Denmark in 1943 and stars Anna
Svierkier as the old woman
burned at the stake "for witchcraft.
CRITICIZE HILL FOR USE
OF NAUGHTY WORDS
Controversy over the use of
the terms "incestuous" and "homosexual" to advertise a play
broke out this week as a result
of the publicity methods employed by Fred Hill of the Vancouver Little Theatre.
The play is Arthur Miller's
"A* View from the Bridge,"
which opens tonight at the
Queen Elizabeth Theatre, and
continues until Saturday, January 16th.
The two offending words occur in a quote from Mr; Miller
himself, who affirmed that not
only these two themes, but
many other neurotic threads ran
through his startling story of
slum-life in New York.
They were used by Hill in advertisements appearing in both
the "Sun" and the "Province"
newspapers.
FILM SOC PRESENTS
A Civil War Movie
("THE RED BADGE
OF COURAGE"!
with Audie Murphy and Others
A FULL LENGTH FEATURE   -   at noon today
■AUDITORIUM 35c OR NOON SERIES PASSl
LECTURE SHOWS
ABUNDANT LIFE
Christian   Science   Organization
"Christian Science reveals the
door to a life more abundant"
will be the topic of a lecture by
Sylvia N. Poling at noon today
in  Bu.  106.
The UBC Christian Science
Organization invites everyone
to attend.
*       *       *
UCC
The Undergraduate Clubs
Committee is looking for a new
public relations officer. Nominations will be accepted at the
general meeting next Thursday.
•k "k it
DANCE CLUB
Do you like dancing? Do you
like dancing well enough to
keep on going for twelve hours?
Do you like money enough to
keep on dancing for twelve
hours to win sixty-four dollars?
If the answer is yes, the Dance
Club invites you to enter their
Dance Marathon on Saturday,
Jan. 23.
More information about the
marathon will be given next
week.
TWEEN CLASSES
continued from page 1
SPORTS CAR CLUB
Meeting Thursday noon in
Physics 200. Films on "Triumph
Tour of Europe" and "1955 Le
Mans".
* *       *
BIOLOGY CLUB
Richard Krejsa will speak on
"Biological Observations in the
Gulf of California" noon Thursday in Bi. Sc. 232.
* *       *
INTERNATOINAL HOUSE
Elmore Philpott, Prof. Rowan,
Prof. Conway and Prof: Feltham
will discuss "The Universal
Declaration of Human Rights"
noon Thursday in Bu. 100.
* *       *
NISEI VARSITY
Important meeting Thursday
noon, in Bu. 205.
* *       *
CAMERA CLUB
A special speaker will be
present at a meeting noon
Friday.
* *       *
PEP BAND
Bandsmen are requested t»
be in Armories by noon today.
Band will play at Mardi-Gras
Pep Meet.
* *       *
RAMBLERS
Stag will be held 8:30 p.m.
Thursday at the Kerrisdale
Lawn Bowling Club, Forty-
Second and Elm. Non-members
welcomed.
* *       *
FILM SOCIETY
"The Red Badge of Courage"
will  be   shown  noon   today in'
the Auditorium.   Admission 35c.
* *       *
NVC
Club will meet noon Thursday in Bu. 205.
ANY QUESTIONS?
About Your NFCS Life Plan
A qualified underwriter will be in the NFCUS Committee Room each
Wednesday and Friday from 11:30 to 1:30 until the January 31 deadline to answer your questions.
Room 165 BROCK EXTENSION (Basement) ' Thursday, January 14, i960
THE     UBYSSEY
PAGE SEtT§N
The Refugee Problem:
A  MATTER
OF CONSCIENCE
(From an Editorial in
The Globe and Mail, Toronto)
There are an estimated 15,-
000,000 refugees in the world
today, of whom 2,000,000 are
receiving some form of assistance from the United Nations.
The major concentrations are
in the Middle East, where over
1,000,000 Arabs cluster around
the border of Israel; in Hong
Kong, where 1,000,000 people
who fled the Chinese mainland
have gathered; and in India and
Pakistan, where several million
people were made homeless by
the partition of the subcontinent.
In   Europe,   at  least   135,000
refugees are still  unsettled, 14
years after the end of the
Second World War. Most of
them subsist somehow outside
the official camps, of which
there are now 14 in Austria,
Germany, Greece and Italy,
One aim of World Refugee Year
is to clear the camps and help
the people in them to resume
normal lives. Twenty per cent
of the camp population are children under 14, most of them
born in the camps. The conditions in which they are growing
up are abominable.
A good start has been made
in the camp-clearing program,
and the number has been considerably reduced. Some of the
remaining   refugees   are   physi
Power From Columbia
Thought Least Costly
Down stream benefits from power developments on the
Columbia will be cheaper than power from Canadian developments.
This opinion was expressed by
Dr. H. V. Warren in a talk to
the Geography Club yesterday.
Hydro power from the States
will probably cost less than four
mills, he said.
Dr. Warren said he is unable
to understand-.how it can be
efficient to use power from the
Peace River.
According to recently issued
figures power from the Peace
River will cost $375 for 1.2 million HP while power from B:C.
Electric's new loco plant will
only cost $140 for 1.2 million
HP, the professor said.
Paddy Leads B'
To Easy Victory
UBC Women's Basketball took
both league matches last week.
In Senior "B" action Paddy
Studds led a 42-16 win over
CYO. Paddy collected 15 of the
team's total. Wilma Lancaster
with ten and Sandy Sankey with
9 filled out the scoring.
The first two quarters play
was close but in the final quarter
UBC moved ahead of CYO.
The Junior Girls' team beat
Black and White Cleaners 59-46.
Warren suggested the B.C.
Electric doesn't kn6w what to
use for power on the Lower
Mainland: coal, natural gas, oil
or hydro power.
Power may be produced from
them all at approximately the
same cost, he added.
Recent large oil discoveries in
northern B.C. Warren said, had
changed the situation in the last
six months and forced him to
alter his lectures.
, Warren pointed out that large
industries have kept the public
from knowing what their power
costs but he made a couple of
guesses.
Pdwer for Consolidated Mines
probably cost one mill.
"It is- considerably less than
one mill and probably nearer
than one mill."
The power at Kitimat costs
more than was expected, he said.
"My guess is that it costs them
between three and four mills."
The most promising future
site for hydro power is on the
Liard river, the professor said.
The Americans have not started power developments on the
Yukon River yet because of politics, Dr. Warren added.
"Americans are just about as
Canadians."
■*k
FOR
UNIVERSITY STUDENTS
WITH THE
Public Service of Canada
$245 to $305 a Month
For  Under-Graduates
Up to $500 a Month
For Graduate Students
Plus travel allowances to and from
positions and, where applicable,
subsistence in the field
Most positions are for students with a background in
Engineering or Science, notably Forestry, Geology and
Agriculture, but some will be drawn from other faculties
as well.
POSTERS, DETAILS  and APPLICATION FORMS at
UNIVERSITY PLACEMENT OFFICE
CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION
OFFICES
CLOSING DATE FOR APPLICATIONS JAN. 30th
cally handicapped, which prevents the entry of their family
as well as themselves into some
countries. Others have none of
the legal documents required
for admission as immigrants,
and no money to pay for transportation in any    event.
Canada has already indicated
active support of World Refugee
Year by agreeing to admit 100
refugees (plus their families)
who have tuberculosis—a disease which is widespread in
refugee camps because of the
living conditions — which is
merely a token.
There is much more that this
country can do to help the refugees. Legal formalities should
be waived, and physical disabilities overlooked. The refugees are not charity cases; they
want nothing more than to cease
being refugees, to be given a
chance ■ to contribute their
talents to some productive enterprise. This country has room
for such people.
For those who wish to be
re-settled- near the camps, as
many do, there is still a great
contribution to be made by
public and private agencies in
this country. The biggest need
is money — money to provide
new housing, vocational training, and the necessities of life
until they become re-established.
Canada's contribution should be
most generous. The special
camp-clearance program now
under way requires an additional $3,500,000—a mere pittance
in   Government  budgets  which
this country could easily provide
itself.
It would be a grave error to
believe that a one-year effort
could possibly solve the world's
refugee problems. But one concentrated program during World
Refugee Year could greatly reduce the number and intensity
of those problems, and arouse
the conscience of the fortunate
to the misery of the homeless.
As one of the wealthiest and
most respected nations in the
world, Canada has a heavy
obligation to take a leading part
in this great humanitarian enterprise.
READ
RAVEN
THIS
WEEK
cinema 16"
i
Carl Dreyer's       w7 7
DAY OF
WRATH"
SPECIAL STUDENT RATES
COMPLETE OPTICAjL. SERVICE
GLASSES FITTED
24-Hour Service OPTICAL Repairs
VANCOUVER BLOCK
Main Floor
734 GRANfVILLE St.
Immediate Appointment
NEW WESTMINSTER - 675 COLUMBIA STREET
LA ,6-8665
TRAIN FOR THE BIST
OF TWO WORLDS
Develop your leadership ability, acquire new technical skills,
benefit financially and continue your university courses by enrolling
in the tri-service Regular Officer Training Plan (ROTP).
It provides for:
• university tuition fees paid by the     • allowances fbx-board and room,
Department of National Defence books and instruments
• a monthly salary * free medieval and dental care
• and a career in the Canadian Army
Then, on graduating, you wilWhave not only yoor c^ioseh
professional traimng, but also the Queen's. Comiulsision.
as a career officer in-the Canadian Army with the prestige
and many personal advantages it brings.
A LIMITED NUMBER OF CANADIAN ARMY VACANCIES IN THESE
ROTP "UNIVERSITY QUOTAS" ARE STILL AVAILABLE.
If you want the best of both worlds, find oat what this plan jcaA offer yon today*
For further particulars, contact your University Support Officfcr (Army);
MAJ. REYNOLDS
Armoury, UBC
Tel. No.: ALma 1922 PAGE EIGHT
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 14, 1960
Students of Nicaragua
Stifled by Dictatorship
The struggle of the Nicuarag-
uan   students   and   intellectuals
_ against   the   oppression   of   the
Somoza dictatorship has gained
world-wide  attention.
The following is an excerpt
from "The Student", an international student magazine, in
which Salvador Navarette Mel-
ghen, a law student of the University of Honduras interviews
Dr. Hernan Silva Arguello, former Justice Court Magistrate of
Nicaragua.
•—When did you leave Nicaragua?
»—Almost a month ago. I first
went to San Jose. Later I
was granted a visa for El
Salvador and I am now enjoying Honduran  hospitality.
—What were your reasons for
emigrating?
•—Merely to avoid becoming an
instrument    of    the    Somoza
■    family.   As a Crimujal Judge
in Managua, I was forced to
*:    accept the   family's   ipterfe^
'-   ehce in sacre<l judipial affairs.
'    The     'NicarlgSuan     Executive
''    exercises obvious-pressure on
■r'   every court in Nicaragua and,
>    in my case, it went so far as
to send me judicial decisions
prepared in advance for my
signature. I still have in my
possession a request presented
by a high Somoza official who
wanted me to sign a declaration containing the accusation
he had himself carefully written down. There is no doubt
whatsoever that no rights
exist in Nicaragua. Magistrates and judges are directly
appointed from the desk of
the governing family. The
habeas corpus is nothing more
than a myth, the National
Guard does not accept the
orders given to them by the
Judiciary.
—What is the student attitude
toward the present national
political situation?
—The dynastic Somoza regime
is fully and unconditionally
rejected. In Nicaragua the
university students are fighting, clawfestinely. Those in
other countries are working
openly for the overthrow ©|
the corrupt Regime headed tjy
Luis and Aanatasio Somo2$;
Debayle. j £'
—Are there; students in prison?
—Even before the Somoza responsible- for the present
tyranny was assassinated a
number of students were in
prison.    Later on special war
Indian Craft Featured
In Anthropology Exhibit
MUSEUM OF anthropology __
Navajo and Pueblo Indian
craft .will be featured in the
spring loan exhibit opening Jan,
10 in the UBC Museum of Anthropology.
It will include finely woven
Navajo rugs of highly colored
early Germantown trade yarn
introduced to these tribes in the
last century.
The Eastern "Woodlands and
Northwest   coast   will   also   be
INCOME
(Continued from page 1)
come is derived from the rents
of the students.
According to the City Planning-Office, the by-laws allow
any family in the area to take
te two roomers or boarders.
The pretests are against those
'"laoaBes .with more students in
residence than the legal maximum.
These are the homes that
have received notice that within one year they must conform
to legal requirements.
Protests of past years have
been successfully met by representations of the AMS Council
to City Council.
But the protests this year
"have every chance of being
successful," states the brief.
Hogarth suggests that the
Students Council could:
1. Poll the residents of Point
Grey to see how many are opposed to students resident in the
area.
2. 'Confer with the UBC Housing Administration, which originally asked the residents of the
area to take students in, and
enlist the support of Dean
Shrum.
3. Petition directly to the
Mayor and Council to remove
or. change the restrictions in
the by-laws, or to postpone enforcement of the existing regulations.
represented.
Viewing hours for the exhibit
in the basement of UBC library
will be from 1 to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and from 7
to 9 p.m. Tuesdays.
Credit Union.
Formed Here
The first credit union to
appear on any North American
University campus has been
formed by the UBC International House.
The union, the purpose of
which is to aid students in obtaining loans and securing jobs,
was formed^ *"& *** aid of the
B.C. Creditjj Union League.
Elections! for an executive
board will ^e held today. Term
of office will be one year.
All applications for positions
should be submitted immediately to any of the following members of the temporary board:
Beant Barewal, president ^Lawrence Douglas, vice-president;
Penny Phillips, secretary; or
Winston Joseph, treasurer.
CLOTHIER IN
COMING PLAY
Robert Clothier, a well-known
Vancouver actor, will be guest
artist in a forthcoming production of Shaw's "Arms and the
Man".
Clothier stepped into the star
role of Bluntschli after Christmas when John Gilliland was
forced to drop out because of
illness.
The play will appear in the
Aud. Jan. 21, 22 and 23. It is
presented by the Department of
Theatre and directed by Miss
Somerset, head of the department.
councils were created to regulate the torture, imprisonment and forced exile of the
Nicaraguan elite. Managua
and Leon are the cities which
have been most heavily struck
by gangs of official executioners. The latter city might
well be called the town of
heroism and martyrdom. But
the Somozas will soon fall and
then the sufferings of Nicaragua will come to an end.
-Do you wish to add something
more?
-I   would  like  to   thank   the
Honduran   students   and   all |
other     progressive    elements
for   their   moral  support   for |
my harrassed fatherland. I
hope you will publicly state
my gratitude in your article.
UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE
HOURS:    -    -    -
SATURDAY:    -
-   9   a.m. to   5   p.m.
-   -   9 a.m.  to  Noon
LOOSE LEAF NOTE BOOKS
EXERCISE BOOKS AND SCRIBBLERS
GRAPHIC ENGINEERING PAPER, BIOLOGY PAPER,
LOOSE LEAF REFILLS, FOUNTAIN PENS and INK,
DRAWING PAPER
Owned and Operated by . . .
THE UNIVERSITY OF B.C.
COLLEGE
SHOP
Open Daily in the Brock Extension
11:30 a.m.   -   2:30 p.m.
*
- JUST ARRIVED -
BLUE
UBC JACKETS
(in all sizes)
* School Supplies and Stationery
* Faculty Pins
* Faculty Sweaters
* Gym Clothing
* Lost and Found
OWNED AND OPERATED BY THE A.M.S.
RAVEN
35c
'mM.tito ')a3U£M>edaci 9o;jjo *3<>c£ s.q. itma scrap pttooas su p»j«jotn.rvy
mt   -0

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