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The Ubyssey Oct 5, 1923

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 Issued Weekly by the Publications Board of the University of British Columbia
Volume VI.
VANCOUVER, B.C., OCTOBER 5th,    1923
No. 1
Frosh Reception
Lester Court
Free For All
Yearly Crush Threatens To Be
More Compact Than Ever
Everyone may attend the Frosh ^reception this year, it has been decided
by the Students' Council, who state
that the annual stampede will be
held at Lesters' Court, Friday, October 12th.
The attempt to limit the attendance
at the reception last year was a failure and the council at that time decided that if the other years wanted to
attend they would be fellow sufferers
with the newcomers. This year the
council has placed no restriction except that outsiders will not be admitted.
This is the second year that the
dance has been held outside the college. The numbers attending the
University have become so large that
the old tradition of holding the affair
in the auditorium has been done away
with.
FRESHETTES AT
KIDS' PARTY
Wild Program Planned for This
Evening
Gone are the days of initiation! Gone
are the days when shrinking little
Freshettes underwent the agonies of
grease paint, tar and feathers and
Iiimburger cheese! Arts'26 must abolish hazing and receive the newcomers
in a more Tsindly and less barbaric
fashion.
As a result the women of the Sophomore Year have decided to entertain
their less matured sisters at a "kids"
party, to be held in the auditorium on
Friday evening. Here little Freshettes may, for the last time, within
University precincts, wear their long
curls, hair ribbons and socks, and
they may enjoy a last childish romp.
There will be a roll call to see that all
attending the University for the first
time are present, lest some might
think themselves above such youthful
amusement.
Various attractions are being planned—even a very solemn vow wjmJ be
taken, and a few elementary but strict
rules of Freshette behaviour outlined.
However, as a special inducement, the
Sophs, have promised all sorts of
"goodies" for the children. So attention, Freshettes!—and don't forget to
present yourselves at the auditorium
on Friday at 7:30 p.m. with five cents
and five cents in coppers.
FIRST ALMA MATER MEETING
POLICY OUTLINED FOR
THIS SESSION
Addresses Delivered By Various Members of
Student Council
The firsi; Alma Mater meeting ot
the year was held Tuesday noon in the
Auditorium, when Jack Grant outlined
plans for the college year and read
the policy of the council which has
been reproduced below. Special attention was drawn to the fact that
gambling will not be permitted in the
college and that card playing, except
at' college functions, will be banned.
It was also pointed out that no credits for student activities will be given
in the U. II. C.
Percy Barr summarized the balance
sheet of the treasury of the society for
last year, showing a considerable balance. He also told how the menies of
the Alma Mater are spent.
Jasper Wolverton asked the student
body to support the men on the athletic field and urged them to turn out
for practices.
Lloyd Wheeler asked for the support
of the students. He said The "Ubyssey" could carry on its work only by
receiving the co-operation of everyone.
R. L. MacLeod, Marshal, outlined
the marshal organization of the U.B.C.
Presented   by   Students'   Council   Session, 1923-1924
1.    SOCIAL   FUNCTIONS.
Each class will be allowed one class-
party during the session.
The senior classes will be allowed
two parties—one each term.
Subsidiary organizations will hold
no general social functions.
No function of a social nature, i.e.,
dance, will be permitted in the University except on Friday night unless
permitted under very exceptional circumstances.
Major Functions — Three major
dances will be permitted during session, viz., Arts, Agriculture and Science.
2.    STUDENT ACTIVITIES.
Application to hold any student activity involving the use of the University crest or name, or both, must be
made two weeks in advance of date of
such function. Council wishes it particularly understood that this applies
(Continued on Page 2)
TWO PROMINENT SPEAKERS
TO ADDRESS STUDENTS
Sir George Foster to Speak On League of Nations;
W. J. Rose On Life In Poland
Mr. W. J. Rose, who proposes visiting all the universities of Canada to
address the students, is expected in
Vancouver some time during the coming week.
He was one of the first Rhodes
scholars from Manitoba University
and since completing his studies has
been engaged in work among the people of Poland. Those who know him
personally commend him highly as a
public speaker. President Klinck,
who met Mr. Rose a few years ago at
a student conference at Lumsden
Beach, Sask., was favorably impressed
with his intimate knowledge of existing conditions in all countries of mid-
Europe. His lectures will be similar
to those of Dr. Gray, who was here
last year, but his appeal to life
service will be basea on his experiences in Poland.
The subjects of his lectures are not
definitely known; full announcement
of these will be made later.
Sir George E. Foster, Canada's well-
known senator and one of the world's
leading orators, will address the Student Body Friday noon in the Auditorium. He has wired President L. S.
Klinck that he will visit the U.B.C.
Friday and will give a short talk on
the League of Nations Society of Canada with which he is connected.
Since the visitor has a world-wide
reputation as a speaker and statesman it is expected that the Auditorium will be filled to overflowing. Those
who have heard Sir George will recall
his masterly manner in bringing vivid
pictures before his audience. He is
one of the most distinguished guests
the  College has ever had.
Gowns will not be worn this year by
Arts '25, it was decided this week at
a class meeting. Although the class
has taken a stand against gowns for
this session, a list is being circulated
among members of the class and if 50
sign it the academic robes will appear
with the juniors.
Corner Stone
Ceremony at
Point Grey
Glowing Tribute Payed to Dr.
Westbrook by Pres. Klinck
"In the five short years given to
him he accomplished much," said President L. S. Klinck, paying tribute to
the memory of the first president of
the University, the late Frank Fair-
child Wesbrook last Friday, at the
laying of the cornerstone of the
Science building at Point Grey. President Klinck urged the students and
professors to carry on their work following the ideals of the late president
whose work of building a foundation
of tradition was of the highest quality.
Dr. J. D. MacLean, Minister of Education and Provincial Secretary, performed the ceremony of laying the
stone and stated that the registration
figures of the past few years proved
that the building of the University was
not   premature.
Dr. R. E. McKechnie, Chancellor of
the University, outlined the history of
higher education in the province, showing its evolution from one year in Arts
at the high schools to the present
college as organized.
J. W. deB. Farris stated that the
government had pledged itself to carry
on a constructive programme In regard to the University and that the
laying of the corner stone was proof
of this.
Thomas Pearson, M.L.A., welcomed
the students to Point Grey and stated
the advantages of the municipality for
a university site.
Col. E. J. Ryan told of the modern
methods of carrying on the construction and praised the work of the students who had been employed at the
site during the summer. Col. F. J.
Keen also spoke on behalf of the contractors, while C. J. Thompson represented the architects.
TEN  CHOSEN
IN CONTEST
New Reporters on Ubyssey Staff.
The following have been chosen in
the contest held last week, to act as
reporters on the "Ubyssey" staff:
Eric Dunn, Dorothy Arkwright, John
Grace, Laura S. Mowatt, Doris McKay,
Florence Williams, A. Earle Birney,
Ralph Mathews, R. O. Norman, Dave
Taylor.
The above are asked to attend a
meeting to be held in the Publication
office immediately after the close of
the meeting in the Auditorium on Friday, October 5th.
The Business Manager needs assistants. If you have the personality to
sell advertising, call around and get
your assignments and contract forms.
Not only will you be helping the Alma
Mater but also a small commission
will net you a few dollars.
il.„. 1
THE     UBYSSEY
Oct. 5th, 1923
YOU HAVE
FRIENDS INTER
ESTEDINTHE
UNIVERSITY
Tell Them About the
Published every week during the College Term; contains bright and interesting
reading.
If you know any students in
their Matric year in high school
who intend coming to the University nisxt session, let them
know how it would benefit them to
become acquainted with all the
various University activities and
organizations. This information
is found in the "Ubyssey."
EXTRA  MURAL
RATES ARE
$2.00 PER ANNUM
For those connected with the
University, but who do not pay
Alma Mater fees the rate is
$1.50 PER ANNUM
*4r>
Send all subscriptions to
Circulation Manager, Publications Board, U. B. C.
POLICY OUTLINED
(Continued from Page 1)
to unscheduled athletic events as well
as activities of all organizations under
the Alma Mater Society, such as
hikes, skating parties, outside debates, etc.
Student activities with the exception of scheduled athletic events will
cease two weeks before the Christmas
examinations and three weeks previous  to  the  spring-term examinations.
Functions of societies requiring admission charge will be permitted only
when admission charge is imperative
and in keeping with importance of
function. This applies to functions involving student talent.
Final reports of student functions
must be handed to Students' Council
before first meeting of council after
such function, or at latest one week
after such function.
Council wil use its discretion in permitting   constituent    and    subsidiary
organizations to hold social functions.
3.    DISCIPLINE.
Members of the Student Body are
advised that they are responsible to
their governing body, which is the Students' Council for their behavior on
the University campus.
It will be the policy of Council to
treat as breaches of discipline:
1. Loitering and unnecessary noise
in the hallways.
2. Talking or disturbance in the
reading room or breaking other library regulations.
3. Failure to report to Council immediately damage done to any University property.
4. Incorrect reports of University
functions and activities in the press.
5. Gambling. Your attention is
drawn to the by-law passed by the
Students' Council, January 20th, 1920:
"That card playing, except at University functions, and gambling in any
form, such as dice-throwing and coin-
tossing for money or any monetary
equivalent whatsoever, be prohibited
within the precincts of the University."
It will be the policy of Council to
rigidly enforce this measure and to
recommend for suspension or expulsion anyone who violates it.
4. ACADEMIC STANDARD.
It is the policy of the Students'
Council to encourage a careful and
serious attention to study.
We believe that the reputation and
influence of our University can best
be built up by maintaining a high
standard of education.
It is adverse to our policy that any
credits whatsoever be given to students taking part in college activities.
We, therefore, advise any student
to forego his participation in College
activities if it will imperil his scholastic standing.
We believe that the establishment
of the credit system would seriously
lower our scholastic standing and
tend to professionalize our activities.
We believe that any student whose
academic record during the first term
is found to be unsatisfactory should be
asked to discontinue his attendance at
the University and will give our full
support to the University authorities
in carrying out this regulation.
5. STUDENT   CAFETERIA.
It is the policy of the Students'
Council to operate the cafeteria for
the students, giving them the best
food possible at a minimum of cost.
The Council solicits the patronage
and support of the whole student
body, for by receiving it the cafeteria
will be able to improve its service and
cut down its costs.
The Council encourages societies
and organizations within the University to make arrangements for catering at their social function through
the management of the cafeteria.
5.    POINT   GREY   DEVELOPMENT.
Realizing that the establishment of
the University at Point Grey will for
PROGRAM FOR
PRESENT YEAR
VANCOUVER   INSTITUTE   OUTLINES SERIES OF LECTURES
October 4th—The President's Address.
"Niagara, the First Capital of Upper
Canada."    (Illustrated).
Dean  Clement.
Oct.  11th—Institute.
"Ancient Egypt."  (Illustrated).
Dr. George E.  Kidd
Oct. 18th—B. C. Academy of Science.
"Some Geological Discoveries in the
North."     (Illustrated).
Dr. M. Y. Williams.
Oct. 25th—Institute.
"Earthquakes   and   How   They   are
Recorded."
Napier Dennison, Esq.
Nov. 1st—Art, Historical  &  Scientific
Society.
"Africa and the Zimbabwe Ruins."
(Illustrated).
W.  R.  Dunlop,  Esq.
Nov. Sth—Shakespeare Society.
"Shakespeare as a Musician."
Mrs.   Rees-Thomas
Nov. 15th—Women's University Club.
"The Painters of Light in Holland."
(Illustrated).
Miss A. Ermatinger Fraser
Nov. 22nd—Alpine Club.
"First Ascents in the Rockies."  (Illustrated).
Sir Jas.  Outram,  Bart.
Nov. 29th—Natural History Society.
"Nature and Human Nature."
Dr. H. T. J. Coleman.
Dec.   6th—Institute.
"Old and New Around the Mediterranean."    (Illustrated).
Dr.  Todd.
Jan.   10th—Institute.
"Travels Through Egypt, Palestine,
India and Japan."
Prof.  E. Odium
Jan. 17th—Institute.
"Mining, Ancient and Modern."
(Illustrated).
Prof.  J.  M.  Turnbull
Jan.  24th—Institute.
"The New Wordsworth."
Dr. Sedgewick.
Jan.  31st—Institute.
"Harwich to London—through
Copenhagen  and   Strasbourg."
(Illustrated).
Prof. W. Sadler
Feb. 7th—Institute.
"The Evolution of the  Stars."
(Illustrated) Dr.  Plaskett
Feb.   14th—Chaniber  of  Mines.
Speaker and Subject to be announced later.
Feb.  21st—Institute.
"Florence."    (Illustrated).
Prof. A. F. B. Clark.
Feb.  28th—Institute.
"University   Administration."
Dr. L. S. Klinck
Mar.  6th—Institute.
"Mysticism  in  Comparative  Religions."
Rev. N. Lascelles Ward, M.A.
Mar. 13th—Dickens' Fellowship.
"The London of Charles Dickens."
(Illustrated.)
J. Francis Bursill, Esq.
Mar. 20th—"Educational Conditions in
the  Orient."
Dr. H. H. Gowen.
REGISTRATION TO DATE
Registration figures to date for the
1923-1924 session shows a markbd increase over those of the 1921-1922 session. Two years ago the total registration reached 1014. This session
shows an increase of some 233 students in all Faculties. The influx is
especially noteworthy in the First
Year, where the figures have jumped
from 446 to 587, showing an increase
of 141 students. The following is a
complete list of Registration figures
to date, October 2nd, 1923.
Faculty of Arts and Science—
First   Year 491
Second   Year   1S3
Third Year  140
Fourth Year  102
Total          916
Faculty of Applied  Science—
First   Year     70
Second   Year    33
Third Year   32
Fourth Year   35
Total            170
Nursing—
First   Year     n
Second   Year       6
Third Year      5
Fourth Year        4
Fifth  Year         5
Total     31
Faculty   of  Agriculture—
First   Year   15
Second   Year    u
Third Year   20
Fourth   Year     12
Total    58
Graduates—
Arts and Science   10
Applied   Science     1
Agriculture   1
Total   12
Public   Health    Nursing       6
Teachers'   Training    Course     54
1923-24  Total   1247
1921-22  Total   1014
Increase   233
PRINTING
We give the  very  Best in  Service
and Quality-
Dance Programmes. Letterheads,
Envelopes, etc.
also    Personal   Stationery
COADE  &  DAUBNEY
028  Broadway West
PHONE    FAIRMONT    5161
the first few years at least call for a
serious drain on Student funds, Council asks for the co-operation of each
organization under the A.M.S. in a
policy of utmost possible economy in
expenditure of Student funds and in
any suitable manner whereby as large
a surplus as possible may be accumulated to meet that drain.
PHONE SEYMOUR  1160
WM.  TWEEDIE'S
ORCHESTRA
OPEN   FOR   ENGAGEMENTS
FOR 1923-1924 SEASON
Ensure the Success of Your
Social  Affairs
Have Good Music
Exclusive   Booking   Agents
SWITZER   BROS.   LTD. r
Oct. 5th, 1923
THE     UBYSSEY
Get a
VARSITY PENANT
For the
FOOTBALL MATCHES
We have them  in stock
SHAW &MGGILL, LTD.
SPORTING GOODS
658  Robson  St.
Service  Bldg., 4 Doors  East  of
Granville St.
THE GREAT-WEST
Life Insurance Co.
Head Office, Winnipeg, Manitoba
A gentleman connected with
the Bank of Commerce in Vancouver, on Sept. 1st, 1908, had a
20 Payment Life policy issued
to him by The Great-West Life
Assurance Co.
The quinquennial dividends
were accumulated to lessen the
number of payments.
On Sept. 1st, 1922, fourteen
years from the date of the policy
it was fully paid up, and he received in cash $20.65.
It was really a fourteen Payment Life.
He will receive dividends on
this paid up policy as long as he
lives.
640  Hastings Street West
Vancouver   Branch   Office
SPORT NEWS
NORTH   VAN.   ELKS   DEFEAT
VARSITY SQUAD
After taking into consideration the
facts that two of Varsity's best men
were awg.y, that it was the first game
of the season, and that some members
of the team were playing in unaccustomed positions, the defeat of Saturday need not cause undue consternation. Ternan, Phillips and Crute
played well, their work was a credit to
the team. The one glaring weakness
that manifested itself repeatedly was
the absolute lack of combination
plays. Crosses to the wings went to
waste time and time again. The whole
forward line seemed disorganized.
Emery placed three or four neat corner kicks, but they did not materialize.
The next game is with the Nationals
at Westminster, and with the team at
full strength, a win should be registered. The line-up on Saturday was
as follows: Baker, Crute, Jackson,
Phillips, Buckley, Emery, Ternan,
Lundie,  McLuckie  and  Shields.
SCOTTY  RUSHBURY  ILL.
Henry Scot1ytRushbury is seriously
ill"in" the Vancouver General Hospital.
He was brought to Vancouver early
this week from Naramata where he
has been confined to his bed for sometime. Reports from the institution
across t/ie street indicate that Mr.
Rushbury is in a very serious condition. It will be impossible for him to
continue his studies here as a member of Science '24.
THE   ATHLETIC   MEET.
The athletic meet of the Western
Collegiate International Athletic Association, to be held at Saskatoon, is attracting a great deal of attention. The
representatives from here have not
been chosen yet, and prospective applicants should submit their names to
C. Barton or L. Buckley. Carl Barton's record for the mile is very good,
while Hugh Russell's for the high
jump is a Canadian record. Livingstone's records for the short distances
are also very good; and taking all in
all, U.B.C. should make a name for
itself. The following records made by
the W.C.I.A.A. should prove of interest and give some indication of our
chances:
100 yards  10 2-5 sec.
220 yards  23 3-5 sec.
440 yards  53 3-5 sec.
SS0 yards  2 min., 17 1-5 sec.
1  mile  4 min., 55 sec.
3 miles  16 min., 44 sec.
High jump  5 ft. 6 in.
Broad jump  21 ft.  4 in.
Pole vault  10 ft.
Shot Put  36 ft, 8 in.
Discus 119  ft.  3 in.
Javelin  142 ft. 2 in.
WOMEN'S ATHLETICS
Women's Athletics, as in previous
years, have commenced with the opening of Varsity and already the Gymnasium and Swimming Clubs are well
under   way.
Swimming classes are being held in
Chalmers Church tank on Wednesday,
from 4 to 6, and Thursdays, from 5
to 6, beginning this week. Mr. "Bob"
McKecknie, a qualified coach, will be
the instructor. Tickets may be purchased en the third floor from Sylvie
Thrupp, Phyllis Edgell, Dorothy Holmes or Mary Chapman.
Gymnasium classes will be held
every Monday from 4:15 to 5:15, commencing October 8th. Miss Duff-
Stuart will be the able instructress of
the class.
VARSITY  DOWNS  B. C.  E. R.  IN
TIGHT GAME
It is a hopeful sign for a junior team
when they can reverse a score made
by a senior squad. This is exactly
what happened on Saturday at Powell
street when B. C. Electrics met defeat
to the tune of three goals to nil. Although only an exhibition game, it
was strenuously contested, and if
comparison may be taken as a criterion, the team wil have a much more
successful season  than last year.
After some delay, B.C.E.R. kicked
off and for a time rushed matters;
then end to end play ensued. Underwood registered the first counter, following a corner kick. Poor finishing
spoiled many chances for the blue and
gold forwards. Sheridan almost registered a counter, after a fine individual effort. Cant added the second
point  shortly before  half-time.
The older members of the B. C. E. R.
squad could not stand the pace, and as
a result their goal was constantly in
danger. Butler and Ledingham played
an excellent game, successfully combining with Davidson in keeping their
charge intact. About half way through
the second half, the Varsity forwards
broke away and Cant registered a
third counter. This ended the scoring. J. Cowx assumed the role of
referee to the evident satisfaction of
all. The line-up was as follows:
Davidson, Disney, Butler, Maylaent,
Ledingham, Fanning, Newcombe, Cant,
Sheridan, Underwood and Evans.
» * * #
Athletic Park has been secured for
this season as a training ground for
the soccer team. Every Wednesday
afternoon at 3 o'clock there will be a
turnout.
VARSITY TENNIS RESULTS
Varsity tennis players started the
annual tournament yesterday and will
continue today. The matches are being played on the Laurel courts.
The results of yesterday's play were:
Men's singles—A. Godfrey defeated
J. Logie, 4-6, 6-4, 6-4; B. Spencer defeated H. Etter, 8-6, 6-1; Painter defeated Lee Brooks, 6-4, 6-2; S. Miller
defeated H. Woodworth, 6-4, 6-2;
Shakespeare defeated Fletcher, 7-5, 6-3,
G. Kerr defeated Lomant, 6-1, 6-0.
Men's doubles—Shields and Painter
defeated Palmer and Woodworth, 6-2,
6-1; Logie and Atkins defeated Shakespeare and Warren, 6-1, 6-4; E. Grauer
and S. Wright defeated Miller and Curtis, 6-3, 6-3.
Mixed doubles—Doris Lee and L.
Brooks defeated Miss King and Wood-
worth, while Miss W .Hall and E. Grauer took their match by default.
Soccer  Elections
The Soccer Club held its first
meeting on Monday afternoon in the
Physics Lecture Rcom. The officers
elected for the coming season are as
follows: President, R. Brink; Vice-
President, Val. Gwyther; Captain (1st
team), G. Phillips; Secretary-Treasurer, R. Stroyan; Manager, Chubb Ar-
nett. The officers of the second team
have not yet been elected.
Grass Hockey Club
Plans are being made now to organize a University Grass Hockey Team,
to be entered in the Vancouver and
District  League.
The Athletes' Friend
If you are interested in
sports—come in and have a
talk with Geo. H. Goulding,
successful Rugby, Hockey,
Swimming, Soccer and Track
and Field Coach.
GEORGE GOULDING
Sporting   Goods   and   Bicycle
Dealer
829 PENDER STREET W.
Chocolates
Home-made
Candy
Ice  Cream  and
all   Fountain
Drinks
(A f ternoon
Teas)
We will be
pleased to give
special rates for
jrivate parties,
special classes,
etc.
English
Whipcord Shirts
Tailored to Fit and
a Wonderful Shirt for
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SPECIAL AT $2.95
Wear a Mann's Shirt
Mann's Men's Wear
SHOPS
411-474 Granville St.
rENUS
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FOR the student or prot, the
superb VENUS out-rivals
all for perfect pencil work.
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Writs for
booklet on
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THE     UBYSSEY
Oct. 5th, J 923
500,000 Owners
vouch for
CORONA
MORE Corona Typewriters are
in use to-day than all other
makes of portables combined.
It is the most complete and
convenient of all portable machines—has every modern feature desirable in an office machine, yet weighs less than
seven pounds.
COME IN TO-DAY AND
SEE   IT
Price Complete, $69.00
Graham Hirst Company
Sole Agents for B. C.
312   PENDER  ST.   W.
Sey. 8194 Vancouver, B. C.
The    VARSITY    SHOP
Buy Your
Overcoat
Now when our Stock is at
its Best
PRICES
$29.75
and up
FASHION CRAFT
Thos. Foster & Co.
514   Granville St.
One Store Only
\The Palm Garden
Fruit, Confectionery
Ice Cream  and
Tobacco
Hot Lunches Served,
Also Afternoon Tea
Phone Fair. STH
Cor. 10th and Heather St.
Slip ItnjBflnj
(Member  Pacific   Inter-Collegiate   Press
Association)
Issued every Thursday by the Publications
Hoard of the University of British Columbia.
Extra   mural   subscriptions,   $2.00   per  session.
For advertising rates apply
Advertising    Manager.
EDITORIAL   STAPr.
Editor-in-Chief    A.   L.   Wheeler
Associate Editors  C. H. Dowling
Miss Jean Faulkner
Miss Grace Smith
Feature   Editor   	
Literary Editor   Miss I-iUcy Ingram
Exchange Editor Miss Gwen  Stirling
Sporting Editor J. Cowx
Chief Reporter  .'	
BEPORTOEIAL   STAFF.
Laura S. Mowatt, John Grace, Dorothy Arkwright, A. Earle Birney, Florence Williams, Eric Dunn, Doris McKay, Ralph Mathews, R. O. Norman,
Dave Taylor.
BUSINESS STAFF.
Business Manager  T.  J. Keenan
Assistant Business Manager	
— W. H. Sparks
Circulation  Manager  T. J.  Brand
EDITOR   FOB   TEE   WEEK
Cliff Dowling
INITIATION
Last year, following the initiation
given them by Arts '25, there was a
general feeling among the fresnmen
that there should be no blazing this
year. This feeling was not caused by
any revulsion born of the atrocities
committed by the sophomores, but it
was, we believe, more or less due to
a contempt for the lunatic play to
which Arts '25 was forced to restrict
itself. Unfortunately the sophomore
spirit began to assert itself towards
the end of last year and Arts '26, like
every other class, has completed plans
for an initiation this year.
There are a great many of us who
are not afraid to display an admiration for such an exhibition as a Demp-
sey-Firpo fight. In a like manner,
there are a few who still have a
hankering towards the old forms of
hazing as they were practised some
eight or ten years ago. These "stunts"
at least had something daring about
them and could not, like last year's
demonstration, be dubbed of a puerile,
dish-water variety. Now we would
not have anyone think that we are recommending the old barbarous initiations of a few years ago. We are
not. The times when a few broken
arms, legs, and necks were the order
of the day are irrevocably passed, and
although we realize how such an initiation might aid in clearing up the
congestion in our halls, there are few
of us who would sanction it. The
point is this: if we are unable to carry
out a hazing the way it should be carried out, then let us do away with it
entirely. It has been abolished by
practically every university in Europe,
and little difficulty has been found in
replacing it by something of a more
sane and civilized nature.
Initiation will take place Saturday
night, and we wish both initiators and
initiated the best of luck in whatever
program they have planned. We have
heard nothing at all as to how rigorous or lenient the initiation is to be
this year. Whatever the program may
be, we feel sure that the members of
Arts '26 will respect any orders that
may be given by the Student's Council,
through the Marshal.
Next year we hope that Arts '27
will do that which Arts '25 and Arts
'26 have considered but never carried
out. It remains for the Freshman
class to do something original in the
history of the University. This will
probably be the last session spent in
these worn out buildings; let us hope
that it will probably be the last to
see the execution of a worn out custom. _. __
THE CORNER  STONE
It is gratifying to consider that the
ceremony at Point Grey marks the culmination of the University campaign
which was conducted with such enthusiasm last year. This consideration,
however, provides no excuse for complacency on our part. Though too
much credit cannot be given to the
Campaign Committee for their discretion and industry, their efforts would
have been futile without the -wholehearted co-operation of the entire University. In the same way the students,
despite their zeal, would have been
incapable of pushing the campaign to
a successful conclusion if the electors
of the province had refused to lend
their support. But they, on realizing
that our claims were just, espoused our
cause, with the result that on Friday
last our goal was realized. We are
now the recipients of the people's
trust. How unworthy of that trust we
will prove ourselves if we subside into self-satisfied passivity—the senior
years conscious of unselfish achievement, the younger students complacently awaiting their inheritance. The
Ulyssean spirit, which made our Pilgrimage to Point Grey an impressive
and almost triumphal procession, must
continue to inspire University thought
and action so that when "We shall
touch the Happy Isles" we shall come
as worthy possessors.
BY   THE   WAY
It has been calculated by one of the
faculty in the Department of Mathematics that the time wasted by students standing in the line-up before
the book wicket totals twenty-five
years, nine months, three days, six
hours, twelve minutes, and two seconds.
•    *    •
Where was the Sea-plane when the
Honourable the Minister of Education
gave his address last Friday?
Dictatorship for Men's Lit?
Yes, there will be some excitement
at the opening meeting of that hardy
perennial, the Men's Literary Society.
In an interview given yesterday, Mr.
Lome Morgan, the hustling President,
declared that it was his intention to
introduce a constitution establishing
a dictatorship with the versatile Lome
in the role of dictator. Mr. Morgan
intends using the Lit. as a tryout field
for the international debates and if
the consent of the debates management and of the faculty can be secured, such will be the function of the
society. But, hark! Mr. J. S. Wilcox,
the Secretary-treasurer, when informed of this programme, stated that he
did not approve of a dictatorship.
"While conceding that Mr. Morgan
will probably run the society far better than anybody else could, i am
afraid," he said, "that we would be
unable to find a worthy successor to
so good a man. He may be right
when he says that democracy has
been weighed in the balance and found
wanting, but I disagree with his idea
that the establishment of an autocracy
is the remedy. I will be compelled to
oppose my chief on this important
question of policy. I feel that the
rights of the executive and of the members are jeopardized, and consider it
my duty to stand for my principles."
The meeting will be held on Wednesday evening next.
STOP!   LOOK!   LISTEN!
$2,000.00
Will be paid
into
Alma  Mater Funds
This Year
by
Advertisers
in
the
i<
Ubyssey '
They offer the best
Patronize them loyally
"Tuum Est"
Overcoat Time .* &
We   never   had   such   a
wonderful   assortment   of
GOOD OVERCOATS
at such reasonable prices.
We'll  be  glad  to  show
you.
Turpin Bros. Ltd.
MEN'S  OUTFITTERS
629 Granville St.
•-•*»•»•«•.«
EVERY SUIT must have
its own smart, closely related
blouse—a blouse which, when
the coat is thrown off, maintains the appearance of a
complete costume.
Richness! There, in a
word, you have the end and
aim of the new blouses.
Richness that proves that no
form of trimming is too ornate—bands of beaded and
metal embroidery outlined
with brilliant color make
glittering panels on the
fronts and around the sleeves
of hip-banded blouses. Such
models are from $35.00 to
$49.50.
Drysdale's Blouse Shop,
Second Floor Oct. 5th,  1923
THE     UBYSSEY
^Wtww^ien€/&?ice
This column is maintained for the use
of students and others who wish to express themselves on any topic of general interest. The Ubyssey does not assume responsibility for any of the views
expressed.
All contributions must be written
legibly, in ink, on one side of the paper
only. They must not exceed two hundred words in length, and must reach
this office not later than noon Monday,
in order to appear in the issue of the
following Thursday.
SAFE AND SANE
The Editor "Ubyssey."
Sir:—
I have noticed with great delight the
plans drawn up by the women for. Initiations this year. I think that this is
an excellent idea and cannot see why
the men could not follow a similar
course. A "Kids' Party" staged by the
men would provide wholesome amusement, and at the same time solve the
present difficulty of drawing up an interesting programme without having recourse to hazing and other barbaric and
mediaeval forms of horseplay. I need
only mention the keen enjoyment with
which all would watch a crowd of
Freshmen, dressed in short pants, zealously engaged in playing marbles, or in
spinning tops. Perhaps to further their
discomfiture and add to the hilarity of
the ocasion, skipping, hop-scotch and
other girls' games might be included.
The possibilities of the scheme are, 1
think, evident even from this brief
sketch.
. It is a credit to the women that they
have been the first to find the real solution to the Initiations question. To me
it has always been revolting to see the
Arts men, especially, countenancing the
barbarity practised for the past ten
years. The men of this faculty must
lead the way, must show that they are
really seeking after culture and refinement by taking advantage of this opportunity for good, wholesome fun. Let
the Science men stick to the old order
of paint, grease and horseplay so long
in vogue, if they desire to do so.
—Mens Sana.
WHAT OF  ROAD TAX
Editor,
"Ubyssey."
Sir:—
I received today from the municipality
of which I am a resident a Poll Tax
Bill for $5.00. Upon scrutinizing the
Bill more closely I find that—if you are
over 21, you are liable for another $2.00
Road Tax.
Returned men are exempt, but what of
the University Student, who, working
his way through college must part with
$5.00 or perhaps $7.00? Those who are
in that predicament must clearly realize
that this tax is unjust.
Can not the student body, or the Alma
Mater Society do something to have
students placed upon the list of exemptions.
Sincerely,
"Dum  vivimus  vivamus."
ARTS  '25   MEETING
Florence MacLeod, secretary of the
class last year, was elected to the
position of literary representative at
the meeting, to fill the vacancy left
by the resignation of Helen MacGill,
who will leave for the east to continue
her studies.
Plans for the class party were discussed, it being decided that the affair should take the form of a masquerade dance to be held as early as
possible. Plans for hikes were also
considered and the first will be held
a week from Saturday, if the date does
not clash with important athletic
games.
"Where were you last night?
"At the Historical Club discussing
the war situation in the Near East."
"Then that accounts for the powder
on your shoulder when you came in."
I met the nicest girl last night;
But now—of course, I'm dumb—
I can't recall her name.    They said:
"Miss Mghhddllhumm, thiz' Mr. Mmm.
Mr. Muck Wants
Assistants (?)
No, as yet this is an unconfirmed
rumor, but it is a well-known fact that
Kenny Schell does—indeed—he wants
several. At the meeting held on Friday noon, where there were assembled about thirty would-be journalists,
he made clear the necessary qualifications. A reporter must be able to
write direct, intelligible English, and
must also have the knack of eliminating the unessential (what in Freshman class goes by the name of selec-
tiion of detail). Secondly, he must be
a hustler,—one who gets the news before it happens, preferred. Mr. Schell
then outlined the advantages of a
position on the Ubyssey staff, among
others, a training in journalistic work,
and hence a good chance of getting on
a paper during the summer month.
The following topics were suggested
for the tryouts: —
1. Account of the reporters' meeting.
2. The Laying of the Corner Stone.
3. A nose for news test—any topic
of University interest.
4. The activities of some U. B. C.
Society.
5. The Soccer games on the 29th.
6. Initiation.
Although men and women alike are
supposed to have an equal chance in
the contest, it is whispered that the
Chief Reporter has a brotherly feeling
for all the fair sex, especially Freshettes. Therefore, women, take courage.
SCIENCE '27 NOTES
Gerry Newmarch will guide the class
of Science '27 this year as president,
following the elections held early this
week. The class appointed the following officers to help look after the affairs of the class, Eric McKinnon, marshal; Everette Lees, treasurer; Chris.
Robson, secretary; Alex. Pottinger,
athletic representative; Rex Brown,
yell leader; Charlie Bishop, publicity
manager The class will make plans
for entering the contests for the Faculty and Governors' Cups in the near
future, when the members will also
discuss the social events of the year.
Freshmen—Learn
These
KITSILANO—CAPILANO
Kitsilano, Capilano, Siwash Squaw—
Kla-how-ya,      Tillicum,      Skookum
Wah—
Hy-you   Mammook,   Mucka   Mucka
Zip.
B. C. 'varsity Rip, Rip, Rip,
'V-A-R-3-I-T-Y
'Varsity.
SKYROCKET
S-S-S-SS-S-S-Boom
Ahahahahahahahahah
(whistle)
'Varsity (or other name).
* *    *
CATFISH—DOGFISH
Catfish, Dogfish, Devilfish, Sharks
Atta boy, atta boy, raise some sparks
Eat 'em up, eat 'em up, eat 'em up
raw
B. C. Varsity—
Rah, Rah, Rah,
• •    *
Varsity Rah, Varsity Rah,
Give 'em Hell with a ziz, boom, bah,
Soak 'em, croak 'em,
Cover 'em with gore,
Sweep  'em  away with a rush and a
roar,
Hold    'em,    Varsity,    don't    let    'em
through
Win that cup for the U. B. C.
Hntoraitg of Iriitfilf (ttnlmtthta
INFORMATION   TO   STUDENTS
GENERAL REGULATIONS.
1.    The sessional fees are as follows:
Registration and Class Fees
In Arts—
First Term, payable on or before
Oct. 6th....". $40.00
Second Term, payable on or before
Jan. 19th   35.00
In Applied Science—
First Term, payable on or before
Oct. 6th  $50.00
Second Term, payable on or before
Jan.  19th   50.00
In Agriculture—
First Term, payable on or before
Oct. 6th  $40.00
Second Term, payable on or before
Jan.  19th  35.00
In Nursing—
First Term, payable on or before
Oct. 6th  $40.00
Second Term, payable on or before
Jan.  19th    35.00
$ 75.00
100.00
75.00
Alma Mater Pee—Payable on or before Oct. 6th....
Caution Money—Payable on or before Oct. 6th....
For Partial Students
Fees per "Unit"—Payable on or before Oct. 6th....
Alma Mater Fee—Payable on or before Oct. 6th....
Caution Money—Payable on or before Oct. 6th....
75.00
7.00
5.00
7.00
7.00
5.00
For Graduates
Registration and Class Fees—Payable on or before
Oct.  15th      10.00
After these dates an additional fee of $2.00 will be
exacted of all students in default.
All cheques must be made payable to "The University of British Columbia."
At the request of the students themselves, and by
the authority of the Board of Governors of the University,
the $7.00 fee is exacted from all students for the Alma
Mater Society.
The Caution money is returned at the end of the
Session after deductions have been made to cover breakages, wastage, and use of special materials in laboratories,
etc. In case the balance of the deposit remaining to the
credit of a student falls below $1.50, a second deposit of
$5.00 may be required.
2. Immediately after October 20th the Bursar shall
send to the Instructors a list of the students who have
not paid their fees, on receipt of which their names shall
be struck from the registers of attendance, and such
students cannot be re-admitted to any class except on
presentation of a special ticket, signed by the Bursar,
certifying to the payment of fees.
3. Students registering after October 6th shall pay
their fees at the time of registration, failing which they
become subject to the provisions of Regulation 2. THE      UBYSSEY
Oct. 5th, 1923
Miss Emslic
has removed to the middle store
at the corner of Broadway and
Heather Streets and solicits
your patronage.
Phone  Fairmont 724
695   BROADWAY  WEST
CHARLTON & RATHBUN
Photographers and Miniature Painters
2044   GRANVILLE   STREET
(Cor.   5th   Ave.)
PHONE   BAY.   176       -    VANCOUVER
"A Good Photograph speaks a
Language all Its Own
J. W. Foster Ltd.
345 Hastings St. West
All the Newest Models
in College Suits and Overcoats at Prices that are
right.
See   us   before   Buying
Halloween
Decorations
Come,  saintly vampires
Come, graceful Mephistoph-
eles!
Haunt our store.
Brownies, Elves, Spooks,
Goblins, produced as if by
Magic
IT  IS  SURPRISING WHAT
50 CENTS WILL BUY
Always   Something   Delightfully
Mysterious  at
w.GEHRKEi.td.
651   SEYMOUR   ST.
(Adjoining Hudson's Bay)
The
Royal cleans
everywhere
thoroughly.
B. G.   ELECTRIC
Snake's Hips
Bee's Knees
Bananas
(Mostly Bananas)
Since the termination of the world
war in 1918, many things have happened. Kingdoms and governments
have been overthrown, scientists have
propounded new theories, and finally
prohibition has been tested and disapproved.
These events and countless others,
however great their significance, have
had but a mild effect upon mankind
generally. Nature has continued upon
its old course, and Father Time is still
clipping off the years. Now we are
coming to the catastrophical occurrence which has travelled over the
continent with the speed of a cyclone
and has done more to shake civilization than any earthquake. Please
hold your seats!
This tragedy, the importance of
which has been emphasized, is the
alleged famine of a well-known fruit.
People who have never eaten the tropical dessert are now wailing and gnashing their teeth because of the shortage
of bananas. It's an ill wind that blows
nobody any good, however, and although this famine has had such disastrous effects, it has been capitalized
and now forms the basis of a popular
song; they call it popular but we can't
see it that way. One brilliant young
man has said that if every banana was
piled in a heap and nature left to take
its course, they would never get as
rotten as the song. The young people and others who should know better
can think of nothing but, "Yes, We
Have No Bananas," and I believe that
some of them in their dreary, melancholy attitude, would like to change
Tennyson's "The Lotus Eaters" to
"The Banana Eaters."
There is one consoling fact, however, that alleviates some of the difficulty and makes us feel that life is
still worth living, and that is the increasing number of inventive genii
which our age is producing. Men
have looked with pride upon Watt and
Franklin, for it was they who enriched the world's store by introducing steam and electro-motive power;
but the creative minds of our age, not
to be outdone by such mere accomplishments, set to work and discovered a bee with knees and a snake
with hips, and the world, drunk with
joy, went about kissing Mama every
night. Oh, Death, where is thy sting!
Yes, I guess we have no more ideas
to-day.
HESITATION.
He stood upon the awful, chilly brink,
Where countless weary lovers stood
before;
His very soul within him seemed to
shrink,
With anguish penetrating to the core;
He wondered at the weakness of his
will,
Which led him there that very course
to take;
He started hastily forward, then stood
still;
He did not dare the drastic leap to
make;
He shuddered at each gruesome, chilling thought,
Depriving him of self-possession cool;
But finally, yielding to his fore-
planned lot,
He lightly plunged into the swimming-
pool.
Literary Corner
"TUUM EST"
Written at the  University Site,
Sept. 28, 1923.
'Tis thine—this vista of Pacific kit
Translucent in the amber of the sun,
The  pensive  mountains  climbing  one
by  one
Upward to heaven.   Lift up thine eyes
to where
The summits, like a flame ascending,
bear
Our thoughts as  incense on an altar
thrown,
Our votive tribute to the work begun
By  those  who  raised  this   square   of
stone last year.
Sunset   it   is.     The   unbuilt   structure
stands
Appealing mutely for completion. Shall
We renounce our heritage and fall
Behind those hardy souls whose eager
hands
Strove   for   the   generations   coming
later
That we might say " 'Tis thine, O Alma
Mater."
D. McG., Arts '27.
•    *    •
LITERARY   NOTES.
The purpose of the Literary Corner
is to draw out undiscovered literary
talent among the students. It seeks
to encourage those undergraduates
who write either prose or verse. Each
week one contribution appears in this
column. All contributions should be
addressed to the Literary Editor,
"Ubyssey."
Announcements
Tuesday, October 9th—Letters Club
at the home of Magistrate H. C. Shaw,
1053 Nicola street.
* *    #
There will be a meeting of the Men's
Section on Monday noon in Room Y.
The president for the year will be
elected and the opening activities of
the year arranged.
•     •     •
The Women's Gymnasium Club will
hold their first class on Monday, October 8th, in St. George's school room,
from 4.15 to 5.15 p.m. All interested
in physical culture are welcome.
* •    •
Prefect  Tea.
All freshettes and their prefects are
invited to attend the tea given by the
Women's Undergraduate Society on
Saturday,   October   6th,   from   3   to   6
p.m. in the Auditorium.
* *    •
The circulation manager announces
that Ubysseys will be placed:
1. Third floor of Arts building for
Arts women.
2. Second floor of Arts building for
Arts men.
3. First floor of Physics building
for Science.
4. At  Braemar for  Agriculture.
Students who are at University on
Thursday  noon  may  obtain  theirs  in
Arts building.
■Dancing-
Get Your Next
HAT or CAP
at
LINFORTH'S
Formerly
Richardson & Potts
417 Granville St.
Mt. Pleasant Methodist
Church
Tenth Ave. and Ontario Street
Minister—Rev.   O.   II.   Sanford
Out   of   Town   Students   Specially
Welcome
Good Music      Interesting Sermons
F'riendly Greeting
RADIO
SETS
PARTS
LOUD SPEAKERS
Drop in  and  ask for our
new price list.
RADIO CORPORATION OF
VANCOUVER, LIMITED
Sey. 3814    605 Dunsmuir St.
Ed. Da Motta
Hair Cutting a Specialty
Expert Attendant
□
2558 Heather St.
Dancing
Private and Class Lesson's
Lady and Gentlemen
Teachers
W.E.Fenn's School
COTILLION HALL
SEY. 3058-O or SEY. 101
Alexander Dancing Academy
Wednesday and Saturday Evenings
Our   new   Aug mented   Orchestra   playing   14
instruments features  all the latest dance hits.
804 Hornby St., Opposite Court House- Oct. 5th, 1923
THE      UBYSSEY
MUCK-A-MUCK
^^3
Snappy New
Oxfords
Unmatchablc Values at
$6.00
Just received a large shipment of new fall oxfords for
women, in brown and black
calfskin and patent leather.
These were all made up
especially for us and are suitable for our climate. The
styles are snappy all through.
You will like them. All
sizes and widths.
Our new price, per pair, $6.00
David Spencer
Ltd.
U.B.C Loose
Leaf Note Book
□
Bound and lined in leather.
Specially adapted tor Penning
Monogram or scrolls. Button
Pocket for Gloves, etc., and hook
for Fountain  Pen.
Extensively used in American
Universities
We Invite your Inspection
a
CLARKE & STUART
Co., Ltd.
..Educational Stationers and  Printers..
550   SEYMOUR   ST.
Telephone Seymour 3000
POLICY:     Piffling.
WEATHER:     Washed Out.
Post Mortem
(A   Muckitorial)
We feel sure that all those who attended the laying of the Corner Stone
out at Point Grey last Friday felt
keenly the insult that was tendered
to this our college paper. Colonel
J. F. Keen, in his address, enumerated a number of articles buried in a
copper box beneath the Corner Stone.
Among other things in that box, he
stated, were copies of the most representative papers in the city. The
Ubyssey was not included amongst
these. Why was there not a place
reserved for The Ubyssey in that copper box? Was the box too small?
If so, why not? If not, why so, and
so on. These are questions which the
intelligen: student is asking on the
street. If the dignitaries in charge
felt, as they may have, that the Ubyssey is unworthy of being buried (not
being dead), why under the blinking
sun didn't they tear out the Muck
page and bury it? It at least is
worthy of a decent burial.
MUSICAL   NOTES
1. "Those Automobile Blues" in four
flats.
2. "I Love You Truly"—in Asia Minor.
3. "Carolina in the Morning"—in B.
natural.
!■' \ J^*?y*^c
IN  CHEMISTRY
Q.   Why is Boyle's Law like love?
A.    Because, the lower the gas, the
higher the pressure.
fr* frrifefc-
Many young people do not know
the difference between life and love.
Here it is. Life is just one fool thing
after another; and love is just two
fool things after each other!—Ex.
fr\ frlfr^
Kwestionable—"Why did kings used
to knock men on their heads when
they knighted them?
Karacter—"Probobly because the
stars would make the knights more
realistic."
Ah, Freshman!
A  green  little  boy,
In a green little way,
A  green  little  apple  devoured  one
day,
And   the   green   little   grasses   now
tenderly wave
O'er the green   little    apple   boy's
green little grave.
Registrar (to Freshman): "What is
your  name ?"
Freshman:     "Jule,  sir."
Registrar: "You should say Julius."
(To next boy)—"What is your name?"
Second Boy:    "Billious, sir."
fr\ Vifar*
RELIGIOUS   NOTES
Religious Note—"There will be a revival meeting tonight at the Old Brick
Church. Subject: "Hell! Its location
and absolute certainty." Following the
service Brother Bunk will sing "Tell
Mother I'll be there."
"I  have a good  job at the  confectioners."
"What do you do?"
"Milk chocolates."
PRE-DIGESTED
Landlady (knocking at the bedroom
door):    "Eight o'clock, Eight o'clock."
Frosh (sleepily): "Did you? Better
call a doctor."
^^V^^^^^v*
THE  WILD WEST
Little Girl (at theatre): "Mamma,
when are the Indians coming on?"
Mother: "Hush, dear, there are no
Indians."
Little Girl: "Then who scalped all
them men in the front seats?"—Ex.
Some brilliant students, finding the
four board walk in front of the University too narrow, have suggested
a camel walk. There's nothing like
the  straight  and  narrow  path.
THIS  SHOW  IS
"Running   'Em   Bagged"
at the Box Office
BOOK 'EM EARLY
Oct. 3 to 6  (inc.)
Matinees, Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays
PAUL WHITEMAN'S "S. S. LEVIATHAN BAND"
A  Real  Musical  Treat  Elaborately  Staged.
An Attraction De Luxe
Kerr & Weston
"The Flip and the
Flapper"
Frank Van   Hoven
"The Mad Magician"
Jos.   K. Watson
"Disarranged Facts"
JEAN MIDDLETON
M. E. G. LIME TRIO
BOB ANDERSON
ATTRACTIVE  PICTURES
CONCERT ORCHESTRA
NO BETTER SHOWS ANY   WHERE — AT  ANY  PRICE
Mike up  an Orpheum Party
and Have Beal Fun
Book Seats Regularly
By Phone — Sey. 852
Phone:   Fairmont 3.
T. J. Kearney & Co.
Funeral Directors
*$»
Private   Ambulance   Service
302 Broadway W.   VANCOUVER
The New Snappy
Overcoats have
Arrived.
Three-piece Belts — with raglan shoulders. Prices very reasonable.
Look over our new samples of
suitings — to Order —
$28.00 to $45.00
Thomas 5: McBain Limited
Semi-Ready  Service  Shop
655 GRANVILLE STREET
The Choice of
Experts,
Dixon's
ELDORADO
Master Drawing
Pencil
17 Degrees
One for
Every Purpose
WE
CARRY A
FULL STOCK
OF STUDENTS'
DRAWING   and
Writing Supplies
T¥/HEN  in town
' " meet your friends
at our new store
MURPHY & CHAPMAN
LIMITED
STATIONERS, PRINTERS
569  SEYMOUR ST.
 Sey. 718	 THE     UBYSSSEY
Oct. 5th, 1923
Wilbur G. Grant
A. T. C. M.
TEACHER OF PIANO
Organist and Choirmaster
First Baptist  Church
Studio:      2213  Granville  Street
PHONE BAYVIEW 3140-R
BOYS!
Patronize Canada's Finest Barber
Shop. 18 Chairs. All First Class
Barbers  and  Manicurists.
The  ROGERS  BUILDING
WM.  BRENNAN,  Proprietor
464 Granville  St.      Phone  Sey.  7853-0
"Down the Marble Stairs''
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QUALITY
PRINTING
Invitations
Dance Programmes
Announcements
Printing for all
the Social Functions
of the School
Term.
The
Sun Publishing Co.,
Limited
Printing Department
37   PENDER    STREET,   WEST
MUSICAL SOCIETY PLANS
INTERESTING YEAR
At the beginning of a new year it
may be well to outline the policy of
the TJ. B. C. Musical Society. The
aims of this Society are: one, arouse
and develop the interest of the students in music and two, to afford an
opportunity of taking part in choral
and orchestral work. The social side
of life is not entirely neglected.
At a recent meeting of the executive, a program for the year was outlined.
Last year the Society set a very
high standard in two successful concerts given under the able leadership
of Mr. Wilbur G. Grant, A.I.C.M., who
has been re-appointed conductor of
the Glee Club and Orchestra for the
Season 1923-24.
Several changes have been made in
the program for the coming year. The
usual Christmas Concert will take the
form of a student recital, and the
grand concert will be held early in the
Spring. It is the intention of the
executive to hold lectures and recitals
throughout the season, which will be
of interest to the general student body.
Tryouts for positions in the orchestra and chorus are being held this
week. The regular rehearsals will
commence next week. Students interested are asked to watch for the
notices posted in the entrance hall
of the Arts Building, or information
can be obtained from members of the
executive:
President—Miss   Mary   Pittendrigh,
Arts '24.
Vice-President—Mr.     Fred     Coffin,
Science '24.
Secretary—Mr. H. W. Fowler, Arts
'26.
Treasurer—Miss      Ada      Langdale,
Arts '24.
Women's Representative—Miss Jean
Telfer, Arts '24.
Men's Representative—To be elected.
Orchestra Representative—Mr. C. V.
Nikiel, Science '27.
Publicity      Representative — Miss
Sarah Palmer, Arts '24.
EDUCATION OF FROSH TO
ELIMINATE XMAS
GRADS
Freshmen will have an opportunity
of learning the ways of the college
through the medium of three lectures
to be given next week by members of
the Students' Council. All freshmen
must attend these meetings, it is
stated.
The first address will be given next
Tuesday when Bill McKee, president
of the Arts undergrad, and Jasper
Wolverton, president of the men's athletics, will take charge of a meeting
at noon. On Wednesday at the same
hour A. E. Grauer and other members
of the Literary and Scientific Department, will speak on the societies coming under their control. The other
talks will be given Friday noon by
R. L. MacLeod, marshal, and Jack
Grant, president. Even if it were not
compulsory to attend these meetings
the information should warrant a good
turnout.
WHAT THEY MEAN.
Musical burglary — Breaking into
song.
Mental hospitality—Entertaining an
idea.
Spiritual pageantry—Parading one's
virtues
Moral harvesting—Reaping one's reward.
Social cannibalism—Living on one's
friends.
Undesirable generosity — Giving
yourself away.
Philosiphical etiquette—Bowing to
the inevitable.
Many a woman is unhappy because
she has a Methodist conscience and a
cabaret   soul.
SHEIKS !*
HAVE YOU SENT YOUR "LILLUMS" A COPY
OF THE SENSATIONAL WALTZ BALLAD
a
IF
9)
WE FEEL CERTAIN SHE WOULD LOVE
THE MELODY AND SUCH WORDS FROM YOU
WOULD BE TRULY WONDERFUL.
CALVIN WINTER, Conductor at the Capitol says:
" 'IF' has a melody distinctly above the average."
WELL-KNOWN  GRAD  RETURNS AS PROF.
Harry F. G. Letson has returned to
the University of B. C. as a doctor
and a professor. He has taken up the
duties of assistant professor of mechanical and electrical engineering with
the science men. Harry, who would
doubtlessly be called Dr. Letson
among the university students if he
were not one of the grads, took his
B.Sc. in the spring of 1919 and left
soon afterwards for England where
he settled in London and earned his
Ph.D. He has returned to the U. B.
C. as he is said to have longed for the
university life here.
Harry is one of the grads of which
the U. B. C. can be proud, according
to some of his old class mates who
say that he deserved more than the
Military Cross that he brought back
with him from France when he went
overseas. He was severely wounded
at Vimy while acting company commander in the 54th. He went over
with the 196th battalion forsaking the
class of Science '17 for the army. He
was president of his class in his graduating year and was an adjutant of the
C. O. T. C.
NEW APPOINTMENTS.
New professors, assistants and lecturers that have been appointed during the late part of last term and this
summer other than those announced
in the special edition of The Ubyssey
are:
H. R. Christie, B.Sc.F., Toronto, Professor of Forestry and Head of the Department.
F. Malcolm Knapp, B.Sc.F., Syracuse, M.Sc.F., Washington, Assistant
Professor of Forestry.
Frank Dickson, B.A., Queen's, Assistant Professor in Botany.
William E. Graham, B.A.Sc, British
Columbia Assistant in Chemistry.
C. D. Kelly, B.S.A., British Columbia, Extension Assistant under the
Burrell Grant.
Doris Lee, B.A., British Columbia,
Assistant in Economics.
Hunter Lewis, B.A., British Columbia, Assistant in English.
E. M. Burwash, B.A., Toronto, M.A.,
B.D., Victoria, Ph.D., Toronto, Chicago,
Lecturer in Geology.
Madge Portsmouth, B.A., British Columbia, Department of Modern Languages.
Dorothy Dallas, B.A., British Columbia, Department of Modern Languages.
English
Gabardines
Raglan Style with belt all
round, check lined, and fully
cravenetted.
$15.00 $19.50
$25.00
C. D. BRUCE
Limited
Cor.  Homer  and Hastings
If Athletes make
Men, then good Athletes and Sports
Equipment is almost
as      important      as
Books
lisle tar
Sporting Goods
Wholesale   and  Retail
1020   GRANVILLE   ST.
EVANS & HASTINGS
Better Quality
PRINTERS
We make a specialty of:
College Annuals
Magazines
Ball Programmes
Etc., Etc.
Students would do well to give
us a call before going elsewhere
578 Seymour St.
PHONE SEY. 189
LIONEL WARD * COMPANY. LTD.,4
• PRINTERS, 318 HOMER ST., VANCOUVER, B. C.

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