UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Daily Ubyssey Feb 10, 1949

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0124622.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0124622.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0124622-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0124622-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0124622-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0124622-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0124622-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0124622-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0124622-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0124622.ris

Full Text

 KAY MACDONALD IN AS SECRETARY
*
The Daily Ubyssey
Vol. XXXI
VANCOUVER, B. C, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1949.
No. 64
MATA AND HARI
. . . "danse comiquc"
Radio Society Brings
Two Dancers To UBC
Fund Raising Main Objective But
Mata and Hari Crackerjack Show
Culture will come to the campus March 1 when University
.Radio Society brings Mata and Hari dancers to the Armoury.
"We may have fund raising in mind with our presentation
of Mata and Hari but we are also bringing a crackerjack show
to UBC," said George Barnes, Radsoc president.
"We may have fund raising in mind i to audiences in Billy Rose's Diamond
wiuth our presentation of Mnta and   Horseshoe,   The   Roxy,   Radio   City
Hari but we are also bringing a
cracjkerjack show to UE'Ct" said
George Barnes, Radsoc president.
The ballet company, which will
appear for the first time on the
*oast when they play at the university
tire outstanding as a burlesque ballet
company, on the North American
continent.
KAYE SHOWED INTEREST
The troupe has worked with such
big-name theatrical people as Agnes
de Mille of Oklahoma, Allegro, Carousel, and The Three Virgins and the
Devil Fame; with Jerome Robbins
who did the choregraphy for Fancy
Free On the Town, Billion Dollar
Baby, and High Button Shoes.
Another one-time coworked was
Danny Kaye and his wife Sylvia Fine,
who became so interested in the Mata
Hari troupe that she composed their
Hindu Faker number.
Charlie Chaplin, after seeing the
ballet, said of them "their comedy
reminds me of my youth."
Winning sensational reviews where-
over they appear, the ballet, company
has danced on famous slages across
North   American.   They   have   played
Music Hall, Ciro's, Carnegie Hall, and
Hotel Pierre in New York.
PRESIDENTIAL PERFORMANCE
In a command performance for
President Truman, they danced at
tho White House.
Some of lhe numbers which they
will piesent at UBC on March 1 include: a satire on Pas de Deux. Carnegie Hall in whi^'h they burlesque
the audienge and the orchestra, and
Looking for Talent, a parody on a
scout who interviews a tap dancer and
a strip tease artist.
PIANIST PILOT
Thc Mata and Hari troupe includes
such ballet notables as Soya Leorsky
who went backstage after their first
performance at the National Theatre
and has been attached to them ever
since. Ottawa bom Norman Thompson who danced with the London
Sadler and Wells Company, is also a
member of the cast.
Stage designing is done by Wofang
Roih who worked for Margaret Webster's Shakespearean Company.
The dancing satirists travel from
const to coast in an airlines style Cadillac. The driver, Charles Mngnan,
is also  their pianist.
P.C/s Constitution At
Western To Be Changed
LONDON, Ont. (CUP).—Campus Progressive-Conservative Club at University of Western Ontario will have to make
sweeping  changes   in  their  constitution  before   they   will   be
ratified by the University Student Council.
  • —<s>
This edict   was announced Tuesday
Cumming Activities Coordinator,-
CONFUSED COED CONFUSES
CHEM PROF WITH RADSOC
Confusion was confounded yesterday for a student and
a Chem, instructor.
Mary Chadwick, assistant to Ray Fraser of the University Forum, went over to help with the noon hour broadcast in the Auditorium. ,#
Dumping her books, she hurried on to the platform.
"Where's Ra^?" she asked the only other occupant of the
stage.
"Ray who?" said the man, dusting chalk from his
hands. m
"Why, Ray Fraser," said the coed, eyeing the strange
equations on the board.  "When ifoes the broadcast start?"
"Broadcast?" said the professor and students who were
assembled for their Chem. 300 lecture.
It seems the broadcast was in the Brock.
o
Soph Slot Goes To Plant In
Gross Hockey Monoger
Carol McKinnon Acclaimed
Women's Athletic Prexy
Carol McKinnon was acclaimed president of the Women's
Athletic Directorate yesterday.
 .—_.<§,    WAD presidency  was the  first oflice to go by acclamation since elec-
Apathetic Alma Mater Voting
Kay MacDonald, George Cumming, Peter de Vooght and
Elva Planl will sit on next year's council as Secretary, Coordinator of Activities, Junior Member, respectively.
In   a   bitterly   contested   race   for <? ,   ..  ...
Sophomore member Frene Ginwala
led by more than a hundred votes until the third ballot when Elva Plant,
sister of the present treasurer chalked
up some two hundred votes lo sweep
past her.
Final  standings  were:
Secretary:
Kay   MacDonald   1280
Shirley Manning 035
Co-ordinator  of   Activities:
George Cummings 1245
Bob Thurston 1008
Junior Member:    .
Peter de Vooght  122G
Bob Lee 993
Sophomore Member:
Elva  Plant'  1167
Frene Ginwala 1067
Ryerson May
Still Speak
At Western U
Communist Talk on
Economics Banned
Special to the Daily Ubyssey
LONDON,  Ont.   (CUP>.  —
Student indignation is running
high  on the campus  of U.  of
tion  of treasurer Walt Ewing
Carol has been active in campus
sports during her three years al
UBC.
She is novv in third year Physical
Education.
Active in basketball, hockey, and
a variety of thor women's sports she
is manager of ihe girls' grass hockey
team.
She is also a member of the Varsity
Outdoor Club and  Phrateres.
UN Assembly
University Week
To start off University Week February 28, Brock Hall will bc the
scene of another United Nations
Mock General Assembly. This event
which proved so popular and effective
last term is to bo the first of the
activities which will surround University Week.
Students chosen lo represent their
national groups will deb;il<- problem;
of International importance following
Ihi procedure used by the United
Nations.
This event will be open ie Ihe
public and should pr >vo highh in'ei -
e.-.line   I'm   die,-.a  n11i-iv.-.toil.
hv   Doug   Knowles,   Minister   of   Internal Affiars on  the council.
One article of their constitution
is in direct contradiction to the USC
regulation requiring strict responsibility of all political clubs to the
USC. This is it:
"Since this association is a sub-
divlson of Ihe Prgoressive-Conscrva-
tive party, it shall remain responsible
,,re not to be decided by the official
to the PC parly."
Matters of policy and major issue;
PC  parly,  Mr. Knowles declared.
Membership in the campus clubs
is limbed lo Western students rather
than "all valine, people of London and
d.:-lric!." The purpose of political
i Ink-, i.s In stimulate interest in and
ii id >i m .sliidciil.s about  piiliiieal parlies.
Gamma Chapter of Phrateres sponsors a candy sale Friday at 10:30 a.m.
at   the   foot   of   the   Caf   stairs.   Pro-
Western Ontario over a senate, ^h [m. Eui,)pean Rdief Purcols
ruling which ba^s Communist i
speakers here.
The*Gazette, campus newspaper, revealed today that Stanley Ryerson,
LPP secretary, has been barred from
accepting an economics class invitation
to explain inconsistencies in thc Marxian theory of "surplus value."
Ga/.ctte, editorially, protested the
ban,
The board of governors is expected
to issue a statement sometime foday.
GEORGE CUMMING
.   .   .   Co-ordinator
Preferential voting systems affected only one office: that of Sophomore Member.
Frene Ginwala led the ballot in lhat
race until the third count when third
choice votes from Frank S/.ende and
Pat Taylor swept Elva Plant into
office.
Tween Classes
Thunderbird To
Issue Forth Once
More This Term
Editor of UBC's magazine,
The Thunderbird, D. K. Paul
hopes to produce another issue
>>f the popular magazine this
term.
Deadline for material hr*.
been set as Saturday, Febru-
u'V 19. Manuscripts should be
left in the Thunderbird Box,
Publications Offices, at the
Ne."th end of the Brock Hall
* *        *
Dr. J, G. Endicott will speak in Ap.
Sc. 202 at 12:30 today, February
10. His topic will be "A National
Peace Council." All club representatives are asked to meet Dr, Endicott.
the possibility of forming a "Uni-
in the SCM room at 1:30 to discus.-;
vei'.sily Peace Committee."
* * *
Nathan Landow and M'. Freeman
will debate against J, V. MacDonald
and Felicity Pope on the topic "Palestine" al Ihe UN meeting nn Tuesday,
['ehruairy   !:">.
Campus Politicos Clash
In  Elections  Wednesday
Campus political clubs will clash in the annual Mock
Parliament elections next Wednesday. Ballotting will be coincidental with the last of the AMS elections. Political party
representatives will outline their respective platforms and policies in the Auditorium at noon on Tuesday.
  "•'    Climaxing lhe series of AMS elec-
Side lights
Spoiled Ballots
Light in Last
Week's Voting
Spoiled ballots were very
light in last week's presidential
election, according to DaVe
Brousson, AMS president, who
released the figures today.
Here are the figures by ballot
counts:
First ballot count had eight spoiled
forms. Second count, revealed 12
spoiled ballots. Third and fourth
counts showed students knew little of
the procedure of preferential voting
when third count brought 41 spoiled
ballots to light and the final count
showed 54 spoiled ballots.
Students are reminded that in the
finalvoting next week they are re-
cpiired to mark each candidate by
choice. This is the fundamental procedure in preferential voting according to the election committee. It
guarantees that the wishes of most
students are adhered to.
Spoiled ballots were not known for
today's elections.
*
*
Three Rules For
Christian Living
Says Rev. Taylor
Young people of today have a
"greater responsibility than any
group of young people who ever inhabited the earth," Dr. Charles F.
Taylor told a meeting of the Var'sity
Christian    Fellowship    Wednesday.
Dr. Taylor, a noted evangelist of
Pasadena, California, is currently
giving a series of gospel messages at
First Baptist Church in Vancouver.
Known throughout lhe USA, the
United Kingdom and Canada, he is
,'eoprled to have preached al least
'2"iV. times a year since he was 13.
He gave his audience three rules
to achieve real happiness: Don't try
to please everybody by lowering
standards and ideals; try to get the
other fellow's point of view; and
don't be self centered.
His theme wa.s illustrated by a number of humorous stories which kepi
die audience in laughter much of the
lime.
The UBC Band under the leadership
of Arthur Del.imonl will present an
interesting concert at noun today in
lb-' Auditorium. Plan In bo there,
ymi   won't   want   tn   miss   it.
lions during which all candidates
have carefully avoided political issues, the Mock Parliament elections
will evoke attempts campus politicians
to revive the storm of political controversy which raged at UBC last
year.
Thc Mock Parliament will be one of
tlie features of University Week this
year and in co-operation with the
Open House Committee, thc four
political clubs have promised a well
dressed up show. Party leaders are
inviting   local    politicians   to   attend.
Apart (rom the usual joker bills
which will undoubtedly be introduced,
thc session will discuss a program of
education embodying a debate upon
the possible extension of DVA aid
to cover all deserving .students.
Party leaders are to have platform outlines into the Publication
Board   office   by   noon   tomorrow.
Dept. of Transport
Needs Forecasters
Civil Service Commission announces
il. has vacancies for immediate appointment lollowing graduation I'or
Meteorologists and Assistant Meteorologists.
Qualifications for Meteorologists are
honor standing in mathematics, phys-
i,s. engineering physics or any ruiil-
buialion of ibo-c Mibjert... Assistants
u.'.'.sl have !,radii.iled Willi rreegni/r, 1
.-•landing in inalb ,a.,| ph ".ie.. eoni'sea
Sal,ilia,,   beg'Il   ,,t   al.Vl!   pi A    ali.illlll.
Norm Minty, candidate for coordinator, started a "beer and pretzels"
campaign in, an offsided way when
he offered "hot tea" or as he termed
it "Mint Tea" to all visitors to his
lent on the main mall Monday and
Tuesday.
Ho ran out of his campaign cards
early in the day but that deterred
him not—he started handing out
plain tea bags—or Mint Tea bags.
If, if. If.
Aggies capitalized on yesterday's
elections to sell apples for their memorial fountain fund.
In a third attempt to raise funds
for their memorial fountain, Aggies
huckstered apples on the campus
yesterday.
Due to the weather, parade plans
were cancelled and the farmers contented themselves with beseiging the
AMS voters with cries of "don't vote
on  an  empty stomach."
The fund, which has been growing
for the last, three years, will be used
to erect a fountain in honor of Pro-
lessor Buck, who landscaped the
campus,
The proposed site for the fountain is
in the pool in front of the library.
Said one apple salesman "It'll be
handy to dunk Artsmen in."
More Elections on  page 3)
UBC Band Concert
Noon Today in Aud.
The UBC Band under Mr. Arthur
Delamont, noted Vancouver Bandmaster, will present a program of
popular band music in the Auditorium   today  at. noon.
This is the first concert the band
has presented in several years and
if it is successful more may be presented in the future. Numbers included
in  the  program are:
Light Calvary  Overture
F.  Von  Suppe
I'm Getting Sentimental  Over You
—Gershwin
Alice  Blue   Gown
McCarthey and Tierney
Somebody  Loves Me
—Gershwin
Victor  Herbert  Favorites
—Herbert
Fl  Charro  (A  March)
—Travers
Star Dust — Carmichoel
Mexican  Hat   Dance —Bennet. Page 2
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
The Daily Ubyssey
Member Canadian University Press
Authorized as Second Class Mail, Post Office Dept., Ottawa. Mail Subscriptions—$2,50 per year.
Publi.'iht-d  Ihroujdiout the university year by the Student Publications Board of the  Alma
Mater   Society   of   the   University   of  British   Columbia.
If. If. If.
Kdiloriul opinions expressed herein are those of the editorial staff of I'he Daily Ubyssey and
not necc.Miarilv   those of  the  Alma  Mater  Society  nor of  the  University,
* if, if.
Officer, in Diock Hall. Phone ALma 1(124 For display advertising phone ALma 3253
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF - - - - RON HAGGART
MANAGING EDITOR - . - - VAL SEARS
GENERAL STAFF: Copy Editor, Laura Haahti; News Editor, Bob Cave and Novia Hebert;
1'eatuie:: Editor, Rny Baines; CUP Editor, Jack Wasserman; Photography Director, Ellanor Hall;
Spurts  Editor, Chuck  Marshall;  Women's Editor,  Loni  Francis.
tf. if, if,
F.dilor This Issue - ART WELSH
Down At The Bottom
letters to the editor
Now that UBC's administration ha.s plowed
down through the lop three feet of building
plans they should be uncovering a set of
blueprints that were "filed and forgotten"
in the frantic rush for accommodation. These
call, for an extensive road-building and pipe-
laying program lo link the peninsula campus
with the rest of British Columbia.
For the past five years wherever maps of
the endowment lands were displayed they
showed two traffic arteries through the bush-
lands from Sasamat to the university proper,
one from Sixteenth Avenue and lhe other
originating at Twenty-fifth.
The tremendous amount of. morning and
evening  traffic  carried  by   the  three  routes
already in operation and the resulting confusion should point up the necessity of beginning work on the projected routes as soon
as possible.
A second by-product of the understandably
rapid expansion is the dangerous lack of
hydrant water. The monotonous regularity
with which buildings are being thrown up
and burned down may well reach disastrous
proportions unless mqre adequate facilities
are provided.
A coordinated expansion program cannot
afford to ignore either of these two essential
features, Now that the accommodation problem is well on its way to a solution students
would like to see the administration turn its
attention to these other aspects.
Blame The Weatherman
Any students on the campus who think
that the weatherman ha.s done them dirt because they missed a lecture one day or had
their car stuck ought to get in touch with
Graduate Manager Olo Bakken and find out
just how much trouble the weather can
cause,
With the Men's Athletic Directorate budget
badly slashed at, the beginning of the fall
term, officials decided that, an all out campaign should be staged to make football and
basketball pay enough of a surplus to support
'f'the minor sports.
Consequently   no   pains   were   spared   to
arouse interest in the games, both downtown
: anrl on the campus.   Special events, flowers,
pri/.c.s and  beauty contests  were  all  offered
to entice the public into the stadium or gym,
Every angle was covered and Bakken could
sit back and feel with reasonable assurance
that  people wore going to come out,
However,   the   one   factor   that   the   lanky
' promoter   could    not    conli'ol,    the   weather,
turned againsl him at every possible occasion
it seemed.
After the football .season wa.s over, it was
calculated that some of Vancouver's famous
liquid sunshine has fallen at six of the eight
games with the result that even the best
promotion in the world could not drag the
borderline fans into the grandstand.
. As if that wasn't enough Bakken has figured that his receipts for the basketball
games have been inversely proportional tc
the amount of snow that has fallen since the
cold snap started last December 10 and with
a little wind and ice thrown in for good
measure.
There were worries al the beginning of the
Evergreen Conference play that the untried
'Birds could  not make a good enough show
to bring out the fans.
Now with the hoopsters' performance falling just short of the most optimistic predictions, Jack Frost has managed to do what
other teams in the conference could not clo.
keep the benches of the gym empty,
A.s Bakken pessimistically remarked the
other day, "I think that the weather has cost
us about $2000 so far this year."
etters to the editor
DRIVING LESSON
Editor, Daily  Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
Yes, I have an axe to grind but
also a little constructive advice to
put   forth.
I consider  myself fortunate  to  be
my car once  in  the rear, once into
the left fender in front.
As there is ample space usually
around my car I conclude we have
one or more motor morons on the
campus.
A word to those who drive out
here, in the icy weather. Remember
first there is no hurry you probably
aren't going anywhere anyhow,
second, you do slide when you
brake severely, and third, you can
f.et over ice easier in high gear.
To these characters I say, learn to I am sorry to say these three con-
able to motor to and from the drive, this proving too much for ccpts arc in the realm of the un-
campus but I am beginning to won-       yi>u,   lake   tho   jolly   trolly. known   to some  people.
der  just  how  fortunate.
-r,    ,      ,, .    , , „ 1   realize   I   am   not   the   only   to Sincerely,
bo lar Ibis term my car has sun-     ,
o(d    previous    bodily    harm,    total      -s'-dTer  in  this manner, but someone Ronald A. Perkins,
a2.'i. Twice someone has backed into      has  to  protect  this sari  situation. 4th Year Arls
HALLELUJAH!
Editor, Daily Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
My views differ from that of the
writer 'An Unbeliever' in that I
believe that there is a God and that
He is perfect. Because of this perfection He can not be unjust. As
a perfect God he created the world,
but because of His perfection He
made His creature, man, not as an
automaton but as a free man to
love Him through knowing Him.
To say that God were unjust in
punishing those men who disobey
lhe few laws He gave to man would
be to deny His perfection. Because
of His deep and perfect love'for His
creatures He is the more deeply hurt
when He is offended, just as those
who love us most are the more
deeply hurt when we offend them.
But His punishment must come to
those that disobey Him just as the
supreme reward must come to those
that obey Him, or His justice would
nol be perfect.
As most of the ills of the world
come through failure of man to comply with God's laws, we have to
blame man for our troubles; but
those that love their God and obey
Him can rest assured that God's
perfect justice "will reward them
and punish those that made this
wordly   life  such  a   trial.
It seems to be one of the peculiarities of man that he sets himself
up as a God deserving of divine
tribute and freedom of worldly
cares. It is oerhaps unfortunate
that man can r*>t have everything
he wants. But :,i man were made
by a perfect God it must have been
for a purpose. Thus what we want
may not always fulfill the purpose
of our existence and so is not essential to our well being, even though
it be desirable.
To an 'unbeliever' this may appear
an so much drivel, but it is not
offered as proof for belief but only
to indicate that the love of a Supreme Being i.s on an infinite scale,
a.s i.s His mercy and His justice,
"Javimo"
EDEN AGAIN
Editor-in-Chief,
The Daily Ubyssey,
Sir:
1 am writing in reply to a letter
in thc Daily Ubyssey of February 2
from D. Clark, to clear up several
misunderstandings regarding Mr.
Eden's appearance on the campus.
In the first place, it ha.s been the
policy of the Students' Council to
encourage as many outstanding men
as possible, from every walk of life
and political ideology, to seak on
the campus.
In the present instance, the United
Nations Club attempted to arrange
for Mr. Eden to visit UBC, and their
efforts having no results, I personally asked Dr. MacKenzie to help
us  make arrangements.
Mr. Eden notified thc University
that he would be happy to speak
here, but that his heavy schedule
necessitated a morning appearance.
For this reason, feeling that Mr.
Eden's position as one of the outstanding statesmen of the work!
during the past fifteen years, justified an exception, the Faculty
Council cancelled lectures so that
all students might attend his speech.
The Students' Council wishes to
thank the administration for their
co-operation in whal we feel wa.s a
fin* contribution to this year's campus  activities.
Yours very truly,
ALMA MATER SOCIETY
David M. Brousson,
President.
Out Of Nowhere
Il is with increasing concern that I have
noticed the cunenl Irend to appraise everything in terms of ils practical advantages or
disadvantages. As an advocate of return to
llu- beaultlul, a:: a well-schooled artsman, as
a defender of the Romantics, 1 find this preoccupation wilh ugly realism at least disconcerting.
Take, for example, this snow we have been
experiencing of hilc. To most .shallow-minded
people il i.s only an inconvenience, an "adverse wealiu-r condition". Can they not see
its all-einhraeitr-. beauty? Can they not let
d, om'oilerl pin i'.y clasp lliem in its snowy
ho-om? Ia il no possible lo iorgel the minor
Ireuble.s il Inin-s and glory in its chastening
elleei on an uc'y world? Oh, if only Bli.-,s
t 'armen  were le -re  lo say  i!   for  me!
'! H illual i ale : iy nieanin-.1, let m- lake you,
diar reader, hair. In lhe murniue a lew days
.'.go y.lii'ii  I .-;i"p M-il  in\   e.ir nn  lhe univer.-dly
hoiile\,
lal.ill"
I i I'll   a
11. d i uc,   a
Ui   c
'll'vey     lhe     aCeile     'if     bl'Oalll-
!>i ' ad before me.   Whal bad
' ■■',   a    a. I'o s ,   di.-d i<;i:i'einenl    nf
"I   "1    man':,   al rim-de   ,i"aiu. I
man, had become lo me lovely albescence 1n
gentle contours of rolling splendour.
Transfixed before its radiant magnificence,
I did not notice a bus which had come to a
slithering stop behind my car and which
shattered the morning stillness with its raucous horn. Here was my chance, I thought,
to direct another's thoughts from the petty
thinking of practical things to the freedom
of natural beauty. I stepped out of my car
and walked quickly back to the rude gross-
ness of this thing, thi.s infliction on the quiet.
disarray of nature's triumph.
"My good friend," I began, "pause a little
and look at what is spread in radiance before
you, How can you be so anxious to pass by
thi.s gentle mantle of soul-stirring purity?"
The fellow's jaw dropped and a look of
malignant hatred spread over his worn features.
"Mantle! Purity! If you don't get that
!.;oddam crock off the road quick, I'll bounce
il onto lhe lourlh green in one stroke."
Vou ,-ee whal I mean, don't you? Here
w a-; a man who throws nature's gift, to man
bael.   in  her  lace.   Willi  a  vicious  lurch  the
OR ELSE!
Editor,  Daily  Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
1 am sending this letter as a
reprimand to the I*§E which is responsible for the handling, or I may
rather say, mishandling of Max Edward's concert. Max, a 4th year'stu-
dent, is giving a piano recital on
Wednesday evening, February 9th.
This recital has received no publicity in either The Ubyssey or the
downtown papers.
For any one who has worked so
hard and long as Max, in order to
perfect his playing, it is indeed a
very great disappointment to find
an audience of empty seats. I do not
know the name or names of the
people responsible for the ingratitude shown to a student who has
sacrificed his lectures, spare time
and linancial remuneration in order
to win honour for the University,
hut whoever he or they may be,
they may feel ashamed at the way
they have publicized Mr. Edward's
concert. I, for one, hope that all
these budgets are thrown out of
the offices which they are so incompetent in fulfilling.
Yours trujy,
» S. Dales,
2nd year arts
WE AIN'T DOOD IT
Dere Mr, Haggart:
Scein as how sum uv th guyf
n gals at yestidaze Pep-meet(for
the Farmers' Frolic) mite git th
ro'ng impreshun, we uv the ' Aggie Undergrad Society figgereel we
butter strayton out a few things.
Th ackshuns took by sum eleck-
shun candidates aft the Pep-meet
wur in no whey indorsed by us'n.
Eleckshun candidates who appeared
on the platform did not receive
permishun frum the eggsekutive.
Evun th tickuts wich wus gived
away wur a presunt uv the stud-
unts' cownsil an not the Aggie Undergrad Society.
We hope any  1 cumming to th
f.-olic on  thursday will  ware old
clothes an not eleckshun banners.
X Homer Quiney
fourth year agriculture.
Thursday, February 10, 1949.
^^^^^—m****mmmm*mmm^mm**M^a^*m*~-m**W*mmm^*^^~*mmmm^****'
SIGNBOARD
Meetings
UBC   DANCE   CLUB   THURSDAY,
Tango   instruction,   HM5   12:30.   Practice session HG4 1:30-3:30.
THE SCM INVITES YOU TO A Discussion on missions with Dr. H, Y,
Chang at a supper meeting at 0 p.m.
Friday, February 11th at Canadian
Memorial United Church, 16th and
Burrard. Coffee and ice cream served.
Bring your lunch.
GLEE CLUB REHEARSAL THURS-
day. Febrdary 10 HM 1 at 12:30. Girls
and tenors needed. Guest soloist.
SCOTTISH, COUNTRY DANCE CLUB
meeting at noon today Hut G4. Running shoes or stoqkinj soles necessary.
AN AUTHORATXVE, UP-TO-THE
minute picture of "What the Russian
People Think About War" js given in
the Christian Science Monitor of January 11. This international daily news-
'.paper may be read in the Christian
Science Studyfoom in Hut Bl behind
the Brock.
ALL MEMBERS OF THE NFCUS
public-assisted tours committee and
anyone interested meet in the double
committee room, south Brock Thus-
day,  February  10 at 12:30.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZ-
ation UBC cordially invites you to attend its Friday noon meetings, which
include testimonies of Christian Science Healing. Arts 207 at 12:301
Lost
Miscellaneous
WANTED: 4 GIRLS AS WAITRESSES
and chambermaids at summer resort
,on Gulf Island. Must be able to work
from June 15 to end of August. See
UBC Employment Bureau for particulars.
FOR SALE-GENTS' TAILORED
tweed overcoat size 38-40 as new. 1658
6th St. New Westminster. G. A. Bryan,
$25.
WANTED-A CHORE EOY FOR
summer resort, on Gulf Island. Must
be able to drive, look after boats,
and be a general handy man. For particulars see UBC Employment Bureau.
Rides
ATTENTION LITTLE MOUNTAIN
and 41st Ave. drivers: 1 or 2 rides
wanted from UBC to or near Little
Mountain Monday to Friday at 5:30
Saturday 12:30. Phone Herb KE 0023
or see No. 1 Trailer at Camp.
WANTED-RIDE FOR 8:30 LECTURE
from Beach Avenue. Phone John
Oldham, MA 5903.
WANTED: RIDE FOR TWO FOR
8:30's Monday, Wednesday and Friday from West End. Phone Rik, MA
6861.
Accommodation
FOR SALE-A HOME AWAY FROM
home for male student; near transportation and campus, 15th and Dunbar. AL 1971M.
SIX ROOMS IN SASAMAT DISTRICT
a nice family home or would make
good revenue home. Phone AL. 1635R
or phone BA 6102L.
APPROXIMATELY $65 AT THE IN-
ter-fraternity  banquet  Monday   evening.   Finder  please   return   to  Lost
and Found Office at pub board.
BETWEEN HB 3 AND FORT CAMP.
One black exercise book. Please return to Last and Found.
PAIR     PLASTIC     HORN-RJMMED
glasses  in   brov/n   leather,   felt-lined
case. Please phone BA 8245R or leave
at Lost and Found.
ONE GREEN SHAEFFER LIFE TIME
pen. I still have the top. Will finder
please phone Walt, BA 1347L.
WOULD    PERSON    WHO    TOOK
wrong   greatcoat   and   wallet   from
HMCS    Discovery    Monday    please
phone West 879Y.
APP. SC.,204 MONDAY, FEBRUARY
7 notebook for physic 403, 406 and' 7.
P. C. Gilmore Hut 20 rm. 6 Fort Camp.
Reward.
LOST A BLACK PARKER FOUN-
tain pen between Applied Science
building and Brock Hall on Monday,
February 7. Please return to Daily
Ubyssey office. Owner can identify
thi.s pen.
LOST IN SNACK SHOP, BJ^ACK
loose-leaf with important notes and
e.'-'say. DE 2270. ,
A PHI KAPPA SIGMA PIN. PLEASE
i ei urn to Lost and Found or phone
DE 0345.
SET OF KEYS IN OR NEAR CAF.
Return to pub office please. K. Williams, AL 1641R.
CALCULUS  BOOK.   PLEASE  CON-
tact Doug Basus, KE 3873T.
ONE LIGHT BROWN PEN WITH IN-
itials   'MTL".   Would   finder   please
contact Art at BA 2477L.
EVERSHARP PEN BETWEEN ACA-
dia and UBC Thursday. Initials W.B.
on shank. Reward.
WOULD  THE   GENTLEMAN  WHO
has my slide rule please contact Dayn-
ard  Welsh at KE 2546R or leave at
Lost and Found. Urgent,
WILL THE PERSON WHO PICKED
up  Pyschology  201  essay  by D.  D.
Jones that was left in Ap.Sc. 100 please
turn in to Dr. Black.
WILL  PERSON WHO  PICKED UP
K  and  E slide  rule  in  "Totem"  on
Tuesday morning kindly return same
to Pub. Office.
driver hurled his monstrous vehicle up on
the curb and drove off cursing, the tires cutting cruel slashes in the unsullied blanket of
whiteness.
Later in the day, I approached a chap who
was occupied in clearing the stuff from the
various walks about the campus.
"Ah, you're a lucky man," I said in the
friendliest of tones, "while I'm forced to stay
indoors in an angular prison, here are you
permitted to frolic unrestrained in all this
snowy brilliance.  You are indeed fortunate,"
Though I sustained a nasty head wound
as he swung his shovel at me, I fell proud
that I had perhaps brought a little joy into
his life. If only he could have been shown
how his blue hands, and red nose blended
against the background, he perhaps would
not have been so bitter. Realization of the
beautiful can overcome most things.
On another occasion, I wa.s trudging in
joyous freedom though a snow-swept field,
virgin and unstained, when I came upon a
man crawling about in happy freedom, revelling bodily in the cold, white beauty, Here,
at   last,  was a soulmatc.   I  ran  towards him
by ray baines
gaily.
''Greetings, friend, I see that you too share
in an appreciation of all this beauty."
"Beauty, hell," he said bitterly, "I'm looking for my wife, And if you were half a man
instead of a 'snow nymph' you'd give me a
hand.   She was here a minute ago."
Once again I suffered a disillusionment as
I reluctantly agreed to help the man. How
these little cares can take the place of the
sheer wonder of nature's work, I cannot understand.
In any case I shall go on enjoying this
glorious beauty which man has so meanly
rejected. I shall endeavour to point the way
by example recognizing a blessing when it
comes in the form of graceful purity.
1 hope that my message gets to all those
unappreeiative people who need  its wisdom.
My sincerity is evident in that I'm writing
these words from, my sick bed (I seem to
have caught a serious cold somehow) in the
hope that I can clo some good even though
1 wrile by candlelight (lhe vicious, capitalist
power company has curiailed my electric
light.) Thursday, February  10,  1949
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
Page 3
First Count Trend Shows
Slight Voters' Preference
A poll by poll count of first ballot totals showed Kay
MacDonald, George Cumming, Peter de Vooght. and Frene
Ginwala far in the lead in the race for Secretary, Co-ordinator
of Activities, Junior Member and Sophomore Member, respectively.
Here in full tabulation showing how sludents voted on the
first ballot:
How You Voted For Secretary
McKinnon
M. .McDonald
K. MacDonald
Manning
Greene
S.
Audit
239
97
297
184
70
2
Brock
    79
77
112
131
69
0
Aggie
    16
47
6,3
53
17
1
Phys	
    83
50
98
141
45
0
Ap.   Sc,
    70
,r)8
80
70
24
0
Total
487
329
650
579
225
How You Voted For Junior Member
Freeman   DeVooght   Lee   McTnggurt   S.
Audit
Brock
Aggie
Phys.   .
Ap. Sc.
Total   ..
118
327
248
285 i
11
110
172
79
96
5
40
57
37
59
4
84
122
93
110
4
46
138
55
.   60
3
4(14
816
512
510
27
How You Voted For Coordinator
Thurston   Cumming   Minty   S.
Audit
Brock
Aggie
Phys.   .
Ap. Sc,
Total
  290
426
169
5
         145
201
119
1
    70
69
57
0
  113
161
117
3
  138
95
70
2
  775
952
532
11
How You Voted For Soph Member
Audit    .
E'rock
Aggie
Phys.
Ap, Sc.
Total   	
S—Spoiled.
At Lost!
Newmans Find
Average Student
Alma Murphy and Johnny Fedyk
were announced winners of Newman
club average opinion poll to find Mr.
and Miss Campus opinion.
Miss Murphy and Mr. Fedyk, who
answered Newman club questions
with answers closest to the ideal, will
bc guests of honor at the Valentine
dance in the Brock, February  11.
Both winners agree good looks arc
not essential in a date but Alma
states, "If he is late subtly let'him
know it so that he feels embarrassed."
When his girl friend is late Johnny
next time, "asks her to be ready one
half hour before the appointed time."
Taylor
S/ende
Hunt
Ginwala   S.
  146
102
320
304        12
  102
75
118
165          5
    58
40
42
54         2
  107
75
88
142         4
    80
41
70
•111          3
  493
333
638
786        26
"Was US Justified'.'
Asks Varsity Forum
"Was the US justified in refusing
Stalin's offer to talk peace?" was the
topic of Wednesday's University
Radio Forum program, to be broadcast over CJOR on Sunday at 7:00
p.m.
Dave Williams and Ray Dewar defender! America, Ronald Smith and
T'-ni  Beans opposeri.
Williams said that Russia was restricting the places of meeting to
Russia or satelite countries, that she
wa.s ignoring other countries and that
we need not consider Russian peace
offers until the Soviets adopt more
peacelike policies.
Smith stated that America had
lost with Roosevelt, her one claim
to an "intelligent foreign policy." He
referred to American policies that
might well be construed by the Russians as being antagonistic and warlike.
Totem 949
. . . Will Be On Time
Order   Yours Now
SCM Missionary
Featured af SCM
Week-end Camp
"The Christian Basis for Political
Action" is to be the theme of a SCM
weekend camp to be held at Crescent
Beach February 12-13.
Dr. H. Y, Chang who is the Mission-
cry secretary of the SCM of Canada
will be the leader of this spring retreat.
Dr. Chang is a graduate of Nanking University in the Arts and
Theology. He received his doctorate
in sociology from Cornell University.
Prior to his corning to Canada he was
professor of sociology at Yenching
University. At present Dr. Chang is<g>.
working on a book entitled "The
Challenge of Changing China," which
i.s an attempt to reevaluate Chinese
culture and philosophy from a Christian point of view and in relation to
modern sociology.
"The Challenge of Changing China"
is to be the subject of Dr. Chang's
first address to students on Friday
in the auditorium at 12:30.
Dr, Chang has also had considerable
experience as an editor for since 1934
he has been editor of "The Christian
Farmer" which has had a significant
influence on Chinese rural life.
At present he is also head of the
Literature department of the North
China Christian Rural Service which
is directed by six denominations.
The SCM weekend is to begin on
Saturday evening at supper after
which Dr. Chang will direct student
thinking toward the Christian approach to social and political action.
Sludents who wish to attend the
camp are advised by the SCM to
check with their office in the auditorium about transportation arrangements.
DR. H. Y.  CHANG
.  Missionary   Secretary
In 1940—excluding Quebec—there
were five thousand (1 in 10) employed school teachers in Canada
who lacked the minimum profesion-
al qualifications,
 ~—.——— *	
Canada's first ten cities, in order of
population, are: Montreal, Toronto,
Vancouver, Winnipeg, Hamilton, Ottawa, Quebec, Windsor,, Edmonton,
Calgary,
Commies Failed
Labor and Worker
American capitalism and Russian
Communism were verbally spanked
yesterday by Willian H. Mahoney,
western director of Canadian Congress
of Labor, when he spoke on campus
under the auspices of the University
CCF club.
He charged that communists had
failed labor, stating that communists
working in the labor union are not
acting in the interests of Canada's
working men.
"Labor can be more unified, useful
interest of democracy without the
totalitarianism of the left, or the
totalitarianism of the right," he said.
B.C.'s goernment was attacked for
allowing free-enterprise capitalists,
such as H. R. MacMillan to "gouge thc
people," when there should have been
an excess profits tax imposed on them.
He deplored thc belief in the world
that communism wa.s the only alternative to capitalism, and said that the
road of social democratic labor blazed
by Australia and Great, Britain was
similar to President Truman's desire
tor world wide human welfare.
News Caster
Speaking On
Campus Monday
Next Monday, students will
have the opportunity of hearing the first Canadian foreign
correspondent to go overseas
in the last war.
Bob Bowman, an internationally known authority on
foreign and national affairs
will speak at* 12:30'Monday in
the stage room of Brock Hall.
Mr, Bowman is well known in Vancouver because of his daily news analysis, "Report on Today", heard
every evening over CKMO.
He is well qualified to speak on his
subject, The Work of the Foreign
Correspondent in Radio, having worked as news editor for the BBC during the war, in Europe and the Far
East.
His wealth of experience as a
foreign correspondent includes seven
years as reporter for the CEC, part
of which time was spent in Canada,
He has worked with the NBC and
CBS, and has covered the news in
Geneva, Paris, London, Rome and
most of the European capitals.
At the zenith of activity in Europe,
Mr. Bowman was the first Canadian
war correspondent in Europe, anrl wa.s
there with General MacNa.ughton's
troops.
Later, Bowman worked in connection with the British Office of Information in Australia and New Zealand, and spent three years in Washington,  D.C.
With this wealth of experience and
picaresque adventure to draw from,
Mr. Bowman was still able to choose
the one period in his career that he
that Bowman recalls with the greatest
enjoyed the most. The newspaper job
fond remembrances were his years
as Sports Editor of the McGill University paper.
The province of Prince Edward
"The object of labor in Canada," Island has an area of 2,184 square
he said, "is that capital should serve miles, one-sixth the size of Vancou-
society, not society serve capital."       I ver   Island.
JACQUES  SINGER
. . . Symphony Master
UBC LSE has decided to feature the Vancouver Symphony
again at noon on Friday. 2500
students lined up from the
Armouries to the Administration Buildings to attend the
last concert.
Friday's program, the fourth
in the University series, will
be full length and include a
mixture of "Pops" and heavy
classical   items.
U of Man. Cancels
Annual Color Night
WINNIPEG - (CUP) - University
of Manitoba Student Council has had
to cancel its plans for their annual
Color Night and abolish all the
awards that go with it.
The move was prompted by a lack
cf council's funds due mainly to increased costs of operation and poor
box office, response to student productions.
As a result of this move, and other
whole-hearted slashing of expenses,
the council hopes to end the year
with a surplus.
VALENTINE GIFT SUGGESTIONS
CUPIDS GIFTS TO WIN HER HEART
HOSIERY
.  .   ,  For  Her Valentine  Gift.
15 denier,  next to nothing in
flattery. Cobweb sheer nylons.
$2.50 pair
30 denier, dressy and practical
$1.85 pair
GLOVES
Grandeur   personified   in   Fine   French   Kid
Gloves. $4.95 pait-
Fine Kid evening length gloves in white and
black only $7.49 to $9.95
COSTUME JEWELRY
Exquisite heart-shape earrings, bracelets,
necklaces and pins with tiny rose enamel
inserts.  Made by Coro. $2.95 - $3.95
(Plus Tax)
PURE SILK SQUARES
She'll   say   you're   a   Sweetheart,   when   you
present  her with  a  beautiful  pure  silk scarf.
$2.95
Accessories,   Woodward's
Main   Flour
TA. 5231
Store Hours: 10 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.
_j Page '4
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 10, 1949.
'Birds  Meet  Loggers,  Rangers
In Crucial Weekend Series
TOWERING HOOPSTER with the College of Puget Sound
Loggers, Rod Gibbs, a long 6 foot, 7 inch chunk of basketball
player, is seen "jumping" with team-mates Bill Stivers and
Bob Angeline, guards with the Loggers. 'Birds meet the
Lumberjacks this Friday night on the UBC maples.
SPORTS EDITOR — CHUCK MARSHALL
Editor This Issue-KAY FROST
Thunderette Skiers
L
eave
For T
ourney
Eight Femmes Plan Squad To
Compete in American Meet
UBC's aspiring girl ski en
for Emida,  Idaho  to  compete
collegiate meet.
Race will consist of a Giant Slalom
event only. The girls, Anne Hatton,
Jo Castillou, Bev Robertson, and Shirley Welsh, will try their strength
against seven other colleges, all of
which are American.
thusiasts leave Thursday night
in  their second  all-girl  inter-
STRONG SQUADS
Winners of several local championships so far this year the four students
will pit their abilities against such
strong squads as the University of
Washington and the Washington State
College. The former group is sponsoring the meet.
Susie Harris of the University of
Idaho and Mary Alice Peel of Washington State College will bo the
toughest duo Varsity foursome will
have to contend with. These two entrants were spares on the US ski team
during the recent Winter Olympics.
FAST TIME
Having set very fast times in their
city and zone championships recently,
however, the UBC girls will be no
pushover.
The eight collides making up the
tournament are: the University of
Washington, Washington State College, the University of Idaho, College
of Puget Sound, Gonzaga University.
Lewis and Clark College, and the
University of British Columbia.
With only one year of this tournament behind them, the meet has
turned into arogulqMM.^ie. Previously only three colli-'Wenterod in the
inter-collegiate ski event. Thi.s season
a total of eight contingents have notified  their   intended   presence.
SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING
CLUB
There, will be a meeting Thursday
noon in Hut GI. Running shoes, (,i
stocking sole.-, are necessary. All welcome.
'MURAL SWIM NOTICE
The Intermural swimming meet has
been postponed until la liar mi' in tie'
month. Elimination:-: will ho held mi
Monday, February 21 wilh the finals
on    Saturday,    I'Viu Hal ,\    l)(i.
Stop Press
Late Summary
Of Wednesday
Hoop Contests
UBC's twin entries in the Senior
A Men's Basketball League, Braves
and Chiefs, lost themselves all hopes
oi playoff berths last night when both
teams worn' down to defeat in their
home gym,
In the Chief's battle with New Westminster Luckies, the Frasortown crew
edged the students 63-58 in the best
game of the night while Eagletimes
remped over ihe hapless Braves with
a 71-46 whipping in a one-sided tussle.
Chiefs looked like they were going
to make a real bid for their spot in
the playoffs when they took an ear*?
first period lead, outseoring the winners Ki-12. But an over-powering
spurt' of energy by Luckies in the
second canto unnerved the students
lor the rest of the game. Racking up
25 points to the losers 14 put the
New Westminster crew ahead by a
wide margin and they never let ihe
Chiefs stage a comeback.
In tlie first half of thegame, the
losers went all out to overtake their
opponents but close checking resulting in 38 fouls between both teams,
kept scoring down to a minimum.
The luckless Braves fared even
worse, being subjected to a terrific
pounding by (he currently hot Eagle-
lime quintet. Out-hustling the losers
ir. the second quarter by sinking 26
counters lo Braves 11, Eagletime kept
up the spree to make it 7l-4(i at lhe
l"u:al  whistle,
In the Chief's game, Hudson took
full scoring honors marking up 16
points hy "Pop" Fay of the Luckies
with l.">. 'Mitchell of Chiefs and Beckotl
o1' the winners each tallied 14 markers.
■ i\ krs; ol F.i.eleiimes led the pack
vnh -4 points vahile the nearest eon-
•aiiaei., Were Psmim.iles Hoss-ons and
la llu.on  usih   In apiece .in<\  Sweii-on
nl    the    io a  !..   \u t 11   I).
Final Points
Computed For
'Bird Icemen
Young, Torfason Top
UBC Scoring Parade
Now that the Senior B
hockey league is all through
but the play-offs, the final
point standing for the UBC
Thunderbirds has been compiled.
Topping the list is the 'Birds flashy
forward Haas Young who has been
the team's playmaker all season long,
with 27 points.
For actual goals scored torch topped Lloyd Torfason headed the parade by sinking the rubber 18 times.
Four of the 'Bird icemen, Haas,
Torfason, Koch and Wagner all notched 21 points or over.
Victories Over Washington,
Seattle Boost Cagers' Morale
By GIL GRAY
UBC's Thunderbird basketball team will meet (he Loggers
of the College of Puget Sound thi.s Friday night at UBC with
ane factor on their side that has been lacking all year. A little
confidence.
1 Haas   Young
2 Lloyd Torfason
3 Bob Koch
4 "Wag" Wagner
5 Clare Drake
6 Fred Andrew
7 Bill Husband
8 Bob   Lindsay
9 Bob   Saunders
10 Terry Nelford
11 Stu Bailey
12 Ken  Hodgert
13 Jim Rowledge
14 Mac Porteous
G
18
18
17
P
27
23
23
A
9
5
6
11 10 21
5 6 11
8 10
5
4
5
6
2
6
2
3
The added belief in their own ability
came by way of the win against the
WWC Vikings last Saturday, followed
by the near loss Friday and then the
win Saturday over the Seattle University Chieftans.
BEAT EASTERN
Unknown to most UBC hoop fans,
the fact is that the Chieftans have
defeated the Evergreen Conference
leading Eastern Washington quintet,
and also the CPS Loggers who will
be here Friday.
The UBC chances look even better
when a glance at the records show
the Loggers to be a win-poor road
team, much like UBC.
And the 'Birda seem to have cured
a few of the faults that were their
downfall last January when they met
defeat at the hands of tho Loggers.
Principal among these being their
free-shot mania and their .slow breaking style.
TOWERING
The Lumberjacks attack will centre
around towering 6' 7" Rod Gibbs,
who is a transfer from University of
Washington, who spent last year, the
ineligible period, in independent ball.
Backing up the lank pivotman are
fireballing guards Bob Angeline and
E'ill Stivers, and smooth shooting forwards, Dick Brown and Bobby Finch-
am.
The rating of the Loggers, is high in
ihe Evergreen loop with only the
Central Washington Wildcats offering
any real competition to date.
HOLD CELLAR
The other team to arrive on thc
UBC maples for this weekend, the
Rangers of St. Martins College, is
currently helping Whitworth College
lo hold down the cellar in the loop.
After the 59-58 season opener that
tlie 'Birds dropped to thc Rangers at
I.aeey, Washington, the 'Birds will be
out for blood Saturday night when
the two teams tangle.
Added attraction to fans coming
out to the Friday night tilt on the
UBC maples will be a high school
prelim,
Last year's high school Invitational
Tournament winners, Magoe, will face
the cagers from across thc water,
the West Vancouver High quintet in
what is expected to be a thrill a
minute knock-down drag-out fight.
Awards Given
FOR FAST
PRINTING
SERVICE
For Any  Campus Activity
College
Printers
Printers of Thc Ubyssey
4436 \V. 10th        ALma 3253
Half Block From  Sasamat
LONG SHOT ARTIST with the Loggers from CPS, guard Bill
Stivers will be an important cog in the visitors' machine when
they attempt to make it two in a row this Friday night in the
UBC gym at eight o'clock. Loggers are currently holding down
a first division berth in the Evergreen Conference.
Second 'Bird Ruggerman
Applies For MAD Post
John "Junior" Tennant, prominent sportsman on the campus and former member of the MAD, has filed his nomination
for the office of MAD Treasurer.
Tennant, being a keen sport promo-
EXPORT
CANADA'S   FINEST
CIGARETTE     '
Golfers Meet
To Plan
Spring Season
Golf will return to the campus just as soon as the grounds
are clear of that over-abundant
white, powdery snow which
ha.s been the scourge of all athletic clubs in the past mojith.
With promising weather in sight the
weather man keeps telling us), the
optimistic Golf Club are starting out
early to make sure lhat they make
use of all their limited time as soon
as they have clear fairways.
With this in view, the club has
announced their first meeting of the
new year to be held on February 11,
at 12:30 at the south end of the Brock
upstairs.
Business for the coming year will be
the major issue, with full discussion
following on possible procedure. On
the more informal side, it has been
planned to present the prizes for the
Fah Tournament to the winners of
that meet.
Sold
»v»rywh»r«j
In handy r
tub»«
There's nothing like well-,
groomed hair to improve your(
appearance—and make a hit
with the girls! That's why
Brylcreem is so popular with
men everywhere .. . why it is
the largest selling hair dressing
in Canada! It in&tantjy
makes your hair smooth, well-
groomed, attractive—without
being smelly or greasy.
GIRIS—Brylcreem is an excellent dressing for your hair
too—try it!
FREE COMB
Get a special
Brylcreem
pocket-comb and case! Send an
empty Brylcreem carton with your,
name and address to:
Brylcreem, Department' SD
294 Richmond St. W.
Toronto, Ontario
Brylcreem
NO GUM • NO SOAP • NO AtCOHOl - NO STARCH
tor and enthusiastic supporter as
well as a top athlete, has expressed
the desire to keep in with MAD in
some capacity. With sport playing a
major role in the shaping of men on
this campus, "Junior'' decided to try
tc have his hand in its development.
Graduating from commerce this
spring, he intends to come back next,
fall for a law course.
During his four years on the campus
Tennant was a distinguished member
of the Thunderbird rugby team as
well as a member of the 1946 Canadian Football squad which won the
Hardy Cup. For his sport prowess,
hc  received  the Big Block.
Judging from the list of signers for
his nomination, the sports enthusiasts
of Varsity seem to think well of him
since 12 Big Block members applied
Iheir signatures tn tlie document.
IKHKLV   NOTICE
There will he an important meeting
of the hockey team in Ihe Gym on
Thursday   at    Vl.'M).   Everybody   out.
s' v    s   *«***. *\  s .
r»:
lv«"&
m*
•• «ss    ^
•5 >£**;
s'iSfi
<!*■*
I
-Enjoy

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0124622/manifest

Comment

Related Items