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The Ubyssey Oct 21, 1938

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Full Text

 Vol. XXI.
Published Twice Weekly by The Publications Board of The University of British Columbia
VAN0OT_IVERrBT0., FRIDAY, OOTOBER _u7T93iF
No. 9
CONSERVATIVE LEADER TO
ADDRESS STUDENTS TODAY
L
DR. MANION
HON. R. J. MANION . . Conservative leader wbo will address the
University atudent body today.
NEW PLAYERS
CHOSEN FOR
XMAS PLAYS
Once more the Oreen Room goes
into action as rehearsals start for
the Christmas plays. Practically all.
tho parts were allotted in the tryouts Monday afternoon.
In "Judge Lynch", the lead will
be taken by John Glenn, with Barbara Orlffln playing the part of
Bridget, the old nurse. The play will
be directed by Audrey Phillips, an
alumni member, who has played
leading parts In Player's Club productions of "Hedda Gabbler," "She
Stoops to Conquer," and "The Brontes."
ANOTHER JACK DALTON
The cast of "Good-Night Please,"
whioh will be directed by Mr. Oage,
is a modern farce. The cast includes:
Thomas Bailey, as Burton; and
Josephine Kennedy as Vivian,
daughter of Meredith, for whose part
BUI Nickerson and Jack Dorchester
will vie in a final try out.
The  sueeeas  two  year's  ago   of
A.   J.   Talbot's  comedy,   "Lucresia
Borgia's Little Party", haa prompted the olub to choose another by
tbe same author—"One Evening at
Nero's".   Nero's   mother   will   be
played by Jean Croll, and hla wife
by Aileen Dugan. Mra. Caple,  an
alumna member, will direct.
A mighty psychological drama will
be  directed by Prof. J. Morsh. Jim
Frasee will play the part of the atar
of   a  hit  play  which  has   just  concluded its 800th performance. Douglas   Worth   and   Sheila   Wilson   will
also play leading parts.
STRUAN PROTECTS
INFANTJNDUSTRY
Permission was refused by the Students' Council to the Washington
Choral organization to have performances on this Campus,
This refusal was recommended by
Struan Robertson, who thought that
since the Glee Club is a new organization this year, it would be better
to leave a clear field for it.
The competition will be much
keener if the visit ls postponed until
next year.
BRILLIANT   POLITICAL
BACKGROUND
The Hon. R. J. Manion, Leader of His Majesty's Loyal Opposition in the Federal Government and successor to R, B.
Bennett as head of the National
Conservative Party, will speak
at 11.55 a.m. today in the Auditorium, under tho ' auspices of
the Political Discussion Club.
On a national reorganisation tour
Which has carried him across Canada, Dr. Manion will be in Vancouver for a short time. In spite of the
fact that his time here waa filled
with engagements, nevertheless he
has consented to speak to the student body.
REVITALIZATION
Busy with the revltallzatlon of the
newly roused Conservative party,
Dr. Manion will deal with issues of
vital Interest to the student body.
Dr. Manion has a brilliant record behind him, making him one
of the most outstanding of Canadian polltleal figures. After a brief
Aldermanlc poet In Fort William
he   was   elected   to  the   Canadian
House of Commons In 1917.
During  the  War  he   served  overseas with the Army Medical Corps,
and after a distinguished career he
returned   to  Canada  to   hold   office
until 1033, when he headed the Canadian   delegation   to  the  League   of
Nations. In addition to thla position,
be was appointed as Canada's representative'at the Disarmament Conference.
Under the Melghen Oovernment
he held two positions: that of Postmaster-general, and that of Minister
of  Soldiers'  Re-establishment.
Until he left for Europe he was
Minister  of  RaUwaya  and Canals
ln the Bennett administration.
Dr.  Manion  will  be  Introduced  by
Dr.   L.   S.   Kllnck,   President   of   the
University, who stressed, when Interviewed by the Ubyssey, that students
must refrain from eating their lunches whilst listening to Dr.  Manion ln
the Auditorium.
THUNDERBIRDS VERSUS HUSKIES
HERBERT'S SERENADE
PROBABLE OPERETTA
No word has been received from
New York yet as to which opera the
Musical Society -will be permitted to
produce, but lt Is assumed that Victor Herbert's "Serenade" will be the
one.
Already, the orchestra ls practising
the overture of thla work and the
singers are learning their parts. The
production will be more umbitlous
than In former years because of increased  membership  ln  the  society.
According to Mr. Williams, the orchestra ls "well-balanced," and the
choruses are progressing well.
MILITARY MAN WILL
ADDRESS INSTITUTE
Homecoming on
CJOR To-night
All Star Program for Varsity
Time
This week's Varsity Time will be
dedicated to Homecoming and will
Include several novel features.
First   and   foremost   will   be   the
new radio character, Doris, a co-ed
who will present a humorous sidelight on the Cnlverslty broadcast.
The    program    includes   interviews
with Maury Van Vllet and Evan apRoberts.   A   detective   sketch,   written
by   Bob  Thomson,  will  be  presented
b^  Pauline  Scott,  Jack  Metford  and
Don McGuinn.
CAMPUS NEWS.
Highlights of general campus news
together with sports news will be presented by Basil Robinson and Van
Perry.
Musical Interludes will be provided
by a male quartette, David Somer-
vllle, Douglas Ford, Paul Hooklngs,
and Don Baker.
"Varsity Time" Is at 8.15 p.m. Friday over CJOR and ls directed by
Ozzy Durkin and his over-worked
staff.
:
CHEMISTRY STOREROOM
D
CAMPUS CLUBS
TO CONTINUE WITH
TENTATIVE BUDGETS
Pending the final consideration
of club budgets, eaeh campus society is asked to continue according
to its provisional budget. Due to
exceptionally heavy pressure of
Homecoming arrangements Students' Connell has not been able
to discuss the matter of the yearly
budget.
Bob Smith, A. M. S. treasurer,
does not expect. If the Hardy games
are successful, that there will be
many changes In club budgets.
THE CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT STOREROOM is shown
in the accompanying illustration. This storeroom handles all
apparatus, chemicals, etc, for Ohem. 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 9, and all research
labs., a total of approximately 700 students. There is but one full
time storekeeper to serve these 700 students. That storekeeper is
Jack Hunter, who, as any Ohem. student will tell you, handles
the supplies as promptly as any one man is able. Jaok is sometimes helped by Ken. West, and occasionaly by one of the other<
assistants. But an assistant must spend almost all of his time in
the labs., so Jack generally has to handle the 700 alone. As a
consequence, it is not at all uncommon to see a queue of 15-20,
students lined up outside the storeroom, waiting for apparatus^
and supplies, and it is not unusual for some of these students to
have to wait as long as 30-45 minutes, and sometimes longer.
General to Survey Research
Work
General G. A. McNaughton, CM.
O., D.S.O., M.Sc, LL.D., noted military man and member of the National Council of Canada, will be the
speaker at the Saturday evening
meeting of .the Vancouver Institute
this week. "The Role of Research in
industry" will be the subject of the
address which will be given ln Arts
100 beginning at 8.IS.
As lt is expected that there will
be an exceptionally large audience
attending the lecture a public address loud speaker will be placed ln
Applied Science 100 to relay the address to those who cannot be accommodated ln the Arts Building. Hon.
Justice A. M. Manson will be in the
chair.
This afternoon, under the direction
of Dr. R. H. Clarke, head ot the department of Chemistry, General McNaughton will make a tour of the
Science Building inspecting the various research projects which are being
carried on there. It is expected that
a number of regular labs will have
to be cancelled during that time ln
order that the research going on in
the class laboratories may be demonstrated.
SCHEDULE FOR
FOOTBALLERS
A special social program has been
arranged by Jean Stordy and Gil
Morrison for the entertainment of
the   Saskatchewan   Football   players.
BUND DATES
On their arrival Friay they ■will
be escorted to the Football Rally
by a group of the most beautiful
campus   blind   dates  available.
Saturday, foUowlng the rugby
game they will be guests of honor
at tbe Women's Undergrad Tea-
Dance and will take part ln all tbe
Home-coming functions for the remainder of the day.
Sunday afternoon the team will be
divided Into groups which will attend teas in various parts of the
city. Among the group of girls who
will be their hostesses are Betty
Moxon, Audrey Relfel and Nan
Thompson.
SOUP TO NUTS
Monday a drive on the North
Shore to the Pacific Properties and
Whytecllffe has been arranged.
Tuesday    evening-,    accompanied
by  their dates of  Saturday  night
the  players   will   attend  a   RoUer
Skating Party at the Forum. Thia
Party will be open to the Studenta.
Wednesday,     following     the     last
game of the  werlea,  the  players will
attend  a stag dinner  in  conjunction
with  the Rugby Club's Annual Banquet.
Spectacular Homecoming
To Welcome Graduates
A series of social functions designed to dazzle even the most
blase among Varsity's grads and students, finally gets under way
tonight when the Alumni Dinner is held in honor of graduates
who have come home to their Alma Mater.
SWING MUSIC
IN NEW CLUB
A Swing Club, for the "appreciation and understanding of Swing
music, as played by the masters", will
make its Initial appearance on the
campus this coming week.
Monday noon in Arts 104, the
"Bobcats", led by President Frank
Clark, will start negotiations for regular campus swing sessions.
Discussion of different modes and
moods ot swing music, both theoretical and practical, will be the main
consideration of this new campus
organization.
But what the executive wishes to
say ls, ln the Swing language: "All
alligators, who really want to get In
the groove, turn up at this first meeting. Let's declare war on campus
lcklesl"
VISITING OOAOH
COACH COLB McEOWAN . . of the
Saakatohewan Huskies who will
be playing the U.B.C. Thunder-,
birds In the classic football game
tomorrow afternoon In the Stadium.
FRENCH CONSUL
AWARDS SECOND
SCHOLARSHIP
A. E. Carter, B.A., who graduated
from U.B.C. last May with the Governor General's medal but without
any other substantial reward which
would assist him ln pursuing his
studies, -will receive a belated honor
at the Fall Congregation of the
University on October 26th, when he
Is awarded a 10,000 franc French
Oovernment Scholarship, the second
to be presented this year, tt was announced by the Senate following a
meeting Wednesday night.
SECOND   SCHOLARSHIP
The award is made, usually, each
spring by the French Oovernment
and ts designed to assist outstanding
students In attending the University of Paris for one year. The ■winner in May was Loyd Hobden, who
left  Monday  for  Paris  by  freighter.
In view of the fact that Carter, a
high ranking student, received no
monetary award, a fact ■which caused considerable comment in Vancouver newspapers, special representations were made to the French
Consul for Western Canada by Dr.
D. O. Evans,, head of the Dept. of
French, that a second scholarship
be awarded by the French Oovernment.
CONGREGATION   SPEAKER
The speaker for the Congregation
wilt be Dr. Ivor Jennings, visiting
professor ln the Dept. of Economics
for the year from the University of
London, and the London School of
Economics, where he was lecturer
in   English  Law.
More  than  seventy  degrees  will
be   conferred   at   the    annual    fall
ceremony.
ROYAL DINNER
The dinner to be held at the Georgian Dining Room of the Hudson's
Bay, is the first In a glittering galaxy
of events whloh are expected to provide the most unusual week-end of
entertainment ever staged at U.B.C.
The functions are the fruit of weeks
of careful planning and scheming
and are intended to welcome undergrads of former days in royal style.
ON TO THE BALLY
Second function of the week-end is
the monstrous Homecoming Rally
in the Crystal Ballroom. Thia will
follow the dinner at 9.00 p.m.
Ticket*  will be on sale   at tba
gate at only 00 eenta eaoh.    Tba
affair   will   be   strictly   Informal
with co-eds enjoying tbe privilege
of cutting In on visiting Huskies
whenever the little dears desire.
The celebrations then adjourn until   noon   Saturday   when    the    Big
Blook Luncheon will be held In tbe
cafeteria.    At   thla   event   the   Big
Blockers of today will welcome those
who preceded them as stars of oampus athletics.
SALT FOR THK BIROS
A tremendous turnout is expected
at the following event, the football match between Huskies and
Thunderbirds for possession of the
Hardy  Cup.
The match will be discussed  and
refrought at the Tea Dance scheduled after tbe game in the Oym.   It is
rumored Big Blookers will pour tea.
A  Dinner  tn   tbe  oaf  will  precede a theatre program presented
by the Flayers' Club. Tbe program
will be supplemented by a present,
ation of tbe Film Society.
Final event of the week-end will
be a basketball tilt ln the Gym which
begins Immediately after the plays.
The teams will be Varsity vs. Graduates.
CLIMAX
The celebrations do not end however, until the final game between
U.B.C. and U. of a This event will
climax Homecoming functions and
will be played Wednesday at 3.00 p.m.
It Is expected that students who
have energy left will then resume
classes while grads wend tbelr way
homeward, their memories of varsity
days freshened and augmented by a
memorable weekend at the scene of
their student life.
Noisy Dinner
for Big Blocks
Don't be surprised If our auditorium crumbles tomorrow at noon, it'll
Just be a case of sound shattering
poor   frail   walls.
The destruction is likely to start
at 12.30 sharp when pepsters start
to speed up heart beats with a monstrous pep meet, and should gain
momentum when Big Block members, new and old, commence munching below ln the "University Grill"
at 1.00 p.m.
In beetween a "Kla-How-Ya" and
a "locomotive," the Lettermen will
serve soup and special speakers. The
inspiration for the orators will thus
be supplied, but the delivery should
prove an Interesting Intrigue in vooal
manipulation.
However, Messrs. Maury Van
Vllet, Carson McGulre, Milton Owen,
President of Alumni, and Hal "Sport
Ray" Straight have bravely assured
undergraduate Big Block members
the they're willing to take a chance
on being heard above the din at the
dinner.
Quad est faclendam!
NOTICE
The Twelfth Autumn Congregation for the conferring
of degrees will be held on
Wednesday, October 28, at 2.45
p.m.. In the Auditorium.
All lectures and laboratories
will be cancelled from 2.2*i on
Wednesday, October 26.
L.  S.  KLINCK,
President. T^ro
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 21, 1938
THE  UBYSSEY
Issued twice weekly by the Students' Publication Board of the Alma Mater
Society of the University of British Columbia.
Office: 206 Auditorium Building ... Phone Point Orey 200
Campus Subscriptions, $1.00 Mall Subscriptions, $2.00
EDITOR-IN-OHIEF
Dorothy Cummings
Advertising Office
Standard Publishing Co., 1037 Pender Street West, Vancouver, B.C.
Telephone: SEYMOUR 4484
All advertising handled exclusively by Standard Publishing Co.
Editorials
WELCOME ORADS
It is with more than a uaual hearty welcome that we greet
the graduates returning home to their campus this year. First
of all we want them to enjoy themselves at this and have made
extensive plans for their entertainment. But what is more important we wish that they will remember our campus in its uncomfortably stunted condition of growth.
Graduates, if they would continually bear in mind that they
are graduates of U.B.C, could do an appreciable amount in gaining the sympathy of the British Columbia citizens for our institution. They could go a long way toward changing tho antipathy
which we all know is felt toward this university.
While they go about their daily business they could talk for
the university, and stress those points concerning the institution
whloh are most obviously valuable to the province.
NEW HEAD
SOUGHT BY
POLITICIANS
At the Monday meeting of the
Political Discussion Club, the following were elected to hold office for
the coming year: Darrel Braldwood,
speaker; Frank Wlggs, secretary;
Gloria Truswell, treasurer; and Jim
Ferris, publicity manager
The last name dofflce ls a newly
created one, designed to provide a
closer link between the Club and
students who are not members. The
office was created by an amendment
to the constitution, on the motion of
Robert Semple of the Conservative
party.
The question of the election of a
new honorary president, to replace
Prof. Gibson, who is no longer on
the campus, was left in the hands of
the  executive.
HOMECOMING
Friday, October 21:
"9.00 p.m.—Homecoming Rally, Crystal Ballroom.
Students with Passes: Single 50c; Couple 75c.
Alumni:  Guest tickets from Association.
Saturday, October 22:
12.30 p.m.—Homecoming Pop Moot, Auditorium—Free.
2.30 p.m.—Saskatchewan vs. U.B.C, Stadium.
Grandstand: General Public: $1.00 and 75c.
Students (with passes) : 50c.
Bleachers: General Public : 50c.
Students with passes: 25c.
4.30 p.m.—Tea-Donee, Gymnasium—50c couple.
6.30-7.30 p.m.—Homecoming Turkey Dinner—50c.
7.45-9.30 p.m.—Theatre Night—Free.
9.30-11.00 p.m.—Basketball, Alumni vs. Varsity—Free.
Mrs. W. 8. Morgan will give her
flrst lecture this year on Friday at
12.80 in Arts 208. The oourse is open
to all members of the Women's Public  Speaking Club.
LETTERS CLUB
The next meeting of the Letters
Club will be held on Tuesday, October 20. The club will meet at the
home of Mrs. Vanoe, 6026 Adera St.,
Instead of the address formerly announced.
TRANSPORTATION
Transportation wanted from vicinity of 49th and Marine. Contact
Audrey Chowne via Arts Letter
Rack.
UNDERGRAD   NURSES   SOCIETY
Don't forget the Fireside to be held
on Sunday, October 23, at B p.m.
at the home of Pauline MoMartln,
246S West Fifth Avenue—get off
street  car at Balsam  or Larch.
RADIO CLUB
Meeting of the Radio Club
on Friday noon in Arts 108.
It is important that every
member be present.
GIVEN AWAY FOR
AND PRIZES f25'/0<5
10 WEEKLY PRIZES OP *2J80
CLICK !
Your Way to $$
A few extra dollars a
week always come in
handy, especially in
these hard times—and
there's no easier way
of earning them honestly than to let your
trusty camera click for
you with tlie best T-
Shot of the Week!
TCONTEST
Here Are the Simple Rules
For five weeks, in the issues of November 1st, 8th, 15th, 22nd and
December 2nd, tho Ubyssey will print a prize-winning T-Shot.
The winner each week gets a cash prize of $2.50. Then Christmas
and the exams intervene. On five Tuesdays of the New Year
(January 17th to February 14th inclusive) the Ubyssey will run
five more cash prize-winning T-Shots.
THEN COME THE GRAND PRIZES:
When ten prize-winning T-Shots
have been run, the three best will
receive the Orand Prizes of $23, $10,
and $5. The Grand Prize Award
will appear ln the Ubyssey Feb. 28th.
So snoop around—let your camera
go candid ln a big way—snap the
Dean in an unguarded moment
running a spoon in his eye at a
Faculty    Tea—snap    the    battering
backfleld having tea ln the last-
period huddle—snap the Cutest
Thing on the Oampus, having tea
at a stirring moment. Send ln as
many T-Shots as you like.
Ubyssey   by   Friday,   October   28th.
Send your T-Shots in to the
They must be in by then to be
Judged for the following Issue of the
Ubyssey.
T-Shots Are Snapshots
T-Shots, of course, are photographs of people
drinking tea—any people—anywhere—any
time—as long as the tea is there.
SEND PRINTS TO "T-SHOTS", the UBYSSEY OFFICES,
Room 206, Auditorium.
*<s\\jtf/sy
_>v.
A   matter   worthy   of  considerable
cogitation   is   the   entire   system   of
writing essays. These
LECTURE IN     hurdles, placed ln the
ENGLISH 40      path of all advancing
students, must be
surmounted  successfully   by   aspiring   scholars   If   any
credit ls expected. True, no university
student ever expected credit for doing anything, but so-be-H.
Under present conditions the primary step in attacking an essay ls to
choose the subject. This simple task
can be easily accomplished by tearing
the essay list into at least fifty-three
pieces, placing these portions ln a
hat, and drawing them one by one
until the desired one ls obtained. If,
on the other hand, the first attempt
is a failure, destroy the hat and repeat the experiment.
The student should now be bursting with energy and enthusiasm, full
of beer, and absolutely disgusted with
the Library staff. Provided these
qualifications are amply fulfilled, the
ensuing stages ln the writing of the
literary gem become increasingly difficult. Subject matter is said to be a
necessity for the commencement of
the work, so the Library is usually
suggested as being the most suitable
place for unearthing a considerable
amount of dust.
Every essay writer Instantly dashes
to the Library, and with beating
heart descends into the bowels of this
suffocating structure to search diligently for enormous quantities of material. The invariable outcome of this
mad rush ls either that the essay has
f. heart attack and dies a horrible
writ(h)lng death, or that all the
reading matter has been surreptitiously removed  by some other worm.
Shattering though this disillusionment may be, the student bites off
.his tongue, and smelling a rat, nips
lt ln the bud by squealing to the
Library authorities. These harrassed
individuals are bound to choke over
the already spilt ink, and to at once
declare all essay books, ln any subject, "On Reserve", and to forbid
each and every student to read said
manuscripts, except between the
hours of 2.00 and 5.00 a.m. This procedure ls, of course, definitely a good
thing, as the scholar realizes that he
can never hope to understand the
subject anyway, and he gives up ln
Joy, to take to playing marbles in
Geology lectures.
If by chance this almost Inevitable
sequence of events is disrupted, and
the exasperated student ls actually
able to obtain some reading material,
a second process occurs. The books,
generally, forty In number, are lost
rapidly ln as many localities as possible.
If they ARE ever returned to the
Library, the officials of said institution are compelled by tradition to
collapse in a state of prostration ln
the middle of their daily duties. This
ceremony may be watched fervently
by any stude/its Intending to write
essays, in order that they may fully
realize the conventions entailed in
the simplest of essay rites: mislaying
the books.
If, by this time, the unwarranted
catastrophe should come to pass that
a deranged student presents a completed essay to his pedagogue and
if, furthermore, the chef d'oeuvre is
returned to the now shuddering author, he is certain to find that the
margin is well decorated with innumerable curt and sarcastic annotations.
Perhaps '—title of essay has been
entirely misunderstood—'; or worse
'—subject matter too well concealed
—'; even '—essay written In wrong
language—' or triumphantly '—essay
has been submitted to the wrong department—'. . . . Dare we go on? . . .
No.
ELECTIONS   POSTPONED
Elections for the Artsmens' Undergraduate Society have been postponed from today noon until Monday noon because Mr. Manion will
be speaking in the Auditorium at
this time.
The   Hotel   Vancouver
presents
MART KENNY
at  the   Spanish  Grill
-
" I iu.f can'f »lop humming *Oh Ma Ma, gel that man for me''
"Why, doe* he »moke Sweet Cap* ? "
SWEET CAPORAL CIGARETTES
"The purest form in which tobacco can be smoked"
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BIRKS CHALLENGER WATCH
Majors in good time for every busy man
and woman.
Appearance  plus  performance  at  Prices
Ranging from $25.00.
SILVERSMITHS
GOLDSMITHS
BIRKS
DIAMOND
MERCHANTS
VANCOUVER, B.C.
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MAKE YOUR DANOE OOMPLETE
with a OORSAOE from
Point Grey Flower Shop
GARDENIAS  AND  ROSES  ALWAYS   ON HAND
WE DELIVER
4420 W.  10th Ave.
Point Grey 660
AFTER THE OAME .  .  .
visit LANCE HUDSON at
THE BROWN DERBY
Sandwiches Light Lunches
SOUTH GRANVILLE STREET
Shoes that can take
It! Designed »pe-
claUy for Vancouver's  Young FeUowst
$4
SOLD   EXCLUSIVELY   AT
COPP'S
889 West Hastings St.
Men's Half Soles 65c
Men's Rubber Heels.^ 30c
Men's Leather Heels 40c
Ladles' Top Lifts *0c
Ladies' Rubber Heels  »8c
Full Soles, Rubber Heels
and Shine —_  $1.78
Shoes Dyed Black  40c
Work Done While You Wait
HATS CLEANED * BLOCKED
— Expert Work —
Free Pick-up and Delivery
Empire Shoe  Rebullders
712 Granville Trinity 4738
BRUCE HUTCHISON
NOW WRITES FOR
THE SUN
THE Vancouver Sun ls pleased to announce that Mr. Bruce
Hutchison joins the Sun staff as writer on governmental
and political topics and personalities. With headquarters ln
Victoria Mr. Hutchison wiU write for the Sun the fair and
inteUigent news and comment which has for many years earned
him the reputation as a leading figure In Western Canadian
journalism. His unbiassed and objective reporting have given
him the respect and confidence of members of all poUtloal
parties and access to NEWS available to no other newspaperman. His dispatches make politics and its practitioners human
and interesting to aU literate persons.
•
read Hutchison's intelligent political articles in
VANCOUVER SUN
Phone Trinity 4111  for Daily Delivery Friday, Ootober 21, 1938
THE    UBYSSEY
Three
ANGLICAN
THEOLOGS
REVIEWED
The Anglican Theological Oollege
was Incorporated ln 1012 by the union of Latimer and St. Mark's Halls.
It originated in the west end of
the city and moved to the present
site at the extreme north of the University campus on Chancellor Boulevard In 1027. Its present principal is
the Rev. H. R. Trumpour, M.A., D.D.
RARE VOLUMES.
The Ubrary of the College contains
several rare volumes. Perhaps the
oldest book in Western Canada is a
history of the world called "Fasciitis
Temporum" written by Werner Role-
wlnck, a Carthusian monk, and
printed at Cologne ln 1476.
There ia also a Huguenot Latin
Bible published ln Heidelberg In 1600.
"MORNING AND EVENING."
The centre of the Oollege life Is
the Chapel where three services are
held each day; every morning at 7.30,
Evensong at 6,30 p.m. and Compline
or evening prayers at 10 p.m.
The bell wbleb rings for the services was once used as a warning
for gas attacks In tbe trenches during the Oreat War.
GOWNS  BEFORE  COLLARS.
The Oollege has Its own traditions.
Its students wear black undergraduate gowns to Ohapel, lectures, meals,
etc.
They Initiate their freshmen with
a special service in the Chapel and
also by other means. This year they
were made to produce an entertainment for the Sophomores and
Seniors.
The students of the Oollege participate in many activities. The most
important athletlo activity is the
Intramural Program, but an annual
track meet is held and competition
with the Union College for the Scott
Oup
AT HOME AND REVUE.
The big social event of the year is
the College 'At Home'. For the past
three years a pantomime has been
written and produced but this year
it is hoped a Revue will be presented.
The Glee Club, once confined to
the College, became, on the invitation of Professor Dilworth, the nucleus of the Varsity Olee Club.
S. C. M.
The flrst S.C.M. Fireside will be
held at the home of Fronia Snyder,
3006 West King Edward, at 3 p.m.
Sunday, Oct. 23.
Philip Beattie, National Secretary
of the Movement, will speak on the
subject, "World Outlook of Christianity."
An Invitation is extended to all.
Joe Doakes   the  Substitute.
He never gets into the Game.
Dear Dave,
Here I am writing with my Angers
crossed, and all for youl Yea indeed, I think I am as anxious as
you are yourself to hear whether you
make the team for the Homecoming
rugby game. And if you do, why,
If I weren't your sister I know that
my feminine heart would go pitter-
pat at the *lght of you ln all your
padded regalia! So here's hoping,
and In any case, I'll see you there
because Michael is taking me with
him and I'm going to forget all my
cares and go rah-rah with the best
of them. —Claudia.
ZORIC
LAUNDRY CO LTD.
1115 Richards— Sey. 1424
HOPPING
with
MARY ANN
He was just a lumbering male . . . but the football game was
so exciting that he couldn't help jumping and shouting, and generally
enjoying himself . . . and his shoes were at least a number twelve so
how could he help it if he kicked her once in awhile . . . but was
she disconcerted . . . no, of course not . . . for she had those six
thread service chiffon which has the appearance of a very shear four-
thread . . . special hosiery for the athletic co-ed . . . from Phoebe
Hosiery Shop. ...
Overheard an odd remark from a football hero talking to his
U.B.C. co-edi "So you saw me last night, did your . . . Well, I was
where no lady ought to have been." . . . Back to Phoebe . . . we
walked past their window in their ultra-modern Dunsmuir shop at
number 712 ,. . and the daintiest array of matching gloves, stockings and filmy babukshas in wine tones were ensconced in the window
. . . and just think how economical they are—$1.00 and up.  . . .
tS tS Gf
Football season is in full swing . . . and every young co-ed must
look her best . . . smart coats in English tweeds which herald the
coming of the winter season are the ideal thing for warmth and chic
appearance. . . . Fred Holmes on Granville Street has just received a
shipment of the latest tailored coats for both the young men and
women of the campus ... be sure your actions will always catch
up with you ... a Fiji Thunderbird had a date in Saskatoon ... a
blonde freshette . . and her brother was at the dance . . . and
said brother took suid blonde freshette sister home ... to be sure
she got there) . . . Don't let old man winter catch you unawares
. . . hurry down to south Granville now and select your winter
coat at 2841. . . .
(S (S (S
Soft lights and throbbing music murmured through the swaying
crowd . . . how confident she felt in her gown of glamorous green
transparent velvet on molded lines . . . and how dainty was the floral
silver jacket . . . she was very, very pleased with herself . . . she
had gone to Lora Lee Dress Shop, 2814 Granville Street, where the
choicest of frocks and evening gowns are to be obtained . . . then
there is our football-playing president who arrived home from the tour
to find a letter waiting for him, from the little girl he met in the
prairies. . . . He won't disclose whether it was Edmonton or Saskatoon . . . and he says he can't help it, if he is cutting in on another
president's girl friend. . . . Arts-Aggie may seem a long way away,
but it is never too early to think about that formal gown . . . and
remember, 2815 Granville Street . . . Lora Lee Dress Shop . . . with
a Mary Ann ad . . . for one dollar reduction on every dress of five
dollars or more.  .  .  .
(S (S (3
Comfort while lambeth walking, is achieved by a very simple
smart process ... a dainty pair of those special platform slippers
. . . the ideal afternoon dress shoe for a tea dance or other informal
events . . . and you may obtain them in a sophisticated tic, naive
strap, or that particularly suave gore . , . and so light they are . . .
which reminds us . . . overheard a Phi Kap who agreed that love was
blind and yet insisted that he could read his very blonde girl like a
book . , . the brail way . . . the platform slippers we were describing are $7.5 0, a very worth while shoe . . . and may be purchased
at Rae-Son's Mezzanine Floor . . . 644 Granville Street . . . shoes
to match your favourite evening gown . . , select your desired style
of white satin slippers , . , which come in the open heel and toe . . .
and have them tinted any colour for you at Rae-Son's.   .   .   .
(3 tS (3
Don't you love tailored things . , . every campus lass docs from
the sedate scholar to the gay young thing . . . nothing is so pleasing
as the swish of the special%statin slip -with its low back designed especially for the formal gown . . . well at least it was worth it, to come
to college . . . the little freshette who voyaged down from the icebound regions and spent her leisure moments playing badminton with
Robert Taylor, has just found out how much of a celebrity he is	
If you wish a slip for every day wear . . . there is a smart double top
tailored slip for $1.95 . . . others with georgette trim . . . and may
be obtained in white, shell-pink, natural and blossom peach ... in
either satin or crepe de chine . . . Mrs. Paton's Lingerie Shop . . . 2793
Granville Street. ...
TECHNOCRATS
ARE URGED TO
PLANJFUTURE
Technocracy, as defined by Mr. W.
E. Walter, on Tuesday ln Arts 100, ls
an organization, originally a body of
thought "propounded by the arlstoo-
racy of brains on the North American
continent".
Technocracy  has  set  up  a  synthetic  controlling  device  that  will
work.   This   new   form   of   control,
operated and directed by a Continental   Board   of   Control,   would
function within eaeh Industry, controlling Itself from within.
Mr. Walter recommended the study
of Technocracy to the student, who
In oollege ls educated only to a traditional    behaviour    pattern.    Those
who are looking ahead to the welfare
of future generations, he said, must
assimilate new Ideas or see the extinction of our civilization.
Diamonds, Watches, Personal Gifts
FIRBANK and LANGE
USE OUR CREDIT PLAN
Seymour and Dunsmuir Opp. the Bus Depot
FTLM   SOCIETY
The next showing of the Film
Society will be on Monday, Ootober
81, at 8 p.m. In the Audiorlum. All
those who have books of tickets can
turn them in at the Quad box offloe
at noon on Ootober 20 and 21.
V. C. U. meeting will be held In
Arts 206 at 12.45 today at which Mr.
Jas. Forrester will speak on 'Evangelical Faith and the University
Mind'. DaUy meetings will take place
at 1.00 p.m. sharp in future.
£0-£a&4£f^>z^/
Wi M
WHY NOT ENJOY
ONE EVERY DAY ?
11LA,1L
W-i
MARY ANN
ANGLICAN THEOLOGS
INVITED GUESTS OF
ALMA MATER SOCIETY
Seventeen students of Anglican
College who are not members of the
Alma Mater Society have been Invited to take part In intra-mural
athletics and the  Glee  Club.
It was originally planned that
these students might be admitted
Into the Society at a reduced fee.
To simplify arrangements Students'
Council, Monday night, Invited the
group to take part In those two
activities only as guests of the Alma
Mater   Society.
SC.M.
The first S.C.M. Fireside will be
held at the home of Mrs. V. Oster-
haut, 4B30-8th Ave., W., at 3 p.m.
Sunday, Oct. 23.
Philip Beattie, National Secretary
of the Movement, -will speak on the
eubject, "World Outlook of Christianity."
An  invitation   Is  extended  to  all.
85 (count 'em) 85,000 fishes are
kept swimming ln alcohol by the U.
of Oklahoma biological science department—shucks . . . flsh have all
the luck.
PLAYER'S FORMAL
ON FRIDAY EVENING
The annual reception and formal
dance of the 'Varsity Player's Club
will be held at the home of Mrs. R. J.
Cromie on Friday, Oct. 21.
Those Invited include the present
members and the alumni. The patronesses attending are Mrs. T. Larson, Mrs. F. G. C. 'Wood, Mrs. Hunter Lewis, and Mrs. G. M. Shrum.
Receiving will be Mrs. It. J. Cromie,
Anne Carter, president of the Player's Club,  and Professor W.  Gage.
Vhe arrangements for the formal
were made by Jacqueline Kloepfer.
The orchestra obtained is that of
Jack Emerson's, a former member
of the club.
MORE ELECTIONS!
Arts '41 class elections will be held
Friday at 12.30 in Arts 100.
D ■ M E     »/*•. H «-E    «IN\OI
NEED SOME MONEY? •>
Qood Commissions Paid For Selling
Totem Ads.
APPly Jack Stark, Pub. Office.
COLLEGE
"The Smartest
Clothes in
Town"
CONVENIENT BUDGET
PLAN TERMS IF
DESIRED
COLLEGE
TOWN
• Suits
• Topcoats
• Overcoats
SUITS
We're calling all college men . . . calling their attention
to these College Town Suits. Hard finish worsted, blue
serges, oxford greys and banker's grey in smartly
tailored, exoellent wearing suits. An extra pair of pants
to  match at $5.00
TOPCOATS
OVERCOATS
Come in men, and expect value on these "College Town"
topcoats and overcoats, because you certainly get it . . .
they are the smartest and newest for Pall, 1938. Popular
styles are shown in the season's most attractive patterns,
colors and fabrics.
Men's Shops, Main Floor
DAVID SPENCER
LIMITED
"Always the Best At Spencer's" STAY HOME
for
HOMECOMING
WATOH1
Birds and Huskies
At Stadium
Pour
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 21, 1938
Huskies    Battle   'Birds   For   Hardy   Cup
DYNAMITE
Thla happy chappy Is Evan apRoberts, Junior Member and dynamic
plunger of the Thunderbird grid
machine. Half-back Evan will be
out with tne reat of the boya against
Saskatchewan tomorrow afternoon
In the Stadium.
THUNDERBIRDS SET
FOR RETURN CONTEST
WITH SASKATCHEWAN
Playing host to a band of green-shirted University of Saskatchewan Huskies, the powerful Varsity squad will trot out its
undefeated, untied 1938-39 grid team on Saturday at the Varsity
Stadium. The game will be the second Intercollegiate battle the
students have played against the Prairie men. On Monday,
October 10, they beat the Green-white squad in their own dens
at Saskatoon, 13-6.
Unfortunately, the Blue and Oold
will be without kicking, and passing
star Johnny Pearson. Johnny was
foroed to miss the prairie jaunt
owing to an Infection in his leg.
Varsity supporters had hoped that
the injury would be sufficiently healed to enable Pearson to play when
the prairie team oame out to the
coast. The bad news came when the
doctor sent Johnny baok to bed this
week with the statement that he
probably wouldn't be able to play the
rest of the season.
PASSING OUT
The news sent the Varsity stocks
to a new low. Not only has their
defence been weakened by the loss
of Pearson's booming punts, but also
their passing attack suffers. For
Pearson waa the mainstay, throwing
most of the passes, of this very Im
portant department.
The loss of their star sent the team
Into a dither fixing up subsltlute
plays featuring Aub Oray as both
kicker and passer. Big Aub took
Pearson's place on the prairie trip
but waa out-booted by the Saskatchewan star Bud Weaver.
The weight of the running attack
will fall on Tommy Williams, ap
Roberts and Graham Finlay. ap Roberts found himself a marked man
'when he arrived in Saskatoon, the
memory of his plunging in last year's
game being still fresh in the minds
of the Saskatchewan players. Consequently Williams was able to break
clear for long gains while ap Roberts was slowed down.
TRIPLE THREAT
Chief Job of the linemen tomorrow wUl be that of rushing the
passes and blocking the kicks of
Bud Weaver. The Varsity team
were an easy mark for the accurate passes of Weaver ln last Monday's game and the only Green and
White score came aa climax to
three successive passes that netted
more than thirty yards.
Consequently Van Vllet haa been
grooming his lads In the art of pass
Interception ever since and believes
that he has thrown together a system for batting those pigskins from
out the hands of pass receivers.
STRAD. GOOD
Stradlottl, veteran lineman, was a
powerhouse in the first game but the
Saskatchewan line, despite a 11-lb.
disadvantage had an admittedly
stronger defence. The Job will be to
power through this wall in order to
rush the passer. Secondary defenoe
problem will be the marking ot the
fleet-footed Saskatchewan ends without violating the interference  rules.
RUN  VS.  PASS
The game Is shaping up Into a
struggle between the rugged line-
plunging of "the Varsity team as contrasted with the deadly passing of
the prairie squad. Varsity's fourth
game ln quest of the Hardy cup will
be played 'Wednesday afternoon also
at  the   Stadium.
Kappa Kappa Gamma Sorority
pin, somewhere near or by the gymnasium, on Tuesday, October 18.
Time noticed missing on that date—
about 0 a.m. Finder please return to
Mr. Home, A.M.S. office.
10 Years In Varsity District
Your  guarantee  of  quality
We sell and  repair Waches
Pens and Glasses
WEST   POINT  GREY
WATCHMAKER
HOME GAS
Students who tise Home
Products know that they
arc paving the way to
future prosperity by patronizing British Columbia Industry.
HOME OIL
DISTRIBUTORS LTD.
The  Independent   100%
B. C. Company
WHOOPEE!
Home-Coming and all that!
Corsages from Brown Bros,
add to party pleasures. They
are correct and Inexpensive.
Joe Brown (Arts '23)
MgT.
665 Granville Street
GOLF
Play in the University Golf championship gets down to a serious business for the leading campus dlvoters
this week as the eight top scorers
in the qualifying round pair off into
first round 18-hole matches.
Favorites to cop the University
Cup are co-medalists Mansfield Beach
and Roy Leckie who both carded
snappy 77's over the University Golf
course in the qualifying round last
week. Both are veteran linksmen
and have had experience in many
top-flight British Columbia tournaments.
Although obviously out of form
after the summer layoff, Bill Charlton may knock over any of the lead-
era In short 18-hole match play while
BUI Esson is hitting the ball well.
ST|3P RIGHT UP AND MEET THB 'BIRDS
USE STRAIGHT—A third year artsman who has had two years Varstly
experience.  His   regular   position   is  centre,   but  he   as   capable   of
switching to either ned or halfback. Weight, 17S lbs.
AUB  GREY—Hard   hitting  fullback  who  is  one   of  the  most  consistent
ground-gainers  in the city.  Aub weight  17S and  ts  both  fast  and
shifty. He is a first year Aggie,
BILL HODGSON—Bill is an experienced guard who, although he weighs
only 160, is able to open holes through any opposing line. Bill  Is
also an Aggie, third year.
HENRY 8TRADIOTTI—Hank is one of the main reasons for the present
success of the Thunderbirds. He weighs 330 lbs. and was ohosen on
the Big Four all-star team last year.
JOHNNY FARINA—From brawn to brains, "Killer" is first string quarterback, weighs all of 145 and ls one of tho best blockers on the team.
Second year Artsman.
EVAN apROBERTS—Ap is a speedy and hard-hitting halfbaok who has
had two yeara grid warfare already. He is Junior Member and  a
third-year Scienceman. Weight 183.
OSCAR ORB—One of Varsity's two able centres. Oscar is a third year
Solenoeman. He weighs 165 lbs. and haa had two years' experience
on the Blue and Oold team.
DON  MacIVER—A  big  heavy   taokle  who  returns  to  football  after  an
absence of a year. Don weighs 300 and Is  an expert at breaking
up plays. He is a fourth year Artsman.
TOMMY WILLIAMS—What remains to be said about Tommy Is that he
is a superb ball carrier, a sparkplug to the team, and a well-liked
fellow. He weighs 158.
SINK DRUMMOND—175-pound  flying wing  who  has  the   reputation  of
the hardest tackier in the league. Third year scienceman and first
year with the 'Birds.
FREDDY  SMITH—Third  year   Artsman  in  second  year  with  Big  Four
company. Weighs 170 and plays g-^rd.
CARSON McGUIRE—One of the most dangerous tackles In the league,
Carson is Prexy of the A.M.S. and a fourth year man. Weight 315.
DICK DOWRIE—This is Dick's second year at end for the Thunderbirds
and he is the bane of all opposing safety men. He is a third year
Artsman.
GRAHAM FINLAY—A freshman from Prince of Wales, who has played
a lot of football. Playa halfbaok and weighs 180.
FRED JOPLIN—Another freshman who is experienced. Fred  is a good
blocker and  tackier from his flying wing position. He weighs  175
and ls a second year Solenoeman.
NORM RENWICK—Norm is playing in senior company for the flrst year,
after graduating from the Juniors. He is just about the fastest man
on the team and plays right half. He weighs 175 and is a senior.
BILL McGHEE—Bill is another ex-junior and is playing guard. He weighs
170 and is a good tackier. BUI is a second year Artsman.
DAN BURNETT—One  of  last year's  star  ends who  returned  to  school
Just this week. Danny weighs 180 and Is a good pass  receiver and
tackier. Fifth year Science.
MTT.T ANGUS—A big halfback  who is  noted for  his  nonchalant  attitude
off the field. Milt weighs 178 and is fast and shifty. He is a second
year Artsman.
ANGIE PROVENZANO—This is Angle's  flrst year ln  football  but he  is
making good because of his natural ability. He weighs 100 and plays
tackle. Fourth-year Solenoeman.
RALPH HENDERSON—This  is Hunk's  second year with  the  team.  He
is a versatile player but he is most effective at end. Ralph weighs 185
and Is an Artsman.
JACK STEVENSON—Jack ls a husky little fellow who haa had a year's
experience with the Juniors. He plays guard and weighs 170. Third
year Arts.
U.B.C, VARSITY IN BATTLES
LUMSDEN   BACK   FOR
'loma FRAY
Can the best offense In the city
punch holes in the best defense?
That is the rugger problem of the
week which Varaity and Meralomas
-will attempt to solve tomorrow at
Brockton   Ponlt.
To aid in penetrating this orange-
clad bulwark, Coach Carey has been
fortunate ln being able to call on
Harry Lumsden, dynamic little back,
who will be playing for the flrst time
this  season.
Ernie Ttagle will go up Into the
pack to allow Lumsden to take over
the fullback duties.
At the present time lt is doubtful
if Strat Leggatt will be able to start
and if his bad ankle says no. Wad-
die Robertson will step up from the
U.B.C.  team.
(U,Mltl«IMMMHHHII«IM«IMMHMIMMtMIMtMMMII,ll,M,IIHM*l
H. Jessie How, B.A.
PUBLIC   STENOGRAPHER
POPULAR LIBRARY
4451 W. 10th Ave.
P.G. 67
,MIIMIMMHIHIIIHM(IIHH|,MHtl„H,|,„(t,|„MHItt(Ht(MM,|M
Ubeecees Meet Strong
Clubber*
While the mighty Thunderbirds of
the Gridiron pack 'em in at the Stadium, and Coach A. B. Carey's "Miracle Men" engage Meralomaa ln the
feature game of the aeaaon at Brookton Point, U.B.C. ruggermen show
In the opener at the Stanley Park
pitch against the powerful Rowing
Club team.
Aooordlng to campus officials, only
one change will be made in the side
which whipped Barbarians last Saturday at the Stadium. The return
to the Thunderbird squad of Harry
Lumsden, is indirectly the cause of
carrot-topped Evan Davies exit to
the U.B.C. aggregation. Davies is
really a going ooncern, particularly
ln the lineouts, and will strengthen
the "Seconds" considerably.
Speolal University Tuition
Pure  and   Applied  Sciences —
first year.
Advanced  Mathematics, Mathematical Physics, History, Philosophy,  Languages, eto.
1470 West   5th Ave. (Cor. Gran.)
_lMI*tMIIIIM,„MIM(„l(M„M,M|1MI<tlMMM(l,M,in„*ll,M*„M|.l
VARSITY SERVICE
STATION
"AT THE  GATES"
"OUR   SERVICE. MEANS
HAPPY MOTORING''
IHHtlt,MIMM,HIH,tHH,,IH*,IIHH,IHlH,,„ltll,«IMM«HHI|«|
L
WATCH     FOR     OUR     8RD
ANNIVERSARY   SALE
NEXT WEEK
"Marguerite Shoppe
8.   Stolnhorff
X-ADIXS'    KEADV TO-WBAR
OENTS'   rUBNISHINQS
3784 W.  10th Ave. Bay. 7972
BRING BACK, O' BRING BACK
THE HARDY CUP TO VANCOUVER
WORLD TO|>E NEWS
Across from thle Commodore
867
Granville
T. N. T.
POWERFUL MALEMUTE
SQUAD DETERMINED
TO  TIE   UP   SERIES
For five long years the snarling Huskies of the University of
Saskatchewan have clutched the shining Hardy Trophy between
their fangs, and regardless of the flrst game victory of the U.B.C.
Thunderbirds, the Green and White of Saskatoon will be out
fighting like the champions they are in the first game of the
finals tomorrow at the Stadium.
Lead by the kloklng-passlng antics*
of Captain Bud Weaver in the fullback position the prairie squad features driving end runs and a deadly
aerial bombardment that is capable
of blowing up the ball game at any
moment.
LINE STRONG
In spite of the lose of Ave linesmen by graduation laat spring, the
Husky forward wall la little lees
than highly explosive mobile dynamite that charges with the beet of
them and aslca no quarter from the
heavier Thunderbird pillars of
granite.
L-ed by Jack McQueen in the halfback slot, the offensive  is deft and
deoeptive, with speolal emphasis on
the lateral-pass end run style. Ross
Finder at quarterbaok does a mean
bit   of  pass  heaving  when   he  gets
the chanoe, and along with Weaver
and  McQueen  carries  the  brunt  of
the attack.
Coach  Colb McEowan  jumped  on
the rather green Huskie just before
the   flrst   game   in   Saskatoon,   and
gave them a new shift and a complicated  system  of   signals.   By  the
time the Saak. boys reach the coast
they   should   be   thoroughly   drilled
Into the new style of play, and there
won't   be   any   confusion   when   the
'quarter c_.lls for an end run instead
of a buck.
The   second   game   of   the   Hardy
Cup   Finals   will   be   played   at   the
University   Stadium   on   Wednesday
afternoon   next   week.   All   lectures
have   been  cancelled   for  this  game
and a full turnout of students ls desired and expeoted.
DANC- TONITE
One night only . . .
DE SANTIS
AND HIS ORCHESTRA
featuring Ethel Lang
HALLOWEEN DANOE
Monday, Ootober 31
Here they eome I There they go]
In case you didn't follow that play,
Captain Bud Weaver and Jerry Potts
just reeled off some yarda for the
Huskies of Saskatchewan. Weaver
Is the triple threat man with tlie
Green and White squad who will be
showing at tbe Stadium tomorrow
and Wednesday. Potts ls not to play
In the present series due to a fractured ankle suffered in the first
game.
SOCCER TEAM PLAYS
ST. REGIS SQUAD
Varsity Soccermen are preparing
a warm welcome for St. Regls.whom
they entertain at McBride park tomorrow. For the first time this
season, the line-up will be intact,
with the re-appearance of Shaw
Mlzuhara, fighting fullback. With a
rood possibility jf garnering a brace
of points. Varsity will go all out, and
Fred "Twinkletoes" Sasaki is fully
prepared to aid in the subjection of
his  former team-mates.
Lost, a silver band bracelet In the
Library, with the Initial "F." Will
the finder please notify Frances
Dooley,  Bay.  6245-R,
THOME FOR THE GIRL WIT*/
rw SIGHT SAVING KIT/
Before another winter arrives, have your lighting
surveyed by one of oui Home Lighting Advisers.
Her services are free and purely advisory. She will
tell you how your lighting will be more effective
for seeing and decoration. She does not sell lamps;
she merely advises. Call Seymour 5151 and
ask for Home Lighting Advisers—B. C. Electric
Railway Co.
U6HT
*. a *-*-*•!

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