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The Ubyssey Nov 24, 1959

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Full Text

 THUNDER
VOL. LXVII
VANCOUVER, B.C. TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 1995
No. 28
"Gamble
On Peace
rr
by Diane Greenall
(Ubyssey Staff Reporter)
Canada must scrap its defence
plans and wage a war of peace,
a prominent Socialist said Friday.
Alex MacDonald, former
member of Parliament, told 60
students at a CCF sponsored
meeting: defence is now technologically  impossible."
"We should gamble on peace
instead of war," -he said. "Canada's help is not needed in the
nuclear field."
"We should not even allow
atomic weapons in our country.
■-Instead we should develop a
small mobile force ready for military contributions to the UN,"
said MacDonald.
"It is a waste of money to try
to gain entry into the nuclear
suicidal club when money and
resources are needed to strength-
, en the United Nations," he said.
The prestige of the UN as a
law-making and enforcing body
should be built up.
In addition social and economic assistance to underdeveloped
countries should be increased,
he said.
Canada should direct her resources to take the lead in supporting the United Nations.
"The gap is now between the
'have' and the 'have not' nations," said MacDonald.
"Russia has realized this and
plans to win on the economic
level," he said.
"We have utterly neglected
the social and economic struggle
in the world. In doing this we
have not supported the UN,"
said MacDonald.
MAJORITY HUNGRY
"The vast majority of our
world is hungry,"  he  said.  We
' have licked many medical and
sanitary conditions which caused
death. With this came a population explosion.
"The social forces of natural
population   increase   have   the
- makings of a war situation more
than    the   diplomatic    forces,"
'MacDonald said.
Population outgrowing food
supply can cause a very important development in the human
situation, he said.
MacDonald predicted an alliance between Russia and the
United States within the next
ten years. He, said the underdeveloped masses will eventually
rebel and form a defence block
' against their prosperous oppressors.
ASSISTANCE SMALL
"We must revise our thinking
in terms of assistance to underdeveloped countries," said MacDonald. "For example the UNESCO budget does not near that
of Lever Brothers."
Canada's assistance to international social and economic
problems is very small in proportion to the money spent on
her own defence, said MacDonald.
"Canada, recently opposed   a
UN proposal that well off countries give 1 per cent ol their nar
•    tional wealth- to. UniteA nations,
assistance,"  said MacDonald.
GENEROUS  COED   starts off   the   WUSC   clothing
drive, which starts Wednesday of this week. She gave all, but
WUSC wants blankets and warm clothing.
—Photo by Roger McAfee
CLOTHING DRIVE
TO AID JAPAN
Students' Council President, Peter Meekison, Monday
urged all students to support World University Service Clothing drive to aid "destitute" students in Japan.
The drive begins Wednesday,^and ldl|f-until Friday:
Said Meekison, "It is my hope
Extra Bands
To Continue
Standby bands will continue to be used at A.M.S. functions
a student council official said Monday.
Russ Brink, AMS coordinator,
said the present contract with
the Musician's Union will be renewed this year with one possible change.
That change, under consideration now by the union, would
'tween classes
Manitoban
Attacked
WINNIPEG (CUP)—-Manitoban
editor Dave Humphreys, has
been condemned by the "Student Marxist," news organ of
The Socialist Youth League of
Canada.
The SYLC paper attacked
Humphreys for making The
Manitoban appear as "a sensa-
tionalistic rag" and called on
students "to protest, and attempt
to raise The Manitoban to the
position of a respectable university journal."
The attack referred to his
handling of an interview with
Ed Sullivan, after which he
quoted Sullivan as saying members of the Communist regime
in Hungary, "are guilty as Hell
—tell that to your university."
Sullivan said six of 150 Hungarian youths faeing execution
for their part in the 1956 uprising already have met death.
This information he obtained
from Dr. Bela Fabian, head of
the former Hungarian political
prisoners, and Bela Varga, former president of Hungary.
The Student Marxist, a paper
representing a self-admitted
Communist youth organization,
called this Manitoban issue, "a
colossal low in university journalism,"
The Student Marxist concludes, "The Manitoban has
sunk to a flashy mire, the editors
have lost all sense of duty of a
university newspaper, and posses-only a .perverse^ sense . of
values."
that all students support this
drive, as we cannot realize the
magnitude of the disaster which
recently hit Japan."
Students in Japan are suffering as a result of the havoc
created in recent weeks by
severe floods and typhoons
which have destroyed more than
125,000 homes, WUS said
More than 700 students in the
universities of Nagoya area are
unable to continue their study.
Only $50 would provide a
Japanese student with sufficient
means to continue his studies.
Students' Council at U.B.C.
has granted $100, matched by
the WUSC committee, to the
campaign.
Warm clothing and blankets
are wanted by the WUSC committee. Boxes will be placed in
all faculties for the collection.
Shipment of all articles will
be sent to the national office in
Japan of World University Service. The office of the Japanese
consul here has guaranteed free
shipment.
A pickup service will be in
effect Saturday morning for all
students who are unable to bring
the articles of clothing to university. Lists for this service
will, be posted in the WUSC office, AMS affice and all collection boxes.
Rod Dobell, Vice Chairman of
the local WUSC committee said:
"We would like to emphasize
that it - is not a charity drive.
It has the participation of students all over the world."
The WUSC drive is held Li
conjunction with an AWS-spon-
sored food, drive in support of
the Central City Mission.
"SKID ROW" TO
BE PRESENTED
PRE-MED SOCIETY
Pre-Med Soc presents "Skid
Row," a CBC film on alcoholism
in Vancouver, Wednesday at
12:30 in Wesbrook 100. Members free, non-members 25c,
*       *       *
UNIVERSITY BAPTIST CLUB
Meeting Wednesday, November 25, in Buchan 223. Speaker:
Reverend D. Reed on "What Is
Baptism?"
v      v       3£
NFCUS PHOTO CONTEST
Hurry and enter the NFCUS
Photo Contest. Entries close on
November 30. For rules and entry forms go to the NFCUS of-
tice, Room 165, Brock Extension.
■TT* •TV
N.V.C.
Last general meeting for this
term. Members please attend.
Thursday, 12:30, Bu. 205.
**• v ^t*
UBC CHORAL SOCIETY
The UBC Choral Society now
has vacancies for tenors. All interested please attend rehearsal
on Wednesday, in Physics 202,
between 6 and 8 o'clock.
H*       t*       •?•
DANCE CLUB
Wednesday, Thursday and Friday,  noon-hour  instruction  will
be on waltz.    All old work revised and lots of new steps.
3f.        "Jr        *p
ALPHA OMEGA SOCIETY
Ukrainian dancing practice at
noon today in Education 2. All
attend, as partners will be allotted.
•T* **■ *r
NEWMAN CLUB
There will be a talent show in
the Newman Lounge Friday, 8:30
p.m.   Communion breakfast this
Sunday.   Mass at 9:00 a.m.
(Continued on Page 4}
allow students to dispense with
the standby bands at athletic
functions.
Controversy flared when students discovered some members
of a standby band hired for
Homecoming left before the end
of the dance.
Many students have since protested that hiring a standby
tend encourages "featherbed-
ing." -,
Dave Edgar, AMS treasurer,
said one way to fight the union
is through the careful use of
published statements.
"The union is absolutely;
against bad publicity, so
through this we may be able lc>
meet our ends." ;
"The standby bands are like
tariffs on imported goods," he*
said.
Frames Of
Paintings
Discovered
Vancouver Police yesterday
located the frames of twenty-four
missing paintings in a dump in
Vancouver's East-end.
RCMP said the frames were
definitely those from a $40,000
art collection stolen from U.B.C.
between the 7th andlOth of November.
There was no sign of the paintings.
An RCMP spokesman said
"the discovery of the frames
hasn't given us any new clues or
theories, but we are checking the
frames for fingerprints."
Eleven frames were complete
and thirteen had been dismantled.
A group of boys found the
frames in the dump.
Police said the thieves had
apparently taken the paintings
from the frames carefully; they
were not cut out.
RCMP believe that the frames,
which have apparently lain in
the dump for some time, were
thrown there a short time after
the theft.
The paintings were owned by
Edmonton art collector Ernest
Poole.
Thunder Named
Campus Mascot
Thunder! : 1
No, no, not from the angry gods.
Not even from electrical discharge in the clouds.
We mean splashing about inthe pool, romping on the libarry
lawns, patrolling the Brock, and becoming UBC's mascot fcjr
1959-60.
Because it is official now. At the regular Monday night
council meeting this fine canine specimen was named mascot
for the rest of the term.
The shaggy, red haired Irish Setter was first proposed fox
the honor by The Ubyssey.
On Thursday, "Thunder Day", he will be sworn into office,
with all due pomp and ceremony, by A.M.S. President Peter
Meekison in the Broek Lounge at 12:30.- PAGE TWO
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 24, 190f
THE UBYSSEY
Authorized as second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Published three times a week throughout the University year in Vancouver
by the Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C.
Editorial opinions expressed are those of the Editorial Board of The Ubyssey
and not necessarily those of the Alma Mater Society or the University of B.C.
Telephones: Editorial offices, AL. 4404; Locals 12, 13 and 14;
Business offices, AL. 4404; Local 15.
Editor-in-Chief: R. Kerry White
Associate Editor .. Elaine Bissett
J Managing Editor ^- Del Warren
£_ News Editor Bob Hendrickson
t C.U.P! Editor Irene Frazer
r        Club's Editor Wendy Barr
Features Editor •__ Sandra Scott
Head Photographer _-__ Colin Landie
T"~        Photography Editor  Roger McAfee
f Senior Editor: Allan Chernov
'" Reporters and Desk:
George Railton, Art Powell, Garry Keenan, Maddy Bronson,
Farida Sewell, Diane Greenall, Derek Allen.
-EDITORIAL-
Sear boss
* this letter is in this form because i am a reincarnation °i
archie and unlike him have come to believe in what mehitabel
- called her queendom of egypt it still hurts my head as
much but after all this time underground engaged in battle
with a worm who was a most ungentlemanly fellow i have
' come to accept anything in the, name of crusading journalism
1 particularly when it gets me in the root of the stomach the way
that worm did however mehitabel says thats life and
dances over my grave i can hear her now theres a
- dance in the old girl yet etc
i have given up my vers libre this age because i want to
find out if i can do as well as i did in whatever else anybody
else may have done but mehitabel says that it was all i could
do to match the kittens that mexican coyote left her with one
time and if you dont think thats something the other side of the
grave mehitabel did
i hear things are all haywire since ive been away even
you got caught out in a car accident i understand so i dont
Jknow if this is reaching you b,ut try to stretch out a bit and you
plight get to it in time for publication in the infernal oops internal times of course you havent been in as long as
i but i suppose it was for the same offence so bear up it wont
"be long depending on what you really did
at least it wont be for life the way you did for me that
Was cruel
mehitabel is pressing me to make a statement to her public
"about herself how would you like to be a reincarnated
eockroach with a cat who was once the queen of egypt on your
"tback of course she isnt the same as when you knew
Tier her hair is a remarkable shade of blue and she looks
well fed and all but her morals are just the same as ever . . .
^89267
i am inside the typewriter now which bears up a lot about
what i had to say of her doesnt it
i see that things still havnt changed  around here very
much that cheese is pretty high now and the beer is
' flatter than when i left it at the event of my unhappy demise
but some woman has been in with a duster must i sus-
' pect you of infidelity and cleaned out my bed which was
yery comfortable and out of mehitabels reach when she was
very hungry which was often enough but especially after her
' unhappy affair with sailors mexican coyotes dapper sams and
the lot you know what i mean
well boss i hear the cock crowing and must flee or else you
LETTERS  TO THE  EDITOR
Lift Ban
Who's Sick?
Editor:
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir,
would not quite recognise me
habit of two previous lifetimes
earthly form
have the wages gone up any
(Thanks a lot, Don.)
it is hard to change the
i am still half in my un-
archie
HWIM
TODAY...
GEORGE BAKER
Famed English Poet will give a
a Specialu Lecture and
read his poetry
12:30, AUDITORIUM
In spite   of  the   latter   statement, I feel there is something
Editor, of far greater importance in the
The Ubyssey, veritable   contributions   of   tbe
Dear Sir: Greek societies on this campus.
No one realizes more than the Whoever   you   are,   weigh   the
With regard to your editorial  writer the controversial nature following facts carefully before
of 17 November referring to the   0I the subject Fraternities  on you Pass any Judgment on these
ban of alcholic drinks on the this beautiful campus. In my fraternal groups:
campus, it is my opinion that five years at this university I (l) Help Week — an annual
open displays of inebriation have heard countless debates on event which is performed by
might be less frequent wrere the topic and have read inum- the pledges of all fraternities,
this ban to be lifted. A rule of merable articles nailing these A rewarding article was written
this kind is a provocative societies to the proverbial brick in a city newspaper recently
challenge.and even an incentive walL : am a firm advocate of concerning this year's projects;
to any individualistic, thinking freedom of speech, but I believe, the paving of a church's drive-
student, and craves to;.be bro-  this time, someone has reached way and the painting of an old-
a new plateau  in  caustic criti-
ken.
Besides, in England and on   cism-   J personally have a vehe-
the Continent every university  ment dislike for these most des-
age home were examples.
(2)   Song  Fest — an   annual
admirably. Are  Canadian stu-
rents less mature or more per-
they cannot be trusted. I honestly doubt this ... so let's
have a ber and become a civilized university.
Yours Sincerely,
Roland Rocchini,
"Spirited Mayhem'
Editor,
The Ubyssey.
Dear Sir,
me ^uuvmcui evciy   university    — -«--".- -,~v .vv»v *"«*■. «<-*-    gprjng   sh0w which   has  attract-
has its 'bar' and it works out  picable creatures who occasion-   ed much publicity and hundreds
ly abuse this privilege. of citizens from the city   More.
The profound vanity and the   over,  attendance  has  increased
verted   than   students   on   the   staggering audacity displayed in   so greatly in the past years that
otherside of the Atlantic that  a recent article in the Ubyssey   this event has been moved from
is a classic example to our amic-   the Auditorium to the Armour-
ably frosh class of the ill-feeling   ies and this year we shall prob-
that can be dissiminated by the   ably see it at the Queen Eliza-
slanting of one's opinion and the   beth Theatre,
usage of certain charged words.       (3) Mardi Gras—another per-
Such an unfounded and deroga-   ennial   Greek   effort   whkh   jg
Graduate   Studies   tory article cannot fleet by un"   held  in   downtown  Vancouver,
challenged. The Mardi Gras QUeen, attracts
. Irregardless  of the  diversity  much enthusiasm   in   the   city,
of views concerning fraternities   but, what is more, the proceeds,
at  this  campus,   I   believe the   usually around $4,000 net, ar«
time   is   very   ripe   for   many   turned over to charitable organ*
people to weigh, and weigh in-   izations in the city,
telligently,   the   pros   and   cons       „,     , ,, , ,
. ,, • i-       4 iw        • Tne latter examples are only
i   i.  „ ,„™n%a.  nf   thp  of these societies at this univer-   ,, . ., ..
A   perfect   example   ot   xne three of the many constructive
„™„v,Qoio   that   thi«   sity.   And this, my friends, de- ■, , .
gross  ever-emphasis  that  tnis ....... .  . programmes    performed    each
i  j    4. v. j,. „i»™, r,r> "snirit-  mands initially, a bare minimum ,     iU     ^    ,     ■ ..   „   ■
student body places on   spiru      ...        ■    ''    ■ , ,    year by the  Greeks.    Shallow,
,        u ~»,™ro +Vip activities  of facts,  not  hearsay  hogwash „    „ ,.       ,    , '
ed mayhem   were the activities > j ■.     « you say?    Self-centred you say?
accompanying    the   Tea   Cup    hat has plagued our most illus-   Ma h?    Qh
game last Wednesday. Certain- trious paper so far this term. crashing bab'oon yQu ^ ^
ly exhuberance and enthusiasm jjow can anybody say that Do not, please, obtain this
are to be commended (there is fraternities are responsible for wrong impression of fraternity
no wrong in wholeheartedly aimost all the evils that beset men. We are not the hypocriti-
participating in beneficial and this campus; the drunkenness, cal or sanctimonious individuals
exciting pursuits); but, when the discrimination, the increased whom you think we are. We
a "fanatical mob^j|b.ave the fees> and the illegitimate chil- realize our shortcomings, but,
brazen audacity to stand Up m ^ren of the co-eds? This is not like many other organizations
public, sloppily guzzle swamp- onjy a gross exaggeration but we too, are not exempt from
slop, and be proud of it too, it's also a fiagrarlt defamation of them. However it is all relative,
time for at least a brief period   character. You  au taik about  discrimina-
of introspection. In rea(jmg sucn an 0(jious out-   tion,   well  remember  this—the
As for the Aggies and their burst, I cannot help but display Canadian immigration policy is
fire-extinguishers o f "liquid my compassion for such a per- prodigiously discriminating, one
fertilizer," what could be more son. Such a person who is.un- cannot hope to join a "Ye Olde
childish, degrading and insult- doubtedly so bigoted that he is English Chess Club" if he is un-
ing_even to the engineer? completely and utterly unaware   able  to   play   the   ruddy   game.
of    his    own    superficiality—a   The U.S. government refuses to
Fortunately,    the    football
term which he used so emphati-   recognize the existence of Red
China when the United States
today is the living example of
a country that won her inde-
pedance through the means of
revolt—how   about  that  for   a
game (though incidental to the cal~ referring to7r"ate"rnity ......
afternoon's "main events") pro- Qn campus
vided something partly worth
, .,     ,    . .,     ,T.i,«i~   +i-,Q       How  can  such  a person call
while;  but  on the whole,  the *
,. j-j. ■         .      ;„,■ „t„j fraternity     members     shallow,
entire   affair   again   indicated / ...       ,,.
,, ,   e „     „„„ „„„_,_„+   „f self-centred,   and   interested   in
our rttvef for^TdTng" unt tneir personal well-being in the colossal discrimination?
versity. It is my hope that most hSht of the very revealing facts m conclusion, my superficial
students came here to improve existing at this university. Have friend, I - must confess that I
their minds; but it is also my you' my very superficial friend, have used my fraternity broth-
fear that many are more con- a knowledge of the percentage ers as a stepping stone for my
cerned with impudently dis- of faculty members who have financial betterment. When I"
playing their infinite capacity Passed through the various frat- returned from Europe this year
for the beverage of the "beer- ernal societies throughout North in a mild state of penury, I bor-
bellies." America?     I  have,   and,   I  feel   rowed   $15   from  a  brother   in
sure   it   would  interest   you,   if   Montreal.
Sincerely, not   overwhelm, you.     Your re-
Dick  Fast. marks have been far-reaching.
WINNER GRAND PRIX
FOR BEST COMEDY-
CANNES FILM FESTIVAL
M
THJSISNOT
SOfTABLEFOR
CHILPREN
VARSITY
Wlh .1 TRIMBU    Atom
A0ULT
BnOUAIMCKT
OHLY
Fourth Tremendous,
Week!
'A Movie of Tremendous Charm and Wit"
—Les Wedman, Province
Thank God I have
associates like that, because my
former national bank even refused me that paltry amount-
even though I presented them
with proper identification, I
didn't present any papers to my
brother  in  the  east.
John Northfield.
Com. IV.
Need Parts for your
English Car
Call English Car Used Parts
1821 Main St. TR 9-4041
Radiators, Differentials, Tires,
Body Parts, etc.
We Don't Wreck,  We
Dismantle Tuesday, November 24, 1959
THE     UBYSSEY
PAGE THREE
Co-Editors Ann Pickard, Ernie Harder
Reporters Mike Hunter, Fred Fletcher
Birds Drop
From Top
U.B.C.'s Thunderbirds faltered
in the clutch last weekend, and
as a result dropped out of contention for top spot in the city
league.
Thursday night the Birds lost
out to a Deitrich-Collins team,
75-64. Barry Drummond had 14
points for the Birds, and Norris
Martin and Ed Pederson got ten
each.
Saturdays game was just as
frustrating for Birds watchers
as Cloverleafs edged U.B.C. 78*
70. Drummond again led the
team with 15 points.
In Saturdays preliminary
game, U.B.C. Braves edged Ker-
risdale 46-44 in a thriller. Don
Chan scored 11 points, including
the winning basket.
SPORTS
SHORTS
U.B.C.  Sailing Team toook top spot in the North-West
Intercollegiate Sailing Regatta at Seattle, this weekend.
Steve Tupper leads U.B.C. Sailing Team
to the finish.
WOMEN'S BASKETBALL
UBC Senior "B" Women de-,
feated Crystal Freeze 40-19 at
King Ed. Gym last Thursday.
Top scorer for Varsity was Sandra Sankey with 10 points.
UBC Junior Women were ed^
ged by Hastings Senior Business
Women 38-36 last week. Top
scorers for UBC were Jean McDonald and Shelia Ledingham
with 10 points each.
BADMINTON
UBC badminton squad rolled
past Vancouver Racquets Club
team 2 nine matches to three
on Sunday afternoon. Sharon
Whittaker, Les Trabert and
Keith Tolman went undefeated.
RUGBY
Weekend rugby action saw
'Birds retain their slim one point
lead in Miller Cup by rapping
Meralomas 6-3 at UBC.
Stewart Smith led Braves to
an 18-6 victory over North Shore
All-Blacks also in the Miller
Cup series.
Women's Hockey
Undefeated At Oregon
UJB C. Grass Hockey team won all four of their games in
the annual Women's Pacific North West Hockey Conference, at
Cornwallis, Oregon, this weekend. „ „
The Varsity team took Oregon
State College 7-0, University of
Idaho 5-0 the University of Washington   3-0  and   University   of
Oregon 1-0.
ALLISON STARS
The major scoring punch was
led   by   Allison   Gourlay.  Ruth
Orton,   Barb  Hay  and  Jocelyn
Searle contributed goals.
UBC UNDEFEATED
Team manager Barb Lindberg,
In Bell-Irving Cup action the
UBC Physical Ed. team was defeated 9-6 by Kats Second in
"A" division.
In the "B" division Frosh
sloshed to a scoreless ties witn
Ex-Gladstone.
said U.B.C. was easily the most
experienced team on the field.
Although a winner was not declared, varsity was the only undefeated team in the conference.
TEAM MEMBERS
Team members making the
trip were Anne Swan, Alice
Genge, Marg Baynse, Elaine Cal-
laghan, Sheila Clarke, Madeline
Gemmill, Barb Lindberg, Barb
Hay, Alison Gourlay, Ruth
Orton, Cathy Swan, Judy
Sewell, Jocelyn Searle and
coach Miss Schrodt.
UBC "Varsity" team is still
undefeated in play this year.
This week both varsity and
U.B.C. will play decisive league
matches on Saturday afternoon.
T-Birds
Lose Last
Contest
Thunderbirds ended their
most successful football season
to date on a low note this weekend.
In their final game Saturday
they dropped a 14-13 squeaker
t o    Eastern     Washington     a t
Cheney.
GORD AND ROY STAR
Gord Olafson and Hoy Bianco
were the big men in the UBC
backfield. Gord picked up 79
yards en refute to both 'Bird
majors. He plunged two yards
for one a.gd snugged a 16 .yard
pass from Jon lyiqrris for the
other. Bianco contributed 44
yards in 10 carries.
UBC marched for two TD's
in the fourth quarter but failed
to overcome Eastern's early lead
wjhen usually reliable Dave Barker missed a convert.
BfefORD
' '|5irds bowed out "with asp
over-all record of six wins and
four losses. They won five in a
row from the kickoff and then
dropped three of four in the
final stages.
WCIATJ RESULTS
They went undeafeated in the
WCIAU with four wins but dropped three of five to 9Pr American neighbours and lost the
Churchill Cup game to our
Eastern cousins.
The Varsity team of Steve
Tupper, skipper; Doug Helmer,
crew; Sandy Robinsons, skipper;
and Roy Hay, crew, placed first
in seven of eight events.
FIRST OF FOUR
The University of Washington
sponsored the regatta in Portage
Bay, opposite the Seattle Yacht
Club. This was the first of four
regattas between College of Puget Sound, University of Washington, Seattle University and
UBC.
Next meet goes at UBC on January 9 and 10.
FINAL RESULTS
Final team results for the
weekend were UBC 96, C.P.S. 85;
U of W 58, and Seattle U. 49.
All races were sailed in Penguin class boats. These are thirteen-foot single-sail dinghy, sailed with a crew of two.
FIRST TEST
This was the sailing club's first
test. Although a new cliib, the
team already had 122 members.
At present they are building
six boats, of a similar type to
those used in the weekend regatta.
Morz & Wozny
548 Howe St.      MU 3-4715
Custom Tailored Suits
for Ladies and Gentlemen
Gowns and Hoods
Uniforms
Double breasted suits
modermized in the new
single" breasted styles.
Special Student Rates
UDC  radio presents...
NEWS
ON THE
HOUR
Up-to-the-minute world news from the wires of Canadian Press,
Associated Press, and Reuters News Agency. Five minutes news
summaries every hour, headlines every half hour.
atfts«»-.r»>w.i«yii.
my dear Watson! From the happy look
on your physiog, from the cheerful lift
you seem to be enjoying, I deduce
you are imbibing Coc^-Cola. No mystery
about why Coke is the world's favorite
.. . such taste, such sparkle! Yes, my
favorite case is always a case of Coke!
SIGN OF GOOD TASTE
SAY 'COKE' OR 'COCA-COIA'—BOTH TRADE-MARKS MEAN THE PRODUCT
OF  COCA-COIA m^WWoiffi'S  BEST-LOVED  SPAMOtttG IHBNtC PAGE FOUR
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 24, 1959
Swsm fi&auiifrjd dhrilA 9n
Accommodation from 25 to 4,000
i%   SMORGASBORD
i%   HOT MEALS
■&■ COLD BUFFET
-fr   LIGHT REFRESHMENTS
Prices ranging from $1.25 to $3.0ft per person including all
JTL
n  r k—
GaUwU of ^bUtmctiOH £td*
5802 Fraser Street
FAirfax 5-7411
TRinity 6-5143
U.B.C. FILMSOC
AS SIR LAURENCE OLIVIER IS   INDISPOSED
JOHN BARRYMORE HAS GRACIOUSLY
CONSENTED TO STAR IN A REPLACEMENT
FOR HAMLET — THE ORIGINAL
j
Romeo and Juliet
OTHER GRACIOUS VOLUNTEERS ARE
NORMA SHEARER
LESLIE HOWARD
TUESDAY,  NOV. 24th
at 3:30 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.
ADMISSION — NOMINAL ONLY - 35c
English   101   Students
U.B.C PLAYERS' CLUB PRESENTS
Playboy of the Western World'
By John Millingion Synge
A reading directed by George Spelvin
//
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 26th.
12:30 p.m. U.B.C. Auditorium
Tickets - 25c at the door
One Performance Only
COLLEGE SHOP
U.B.C.
CHRISTMAS CARDS
NOW ON SALE
FACULTY SWEATERS
SWEAT CLOTHING
UBC STATIONERY & SCHOOL
SUPPLIES
FACULTY AND CLUB PINS
CRESTED U.B.C. JEWELLERY
U.B.C. COPPER COASTERS AND
PLAQUES
OPEN DAILY IN THE BROCK EXTENSION
11:30 ti 2:30
JtoAi and Jowtd
OWNED AND OPERATED BY THE AJM.S.
'tween classes
(Continued from page 1)
S.A.M.
C. Ingram, President of Western Power and Development,
will speak at noon today in BU
102. His topic is "Economic Attractiveness and Potential of B.C.
as the Site for New Industry."
EL CIRCULO
Recordsof South American and
Spanish music will be played at
noon today in BU 204. Admission
free.
¥       H>      H"
AD & SALES CLUB
"Inside Look at Car Sales."
Mr. G. Hankenson, General Sales
Manager, Lawson Oates Motors;
noon today BU 212.
if, Zfi fft
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Dscussions in French noon today in BU 214.
T V T
ARCH U.S.
General meeting of Architecture and pre architecture students
noon today in HO-12.
* *       *
GAMMA DELTA
There will be a meeting Wednesday noon in BU 227. Rev. E.
Treit will speak on "The Safety Margin in Social Drinking."
* *       *
VOC
Meeting Wednesday noon in
F&G 100. Film on Skiing.
* *       *
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
ORGANIZATION
Weekly testimonial meeting,
Wednesday noon in H.L. 4.
* *       *
UBC ICE HOCKEY
Hockey practice iThursday
noon in Kerrisdale Arena. Bring
as much of your own equipment
as possible.
* *       *
BOOSTER CLUB
Pep band practice on Thursday noon in Hut L-6. All interested in classical music please
come.
* *       *
ARCH U.S.
Tape recording of Frank Lloyd
Wright's speech to A.I.A. 1951
Thursday at 1:00 p.m. in HO-12.
Married Accommodation
in Acadia available for undergraduate students, all years.
Call at Housing Office
Rm. 205-A, Physics Building
A. R. BAIRD
Housing Administrator.
MEN
TWO BARBER SHOPS
TO SERVE YOU
inside  the  gates
• Brock Hall Extension
• 5734 University Boulevard
Professional Sales Career
The Upjohn Company of Canada
a well-established, ethical, pharmaceutical house, offers
opportunities for a professional sales career. Our contacts
are with professional people—physicians, pharmacists and
hospital personnel. A stimulating and interesting future
is to be found in this field.
SALARIED POSITION.. • ..FRINGE BENEFITS .
AUTOMOBILE FURNISHED
Our Representative will visit Your Campus
November 26, 1959
For further information, obtain our brochure "A Career
With a Future", from your personnel officer.
NOVEMBER PROMOTION
One Week Only
TRIUMPH & WEARMORE SHOES
$1095
Last Day, Monday, Nov. 30
Sheppard Men's Shoes
516 W. HASTINGS
(Just Opposite Eaton's)
AJh * <* *
Interesting Career
Are you a first year student pondering over your future career? Would
Chartered Accountancy interest you? Why not enquire — it is a fine profession offering interest, variety, opportunity and substantial reward. You
are invited to the . . .
MEETING TOMORROW
IN BUCHANAN 318 at 12:30 p.m.
(WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 25)
at which full time details will be presented of a program in which a course
of University- studies in the summer and practical training in a Chartered
Accountant's office during the winter (on a salary basis) will permit you to
minimize the time required for the Bachelor of Commerce degree and for
admission to The Institute of Chartered Accountants of B.C.
THE INSTITUTE OF CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
TYPING
ESSAYS, THESES, NOTES
MIMEOGRAPHING
MRS. F. M. GOW
445$ W. 10th Ave.
AL 3682
fmao naauuj-miaa; aotjjo Wsotf- Al liBta ss«{o paooas sro pszpiomnT

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