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The Ubyssey 1957-09-17

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 THE UBYSSEY
Volume XL
VAMCUuvEif.  tt.C.  XCESL »*, hEPlEMMER  17.  1957
No. 1
Armoury   "Crush"   Eased
'57 BOOM
Buildings
Give UBC
New Look
1957 lias created UBC into a
metaphorical mushroom.
Buildings have sprung up as
if from spores miking this year
one of the greatest construction
boom years in UBC's history.
The new Arts and Science
building, still under construction, occupies a place on the
Main Mall next to the Women's
gymnasium. Although the
more than $2,000,000 structure
will not be open for classes until
the 1958-59^ session, faculty offices are scheduled to be ready
for use in the late fall.
Brock extension, a $350,000
example of students determination and following of the old
tradition of helping themselves
is open now and ready to house
club offices. The extension was
financed solely by the $5-a-stu-
rient lew initiated by the
students to build their $1,000,-
000 War Memorial Gym.
Also completed are the bowling alleys in the Memorial Gym
valued at $37,000, additions to
the library stacks costing $225,-
000 and $125,000 worth of heat,
light, water and sewage services.
Construction is expected to
start sometime next month on
the $500,000 Faculty Centre.
The Centre will occupy the site
of the present temporary Faculty Club. Tenders have not
been called for the Centre yet,
but architects are working on
the final drawings. Tenders are
also expected to be called soon
for a new $150,000 International
House.
Construction has also started
on a Fisheries Technological
building located south of the
New Forest Products Lab. Turn-
bull and Gale Construction Co.
have been awarded the $604,000
contract by the Federal Works
Department in Ottawa. It is expected to be completed in one
year.
Smaller construction projects
now underway include a $20,000
auditorium renovation project,
$25,000 expansion in the temporary College of Education
(Continued on Page 3)
See   BUILDINGS
Over 8400 Students
Expected To Register
An estimated 8400 students, highest enrolment since the
post-war peak a decade ago, will register this week for UBC's
43rd winter session, according to Registrar J. A. Parnell.
Administration officials are taking every feasible precaution to ease the inevitable "crush" of the first days of reg-
stration.
WHERE'S THE JOHN?
Morfitt Saves - All
Funds To Go To AMS
Savings  have Been  already  achieved   in  student  funds,
according to George Morfitt, elected Treasurer to Students'
Council.           v
Mr. Morfitt informed the Ubys-I         	
Over 2000 frosh will crowd
into the Armoury today, many
"f them having arrived in the
small hours of the* morning.
However, the long wait probably has been in vain.
Mr. Parnall told the Ubyssey
that there 1s "no real advantage"
to the traditional dawn lineup,
■as all sections are being assigned in rotation. Those who register Friday or Saturday will have
as good a chance as those who
register earlier in the week.
Engineers will register this
year in the Engineering Building, a move designed to unsnarl
Armoury traffic on Thursday.
Enrolling Engineers should
reach the 1000 mark this year.
UBC's highest enrollment was
9,374 in 1947-48. one of the post-
Second World War years when
many veterans had returned to
complete their interrupted studies.
This year's near-record figure
includes the Sopron Forestry
Faculty of Hungary, with nearly 200 students.
A total of over 7900 students
registered  at  UBC  last  winter
(Continued on Page 3)
Se*   ARMOURY
Freshettes
Eligible For
QueenVot€
Nominations open today for
Frosh Queen of 1957.     '
Women's Undergraduate Society, sponsors of the contest,
m\\ receive nominations at the
Frosh Orientation Booth
throughout registration week.
Any member of the freshman
class is entitled to nominate
my freshette for the honor.
The field of contestants will
be narrowed down to 10 at ihe
Tea Danre. Monday, September
23, at 3.30 in the Brock.
Finalists will be introduced to
Frosh at the* WUS Big-Little
Sister Banquet, the Big Block
Smoker, and the VOC Splash
and Dance party. Voting will
take place at these three functions.
The triumphant Frosh Queen
candidate will be crowned at
the Frosh Reception in Brock
Hall, Saturday, September 28.
BUDGET DEADLINE
OCT. 1st FOR CLUBS
All clubs and undergraduate societies must have their
budgets in to Treasurer
George Morfitt by October 1.
Budgets not in his hands by
that date stand possibility of
^.tion and no financial
from the KW±. 'Wlis
.am <4WV«RSJiryWU A»,n'
sey that the profits will be j
handed on to students through
wider AMS-sponsored events
and services. All possible funds
are being freed for direct student
use.
Among the advantages of the
savings to date are a less expensive Totem. Totem will now
sell for $3.50, a saving of 75c
to students.
Also, free registration cards
will be given to all students
when they enroll. Formerly
these cards, with the student's
picture attached, cost 35 cents.
Mr. Morfitt confidently announced that a more complete
student directory, made possible
by extra available money,
would appear at the earliest
possible date.
Most important change under
the Morfitt regime has been the
installation of a telephone
switchboard and extensions for
extended student use. Switchboard has been installed in the j
AMS office. I
Despite the changes, however, •■
Mr.  Morfitt  maintains that  the I
"monetary   policies   will   follow i
closely those established  in  the
1956-57 year.''
The most basic change will be i
in the realm of Men's Athletics, j
That  committee  will   receive  a
grant of $4.30 per full fee-pay-1
ing  student,  instead of a  lump
sum allocation as was given last
year.
FROSH    CALENDAR
TUESDAY, September 17:
Registration, 9 a.m., Armoury.	
THURSDAY, September 19:
Orientation   Lectures,   9   a.m.,   Auditorium.
FRIDAY, September 20:
Students' Council Program,  9:30 a.m, Auditorium
Guided Tours of campus points of interest, 1:30 p.m
Quad.
Armoury,
Free film, "Highlights of the U.B.C. Year", 1:30 p.m., Biology 100.
Registration  Mixer, 9:00 p.m.,  Brock Hall.
SATURDAY, September 21:
Guided tours of campus, 10:00 a.m., Quad.
"Highlights of the U.B.C. Year", Biology 100, 10 a.m.
Registration Ends, 12 noon.
Frosh Dance, 9 p.m., Brock Hall.
MONDAY, September 23:
Lectures begin, 8:30 a.m.
Tea Dance, 3:30 p.m., Brock Hall.
TUESDAY, September 24:
Jazz Concert, 12.30 p.m., Auditorium,
WEDNESDAY, September 25:
Regalia compulsory all day, W.U.S. Big-Little Sister Banquet, 6 p.m.,
Big Block Smoker, 7 p.m. Brock Lounge.
THURSDAY, September 26:
Red Sweater Day   (Engineers   vs.  Frosh).
Regalia compulsory all day.
FRIDAY, September 27:
"Her  Scienceman   Lover"   (Eric   Nico! play), 12:30, Auditorium.
Bonfire Rally, followed by V.O.C. "Splash and Dance" party, 7 p.m., Empire Pool.
SATURDAY, September 28:
Pep Rally, 11 a.m., Stadium.
Football   Game   (U.B.C.   Thunderbird: vs. Southern Oregon), 2 p.m.. Stadium.  Frosh
must  attend,  wearing  beanies,  or  fac- expulsion from the university.
Frosh Reception, 8:30 p.m., Brock Ha!l.
WEDNESDAY, October 2:
President N. A. M. MacKenzie's address to faculty and student body 11:30 a.m.   Lectures and labs cancelled.
UP 171357 PAGE TWO
THE UBYSSEY
Authorized as second class mail.  Post Office Department,
Ottawa.
MEMBERS CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Student subscriptions $1.20 per year (included in AMS fees). Mail
subscriptions $2.00 per year. Single copies five cents. Published
in Vancouver throughout the University year by the Student
Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society, University of
British Columbia. Editorial opinions expressed herein are those
of the editorial staff of the Ubyssey, and not necessarily those of
the Alma Mater Society or the University. Letters to the Editor
should not be more than 150 words. The Ubyssey reserves the
right to cut letters, and cannot guarantee publication of all letters
received.
Editor-in-Chief  Pat Marchak
Managing Editor  Dave Robertson
News Editor Bob Johannes
Advertising Manager Bill Miles
Business Manager   Harry Yuill
CUP Editor  Marylyn Smith
THB     UBYSSEY
Tuesday,   September   17,   19S7
•   •
To All Phonies
Okay. So you're here now. And you belong to the
largest class ever enrolled at this great institution, etcetera. So you can strut over the campus now and dream
of degrees and notriety. Ycu may even end up being
Frosh Queen or First Member at Large.
What we want to know is what right, have you to be
here? Don't turn away yet . . . what makes you
think you're not just another mealy-mouthed parasite
like 75 per cent of the other freshmen who have riddled
through the registration line?
You with your juvenile duck-tails or debutante
dresses. You're coming out this year? , Sure you're coming out . . . you're coming out to show that you're
nothing more than a bunch of ignoramuses, parasites who
came here to have a ball and boast to your mechanic
friends that you're a Vareity type.
Oh, you've heard the myth that all men are born
equal and you figure that since President MacKenzie had
the intelligence to pick up degrees, you must also have
that ability .. . to use as a mechanism of proving
your superiority over the  laboring classes.
Unfortunately some top administrators in the education field have heard that Dewey myth too. That's why
you're allowed to show your pimply young faces without
proving yourselves first. No, you didn't have any entrance
examinations. No, you didn't have to do some honest
laboring work to rid yourselves of that high school glow.
No, you didn't have to learn how the other half lives before
you oculd say you belonged to this half. No, none of
this. You can just waltz with the Varsity Debs and swear
with the Frat boys and that alone should prove your
worth to this University. You fit in all right, buddy. You're
right in there.
Or are you the other type? You know the world
owes you an education . . . that's the right of
Canada's great youth and all that . . . yet for some
reason you're a little bit afraid? Maybe those erudite
upperclassmen who find you amusing scare you? Maybe
the calender descriptions of courses sound ominous? Maybe
the vaulted ceilings in the Library inspire awe? Maybe the
English professor looks as if he knows something you
don't?   Maybe you have an inferiority complex?
Congratulations! You should have an inferiority complex. You are inferior. You're nothing at all. You have
no "right" whatsoever to the education on which you're
lightly embarking. You haven't even begun to find out
what life's about, and you have no right at all to feel on
a par with the serious students on this campus who are
honestly endeavouring to gain knowledge. You can't hold
a candle to that professor who spent his "coming out" year
earning   tuition  fees  on  a   tug-boat.
So smarten up, kiddies. You're not much of a credit
to the University with your present boy scout mentalities.
And the leftovers . . .
You're the leftovers. You are the few, the very very
low. who already suspect that you came here to learn
because you recognize your ignorance. You probably won't
be the social leaders. You won't wear a blue blazer or
speak up in the Club executive weekly meeting. But
you are the lew who would hive passed entrance examinations. You are tho few who know what a day's work means.
You are the ones who will stave off your "coming out"
until you leel you have some reason to do so. You are the
few who make it worthwhile for professors to tolerate the
others.   You  are  the leftovers.
We may never again hear of you, nor have the sense
to address you again. But while we do have the sense,
we welcome you. 4
,,.)...,-<;  *»«."-. . ^-'vfV-irrtaiAi *..ivft.,..»Blv.vi.iii ..,.i».»it4i«,-«(.i..;,iW !."(.,.i,-* ., J.i.i...' ...**■;■ .^.Sl*-i.wa.At ■ «.•'.■■ ''  ..     ■ '".,    ■ A.*.       -   - i  ...•**.. -.;*■..- -rtkfr)        -*\**i& -&&V^t. s ^Jmf»« Vi *"* *
LIFE AMONG THE MODERNS
"Gentlemen, I want you to observe the change in the signs this year."
Mat 7hU CampuA fleefa . . . .
by*  atcuL . dsL  dt/uupt
Ed. note: This is ihe first in
a series of columns under the
titled inspired by a five-cent
cigar   vendor.   Attention   Jim
MacFarlan: your column due
September 23rd,  2 p.m.
SCENE: The Brock Lounge.
SCENERY:   Two   Loungers—
Frosh—deep in what they now
consider their vocation, i.e. profoundly serious talk. Sparks are
flying   in  the  smithies  of their
minds as they hammer out ideas
on the anvil of intellect.
"I see," says one, frowning
aloofly from the depth of a
couch bathed in the brilliant
light of a Harris abstract, "I
see that this here Ubyssey
paper is runnin' a column on
what this campus needs. Can't
sec much sense in it myself. Ain't
nothin' missin' 'star's I can sec.
This sure is the life!"    •
"Yeah," replies his interlocutor, subtly removing all traces
of roast beef (from between his
teeth with delicate jabs of his
thumbnail, "this place sure's
yot everythin'. Swimmin' pool,
bowlin' alleys, eatin' joints,
women—and' ya don't even gotta go to lectures."
"AN' DIDYA see Hie clubs
they got here! Boy, there's some
real ciillies —jazz an' dancin' an'
skim' an' all sorts. They got some
for the creeps too, like this here
Critics' Circle an' French an'
like that, but then I guess they
gotta cater to dil'f'runt types, I
guess. But anyhow I got mosta
my evenin's booked already an'
I met my babe yesterday would
knock ver eye out. Her an' mc's
gonna get along okay, balieve
you me." The lad, obviously
worried from the strain of putting Ubyssey in its place and
marshalling the evidence for his
cogent argument, slumped even
lower into the cushions, while
his friend, removing the strands
of meat from his right thumbnail
with the nail of his left forefinger, confidently picked up
the ball and gained a-few more
yards for the old team. "An'
this here Brock place ain't so
bad neither," he pointed out.
"Ya c'n play poker an' have a
snooze, or even getcher hair cut.
I heard some interestin' rumors
'bout a 'pub' too, but I think ya
gotta be in some kinda job to
get in."
JAN   de   BRUYN
"Course there's other things
ain't so hot," says the oilier,
emerging slightly from retirement, and replacing the loftly
frown on his physiognomy.
There's this timetable thing we
got at the Armouries. I guess ya
can't just cut them classes altogether, what with exams an'
all."
"Aw, I wouldn't worry about
them. Ya c'n get all the dope
from   some   creep   that   goes   to
the classes regular, and cram up
the notes just before the exam.
They only have them courses
to keep the teachers an' them
busy doin' somethin'. Y'know
my cousin Slim, he was here last
year—never bothered his head
none 'bout all that stuff. He had
one sweet time, I c'n tell ya."
"YEAH? Is he comin' back
this year? Maybe he can show us
some angles."
"Well, yeah, he's havin' another shot. Didn't do so good in
his courses acourse. He's repeat-
in' the year, but he ain't worried none. He'll sure have himself a time. If this place needs
anythin', boy, it's a few more
guys like him. He sure livens
things up."
"Yeah—well, I guess at the
rate he's goin' he'll be around
for awhile, eh?" said the other,
who, surprised at the quickness
of his mind and the sharpness
of his wit collapsed under a
mushrooming cloud of his own
uproarious laughter. His companion, grasping thc humor of
the comment after a moment's
hesitation, joined in the laughter.
The cloud filled the Brock
Lounge, thundered back from
the walls, and finally swirled out
the floors. Gradually an awe-
same stillness, like that succeeding the blast of a hydrogen
bomb, filled the room; the
loungers, wearied with laughter
and obviously affected by radioactive fall-out, sat stunned and
silent. The aloof frown reappeared; the fleshy toothpick
went once more into action.
"There must," said the one, "be
something   this  outfit  needs."
"YEAH," was the reply, made
somewhat gurgly as a result of
the dental operations; "I wonder what it can be?" Tuesday,   September   17,   19S7
THE     UBYSSEY
PAGE THREE
WELCOME FROSH & SOPRON
'EXTEND A HAND" -
AMS PRESIDENT BEN
The Frosh of 1957 have a
big year in store for them.
Our Brock Extension will soon
have its formal opening; Club
Day should be bigger and better than ever; Open House will
take place in the Spring; New
buildings are either going up
now or are on the drawing
boards; the University's Capital Gifts Campaign is underway; British Columjbia's Centennial year is just around the
corner; and at last, but not
least, we are hosts to the students who formerly comprised
the Faculty of Forestry Sopron
University in Hungary.
To the Sopron students I
would like to extend an especially warm welcome. I hope
they will make every effort to
meet as many people as possible and to participate in as
many activities as possible.'To
all the other students I can only
ask that UBC's hand of friendship be extended as readily as
was Canada's hand of humanity
in the recent Hungarian Revolution.
To all students I would like
to point out that the best thing
you can bring to University is
a healthy curiosity. An inquiring mind will help you in your
studies as well as your extracurricular activities. Be curious as to how your AMS fee
is spent, who spends it, and
why. Get your money's worth
by taking part in as many activities as your study time-table
will allow.   Only in this way
New Pubsters Meet
irst Friday Of Fall
If you are strong, virile and owneither a sense of humor
or, failing that, some taleht, you too can be a news reporter.
DEAN GAGE
Friend For
Fundless
Freshmen
Some funds are still available
for loans to students in acute
financial difficulties, the office
of Dean Gage has announced.
However, all existing loan
funds have been heavily drawn
upon this summer and fall. As
a result, only those students in
particularly grave circumstances will be considered.
In a recent interview, the Dean
said that his office would welcome for consultation any student whose personal troubles
were interfering with his studies
or with the continuance of his
education at UBC.
Freshmen, in particular. f>re
encouraged to visit Dean Gage
in his ofice, Room 10 of the Arts
Building.
40  YEARS OF SERVICE
TO THE  UNIVERSITY  OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA,
ITS FRATERNITIES
AND SORORITIES.
THERE'S A REASON
BEN   TREVINO
can you reap the full benefits
offered by University.
There are opportunities at
UBC that should not be lightly
passed by. Writing for the
Ubyssey or Totem can develop
or polish skills and talents you
may have. We have an extremely active Club organization,
with students gathering together to study or take part in
religion, language, politics, literature, communications, drama, photography, films, archaeology,   dancing,   skin-diving,
BUILDINOS
(Continued from Pag*  1)
building, $35,000 extension to
the buildings and grounds department to house architects and
draughtsmen during the. continuing building boom, and a
$35,000 temporary building for
medical research.
Other buildings now in active
planning stages are: medical
sciences centre, biological sciences addition, chemistry addition,
library wing, student residences
and cafeteria.
This boom is something quite
unparalleled in the 982-acre
Point Grey campus' history.
and any other socially acceptable activity you can think of.
All of these organizations are
avenues to new friendships and
interests.
The same can be said of the
UBC sports program, which is
also operated to a large extent
on your moneV UBC squads
and crews offer the athletic
p+udent excellent competition
in sport.
AH  of these  activities and
several   more   that   have   not
yet   been   mentioned  have   as
their governing body the Student Council.   The Council offices in  Brock Hall fcre open
to any student.    If you  have
troubles you would rather take
to a student, or  if you have
doubts as to whom to go to
with your problem, your Councillors will be more than glad
to do whatever they can, Council   meetings  are   open  to  all
students   and   begin   at   7.301
every Monday evening in thel
Board Room of Brock Hall.   If
you   would   like   to   hear   all I
sides of an issue discussed — j
and  perhaDs  put in  your two ]
cents worth,   come  along,   we
are glad to have you. ;
You will soon be asked to
vote on your Frosh*executive.
The person you elect will sit
on the Undergraduate Societies Committee and will represent you in that way. He .or
she should be someone who
can mold the Frosh, the largest
single "group" on the campus,
into a cohesive and vital unit.
Take an interest in the campaign speeches and use your
vote intelligently.
Remember always that you
are now part of a community
known as the University of
British Columbia. High-school
loyalties should be submerged
for a while and your primary
loyalty reserved for UBC.
Since the time of the Great
Trek this student body has
been one of the most autonomous — and therefore one of
the most responsible — student
bodies in North America. Cherish the traditions we have
now, and develop new ones of
your own. Only in that way
can we keep UBC the vital,
exciting place that it is.
I extend my sincere best
wishes for a stimulating and
profitable year to all the Frosh
of 1957.   TtJUM EST!
If you are weak, effeminate
and own brains, a camera, a cartoonist's hand, a roving eye or a
yen for parties, you too can be.
If you want to find a quiet
spot on campus where you can
fraternize with the opposite sex
without fear of a Redshirt raid
and where you can sponge a
lunch and last year's Psych
notes, you too.
i.e. the Publications Board
needs new staffers. Experience
preferred — on a high school
paper or annual, on a community paper or a downtown daily.
If you have no experience at
writing, snapping pictures, asking questions, fraternizing with
the opposite sex or eating lunch,
you.
Aye, even you.
Training course begins immediately for all freshmen and
upperclassmen who wish to
learn any phase of newspaper
wor'-' photography, layout, report g and writing. Parties also
begin immediately.
Initial meeting for new pubsters will be held at noon Friday
September 27 in the North side
offices of the Brock Hall base- I
ment. Assignments and practice
sessions will commence Friday
afternoon.
APPLICANTS WANTED
FOR WUSC CHAIR
Applications are now being
received by the Students'
Council for the position of
Chairman of World University Service.
The position has been* left
vacant by the resignation of
Mrs. Jerry O'Flannigan, the former    Kathy    Archibald,    who
notified council this summer
she does not intend to return
to University this fall.
Deadline for applications is
September 30.    Council  will
interview   all   candidates   for
the post the night of September 30.
ARMOURY
(Continued from Pag* 1)
session, upsetting an estimate of
7200. The estimate of 8400 for
this year is a "conservative"
guess, said Mr. Parnall.
With an enrollment of 8400.
UBC would retain its position as
second-biggest university in Canada. McGill is the largest, with
an enrollment figure approximating 10,000.
In   addition   to   discouraging
registrants   from   crowding   the
Armoury early in the week, and
moving  the    Applied     Science
Faculty  into    the    Engineering j
Building   for   registration,   offi-1
cials have relieved  the "crush" j
further   by   moving   the   photo-1
graphy studio upstairs to COTC j
headquarters     and     restricting
slightly the Alma Mater Society
displays.
Registration closes noon Saturday, September 21. I
io the,
£dito)c
September 6th,  1957
Mr. B. Trevino,
President,
Alma Mater Society,
The University  of
British Columbia.
Dear Mr. Trevino,
Copies of the report on the
first annual Academic Symposium held at Parksville in
February, 1957, were circulated to the members of Senate of the University prior to
their recent meeting.
The members of Senate
have asked me to let you
know that they found this
report most interesting. They
would like to congratulate
those responsible for organizing the Symposium.
Yours sincerely,
J. E. A. PARNALL,
Secretary of Senate
Double Breasted
Tuxedos
Converted into New
SINGLE BREASTED
MODELS
New Silk Facing
UNITED TAILORS
549 Granville
PA. 6449
fln0ifmv0
VV ARMSTR0N
ROM I. ARMSTRONG 0 o
BEST WISHES
and years of success
The Toronto General Trusts
Corporation
590 WEST PENDER STREET PAGE FOUR
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday,   September -17,   1957
■iMritoaiiMifci
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i
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ALSO
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A FREE DINNER FOR TWO at the
WHITE SPOT DINING ROOM, 67th and Granville
VALUE: $5.00 Tuesday,   September   17,   1957
«-»"'*
THE     UBYSSEY
PAGE FIVE
¥^mmmmmim
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• • •
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WATERMAN
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Vi Price
Special shipment of factory-fresh Waterman
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OPEN FRIDAY
NIGHTS TILL 9 PAGE SIX
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday,   September   17,   1997
Campus Leaders
Meet October 4-6
UBC's third annual Leadership Conference will be held
October 4-6 at Camp Elphinstone.
FIRST CRf AT TREK
~* Attendance at the Conference
Is by invitation only. Representatives from club and undergraduate society executives, faculty
and administration, Students'
Council and former HA A. and
UCC. award winners have been
chosen and notified.
Dean Roller and a small number of Hungarian forestry students of the Sopron University
•have also been invited to attend
the weekend conference.
Finances, organization and administration of clubs and: undergraduate societies will be the
main discussion topic.
Delegates are reminded that
the return of registration forms
and payment of $4 fee to the
AMS office in Brock Hall should
be made by Monday, September
30.
The registration fee covers
boat fare, food and accommodation.
Main Mall Ceremony
Commemorates   Move
Campus newcomers will participate in a ceremony paying tribute to the initiative of
their, predecessors when the annual Cairn Ceemony is enacted Friday, September 20, at 11
a.m. on the Main Mall. ®-
Coeds Can
Clue Up On
WUS, WAD
Coeds at UBC are being given
every oportunity to "get clued
up."
Two booklets full of "clues"
have been compiled by upper-
class-women designed to tell the
freshette how to go about getting what she wants.
Both booklets will be distributed to freshettes during registration, one by the Women's
Undergraduate Society and the
other, by the Women's Athletic
Directorate.
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The Cairn commemorates The
Great Trek of 1922, ah integral
part of UBC history which is unmatched by any other university.
In 1922, eleven years after
Point Grey had been.chosen as
the site of the University of
British Columbia, the university
was still housed in a group of
ramshackle buildings on part of
the General Hospital grounds in
Fairvlew.
Students, tired of their "Fair-
view shacks," swarmed over the
city and gathered a petition to
the government containing over
59,000 signatures. Then came the
Trek.
The Trekkers paraded through
downtown Vancouver in jalopies, then gathered en masse at
the site of the present University gates. Marching on foot
through bush along what was
then only a trail, they gathered
rocks on their way and piled
them into a mound when they
reached the university site.
The mound of rocks was the
mark they left to show they had
been there. Demonstrations
lasted for hours. They shouted,
cheered, and formed a giant human "UBC" in letters of hundreds of students each.
The government was duly impressed. It invited a student
delegation to attend a sitting of
the legislature to present the
students' case, a move then unprecedented  in the history  of
the province.
Three years later, students
moved into permanent buildings
on the present campus.
And three years after that,
copies of the 55,000 signatures
gathered by the students were
placed inja peyiruKient cairn, the
cairn that stands today on the
Main Mall, as a tribute to the
Great Trekkers of 1922.
F. U. S. Executive
Elections Set
For October 9 ;
Frosh Undergraduate Society
executive will be elected by first
year students Wednesday, October 9.
Deadline for nominations is
Friday, October 4.
Nominations will be received
at a Frosh general meeting in
Physics 200, Monday, Sept. 30,
at noon, and candidates will give
campaign speeches the following
Monday noon, in Phys. 200.
Polling booths will be situated, on election day, at strategic points on the campus.
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THE     UBYSSEY
PAGE SEVEN
Nf
Lollipop Passport To
Big  Sister   Banquet
Freshettes need only a short shirt, a lollypop, and a big
pink hair-ribbon to get into the Big Sister-Little Sister Banquet September 25th.
EYES
EXAMINED
J. J. Abramson
I. F. Hollenberg
Optometrists
Immediate Appointment
Vancouver Block
MArine 0928    MArine 2948
Object of the annual event is
to acquaint new coeds with their
upperclasswomen and with each
other. The banquet begins at 6
p.m. in the Armouries.
Sponsored by the Women's
Undergraduate Society, freshettes are invited through a "big-
sister" system which has proved
highly successful in orientating
freshettes, in the past.
New coeds are asked to sign
forms during registration if they
wish to have a big-sister. They
are contacted frosh week by the
upperclasswomen assigned to
their "case," and are then shown
the campus, its ins and outs and
who's by an experienced lady
of the world.
They are to go to the banquet
with their big sisters. Another
duty taken on by the big sisters
is to be obtain dates for their
ittle sisters who wish to attend
the Frosh Dance.
The banquet will cost only
80 cents per person.
Blood Drive
To Go October 7
The twi'iiiiil fall blood c'ri'e
vill occur during V.:v week of
X'tober 7th, Undergraduates
;<xkT!os Chairman Neil Merrick
naounced Monday.
UP'jor   the  direction   of  Law
indent.   Al   Stusiak,   the  drive j
vill be sponsored by the Nurs--
ng and Coir,merce Undergraduvi
>te Societies.
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and clinging waistband. Full-fashioned and ha$d-
finished, in heavy-knit Pettal Orion, moth-proof and
thrink-proof. Comes in an exciting range of new
Autumn colours for campus, or sportswear.
$10.95, at good shops everywhere!
took for the name
0^
SP338
UBC RADIO
PROUDLY ANNOUNCES
A FIRST FOR THIS UNIVERSITY
t^mmm*m     mmmmm
This year UBC Radio becomes the ONLY campus medium in Canada (news*
paper or radio) to have the full time and exclusive service of a     .    .    .
NEWS TELETYPE
At the rate of 50 words a minute—24 hours a day. news pours into the UBC RADIO
newsroom. It comes from every major thy and remote corner on the globe —- as
reported by more than 15,000 top reporters on   .   .   .
THE CANADIAN PRESS — THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
REUTERS NEWS AGENCY
8 NEWSCASTS
3 SPORTSCASTS
DAILY
ON   I BC   RADIO'S   CLOSED   CIRCtn NETWORK SERVING  CLUBROOMS,
LOUNGES AND CAFETERIAS TIIROUG HOUT THE CAMPUS SIX HOURS DAILY.
Watch for further announcements concerning our first day of
broadcasting in subsequent editions of the Ubyssey
THE GREATEST DISCOVERY
FOR GIRLS SINCE BOYS!
•;*v
Madp in U.S.A
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The girls that have all the fun,
wear Sport-Pals on the campus.
Both styles come in AA and B
widths, sizqs 4-10.
Black Suede
Blue Suede
Brown Suede
Carbon  Grey
Russett Elk
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3035 W. BROADWAY PAGE EIGHT
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday,   September   17,   1057
Special Event Brings
French Artists To U.B.C.
A series of noon-hour concerts covering all areas of the
music of French composers will be given in Physics 200 this
term.
Wuuet
Don't be fooled by appearances. Good
Irime Charlie missed his last payment,
so both car and smile are due to fade
away. How different had this madcap
boy set aside a few bucks in a Royal
Bank Savings Account Car, smile and
girl might still be his. Take heed ancl
open your Savings Account today.
THE ROYAL BANK OF CANADA
There's a handy branch of the Royal nearby
The Vancouver Symphony returns to the campus on November 14 for a two-hour concert in
the Auditorium.
Both events along with a wide
choice of others will be sponsored by the Special Events
Committee in co-operation with
the Faculty Fine Arts committee
in the 1957-58 term.
Nobel Prize winner, Harold
Urey, a physical chemist, will
give a lecture in January. This
controversial speaker initiated
nuclear energy work in the U.S.
and is at present concerned with
the problem of the origin of the
earth.
Alfredo Campoli, internationally known violinist, will appear
early in February. .
Tom Tothill Billiards
Broadway at Dunbar
The finest  equipment  in
Canada
FOR   FROSH   ONLY =
BALLOT  FORM
   FOR   r-
FROSH   QUEEN
 AND	
FROSH   COUNCIL
Fill in this nomination form NOW. Here it your chance to elect a queen worthy
of the till*. Second pari of the form dealt with the people who will run frtshmen activities
during the year. Fill in both parti, get the necessary seconders, and hand them in at the
A.M.S. offfee, give to any council member, or hand them in at the special booth provided
al registration.
Your choice for Queen: .   .,  	
Five seconders:    	
4p} +. ■ — -- — , -■._-_..
Your choice for executive of the Frosh Undergraduate Society:
President:       	
Vice-Presideni:	
Secretary:   	
Treasurer:       	
Men's Athletic Director:    	
Women's Athletic Director:  	
Ten seconders: .-. —*   .	
Important — USE BALL POINT PEN AND PRINT.
Other events that SEC hopes
to book include a jazz quartet,
string quartet and various speakers and artists.
In past years student audiences have filled the auditorium io
hear Dylan Thomas, and W. H.
Auden read their own poetry;
Margaret Mead discuss marriage
and Stephen Potter describe
Gamesmanship.
The musical series of Beethoven sonatas given every Wednesday for 16 weeks last year
met a full house for each presentation.
Students can keep posted on
SEC events by watching notices
in the Ubyssey or taking a look
at the noon-hour show case bulletin board at the east end of
the Quad.
STUDENT FEDERATION
GATHERS UBC FROSH
As you handed over your
registration today, Frosh, you
automatically became members of NFCUS.
Students at UBC, with those
at some thirty-five other
Canadian universities, compose the 50,000-member organization.
For the fifty-cent membership fee, each student receives
benefits from NFCUS's projects, including reduced railway fares, inter-regional exchange scholarships, and income tax exemptions.
Filmsoc
$1 Passes
Available
This one dollar pass when
presented at the auditorium door
Tuesday noon hour will enable
the holder to view twenty of
Filmsoc's entertainments.
Along with the old slapstick
of the Twenties, Mr. Magoo, the
Keystone Cops, and the inevitable Charlie Chaplain, Filmsoc
plan to present a War Series for
their noon hour shows.
A wide variety of feature movies will be shown this year, the
first cne being "Night at the
Opera" with the Marx Brothers
on Red Sweater Day, Sept. 26.
Also to be shown this year Is
"Seven Deadly Sins", Rudolph
Valentino in "Son of a Sheik"
and Gina Lollogrigda in "Beauties in the Night". Marie Dressier will be seen in "Tillie's
Punctured Romance", the show,
incidently, in which Charlie
Chaplain made his first appearance.
. "Birth of a Nation," D. W.
Griffiths' long epic film will be
featured in Filmsoc's repertoire.
Among those "films connected
with English courses will be
"Hamlet" and "Pride and Prejudice."
Feature films will be shown
Tuesday evenings, Thursday at
noon, also on Thursday at 3.30,
6.00 and 8.15 p.m.
Admission is 35c while door
price at noon hour shows for
those who have not been persuaded to purchase a pass, is 15c.
We'd like to admit right here and now that tht
main reason we run advertisements like this is to
get you, dear reader, to drink Coca-Cola to tho*
virtual exclusion of all other beverages. The
sooner you start going along with us, the
we'll both begin to gat mors out of Ufo.
lie
coca-cola im Tuesday,   September  17,   1957
THE     UBYSSEY
ON CLUBS DAY
Membership Drives
Aimed At Freshmen
UBC's more than 80 student clubs will set up display booths in the Armory, Thursday,!
October 3, with an eye to bolstering their memberships   from   the   ranks   of   the   Freshman
Class.
The annual "Clubs' Day", a
colorful competition for Frosh
attention and membership, features booths representing religious, athletic, musical, political,
dramatic, ethnic and pre-faculty
organizations,
For your attention will be
displays set up by purely social
clubs, such as Dance Club; "intellectual" organizations, like
Critic's Circle; and penetrating
political groups, such as Parlia-1 their UBC devotees, from jazz to
mentry Forum. | classic^.    Jazz  Society,   Choral
Many clubs sponsor famous
speakers on campus. In- past
years, celebrities such as W. H.
Auden and Stephen Potter have
drawn capacity crowds to the
auditorium.
Religious clubs, representing
nearly every major denomination, hold open discussions and
lectures on subjects ranging
from social controversies to articles of belief.
All  branches  of music have
Society, and Music Appreciation
give concerts and lectures.
Then there' are the various
language groups, such as Le
Ccrcle Francais and the Alpha
Omega Society. And of course
the bigger clubs, that approach
being apprenticeship schools for
vocational fields, notably Filmsoc, the Radio Society and the
Ubyssey.
However diverse the interests
of the frosh may be, he .is sure
to find some organizations on
the campus that cater to his specific tastes.
NON-CONFORMISTS
UBC Players' Club Promises
Rare   Fare   For   Centennial
By HELEN ZUKOWSKI
FRATERNITY
RUSHING
L
Never let it be said that the*
Players Club is conformist.        |
This will  be well  illustrated I
in the campus thespians offering
to    the    Centennial Year — a ;
light comedy minus totem, poles, I
B. C. Indians, stage coaches and
Sasquatch.
As Club president Walter
Shynkaryk explains, "Almost
every drama group in B. C. will
be portraying loggers and Indians. By the time the centennial year is over we will have
loggers and Indians running out
of our ears."
In addition to the spring light
comedy the club has tentative
plans for bringing back Players
Club Alumni members to resurrect their roles in a type of
stage medley.
Among the ranks of the one-
time-Player<3 are: Justice and
Mrs. Clyne; Bill Buckingham,
producer of TUTS; Olive Sturgess, well-known NBC TV actress; David Fulton, Minister of
Justice; Lester Sinclair, poet
and playwrite; John Glen, popular feature actor in England;
Norman Campbell, one of CBCs
top producers; Eric Nicol, Pro-;
vince columnist; and Arthur j
Hill, who starred on Broadway
in "The Matchmaker."
True   to   tradition,   the   first:
presentation of the year will be;
Eric "Jabez"  Nicol's "Her Sci-1
enceman Lover," especially designed   for   acquainting   Frosh
with the wild,    sinful    life    at
UBC.
Players Club curriculum will
also include a series of noon-
hour one-act plays commencing
with Saroyan's "Hello Out
There" directed by Peter Brockington.
A "not new but much improved upon" feature is the club
member training program. Local
; directors and dramatic personalities, will lecture to the members of principals of acting,
make-up, direction and-general
theatre practice.
President Shynkaryk stresses
that this is a "must" for club
members, but others are welcome.
FROSH ORIENTATION BOOTH
Set up and operated by
The Commerce Undergraduate Society
Supervised by David McGrath
Each Frosh Receives:-
1  Beany
1  Copy of U.B.C.
1   Frosh Pass
1  Report Card
A Ballot Box is also in the booth for
<• Frosh    Queen    Nominations
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VANCOUVER, B. C. PAGE TEN
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  .September  17,   1987
WELCOME STUDEiyTS!
Drop in to our new location
at 4544v West 10th Avenue,
opposite Sateway's parking
lot.
FINE FOOD
• FINE SERVICE
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BUY   TOTEM
WHAT EVERY STUDENT NEEDS
a REMINGTON portable
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REMINGTON VARSITY SALES,"™ "' • — —
P.O. Box 4072,
Vancouver. B. C.
Please send me the Remington QUIET-RITER [j      LETTER-RITER rj
Mr.
My name is Miss Age	
Mrs.
Vancouver   Address  Signature	
Guarantor's Signature     Address	
(If purchaser is under 21)
UBC Reg. No.
Work at   How long
Own home Q      Rent Q      Board  r-|      How long .
Own car Q     State make and year	
My deposit is $ r	
I wish to pay $  per month
I wish C.O.D. of $	
Credit Accounts (2 firms)	
My bank is    Branch
Personal  references  (1)	
(2)	
Small carrying charge, at bank interest rates, will be applied on unpaid balance.
If purchaser is  under 21, parent  or  guardian must  sign as guarantor  and  complete  credit  information  below
guarantor's  signature. .       ,    ,       ,
WATCH
THIS
SPACE
FOR THE
TIE
BAR
COLUMN
Come in,
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*
TIE BAR
712 W. Pender       TA 6752 Tuesday,   September  17,   1957
TH B     UBY S S E Y
PAGE ELEVEN
IVY LEAGUE
The college style that received
national acclaim now showing
at Bob Lee Men's Wear   .   .   .
IVY LEAGUE JACKETS
$45.00
Homespuns and Shetlands.
IVY LEAGUE SLACKS
$21.50
"Worsteds and Melanges.
BOB LEEltd
Mens Wear
623 W. Hastings
TA0049
CLOTHES FOR THE MAN'S MAN
TO TAKI M, H. AT STANFORD
INFORMATION  OFFICER
RESIGNS FROM POSITION
Edwin  B.
Information
Parker,    UBC's
Officer   for   the
EDWIN .B.   PARKER
past two years, has left that
post to study for a Master of
Arts degree at Stanford University in California.
His successor is James Ban-
ham, who was an editor of the
Daily Express in London before leaving that position to
become Information Officer at
UBC this fall.
Parker studied at McGill
University for iwo years before coming to UBC in 1952,
where he was City Editor,
Managing Editor, and Business
Manager of the Ubyssey. He
obtained his B.A. here in 1934.
In the summer of 1955, after
working for the Vancouver
Sun for a year, Parker took
over the Information Office
job.
He has been awarded a
$1400 fellowship at Stanford
and a $500 grant from the
Leon and Thea Koerner Foundation to continue his study ol
the sociology of mass media
communications.
Banham was Editor-in-
Chief of the Ubyssey in 1949-
1950, and graduated with a
B.A. in 1951.
BUY YEARBOOK MOW
TO SAVE FOUR BITS
Price of Totem, UBC's
yearbook, will rise 50c after
November 1.
Totem ordered during registration or before the deadline, will cost $3.50; after November 1, $4.00.
This price is down 75c from
last year. The reduction was
made possible by contracting
a new mass-production process with Yearbook House, a
Kansas City, Miss., firm printing only college annuals.
Motif of the '57-'58 Totem,
including embossed cover
and colored dividing pages,
will be "modern", promises
editor Norm Pearson.
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COLLINS
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470 Granville St.
MArine 0564
EATON'S
. •   •   •
WELCOMES FROSH OF '57
Just  new  to  Campus  and
already wise to a woman's
ways is Connie. Here she is
exercising   her   prerogative
on Chuck, who is, after all,
only a man. Connie    is   wise    in •
other   ways,   too.
She makes Eaton's
her fashion shopping     headquarters.   She knows
that   for   a   skirt,
shirt,   coat   or
gown   she   gets
more    for    her
style dollar.  And
Chuck? Of course,
he agrees.
_
EATON'S Fashions, Second and Main Floor
Telephone MA 7112
Also ai EATON'S New Westminster. Telephone LA 2-2741 PAGE TWELVE
ENROLLMENT  TO   DOUBLE   BY  1965
TH«E   -U B Y-SSITY
 ' Tttesday,   Se^einoer  17,   1M7
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Trek Drive Target 5
n
Paul E. Cooper, Vancouver
executive, has been appointed
general chairman of UBC building fund, UBC President Dr. N.
A. M. MacKenzie announced recently.
Mr. Cooper, executive vice-
president of Sandwell & Co. Ltd.
and former president of Crown
Zellerbach (Canada) Ltd., has as
his objective $5,000,000 which
the provincial government has
promised to match dollar for
dollar.
He is vice-president and former general campaign chairman
of the Community Chest and
director   and   vice-president   of
COMPLIMENTS OF
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DOYLE
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4829 Willow
BAyview 7708
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the Children's Hospital.    He is
a graduate of McGill University.
In accepting the chairmanship, Mr. Cooper noted that
UBC's present enrolment of
8,000 is expected to double by
1065. "Expanded physical facilities are therefore essential," he
said, "but they can be provided
only through a partnership of
business; industry, government
and the people."
"I, am proud to have a part in
the UBC building fund and I am
happy that I have been assured
all-out suporl by people in all
walks of life."
f-Jjnorary chairman of the
campaign are Dr. A. E. Grauer.
chancellor-elect and Hon. E. W.
Hamber, chancellor-emeritus.
Patrons are Lieutenant-Governor Frank M. Ross, former
lieutenant • governors Clarence
Wallace and Charles A. Banks.
Chief Justice Gorden Sloan,
Chief Justice Sherwood Lett,
and Premier W. A. C. Bennett.
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FILMSOC
;     '\ For Students And Stat/ 0t**/
PRESENTS
"A NIGHT AT THE OPERA"
with THE MARX BROS.
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 26th
or 12:30 in the Auditorium
Don't hyss the first feature of the '57-'58 season
COMING ATTRACTIONS
Coine Mutiny
Prom Here to Eternity
Born Yesterday
Mister Roberts
Inspector General
WATCH FOR THE DATES
Your $1.00 pass entitling you to all Tuesday noon shows
free of charge, now available at the Filmsoc Booth
in the Auditorium.
^
5?"
BEST WISHES TO THE
0
ALMA MATER SOCIETY
-    *
on   the   opening   of  the   new
BROCK EXTENSION
'li|!'
*
GENERAL  CONTRACTORS
Vancouver, B. C.
Builders of the new Arts Group Buildings
s      ,.J Tuesday,   September   17,   1957
THE     UBYSSEY
PAGE THIRTEEN
WEST VIEW
BROCK EXTENSION
NORTH1 V,IEW
BROCK EXTENSION
THIS PAGE COMPLIMENTS OF
&
UNIVERSITY ARCHITECTS
D.  W.  THOMSON M CO.  LTD.  Mechanical  Consultants
O.  SAFIR  Structural  Consultants
simpson & McGregor
Electrical  Consultants
■»-■«•»■ PAGE FOURTEEN
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday,   September  17,   1957
Obscene Scenes
From the screen .you can hear
straw rustling and a low-slung
female giggle — Clark Gable
strolls out of a stable brushing
chaff off his checkered shirt and
tightening his belt up a notch.
He stops, stands feet astride,
ho6ks his thumbs on his gun belt
and then gives you a sideburn-
to-sideburn leer.
"Why, hello there folks."
He speaks to you in the soft
tones of an old black mammy
tucking her picanniny into bed
for the night.
"I'd like to tell you about this
motion picture. It's the story
of a man and the woman he
loved . . ."
And with that, and as Ava
Gardner slips furtively out of
the barn while Gable is talking,
you have the introduction to
another movie preview.
1 This is- one of the most jaro-
minent ways of luring an audience into watching the "trailer"
of a film. Other methods include flashing a series of teaser
scenes before you and the heart-
to-heart chat with the story's
author (if his prestige is the
only thing that will save the
plot) or perhaps the film's director — on location, of course.
The Ubyssey, eager to have
its Frosh adjust quickly to
Canada's number one snake pit,
acknowledges the talent of the
celluloid jungle (and Clark
Gable too, I suppose) and is
pleased to present three previews of the campus in Wistful
Vision and Hysteriophonic
Sound.
First, meet the director (no
author will admit to creating
this thing).
The scene opens with a view
• of the front of the Library. The
camera closes in on the back of
a deckchair near the pond. On
the canvas is the word DICTATOR, put there by a stage hand,
who is now trying to get a job in
television. A gentleman seated
in the chair speaks.
"I direct this production. You
will like it and I'll like you —
as long as you don't put youi4
car in my parking space. Apply
some effort and you'll enjoy
yourself and appreciate the results. But keep out of my parking space. Now I'd like to pre-
' sent 'Tuum Est and All That'."
Or how about a series of
scenes? Described as a show
that will tell you about a Guy
and his Way of Life, the preview
will tempt you with glimpses of
— you taking your B.A., B.Sc,
B. Comm., M.A., M.B.A., M.D.,
LLD. . . .
Finally, the let-our-stan-tell-
you type of preview.
From the screen you hear the
rustle of hay and a low-slung
iemale laugh. Out of an Aggie
chicken-house crawls the AMS
President, casually flicking the
chicken. . . .
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BROWNLEE
OFFICE   OUTFITTERS   LTD.
->2!) \V. Ponder TA XVM
With the new Brock Extension forming an imposing background a pretty 1957 model freshette shows the latest in
campus style. The UBC booster beanie created by Dior
features his newest color sensation, "electric blue."
Turnup collar "Ivy League" shirt is by Hathaway. White
Buck shoe is available in either right or left footed models
at the British Boot Shop.
WELCOME CLASS OF '61
Your Flower and Gift Headquarters
FLOWERS and GIFTS
FLOWERS WIRED ANYWHERE
4427 W. 10th Ave. ALma 0660, ALma 3465
Welcome Frosh Gnd Old Friends
Campus Barber Shops
DROP IN AND SEE US SOON!
PETER VAN DYKE
2 Locations
North FntraiU'o, New Hrock Extension
and 57:! 1 University Boulevard
World Fashion Czars
Decree Frosh Styles
VORLD FASHION CZARS DECREE FROSH STYLES
By W1NNIFRED BACHARACH
As orientation draws nearer, only one question is on the
nind of every fashion-wise Freshette: "What will I wear?"
With help of the Ubyssey's fashion department, and iust a
prinkle of inside information on Fall trends, every Frosn can
look.like she (or he) just stepped off a page of Mademoiselle's
College Issue.
To step into Red Sweater Day * ■
vith your best foot forward, be
ure it doesn't match the worst
>ne.
Patou dictates odd shoes and
;ocks for both men and women
his year, a trend found in most
3aris showings, while Chanel
idds a personal touch; she has
ler masculine models wearing
)ne trouser leg rolled above the
knee.
Absolutely necessary for the
veil-dressed Frosh are access©-
•ies shown by Givenchy, includV
ng the ever-faithful berinie-
A-hich has emerged this year in
he new Robin Hood style.''
Castillo-Lanvin has dispersed
with the "sack" skirt, and will
ie followed by the nnost aware
cirst-year coeds this fall, who
.vill be wearing ordinary, street-
length felinf skirts under their
nan's shirt which, by the way,
MTJJST be worn backwards.       ;
Liike their masculine counter^
oarts, who will be playing the
Pajpma Game with a pajama top
in backwards, Freshettes must
-ve&r a man's tie in front.
Freshettes will wear their
'report cards" pinned to the
front  of their  shirts  to   make
ihem more easily distinguishable
from Freshmen, who will pin
their cards on their backs.
It was Svend who started the
trend away from belts and suspenders for Freshmen. But
don't worry men. Though you
can't use these more conventional ways of keeping your
trousers up, you won't have any
trouble. You can tie the strings
of the apron you must wear
through your belt tops.
Trust Dior to come through
with the finishing touch, to complete the unique ensemble of
every Freshette. Carry a doll,
he says, if you want to be well
dressed. And if you want to be
right on top of the fashion
world, carry it by the left heel,
and only the left heel.
And so the fascinating, ever-
changing world of fashion once
more reaches from Paris to
UBC, and, interpreted by the
Ubyssey, dictates what you, the
Frosh of 1957, will wear this
Farl.
Well, what you'll wear Sept.
25 and 26, anyway.
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WHILE YOU WAIT Tuesday,   September  17,   iSSf
THE     UBYSSEY
PAGE FIFTEEN
Close to twenty-nine hundred out-of-town students will
be forced to board off campus this year, official sources disclosed Monday.
More than half the students ^
enrolling  this  week  are  from
are
out-of-town, and twelve per cent
of these are from foreign countries.
All rooms in campus residences and camps, which can accommodate 1,200 single and 190
married students, have been
rented.
Most desirable rooms offered
students by home-owners lie
/within the area closely surrounding the gates.
Though no record has been
kept by university housing authorities as to how many rooms in
this area have been available in
previous years, it is estimated
that a large majority of "surplus" students will be forced to
take roorrtp in more distant parts
of the city.
Average rent charged students
for room and board in private
homes is $65 monthly.
Friendly Relations to Overseas Students committee has established a housing bureau under
direction of Mrs. F. S. Hobbs in
Physics 200, which will operate
today and Wednesday between
9 a.m. and 5 p.m.
Attention Students!
"Don't conjecture
about missing a lecture"
get a reliable car from
Harry at
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130 W. Broadway    EM 2191
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ZIPPER
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PARKER JOTTER BALL PENS $2.95
SHEAFFER FINE LINE PENCILS    1.95
ADPAC   PENS    98
SCRIPTO BALL PENS  39
SUBJECT  INDEXES 15
LOOSELEAF   REFILLS
NOTEBOOKS
AND MANY OTHER SCHOOL SUPPLIES
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wSW*wmm*       0 nwikiii nu mm in. ™\GV, SIXTEEN
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday,   September   17,   1957
UBC Not Doormat
Birds May Win Yet
by*  (Pain  ShsiqsJL
Football fens, please take note!
UBC is no longer going to be conference door-mat.
If you dcn't believe me, I suggest that you trot out to Varsity Stadium this fall to
see the 1957 edition of your UBC Thunderbirds.
Since the opening of training camp September 12, I have dropped in on several sessions to take a look at what Head Coach Frank Gnup and his coaching staff have to work
with.
to
KAY HAMMARSTROM candidate for Miss Football at
Berkely California, September 17 to 21.
UBC Coed To Enter
Berkeley Queen Contest
Kay Hammarstrom, 19-year-old College of Education
student who was elected Frosh Queen of 1955, will represent
UBC in the "Miss Football of 1957" contest at Berkeley,
California.
The contest runs from September 16 to 19. Crowning of
the queen will occur at the Coronation Ball, September 19, and
followed by a spectacular Parade of Lights in downtown Berkeley.
Miss Hammarstrom, a brown-
eyed blonde, will compete with
couver's  summer  playgrounds.
Miss   Harr.merstrom's     future]
plans include a career as a high-
school teacher.   Her hobbies are j
sewing and skiing. j
i
The sixteen contestants will
be taken to Hollywood for movie
and television studio tours and
a  visit  to  Disneyland  on   Sep-
coeds from 15 other colleges in \ tember   16th   before   flying   to
the competition at the twelfth
annual Berkeley Football Festival.
She won the crown of Homecoming Princess last year and
spent her summer as a playground director in one of Van-
Berkeley for the coronation
competition. In Berkeley they
will be accorded a civic reception.
Other contestants represent
colleges in Washington, Oregon
and California.
'BIRDS FALL SCHEDULE:
September 21:
U. of Western Ontario London
September 28:
Southern Oregon Home
October 5:
Pacific Lutheran Parkland
October 12:
Eastern Washington   ..Home
October 19:
Western   Washington    Bellingham
October 26:
Whitworth   College    Spokane
November 2:
Portland  State   U. Portland
November 9:
Central  Washington   (Homecoming) Home
November 16:
Exhibition (To be arranged) Home
November 23:
College of Puget Sound Home
Believe me, it's impressive.
The crack of shoulder pad on
shoulder pad and helmet on helmet seems to smash out the message "Beware John Metras, we
are going East Sept. 21 to lick
the tar out of your Western Ontario Mustangs."
There's a tone in the air that
says that this club has a oneway ticket — to the top.
There are a couple of fullbacks: Sandy Harvey and Don
JEllerby, who are hitting that
line like Sherman tanks with
souped-up engines.
The half-backs are raising a
few eye-brows too.
- Veterans Jackie Henwood,
Bruce Allerdyce, Bruce Eagle,
Frank Tarling and others are
fighting to retain their varsity
positions.
New-comers Len Smith, Paul
Vassos and last year's JV's are
making a real race of it.
On the quarter-back scene
there are three candidates who
are showing signs that they can
carry the team.
Converted half-back Wayne
Aiken, veteran quarter-back Bill
Melville and rookie Jimi Oliver
are all showing that they want
that starting job when the Birds
open in the Paraplegic Bowl at
Western.
.At the end spot, things do not
look as bright as other places.
Mike Williams, last year's
starter may find himself out of
action because of marks.
George Kosich's trick knee
never came around.
Laurie Tuttle has moved into
tackle.
This leaves Gnup with a handful of rookies,, long on desire,
but short on experience.
The tackles are as bruising i
bunch as have ever been seen
around these parts.
Co-captain Roy Jokanovich
and Bill Crawford, both last
year's starters, are getting stiff
competition from veterans Doug
Fromson, Jurgen Von Schilling
and new-comers Gerry McGavin, Paul Donald and Dave Den-
nison.
The competition is just as
keen in the guard slot, but when
the smoke has cleared away, co- *or ^e eas*
captain Oscar Kreutziger will
be in one spot, with four of Tom
Tom Toynbee, Phil Reader, Don
MacNamee, Jack Busch, Sven
Sunquist and John Goodwin alternating at the other spot.
At the centre of the action it
looks as if veterans Chuck Kules
and George Hoar will be taking
encores for another year.
r'or Coach Gnup and his assistant, Bob Hindmarch, things are
looking brighter than ever before.
"However,, anything can happen," cautioned Gnup.
For the counter with the Me-
tras-men. Gnup must whittle his
club from/ the fifty candidates
now at camp, to thirty-three.
It will be a tough job for
Gnup in his junior year of
coaching at UBC, as there has
been an atmosphere of seriousness in camp; that has never existed before*
"Everybody wants 'to catch
the club this year," said Gnup.
"It is going to be a tough job
choosing the final team," he
said.
Gnup hopes that a scrimmage
with the B.C. Lions can be arranged  before  the  club   leaves
"That will really seperate the
men from the boys," laughed
Gnup.
Following their eastern encounter, Birds return home to
do battle with Southern Oregon
on Sept. 28 before swinging into
conference action against Pacific Lutheran on October 5.
Home Game To Host Oregon,
At Stadium September 23rd.
UBC Thunderbirds play their first home game of the
fall football schedule against Southern Oregon College
of Education at 2 p.m., Saturday, Septemeber 23, in the
UBC Stadium.
Their season opens Saturday, September 21, when they
play at University of Western Ontario in the annual Paraplegic Bowl game.
NEW LOCATION FOR
TEXTBOOK SALES
All textbooks ore now on sale in the FIELD HOUSE,
immediately south of Brock Hall.
This FAST SERVICE Center closes September 28th
.  .  . avoid the rush, get your books today!
Operated by the
I
E

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