UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey May 21, 1957

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0124574.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0124574.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0124574-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0124574-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0124574-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0124574-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0124574-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0124574-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0124574-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0124574.ris

Full Text

 THE UBYSSEY
I WONDER IF  IT'S EDIBLE?
Graduation 1957 PAGE TWO THE      UBYSSEY Tuesday, May 21, 1057
Jo.   Mul
Visitors, Graduates and Students
University of British Columbia
The Government of British Columbia has every reason to be
proud of the contribution being made by the university to the
development of the province through its staff, its graduates and
its research scholars.
In the years that lie ahead, the increasing number of
children in our elementary and secondary schools will be seeking university education so thai they too will be able to assume
their responsibilities as trained citizens.
To provide these young people with the educational opportunities to meet the needs of the province, our schools at all
levels will require more teachers.
It is therefore the hope of the government and the Depart:
ment of Education that an increasing number of university students will elect to become teachers.
Only if sufficient numbers of those young men and women
who are academically and personlly suited to become teachers
enter the teaching profession, will it be possible to develop our
human and economic resources in relation fe our needs.
For this reason, to all those young people who are suited
in ability and personality, we recommend the profession of
teaching as a satisfying and fruitful field of endeavour.
HON. W. A. C. BENNETT HON. LESLIE R. PETERSON
PREMIER MINISTER CF EDUCATION Tuesday, May 21, 1957
THE      UBYSSEY
PAGE THREE
Honorary Doctorates to Five
Five honorary degrees are
being conferred at the 42nd
annual spring ' convocation
this year. Two persons are
receiving the Honorary Doctor of Science Degree and
three, the Honorary Doctor of
Laws Degree.
Convocation speaker on
May 21, Dr. E. W. R. Steacie,
receives the honorary Doctor
of Science Degree. Also receiving this degree is Dr.
Clarence M. Hincks.
Honorary Doctor of Laws
decrees will be conferred on
Captain M. C. Robinson; Professor H. J. Davis, speaker at
the ceremonies of May 22; and
Professor Doris B. Saunders.
Dr. Steacie, who has gained distinction in his career as
a chemist, is president of the
National Research Council of
Canada.    He receives his degree May 21.
H. J. DAVIS
. . . LL.D.
Dr.  Hincks is the national
consultant    to  the  Canadian
Mental Health Association. Ho
founded the Canadian mental
health movement in  Canada.
Captain Robinson, who has
participated .in the organization of numerous rehabilita*
tion programmes, is national
director of the Canadian National Institute for the Blind
in Western Canada. Capt.
Robinson is past president of
the Vancouver Rotary, and of
the American Association of
Workers for the Blind, Incorporate;!. He is a Vancouver
resident.
Leading authority on English author and satirist Jonathan Swift, May 22 speaker
Professor Davis is an Oxford
professor.
Miss Saunders is known for
her guidance and counsel to
university women.
Other  degrees   granted   on
Tuesday,   May 21,   are: Master of Science (M.Sc); Master
E. W. R. STEACIE
. . . D.Sc.
of Applied Science (M.A.Sc);
Master of Science in Agricul
ture (M.S.A.); Master of Forestry (M.F.); Master of Business Administration (.M.B.A.);
Bachelor of Applied Science
(B.A.Sc); Bachelor of Architecture (B.Arch.); Bachelor of
Science in Agriculture (B.X.
A.); Bachelor of Laws (LL.B.);
Doctor of Medicine (M.D.);
Bachelor of Science in Forestry (B.S.F.); Bachelor of
Education (B.Ed.; Bachelor of
Commerce (B.Com.).
Degrees granted Wednesday
May 22, are:
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.
D.); Master of Arts (M.A.);
Master of Social Work (M.S.
W.); Bachelor of Social Work
(B.S.W.i ; Bachelor of Arts
(B.A.); Bachelor of Home Economics (B.H.E.); Bachelor of
Physical Education (B.P.E.);
and Bachelor of Science in
Pharmacy (B.S.P.).
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. XL
VANCOUVER, B.C.. TUESDAY, MAY 21, 1957
No. 64
Wood,
Vernon
Retire
Two well-known UBC figures
will be retiring this summer*.
Dr. Francis Vernon, Mechanical Engineering, and Registrar
Charles B. Wood are both retiring this June.
Mr. Wood will be succeeded
by John E. A. Parnell, now Associate Registrar.
Coming to UBC in 1934, Mr.
Wood was a transfer from the
Department of Education.
In-coming registrar Mr. Parnell graduated from UBC in
1935. He holds a Master of Arts
degree from University of Toronto.
Since 1951 he has served both
as associate registrar and mathematics instructor.
More than one thousand graduates have passed through Dr.
Vernon's engineering classes
over the last 31 years.
Three of them were Fisheries
Minister Jimmy Sinclair, Air
Marahall John Plant and Brigadier-General Joseph Bishop.
Dr. Vernon came to UBC in
1926 from London's City and
Guilds Technical College. He is
a graduate of the University of
Manchester.
A fellow of the British Royal
Aeronautical Society, he is a
forir.er member of the profes-
sior.al engineers' association of
B.C.
Dr, Vernon plans to continue
teat 1".ing part-time for a year or
so.
$1000.00
Legacy  Of
Grad  Class
For the first time in UBC's history a graduating class
will give as its gift to the university a sum of money.
Departing from the tradition of leaving as an annual gift
to the campus such sundries as library doors, "Faculty Parking Only" signs, and garbage cans for the Women's Common
Room of the Arts building, the class of '57 will donate to the
University's Capital Grants Campaign $1,000.
According   to   the   Provincial *
Government's   agreement    with |
thc university this donation will
be   matched   by   the   province,
bringing  the  sift  to  a  total of
cision  to  establish   a   fund  for
university  expansion.
RESPONSIBILITY
FUTURE TEACHER is John G. Hall, 22, of 2802 Charles,
winner of The Governor-General's Gold Medal for 1957.
Award is made annually to the student heading the graduating class in Arts and Science. Hall plans to begin work
or. his Maker's Degree this summer and hopes eventually
to get a Ph. D. and to teach Classics at UBC.
 Awards winners' photos in this i.-:sue Courtesy
'Ihe Vancouver Sun
Classics Scholar
Wins Gold Medal
John Greenway Hall, 22-year-old classics student, headed
the graduating class in Arts and Science this year to win the
Governor-General's  Gold Medal.
Hail also won the $100 Ahepa Prize for efficiency in
Greek.
A graduate of Britannia High
School, John plans to teach
classics at university and will
go on next year to work towards his masters degree.
His   main   interest   is   music,
first violin with the Junior Symphony,  he  plays  in  a  chamber  each    year
music trio, composed of himself I career
and two friends.
Born in Winnipeg, he came to
Vancouver as a child and attended Templeton Junior High
School and later Britannia High
School.
He has won scholarships in
of    his    university
$2,000.
The agreement is the result
of a concentrated campaign
initiated this year to raise money
for thc university.
INCREASED AID
Modelled on and named for
the Great Trek of 1922 which
brought the university from a
group of shacks near the present
site of Ihe General Hospital to
its Point Grey location, the
Second Great Trek got underway officially nn Monday, November fifth of last year, when
Students Council voted to present a brief to the Provincial
Government requesting increased financial aid to the university.
Following the decision, Trek
Chairman Ben Trevino concen-.
trated on the success of three
main appeals; a letter-writing
campaign by out-of-town students, appealing to friends and
relatives in heme towns tor support of the Trek; a student delegation to Victoria armed with a
comprehensive, student-prepared
brief stating the needs of thc
university; a petition, similar to
the one circulated in  1922.
In mid-November Trekkers
were surprised but not deterred
by the Federal Government's de-
"Fedcral grants in no way
minimize Provincial responsibility to universities," Trek Chairman Trevino commented, and
the campaign continued.
Plans began lo circle around
a "Squeeze Day," which Trelc
officials tentatively described as
"a dramatic portrayal cf UBC's
needs." They scheduled the day
for early February, and continued compiling the brief.
On January 25 of this year,
Trek officials Ben Trevino, Don
Jabour, Sam Huberman, Al
Thackray and Jim MacDonald
flew *o Victoria for an hour-
long meeting with his cabinet,
and hopefully presented the
brief.
Premier Bennett, while labelling the brief the "best ever
presented to this cabinet," gave
intimations of things to come
when he warned the "Government isn't the only source of
revenue in this province," and
cautioned Trekkers not to ignore industry in seeking university aid.
MATCH GRANTS
And, as many observers predicted,  Bennett   announced  this
(Continued   on   Page   10)
See $1,000 LEGACY PAGE FOUR •
THE UBYSSEY
Authorized as second class mail.  Post Office Department,
Ottawa.
MEMBERS CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Student subscriptions $1.20 per year (included In AMS fees). Mail
subscriptions $2.00 per year. Single copies five cents. Published
in Vancouver throughout the University year by the Student
Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society, University of
British Columbia. Editorial opinions expressed herein are those
of the editorial staff of the Ubyssey, and not necessarily those of
the Alma Mater Society or the University. Letters to the Editor
should not be more than 150 words. The Ubyssey reserves the
right to cut letters, and cannot guarantee publication of all letters
received.
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF    -   -   .   PATRICIA   RUSSELL   MARCHAK
MANAGING EDITOR PHILIP D. ROBERTSON
BUSINESS MANAGER HARRY H. YUILL
EDITORIAL ASSOCIATE    ...   J. JEREMY FISHER-BROWN
ADVERTISING MANAGER ALAM   ttiUBl/iit
reporters and desk:
b. russell cook-, m. bridget smith, s. anne shorthouse,
r. kimball kent-barber, alexander cameron ross jr.,
o. michael wurm, d. william ferry, r. livingstone smith,
s. wynn ross, m. lloyd ritchie, k. bernard lamb.
... now an alum
This issue is dedicated to graduates, now becoming a
part of that amorphous mass known as the Alumni.
The messages here have been reworded and reprinted
year after year for four decades. Each one in turn who has
written an essay in these 40 years has expressed in his own
way a sentimental Vale Atque Ave to the current graduating class.
, The Alumni address is, as always, inextricably tied up
with a sublime ivy-wall nostalgia that graduates are expected
to have acquired during their stay on campus.
The graduates of this class have now been "admitted"
into the Alumni of the University by a Chancellor just as
the graduates of many previous classes have been admitted.
However, despite the disillusioning realisation that
degrees and sheeps' epidermis are not at all rare and despite
the overworked sentimental appeals annually bruising graduation, the receiving of an education at UBC has been a
worthwhile experience which will result in both tangible
and intangible benefits to the graduate and to his society.
For this reason "Friends and Alumni of the University"
is a meaningful phrase.
Through the monetary contributions of the Friends and
Alumni, many members of this class have gained sufficient
funds to qualify themselves for the black robe.
Through the contributions in money, time and talent,
of the Friends and Alumni, the current students have rebuilt
Brock Hall, put a rowing team on the map, captured a
swimming pool, and above all, won support for the Second
Great Trek.
The Trek was successful in its initial stages largely
through the efforts of this class. Although its effects may
not directly benefit this year's grads, they will in tfeis business and professional lives feel the benefits through succeeding students who have learned under top level professors with adequate research facilities.
The Trek has been successful in more recent stages
largely through the response of former UBC students, now a
part with this class in that amorphous mass: Alumni.
Perhaps an Alum supports the university growth because
he realises the advantages such a growth can have to himself,
his business or his profession. Perhaps he supports the
growth because he wishes to aid other students to gain from
an institution which has served him well.
And perhaps he supports the growth because he suspects that his undergraduate days were his most pleasant.
The Alumni Association may well act as a souvenir scrap-
book for the few persons whose sensitivity to sentiment
refused to die under the shocking influence of agnostic
mentors.
These last persons are, however, rare, and there is
no need for the less sentimental graduate to feel guilt at
an inability to express sadness in parting with this institution. The invitation to remain in contact wiih the university
through the Alumni Association really has very little to do
with sentimental recollections of youth.
What the invitation does have a great deal to do with
is the future of an institution which is as necessary as it is
beneficial to our society and culture.
This is not a command; it is an invitation. An invitation that the graduate of the class of 1957 would do well to
accept.
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, May 21, 1957
President's Message
Another University year has
come to an end, and I am sure
that all of you are rejoicing
that you have completed your
University careers. I congratulate you, but for those of us
who are left behind there must
also be some element of regret
that the time has co/ne to say
goodbye to a group of students
who have been with us for the
past four years,
N. A. M. MacKENZIE
President
Occasions like graduation
ceremonies usually produce a
good deal of earnest advice, and
conclude with homilies pointing out that the possession of
a degree, which is supposed to
guarantee   that   you   are   edu
cated men and women, also
imposes upon you responsibilities and gives you advantages
in facing the future. They
Usually contain an exhortation
to the young graduates to go
out into the world with head
high, grateful for the happy
days spent at their "Alma
Mater," where they have been
trained to meet the challenge
of difficult days ahead.
Despite all this, and at the
risk of being obvious, I do express our genuine pride in seeing the ranks of our graduates
enriched by another generation. Today's world is, in a
very difficult and immediate
way, an exciting, stirring, and
indeed fearful one. On the one
hand there is evidence all
around us of attractive openings. Exciting developments
are taking place all across Canada, but nowhere more so than
in our own Province,. On the
other hand we do live in the
shadow of the atom and hydrogen bomb, and in a world
divided by deep and bitter differences, and by fear and
hatred.
In the years you have spent
at the University I hope that
you have managed to acquire
two things. One, the technical
knowledge to keep the momen
tum of our material prosperity
in full swing. This is necessary
and we have a responsibility
to encourage it. But together
with this professional training
I hope that the University has
been able to give you education in the wider sense—
honest, sincere education which
is to be distinguished from
mere knowledge—for you will
need this too to help reduce
the gap between our material
and our moral development.
The words "Peace," "Democracy," "Education," are all
bandied about glibly without
much understanding. This
tends to be a conforming age
in which it is very easy to
accept mediocre ideas without
discrimination. If you can
think independently; if you can
ask the right questions; if you
avoid an uncritical acceptance
of the loudest voices, the University will have succeeded in
instilling some of those qualities for which it should stand.
You leave us with all our
good wishes, and a sincere hope
that you should achieve the
goals you have set for your-
selve, and practise the qualities which our society so deeply
needs. And please come back
to see us from time to time.
N. A. M. MacKENZIE.
Valedictory
• • •
On an occasion such as this,
and in the presence of a
group as diverse in intellect,
ambition, and training as this
one is, it is desirable to consider some subject which is
interesting to everyone and to
which we have all been giving some serious thought. Customary topics are such things
as the philosophy and purpose
cf education, the functions,
needs, or nature of a university, the unlimited opportunities available to the university graduate in Canada,
the meaning of a university
degree, or our responsibilities
to the people of Canada and
in particular to the citizens of
British Columbia who have
subsidized our existence at
this institution. A message
which has lost respect through
overuse but still retains its
wisdom is that university
graduation is the commencement and not the conclusion
of our period of education.
The foregoing topics are
interesting and important
ones, and arc certainly deserving of the most careful consideration of each one of us.
But there is one subject that
in this age of competition and
selfishness holds a deeper and
more vital interest to all of us
—ihe university graduate. Let
us consider some of the characteristics of this very fortunate individual.
Our ': st qualification might
be a negative one, that lie is
not merely a person who has
learned by rote the thoughts
and discoveries of other men.
Surely he is someone who has
conceived an original thought,
who has created something
witli his own mind and hands,
and has learned to express
his thoughts and emotions so
Sholto Hebenton
Valedictorian
that they may be conveyed to
others. A university graduate
has obtained a certain amount
of knowledge and a facility in
applying it to special and associated problems. In the course
of the acquisition of this
knowledge, he has developed
the ability to discern and draw
distinctions, and he has acquired a sense of intellectual
(Photograph of
SHOLTO
HEBENTON
not available
at press time).
scepticism, which one must
not confuse with cyncism, a
sordid, negative imitation. We
must hope that the university
graduate has gained the ability
to develop an original idea, or
second-best, to synthesize the
thoughts of other men in drawing his own conclusions If
he cannot be conMructivo in
either of these fashions, then
at least he should be able to
dissect and analyze and ascertain truth for himself.
The university graduate, in
addition to one of these faculties, has as a corollary a competency of expression, not
necessarily a fluency in pompous phrase or trenchant wit,
but   a   familiarity   witli   thc
May 21-22, 1957
language essential to the expression of ideas associated
with his course of studies, and
a vocabulary of sufficient
scope to enable him to freely
express his feelings and emotions. He has of necessity acquired an appreciation of the
precision of expression available to he who chooses his
words carefully and has
reelized that clarity and brevity are as cup and saucer—
those whom we respect the
most seldom use one without the other. The university
graduate, too, has developed
an abhorrence of cliches, triteness, and plagiarization, and
maintains a feeling of repugnance and wariness to the
bearer of slanted information,
slander, and prejudice. Considering a difference of opinion to be stimulating and invigorating, he maintains an
open mind for free and logical
discussion, remembering t o
use only the accents of good
temper and good faith, and to
display a sense of responsibility and proportion, and
especially a sense of humour.
In conclusion, although this
is not the occasion for a harangue on the evils of totalitarianism nor an ode on tiie
benefits of democracy, the appreciative graduate will bear
in' his mind and heart a feeling of gratitude to those wiio
have gone before and who
have moulded our nation and
our civilization into its present form.
May every member of the
1957 graduating class of the
University of British Columbia have every success and
happiness in making his contribution in the glorious days
ahead.
SHOLTO HEBENTON. Tuesday, May 21, 1957
THE     UBYSSEY
PAGE FIVE
Alumni Address
It is commonplace to note
th;t in many important respects graduation is an end
and a beginning. For most
graduates it is an end to what
DR. H. S. PURDY
wc might call formalized education—the education of the
classroom. And it is a new
start  into  a   rather  different
social and economic environment. At the same time, however, in very fundamental respects there is no break in
the continuity of things. The
learning process goes on—at
least, it had better do so—
and your participation in and
support of the affairs of the
university should not stop.
With graduation you become an alumnus of the university. As the origin of the
word suggests you ere still
thought ot as a member of the
university family though your
formal relationship has
changed somewhat. Xour continued close association with
the university family is valuable to you, to the university
End through the university to
the whole province.
The Alumni Association, consisting of those who have preceded you in graduation, provides the ready means by
which you can take on the
proper role of alumnus. Active meiiibeiship and partici
pation in the affairs of the
Alumni Association will allow you to keep in touch with
the university environment
which has been such an important part of your living for
the last four years. And you
can contribute much to thc
health and strength of the
university in the years to
come.
From time to time individuals and institutions meet particularly challenging days.
Such days are with the University now. If it is to go on
to make the contribution to
the Province that it should
make it will need support
from the alumni in multitudinous ways. However, I am
urging your active participation in the affairs offthe
Alumni Association not only
because we need the strength
of your continued association
with the University but also
because we know how valuable that association can be
13 vou.
Employment Rosy
For Bright Grad
If you are the cream of the academic crop, employment
prospects are rosy for you; if not, marry rich.
This exortation may sound a bit brusque, but it is, in
fact, based upon an exhaustive survey made by Fortune magazine last spring.
We Bequeath
DON JABOUR
In live or (en years if you
pick i.p a Ubyssey you'll likely see Headlines saying: "Arts
Undergraduates Society to Reform," 'Engineers Riot," or
"Ubyssey Editor Charges
'Graft," and to this you'll
sadly remark. "Things haven't
changed a bit!"
Furthermore, with your five
or ten years maturity derived
from struggle with the outside
world, you'll probably laugh a
little at UBC students for the
serious way they attack their
"earth - shaking"    problems.
You might remember that you
yourself   once    assailed    the
Students' Council for inequalities existing in the USC constitution,   but  in   1966  you'll
recall that you  were full  of
youthful   enthusiasm   at   the
time  iind  it was really such
a silly thing to do.   After all,
what's     the     difference     if
ASUS lives or dies, or if NF
CUS even exists.    For all the
yelling   and   screaming   done
in one year at UBC, will Canada fird herself in a depression,   or  at   war  with   Manitoba in the next?
As a matter of fact, even
without five or ten years
maturity tucked under your
belt, or even while you are an
undergraduate, you may still
view the AMS's struggles and
torments grunting "So what?"
or  "Who  cares?"
To answer the question
h o n e s t 1 y and objectively
would probably be very embarrassing for most campus
politicians. The main benefit
derived from most campus
crusades seems to be only a
little vocal evercise and campus publicity for the crusader.
Of course some crusades have
very noble aims and plan to
benefit millions, but life at
UBC would very likely still
be bearable without them.
This is the reason it is so easy
to chuckle at campus "problems."
But one wouldn't get much
enjoyment out of UBC if he
viewed all activities objectively, or i.ook iiini.-elf too seriously. True, the fate of nations
is not deeded on the campus,
but fond memories are: an^i
students woo have shouted
and    /petitioned    and    rioted
DON   JABOUR
Past   President
have taken more of what this
university offers than those
who "haven't got time to fool
around like that."
It's part and parcel of an
undergraduate, in the traditional     connotation     of    the
•        •        •
word, to be loudly concerned
in campus problems, notwithstanding the ridicule of dispassionate observers. Every
counsellor and advisor will
tell you extracurricular activity helps you to meet people,
to talk on your feet, to learn
to organize, and to make new
friends, and even though
such phrases come from the
"Counsellor's Handbook,"
they  are nevertheless true.
In five and ten years, students will still be crusading
and rioting. You might think
that with the changing of the
times, ideas, problems, and
personality types •> would
change and students would
have a more mature approach
or at least new problems
would arise. But campus politicians are campus politicians
because that is their field of
enjoyable activity, just like an
athlete chooses sports, and because they believe (objectively or subjectively) that they
have an important crusade to
carry out.
"Things haven't changed a
bit!" you'll say.
And you'll be right.
e e •
Every Success
Graduates of 1957
GENERAL EQUIPMENT
LIMITED
Heating and Ventilating Equipment
Steam Power Plant Specialties
Pumps for All Applications
224 West 5th Avenue EMerald 8881
According to Fortune, eastern
and mid-western American universities are annually descended
upon by corporation representatives in search of mental talent.
MOSH POPULAR
Currently, these talent scouts
are in search of brilliant or
semi-brilliant mathematicians,!
physicists, and engineers. Less
than a generation ago, the company engineer was the little
man in the frayed collar with i
the   dingy   four-by-four   office
i next to the drill press. Today
he is the while-haired boy of an
(economy suddenly aware of its
dependance upon technological
advancement.
A close second in demand are
those trained in business administration, although stress is
laid upon the desirability of the
upper strata of the Arts graduates, as these, too, have shown
talent in administrative posts.
FREE HOUSES
The brightest students arc
wooed into the various corporations   with    offers   of   startling
: salaries that move them immediately into a higher tax bracket
: than many of their fathers.
Choice   of  city   in   which   they
! work,   special    retirement   and
| insurance funds, and even free
houses are also offered as inducements, especially to engineering
graduates.
Below   the   Cream,   however,
tilings as much as they used to
be, with the single exception of <
engineering graduates, who may !
command higher prices than
ever whether they have frontal
lobes   or   not. '
Congratulations
to the
Graduating Class
Whether for home or
business
our office stationery and
printing departments
will serve you
in many  ways.
GEHRKE
STATIONERY &
PRINTING CO. LTD.
1035 Seymour Street
For People on
The Way up...
DUECK LOOKS FORWARD TO
FILLING YOUR AUTOMOBILE REQUIREMENTS FOR
YOU . . . AND IN YOUR SUCCESSFUL YEARS TO FOLLOW
Canada's Largest Automobile Dealer
* Cadillac
* Oldsmobile
* Chevrolet
r\l IC^IXON BROADWAY
UUtLlX      CEdar 4111
Congratulations Graduates of  1957
NATIONAL FURNITURE STORES
138 West Hastings Street 1076 Granville Street
350 Columbia Street, New Westminster PAGE SIX
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, May 21, 1957
Firms, Societies Award Grads
For Scholastic Achievements
Scholarships, bursaries find
prizes with a total value of
$107,17." were awarded to UBC
students this year.
Heading the grad class in engineering was Graham Falconer
Somerville of West Vancouver,
who graduates this year in
chemical engineering.
In addition to the Association
of Professional Engineers' Gold
Medal, Somerville was also
awarded the Athlone Scholarship in February of this year
which entitles him to two years
tuition and travel in England.
Throughout his high school
and university years, Somerville has also been recipient of
thc Vancouver Sun Scholarship
of $1000; California Standard
Scholarship of $375; Plimsoll
Club Scholarship of $100 and a
University scholarship in applied science of $200.
LAW
The Law Society Gold Medal
and Prize was won by James
Murray Maclntyre of Vancouver who was: also winner of the
Viscount Bennett Award oi'
$2000. awarded to one law s'u-
dent in Canada each year by the
Canadian   Bar   Association.
the $250 Hamber Gold Medal.   ,
Thc  24-year-:Id  student  who;
leaves soon to interne at Royal'
i
Victoria   Hospital   in   Montreal.
hopes to return some day as a j
member of the UBC faculty of [
medicine.
Originally from North Battle-
ford, Saskatchewan, Dr. Kljssen
moved to Surrey in 1947 and
graduated frcni Queen Elizabeth
High School.
PHARMACY
Heading the grad class in
pharmacy was Ian Wilfred
French, of Chilliwack and North
Vancouver, who was awarded
Ihe Horner Gold Medal of $250.
French  last  year    won    the
tion for Health, Physical Educa-' the? Totem in her third year, is
tion and Recreation Prize. j ^   member  of  Delta   Sigma  Pi.
T.       .,,...,, .     'Women's     honorary      sorority,
ho will study for his master ... ,      ,,, ...   ',     .      '
J : Women, s    At'ictic    Directorate
of   science   degree   in   physical: E,-d E,2 b;0,..^ club.
i
An avid sportswoman, she is
! a former junior tennis champion
1 (if British Columbia.
(SOCIAL WORK
'Ax?,. Join Margaret Williams
1 of  North   Kamloops,   moMier  of
, three,  headed    the    graduating
class for bachelor of social work
degree.
Fhe wan  awaiccd a $."0 special university prize.
Master of social work class
: wa3 headed by Patricia Louise
i Sharp of Sa.-k.'.tcrn who was
'■ awarded tho Moe and Leah Chet-
; kow Memorial Pn:*e of 3103.
MURRAY  McINTYRE
Law
Maclntyre and Professor F.
Carrmhers of the UBC Law Faculty are thc only two British
Columbians ever to receive the
award.
A graduate of Lord Byng
High School, Maclntyre wa.s
editor of Legal Notes, UBC law
school periodical, for the past
two years.
MEDICINE
Gerald Arthur Klassen of New
Westminster headed the graduating  class  in  medicine to  win
IAN W. FRENCH
Pharmacy
Frosst Scholarship in pharmacy
of $125.
He leaves this month for Ontario where he will work in
quality control and production
with a drug company.
HOME ECONOMICS
Dorothy Colleen Reader headed the grad class in Home Economics this year and was awarded the $100 B.C. Parent-Teacher
Federation Prize.
She will leave for Ottawa on
EUGENE V. DOROSCHUK .
Physical Education .
education  at   the  University  of
Illinois this fa!!. I
Born in Pino River, Manitoba,
Dortmc'iuk v. as educ:1 ted  -t Toulon   C'eliminate   after   taking   hi;
'normal  sc'nm 1  al  Winning?;.   He
: wa.s  pii;n,;;'al  lor  foil''  years ol
Belmont Fchool m  Alar.itaba.
FORESTRY
Topping Ice grad class in for-
j estry was Richard Barry Smith
of Vernon.    Smith was awarder!
the  Canadian   Institute  of  Fcr-
GERALD A. KLASSEN
Medicine
DOROTHY READER
Home Economics j
May 23 with l.er husband, Kurt
Edner, who i.s receivim; his mas-1
iers degree i.i Ofi-iculturo.
Mrs. Ednor wa.s born in Re-
gina and received her schooling
in Vancouver and Port IMoady.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
Physical Education Class was
headed by Eugene Valen Doros-
chuk of Vancouver wb.o was
awarded  the  Canadian Assoc ia-
RICHARD B. SMITH
Forestry
estry Medal for    the    best    all-
around record    in    professional
forestry   as   well   as   ihe   H.   R. ■
MacMillan   Price  m   Forestry  of
Sioo. ;
EDUCATION
Lcona Nancy (Lee) Davenport
of Vancouver was winner of die
Dr. Maxwell A. Cameron '.Medal
and Prize of «".() for the highest
proficiency with firsi cla.rs in
practice leachinr; in t'.e elemr-n-
tary iicld.
Lee graduates witli ner B:uh-
elor of ttcMcaiian this yojr and
will tech in. X:<:\.-:<\\vit next
year.
During her undergraduate
years she received ii e B.C. Teacher Federation Scholarship of
$200 and an honorarium of SI00
from the university.
A graduate from Lord Byng
High School, Lee  was ec'itor of
MRS.  J.  M.  WILLIAMS
Social Work
;     A     registered     nurse,     Miss
Sharp received her bachelor of
I social work from UBC ard look
j her undergraduate years at the
j University of Saskatchewan.
I     She  was  awarded  the  Laura
| Holland Scholarship of $262 in
j social work last year.
;     Miss   Sharp   has   taught   and
j nursed    in    Ottawa,  Saskatoon
! and   Edmonton,   and  will   work
'■ with the Child Welfare Department   in   the  Saskatchewan   De-
oartr.u.nt   of   Welfare  in   Moose
Jaw Legir.nin!; in J'.u-?.
i ARCHITECTURE
Gordon   Richard  Graham,   24-
ycar-cW   ntvhitctUive   graduate,!
■was winner of the Eoval Archi-i
tectural     Institute    cf
tcmadn
TEACHER TRAINING
Heeding the grad class of the
one-year teacher training course
program was Laura Jane Shrum
of Vancouver,
Miss Shvum was awarded the
Dr. Maxwell A. Cameron Medal
iv.d Pn.ic of $r>0 for the highest
proficiency combined with first
jlass practice teaching.
A graduate of University Hill
GCRDON R. GRAHAM
Architecture
Medal for academic achievement in the tmal three ;. ears
and oil ihsrae'ltr nu.dilics and
premise.
Married,   with   two   children.
Graham is from Chilliwack.
JANIE  SHRUM
Secondary  Teaching
High School, she received her
'.acv.cLr oi a-'ts nt UBC last
year and next year will teach in
Vancouver.
FIRST CANADIAN
i     Paul Roivit-ril of Vancouver is
i the first Canadian to win a Ford
I Foundation       "Foreign       Area
| Training  Fellowship"  of $2600.
!     A student in international stu-
i dies,  he will attend McGill  or
Princeton for a year to continue
studies  in  Middle East  international relations and in the Ara»
bic and Turkish languages.
I PAUL   ROMERIL
| Fcrd Foundation
! A graduate of King George
J High School, Romeril received
■ scholarships for a study tour of
international organizations in
I Western Europe and to the Insti-
i tute of World Atfairs in New
York.
Last year on a scholarship
from the World University Service cf Canada, he attended the
University  of Istanbul, Turkey.
SCIENCE
Head of the science group in
ihe grad class in arts and science
was Robert PI.elan Langlands
i.vho was awarded the University Medal for arts and science.
He was also winner of a National Research Council bursary
for $800 and will take an M.A.
degree  in  mathematics at UBC
(Continued   on   Page   23)
See  FIRMS,  SOCIETIES Tuesday, May 21, 1957
THE     UBYSSEY
PAGE SEVEN
Class Prophecy
The occasion is the dedication of the University of
British Columbia's first coeducational dormitories. These
dormitories are the proud
result of twenty-five years of
concerted struggle by the
university alumnae to raise
funds through the Capital
Gifts Campaign. Chairman of
the drive, Mrs. Lynda Gates,
has just been elected President
of that unique splinter group,
the Conservative Party of
Canada. With her is T.V. producer, .Mr. Gerry Brown, here
to supervise the televizing of
the triumphant event.
Crowds of former university
students have returned for
this dedication. Amongst the
early arrivals is Mr. Jim Macdonald, Q. C, Vice-President
of the Canadian Bar Association. Questioned on the newly-
changed Divorce laws of Canada, Mr. Macdonald said,
"Let's get back to the point."
Following are Messrs. Dave
Helliwell and Ted Hunt, co-
Chairman of the National
Olympic Committee. They
have just announced the increase of the Canadian Olympic team to five, with the inclusion of Al Ezzy Jr., who
has refused a B. C. Lions contract to participate as Canadian single fencing champion.
This announcement was not
received with particular
pleasure by Messrs. Ron and
Ian Stewart, owner-managers
of the B. C Lions. The Stewart brothers still hope to carry
the Lions to another Grey Cup
victory because of their franchise on the importation of
football players from Red
China.
Sitting in the front row is
Mr. Robert McQueen, longtime chairman of the Royal
Commission on the Fruit
Growing Industry in the Okan-
agan. He has been expressing
his views on the nutritious
value of apple eating in the
Arab States to the reserved
laconic President of the World
11 e a 1 i h Organization, Dr.
Larry Rotenberg. Dr. Rotenberg has just completed his
first successful anti-Santa-
Claus year. They are now
joined by the Hon. "Bill" Marchak, Canadian Minister of
Labour. Commenting on the
successful outcome of his long
struggle with the C.I.L. and
A.F. of L. he said, "Socialism
is a dying cult."
Among thc dignataries
awaiting the arrival of the
President, are Mr. Gerald
(Gerry) Lecovin, Chairman of
Canada Council. His latest
press release has been a source
of great pride to Canadians—
the "great Canadian novel"
has finally been written.
Author Doug Howie, a graduate of 1957, attributes the inspiration for his novel entitled
"The Rape of the Raven" to
his literary and other experiences at U.B.C.
The former Miss Lee Davenport, Deputy Minister of Education, was seen chatting to
Dr. Tom Wilson, Head of the
U.B.C. Department of Economics. Miss Davenport's
revolutionary introduction of
economics into High School
curricula has been greatly
appreciated by U.B.C. professors who now fail only
!>!)';. of Economics 200. Dr.
V.'ilson, Honorary President of
Joan Irvine, Prophet
the strong ten-member Arts
and Science Undergraduate
Society for his application of
economic principles to contract bridge.
Hastily glancing at his notes
in a corner is multi-millionaire Gerry Hodge, owner of
the Booze Box Company
Limited, which made the
popular liquor vending machines recently installed on
the U.B.C. campus after a prolonged battle with the Foods
and Services Committee. Com-
JOAN IRVINE.
mittce Chairman "Bugs"
Thompson lamented, "Now,
we'll never sell Caf coffee."
In appreciation of faculty and
student patronage, Mr. Hodge
will present during the ceremonies a twenty-foot bronze
replica of the "Three Forms."
The original statue on the
library lawn has disintegrated
under the annual application
of red paint.
Entering the armouries, Mr.
Brian Guns, C.B.C. Musical
Director, has been accosted
by Jack Reynolds, leader of
the popular sextet, "The Sagebrush Saxophones." Mr. Reynolds has long criticized Guns'
policy of resurrecting jazz
through the C.B.C. Claimed
the orchestra leader, "The
C.B.C. should be the instrument of Canadian culture and
Western music IS Canadian
culture." The two men have
now been joined by the well-
known ballad writer Sandy
Ross. His latest hit inspired
by a trip to Soviet Russia is
called "They can't love Marx
outside the Iron Curtain."
Present here is Mr. Robin
Scott, President of the
Suez Reconstruction Engineering Company, in Canada from
Egypt to hire more engineers.
Said Mr. Scott, "Thene is a
great future for engineering
graduates in our company.
The Suez Canal is re-constructed annually." With Mr. Scott
is another successful businessman, Mr. Rod Pringle, President of the Magyar Forest
Products Company. In his
capacity as Chairman of the
joint university - industrial
Committee o n Hungarian
classes for Forestry Students,
Mr. Pringle said, "A good
knowledge of Hungarian is
essential for any person entering the forestry industry today."
A mob of reporters and
photographers are covering
the entrance of the celebrated
movie actress "Honeybun"
Gregory accompanied by her
pooole and three husbands.
According to Miss Gregory,
her famed lily-pond swim took
place in 1967—a statement re
ceived with skepticism by the
crowd. Now arriving is Mr.
Murray McKenzie, international playboy. His utilization
of an engineering degree has
enabled him to win the Grand
Prix five years in succession.
Sir Marcus Bell, noted explorer, who has just recently
captured the famed Sasquatch,
has arrived accompanied by
his firm of lawyers, Donegani,
Christianson and Horn. Before Sir Marcus can collect the
$5000 reward, his lawyers
must prove the authenticity of
this monster to the B. C. Historical Association. It seems
that Sir Marcus' Sasquatch
bears a remarkable resemblance to a former Premier cf
British Columbia, W. A. C.
Bennett, who disappeared
twenty-five years ago after dh
investigation into a crooked
land dbmpany, Wenner-Gren
Incorporated,
Conspicuous by his absence
is Mr. Paul Romeril, ex-Canadian ambassador to Turkey.
He is defending himself in
front of a U.S. Congressional
(Continued on Page 15)
See PROPHECY
c
r
LASS
of
57
ll ONGRATULATIONS
on your graduation with
wishes for your future
business success from
EATONS
ALVA WHITE (with blueprint plans)
1953 engineering graduate of McGill
University. Now an engineer, buildings, at thc Bell, he performs the
duties of field supervisor on new Company construction projects of all kinds.
What are some of the reasons why more and more college graduates are joining
the Bell? Read Al White's report on his first year with the Company:
"What I like about my work as a field supervisor is the
feeling of responsibility. I like the way I'm handed a job
with the statement, 'We're going to build — it's all yours!'.
"I also like the way in which my college training is being
put to use. In my first month, I made quite a number of
visits with an experienced Bell engineering supervisor to
new buildings under construction. These visits gave me a
clear picture of that phase of nry work. I'm always surprised liow frequently I can apply my college training, for
example, trigonometry, maths and considerable surveying
for new micro-wave tower sites at remote locations.
"At the earliest possible moment, I wa.s put 'on my own'
and given all the responsibility one could ask for. Delegating
of authority has been 'tops' and the teamwork is good, too,
for the Bell i.s a company where management-employee
relationship really works.
"At present, about 50* of my time is spent out of the
office, and I enjoy meeting the public, architects, contractors
and other professional men in my work.
,     "I'm glad I joined the Bell!"
Numerous friends of AVs at thc University now also
work for the Bell.   •'
THE BELL TELEPHONE COMPANY OF  CANADA
Write*, phone or
apply in person to
our
Employment Office
at 620 Belmont St.,
Montreal—or
76 Adelaide St. W.,
Toronto.
♦ Applicants .* li a u I <1 l>e
available for interview i"
Munuval   ar  T.-i-.mi■.. PAGE EIGHT
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, May 21, 1957
Awards
NOTE: This list includes awards for graduates and for students in the final undergraduate year only. Further
awards in these categories and in the other undergraduate years will be announced in later lists.
Heads of the Graduating Classes
The Governor General's Gold Mednl (head of the graduating
class in Arts and Science, B.A. degree):
JOHN GREENWAY HALL (Vancouver)
The Wilfrid Sadler Memorial Gold Medal (head of thc graduating class in Arts and Science, B.A. degree):
GERALDINE ANN WATERS (Vancouver)
The Association of Professional Engineers Gold Medal (head
of the graduating class in Applied Science, B.A.Sc. degree):
GRAHAM FALCONER SOMERVILLE (West Vancouver)
The Kiwanis Club Gold Medal and Prize ($75) (head of the
graduating class in Commerce and Business Administration,
B.Com. degree):
RUTH JULIA KRANE (Balfour)
The University Medal for Arts and Science (head of the
Science Group in the graduating class in Arts and Science,
B.A. degree) :
ROBERT PHELAN LANGLANDS (Vancouver)
The Law Society Gold Medal and Prize, Call and Admission Fee (head of the graduating class in Law, LL.B. degree):
JAMES MURRAY MacINTYRE" (Vancouver)
The Hamber Gold Medal and Prize  ($250)   (head of the
graduating class in Medicine, M.D. degree):
GERALD ARTHUR KLASSEN (R.R. No. 4, New Westminster)
The Horner Gold Medal for Pharmacy (head of the graduating class in Pharmacy, B.S.P. degree):
IAN WILFRED FRENCH  (North Vancouver)
The British Columbia Parent-Teacher Federation Prize (S100)
(head of the graduating class in Home Economics,  B.II.E.
degree):
DOROTHY COLLEEN READER  (Port Moody)
The Canadian Association for  Health,  Physical  Education,
and Recreation Prize (head of the graduating class in Physical Education, B.P.E. degree):
EUGENE VALEN DOROSCHUK (Vancouver)
The Canadian Institute of Forestry Medal  (best all-round
record in professional forestry, B.A.Sc. or B.S.F. course):
RICHARD BARRY SMITH (Vernon)
The H. R. MacMillan Prize in Forestry ($100) (head of the
graduating class in Forestry, B.S.F. degree):
RICHARD BARRY SMITH  (Vernon)
The Dr. Maxwell A. Cameron Medal and Prize ($50) (highest proficiency, with first class in practice teaching, in Education, B.Ed, course in the elementary teaching field):
LEONA NANCY DAVENPORT (Vancouver)
The Royal Architectural Institute of Canada Medal (awarded
on the basis of proficiency in courses, on qualities of character and promise, and on academic achievement in the final
three years in Architecture, B.Arch. degree):
GORDON RICHARD GRAHAM   (Vancouver)
The Moe and Leah Chetkow Memorial Prize ($100)  (head
of the graduating class in Social Work, degree of M.S.W.):
PATRICIA LOUISE SHARP  (Saskatoon, Sask.)
Special University Prize ($50) (head of the graduating class
in Social Wrork, degree of B.S.W.):
(MRS.) JOAN MARGARET WILLIAMS (Kamloops)
The Dr. Maxwell A. Cameron Medal and Prize ($50) (highest proficiency combined with first class practice teaching in
the one-year teacher training course for graduates):
LAURNA JANE SHRUM (Vancouver)
with honourable mention for the runner-up and special University prize of $50:
BRIGITTE AGNES ZICKMANTEL (Falkland)
THE RHODES SCHOLARSHIP
GEORGE SHOLTO HEBENTON
(Penticton)
Awards for Graduate Study and Research
The Anne Wesbrook Scholarship, $200 (for graduate study
and research):
ETHEL LOVERNE MADDEX   (Vancouver)
The British Columbia Electric Company Limited Fellowship
in Agriculture, $800:
HARRY P. C. HOGENKAMP (Vancouver)
The British Columbia Electric Company Limited Graduate
Scholarship in Engineering, $500:
HAROLD GEORGE CHEVELDAVE (Castlegar)
The British Columbia Electric Company Limited Graduate
Scholarships, $250 each:
DONALD WALTER ANGOLD (Vancouver)
ROBERT RAY PARKER (Auke Bav. Alaska)
(MRS.) SANDRA MARGARET TYLOR (Vancouver)
Award in Social Work to be announced later.
The   British   Columbia   Sugar   Refining   Company   Limited
Scholarships (for graduate study and research):
PASCARAPATHY CANAGARATNAM <Colombo, Ceylon)—fisheries, $250
Continued on Pag*   8— £••    AWARDS
Sincere Best Wishes to the
Graduating Class of 1957
FROM   THE   FOLLOWING   PROFESSIONAL  AND
BUSINESSMEN   AND   FIRMS
Chancethr £hemw<( Xett
«
foot Crew
Hon. C U timber
Jutye J. 8. Clearihue
Hen. Jrank Ut. &AA
&AA and Her— CuMwa SakerA
(jewqe Cunningham
Tmnleif and tflatheMn
Ihe Hickob Chemical Cc. XH
£aba fitcA. XH
C M C W/iatnJ a. xu
W. H. gaike*
(jewqe %r$an
G.C. h'Utrict Jet. & kel. Co. XH
Canadian CxpUrathn XH
Orank H. Sreun Tuesday, May 21, 1957
THE     UBYSSEY
PAGE NINE
Sincere Best Wishes to the
Graduating Class of 7957
FROM   THE   FOLLOWING   PROFESSIONAL   AND
BUSINESSMEN   AND   FIRMS
tt /£ lltacllUltan, CSX.
Percy £ Sengougk CSX.
J. Ut. Suckanan
g. W. biamend
J. % t/oungntan
W. g. ttturrin
tttr. and Wa. ?. Ronald (jrakam
hat (jrauer
William HtunAon
Cewett SroA. (19S0) XH
Pacific ttteat Co. XH
Hon. judge A. C. X*rd
?. J. Surd
tttr. JuAtice J. ttt. Coadif
(jerdon Jarrell
Xeon J. Xadner
Curing tttcbenaid
VetAonA XaundererA & fc/-y CteanerA
AWARDS
(Continued from Page 8)
BARRY THOMAS CONNOLLY  (Vancouver)—chem-
istry, $300
HAROLD HENRY HARVEY  (Winnipeg, Man.)—fisheries, $200
J.. A. JOHANNES HOES (Vancouver)—plant science,
$300
ETHEL  LO VERNE  MADDEX   (Vancouver)—agricultural microbiology, $200
DALIBOR J. RUZICKA (Vancouver)—chemistry, $200
MICHAIL SCHAEDLE (Vancouver)—soil science, $300
GEORGE  ALFRED  STRASDINE   (Vancouver)—bacteriology, $250
(MRS.) SANDRA MARGARET TAYLOR (Vancouver)
—chemistry, $250
MARY ELIZABETH TODD (Esquimalt)—zoology, $250
British Columbia Telephone Company Scholarships in Engineering and Physics (for graduate study and research):
GEORGE ATHERLEY BEER (Salmon Arm)—$600
PHILIPPE JOHN DE FAYE (Vancouver)—$600
WILLIAM CHARLES OLSEN (Vancouver)—$700
The Burroughs Wellcome Fellowship in Anaethtesiology and
Applied   Pharmacology,   $1000   (postgraduate   study   and
research in the Faculty of Medicine):
DR. JAMES ALEXANDER GIBSON (Vancouver)
The California Standard Company Graduate Fellowship, $750
(graduate study in chemical engineering related to oil industry):
GARY CANNELL MORRISON (Royston)
The Canadian Industries  Limited  Fellowship,  $1700   (for
research and graduate study leading to the Ph.D. degree in
Chemistry)!
STEPHEN ALAN RYCE (Vancouver)
TheCanadtan Pulp and Paper Association, Western Division,
Fellowships (for graduate work in Forestry):
WILLIAM JOSEPH BLOOMBERG (Vancouver), $500
RICHARD BARRY SMITH  (Vernon), $300
MARCUS A. M. BELL (Victoria), $200
The Cominco Fellowship, $1000  (for graduate study and
research in Chemistry):
ALAN CHISHOLM HARKNESS (Vancouver)
The Don Buckland Memorial Scholarship in Forest Pathology, $65:
WILLIAM JOSEPH BLOOMBERG (Vancouver)
by reversion to
RQBENA   CLAIRE   ROBINSON    (Cambridge,   New
Brunswick)
The Dr. F. J. Nicholson Scholarships, $500 each:
(a) for geological engineering—
PETER BURLAND READ (Vancouver)
(b) for chemical engineering —
THOMAS ARNOLD CROIL (West Vancouver)
The Edith Ashton Memorial Scholarship, $250 (for graduate
studies in Biology or Botany):
THOMAS BENJAMIN WIDDOWSON (Read Island)
by reversion to
CHARLES LINDLEY KEMP (New Westminster)
The Gault Brothers Limited Graduate Scholarship in Commerce, $700 (for graduate work in Commerce and Business
Administration):
JOHN HECTOR McARTHUR (New Westminster)
The John and Annie Southcott Memorial Scholarship, $100
(for investigation in field of B. C. History):
JOHN SPENCER CHURCH (Vancouver)
The Lefevre Gold  Medal and Scholarship,  $125  (highest
standing in Chemistry or Chemical Engineering):
GRAHAM   FALCONER   SOMERVILLE   (West   Vancouver)
The  Leon J.   Koerner  Graduate  Scholarships   $250  each
(graduate study in Biology and Botany, Forest Ecology):
DIETEV MUELLER-DOMBOIS  (Vancouver)
JOHN GERARD NOEL DAVIDSON (Vancouver)
The Mo/ris Belkin Prize, $50 each (best essays in field of
Freudian Psychology):
JACK JACOB JOSEPH HOROWITZ (Vancouver)
SHEILA ANNE ROSS (Vancouver)
The Native Daughters of British Columbia Scholarship, $100
(for research in early B. C. History):
JOHN NEIL SUTHERLAND  (Vancouver)
The Poulenc Fellowship in Applied Physiology, $500 (postgraduate study in physiology, Faculty of Medicine) :
DR. JAMES ALEXANDER GIBSON   (Vancouver)
The Powell River Company Limited Scholarship, $700 (for
research in Wood Chemistry);
MICHAEL JACKSON (Vancouver)
The Richard Claxton Palmer Scholarship, $240 (for graduate studies in Horticulture or related fields of Agriculture):
GERARD HUBERT GUBBELS  (Victoria)
Scholarship for French Canada Studies, $500;
IAIN HAMILTON BROWN   (Vancouver)
The Shell Oil Fellowship for Research,  S1200   (for graduate study and research to the Ph.D. degree in Chemistry):
Continue on Page   10 — See  AWARDS PAGE TEN
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, May 21, 1957
uoooooooooooooccc
It Pays To
Patronize The Advertisers
oooooooooooeoooooooooooooooooooaoaaooooooooooocoo
CONGRATULATIONS GRADUATES
OF '57
UNIVERSITY PHARMACY LIMITED
V/z Blocks East of the Empire Pool
ALma 0339
CONGRATULATIONS
•     •    •
GRADS
ttin^
4538 West 10th Avenue
Camera Supply
and
Photographer
ALma 2404
TO THE GRADUATES OF 1957
A one-year course in Librarianship leading to the degree
of Bachelor of Library Science is offered, for university
graduates, at the
LIBRARY SCHOOL
UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO
The school provides a placement .service and there are
good openings in various types of libraries including:
Public libraries for adults or children; university and
college libraries; government, business, scientific and
technical libraries.
All inquiries should be addressed to the Director, University of Toronto Library School, Ontario College of
Education, 371 Bloor Street West, Toronto 5.
$1,000 LEGACY
(Continued from Page 3)
spring, that, rather than granting a specific amount of money
to the university, the government would establish a Matohing
Grants Fund.
The phrase denotes a fund, established by the government for
matching, dollar for dollar, any
money to the amount of $5,000,-
000 donated to the university by
industry or by private citizens.
In tins Matching Grants Fund
lie UBC's hopes for expansion;
a dental school, a decent medical
building, adequate student housing, and elimination of the
"temporary" post-war huts.
So the class of '57, setting a
precedent in leaving money to
the university, is also investing
in UBC's future.
We'd   like  to
express our
friendly congratulations
on your graduation . . .
and our confidence that
you will meet
.the challenge
'of the future
with success.
Dress for Success
IN A CUSTOM-MADE
I f,
SUIT
by MODERNIZE
As Western Canada's I ft r K e * t
lustoni tiitlurs "f slacks we offer
I thi' same painstaking service ;ml
attention tu detail on custom
made suits. For a more handsome, well dressed appearance,
weal n MOOEKNIZE (Ts'rO.U
MADE SIIT. CCA
Priced  from        *OW
CONGRATULATIONS
AND  ALL   BEST   WISHES
TO   UBC   GRADUATES
No field of endeavor
offers more opportunity
to the men and women
of tomorrow
than the
PROVINCE   OF
BRITISH   COLUMBIA
Department of
Industrial Development, Trade, and Commerce
Parliament buildings, Victria, B. C.
T. L. Sturgess
Deputy Minister
Hon. R. \V. Bonner
Minister
AWARDS
(Contlnutd from Pagt 9)
RONALD VAN DER LINDEN (Vancouver)
The Standard Oil Company of British Columbia Scholarship, $950 (for graduate study in Chemical Engineering):
WALTER ROSS DEY (New Westminster)
United Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union Scholarship
in Fisheries, $200 (graduate study and research in Fisheries):
ANAND PRAKASH (New Delhi, India)
University Graduate Scholarship, $200 (for graduate study):
JOHN GREENWAY HALL (Vancouver)
The Vancouver B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation Scholarships,
$125 each (for graduate study):
ROBERT PHELAN LANGLANDS (Vancouver)
GERARD HUBERT GUBBELS (Victoria)
The  Vancouver  Women's  Canadian   Club  Scholarship  in
Canadian History, $100 (highest standing in Canadian His*
tory—award for graduate study):
PATRICIA JOAN IRVINE (Vancouver)
Awards in Architecture
The Architectural Institute of British Columbia Prize, books
(approx. $67) (outstanding ability in architectural design):
RONALD V. BASSETT HOWARD (Vancouver)
British Columbia Lumber Manufacturers Association Prize
in Architecture, $100 (special design project involving use
of wood):
ARTHUR LEWIS ALLEN  (Banff, Alberta)
Powell River Company Limited Prize, $50  (excellence in
aspect of planning):
RICHARD COLBURN MANN (Vancouver)
Northwest   Plaster  Bureau   Scholarship   Prize,  $250   (out-
standing in progress toward profession of architecture):
NORMAN SIDNEY JONES  (West Vancouver)
Stuart Diecasting Prize. $25 (awarded prior to 1956-57 Session):
JOSEPH NAITO (Kelowna)
Awards in Arts and Science
The Ahepa Prize, $100 (proficiency in Greek Studies):
JOHN GREENWAY HALL (Vancouver)
,The Armstead Prize in Biology and Botany, $50 (scholastic
achievement and*promise of ability in research):
DOUGLAS MALCOLM SHRIMPTON (Victoria)
The David Bolocan Memorial Prize, $25  (outstanding in
Philosophy and Psychology):
SALLY ANNE GRANTHAM (Vancouver)
The Francis Midforth Painter Memorial Prize, $10 (outstand-
ing in Final Year Seminar, History):
RALPH CHARLES CROIZIER (North Burnaby)
The French Government Medal (proficiency in French):
LORRAINE ELIZABETH BRAND (Victoria)
The German Government Book Prize (proficiency in German, Final Year):
RONALD CLAYTON BEAUMONT (Victoria)
The Gilbert Tucker Memorial Prize, $25 (leading student
in History 404, The French in North America):
JOHN ALEXANDER BOVEY (Vancouver)
The Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire Scott Memorial Scholarship, $100 (high standing in Biology 332):
HELEN JUNE EMMONS (Vancouver)
The Macmillan Company of Canada Prize in Creative writing (bast origina Ishort story), $50:
(MRS.) ELIZABETH MINNIE LAMBERT (Vancouver)
United Nations Prize. $50 (contribution to United Nations
work on the campus):
GEORGE SHOLTO HEBENTON (Penticton)
The   University   Essay   Prize,   books,   $25   (best   essay   in
courses offered by Department of English):
GLEN ALLAN WYPER (Vancouver)
The Victoria Daily Times Prize, $100 (best piece of writing
in mass-media field):
KATHLEEN ANN ARCHIBALD (Kelowna)
Awards in
Commerce and Business Administration
The Better Business Bureau Prizes, $50 each (best essays on
assigned topics related to ethics in business):
'MELVIN JACK SHELLEY (Kelowna)
Awards in Engineering
The American Institute of Chemical Engineers Award, membership pin and certificate (chemical engineering student in
final vear vvith highest scholastic standing in first two vears):
GRAHAM   FALCONER   SOMERVILLE    (West   Vancouver)
The Canadian  Purest  Products  Limited  Prizes,  $100 each
(general pioficiencv, final two vears of forest engineering):
ARTHUR JAMES STROTHER  (Vernon)
HOWARD ELDER  (Victoria)
Engineering Institute of Canada (Vancouver Branch) Walter
Moberly Memorial Prize, $25 (best engineering thesis):
Continued on Page   15 — See AWARDS Tuesday, May 21, 1957
THE     UBYSSEY
PAGE ELEVEN
Class Will
• • •
We, the Graduating Class of
1957 of the University of British Columbia, being of sound
though educated mind, hereby
revoke all wills and testamentary dispositions of every nature
and kind whatsoever by us heretofore made, and do repudiate
all hasty promises made under
the influence of examinations.
We give, bequeath and devise
l.To the AMS, a quorum.
2. To Buildings and Grounds,
in conjuction with the class
of 1946, the temporary huts.
3. To the Raven, Mickey Spiilane.
4. To sororities, larger fraternity pins.
5. To the Senate, Dal Grauer.
6. To the Students, POGO.
7. To UCC, Beta Sigma, a new
fraternity to be composed of
students writing subjective
examinations.
8. To the Faculty of Commerce, as a token of our esteem, with no strings attached, Axel Wenner-Gren.
9. To the Library Staff, a sum
sufficient to complete the
south wing of the library in
order that they may insure
that students in the Riddington Room will no longer be
inconvenienced by people
wishing to study there.
10. To the Faculty of Education,
the enlightening theory that
education is merely the inculcation of the incomprehensible to the ignorant by
the incompetent.
11. To the Administration, the
new Arts Building, Forestry
Building, Brock Extension,
additional facilities in the
Law building and the promise of the Social Credit
Government that it will
match all future contributions.
Finally, we make no promises
of rights we will enforce or horizons we will conquer, but rather
we leave with you the assurance
that should we fulfill a worthwhile role in the community or
perform outstanding deeds,
these accomplishments will have
been due to your imprint upon
our minds. . .
Signed, published and declared in the presence of the Graduating Class of 1957, as and for
its Class Will and Testament.
May, Nineteen Hundred and
Fifty-seven.
— JERRY LECOVIN.
Congratulations  Graduates
CoWunA & QoUmA
CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS
470 Granville St
MArine 0564
WHEREVER YOU GO
WHATEVER YOU DO
WE WISH YOU WELL
Parsons Brown
Limited
535 Homer Street
TAtlow 0311
INSURANCE OF ALL KINDS
Pilkington Glass Limited
CAREER OPPORTUNITY!
We are looking for management material!
Nationally known firm has excellent opportunities for
young men to be trained in sales and administration.
Should have university education and be prepared to
accept transfer during training to various locations across
the country. Initial training six to eight weeks in Toronto.
Starting salary dependent on qualifications.
Write stating age and education to
Box 1000, AMS Office, Brock Hall, U.B.C.
SB OB 8 B Q B 013 £! 13 013 0 G £113 EIB SB £1B £113 EIB CIB ElB £1B £IG £IB £IB 8B 3B 9-3^
CO
CD
<3
CO
ca
cb
ca
cb
ca
cb
C3
cb
ca
GO
ca
co
co
cb
ca
cb
ca
cb
ca
do
ca
cb
ca
db
ca
cb
ca
db
ca
db
ca
m
CHALLENGER ETERNA-MATIC
and let time take care of itself—
automatically!
Challenger Eterna-matic ... the first selfwinding watch with a ball bearing . . . the
most dramatic achievement in watch-making
in half a century.
Each watch features a 17-jewel precision
movement, made in Switzerland's wG|ld-
renowned ETERNA craftshops, exclusively
for Birks in Canada
Geneleman's model; 14kt. yellow gold top,
stainless steel back, 125.00. Silver dial model
also available.
Ladies' model; 14kt. yeltow gold case, 125.00
Other Eterna-matic models from 92.50
BIRKS
JEWELLERS
Granville at Georgia MArine 6211
B £1B £113 £1B £1B £113 £113 CI 13 £113 £113 £1B £113 £113 £1B El 13 £113 £113 £113 £IB £1B £1
CD
03 ,
CO
03
CD '
03
CO
Co
CO
CO
ca
03
CO
cb
CO
cb
co
cb
co
03
CO
03
02
C3
CO
cb
CO
cb
CO
cb
CO
cb
CO
03
CO
cb
cb
CO
cb
cp
CO
cb
co
C3
CP
CO
CO
C3
CD
03
CP
03
£
CD
cb
£
£
£
£
£
£
£
B8-B8-B
BEST WISHES AND EVERY SUCCESS
CAVE
&  COMPANY
LIMITED
SCIENTIFIC INSTRUMENTS and
CHEMICALS
567 Hornby Street
Vancouver, B. C. PAGE TWELVE
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, May 21, 1957
Congratulations
CLASS OF 1957
Pride of the West Knitting Mills Ltd.
Manufacturers of
Custom-made Club and Sports Sweaters and Scarves
VANCOUVER, B. C.
w**ue*f
Let's face it. The genius with a formula
for doubling his money overnight
is a poor Savings Account prospect.
Fortunately for us, no genius is called
for when opening an account with
the Royal. Just a dollar or more. How
about it?
THE ROYAL BANK OF CANADA
There's a handy branch of the Royal nearby
JOHN GAYTON
. Grad Class President
BARBARA  CLEASBY
. . Grad Class Secretary
Wm. Scott
& Co. Ltd.
1426 Cottrcll Street
PAcific 9591
Oldest and largest
poultry and egg
wholesale in
British Columbia
Under Federal Government
inspection
Congratulations
1957  Graduates
Stuart  Keate
Publisher
B.A. '35
WE  WISH  YOU
MANY FINE ACCOMPLISHMENTS IN THE
YEARS AHEAD . . . TOUCHED WITH
THE HAPPY MEMORY OF FRIENDSHIPS
YOU ENJOYED AT U.B.C.
Bruce
Hutchison
Editor
LLD. '51
VICTORIA DAILY TIMES
VICTORIA, B. C.
UBC Capital Needs
Arts building (under way) $ 2,000,000
Medical Science building  2,500,000
Student residences   2.000,000
Addition to Chemistry building  1,100,000
Biological Sciences building  1,000,000
Commerce building   750,000
Power house and services  650,000
Fine Arts building  1,000,000
Library addition   1,000,000
International House dormitory  750,000
Engineering  buildings    2,000,000
Physics  addition     500,000
Forestry and Agriculture building  500,000
Home Economics addition  100,000
Additional student residences  2,000,0^0
Power house and services additions  1,270,000
Cafeteria and student services  500,000
Other campus services  250,000
College of Education  3,000,000
Dental College  1,500,000
Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation  500,000
Administration building   1,000,000
Law building addition  250,000
Athletic buildings   1,000,000
GRAND TOTAL   $28,120,000
-#^r
Compliments
to the
GRADS OF '57
VARSITY  JEWELERS
4479 West 10th Avenue ALma 3104
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE
GRADUATING CLASS
OF 1957
CiVUiA.
LADIES' READY-TO-WEAR
4469 West 10th Avenue
ALma '.1075 Tuesday, May 21, 1957
THE     UBYSSEY
PAGE THIRTEEN
...On The
Graduating Class
All right, so you're graduating. So what? By George,
we the undergrads know just
how you are graduating. As
we take that jaded metaphorical torch from your faltering
hand, we know just why it's
faltering.
Go on, just try to deny that
you got through that Egyptology course by boozing up
your professor; that you
copied your Economics thesis
from a Depression number of
Fortune. We know, that even
as you receive your glassy
.smile and your diploma and
the warm, soft handclasp that
you still don't know how you
did it; that you are the best
possible argument for the
theory that Our Universities
are turning into either trade
schools or rest homes for the
unemployed.
We know all this because we
have had the best possible
teachers—you.
University is so constructed
that as each moves shakily
toward graduation, it becomes
as much like the class that preceded it by four years as
possible without government
by Eugenists. This is what is
known as Standardized Education.
At the end of the process,
each succeeding class disappears in the lower echelons of
the economy, never to be heard
of again, unless perhaps they
are killed in an automobile
accident.
This loss of identity is the
fundamental weakness of the
Graduating Class, for no one
commands much respect when
they i.re not around to assure
that respect is forthcoming.
Ask Jesus Christ or the
Fathers of Confederation.
We, however, are still
University Students. We will
be so for another three to five
or six years. We shall still
inhabit the Georgia and clutter
up Granville Street and have
the community's arm curved
fondly around our shoulders
while you, you poor nonentity
are wondering how you will
support your second child on
sixty a week and walking to
a job that you don't like and
and won't be able to transcend
for at least ten years.
You may argue that this
is an Expanding Economy;
that society is hungry for
Young People with Education.
Nonsense. Why do you think
that your old man worked like
a piston for forty years to
get you into university? To
make sure that you wouldn't
be around to compete for his
job until he reached retirement age, that's why.
So you, you there, looking,
frankly, pretty funny in your
cap and gown, enjoy what is
left of university to enjoy.
Grab those last few minutes
of dull oratory. And then, so
long, suckers.
History Of Grad Year
The winter session of 1956-
57 at the University of British
Columbia has just flown by.
Why is it that every year on
campus seems shorter than the
last? It is the fast age everyone says we are living in or
did we just want to participate in everything possible because we knew this was the
last time wc could enjoy
undergraduate activities? Anyway, let us see what did happen this year.
All the usual activities took
place more or less on schedule.
There was registration, Frosh
Week, Clubs Day, Rushing,
Homecoming, Mardi Gras. Engineers' Pep Meet and the subsequent raid on the Ubyssey,
elections, High School Conference, presentations of awards,
plus the ordinary noise from
blood drives, charitable drives,
athletics, publications board,
and the Alma Mater Society.
Besides these annual occurrences we do have a few
claims to fame,
NEW FACULTIES
We have noticed that the
new faculties are providing
themselves with more distinguished-looking names these
days. The additions this year
are "The Faculty and College
of Education" and "The Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration." Heaven
help the students in future
faculties when dear old aunts
want to know the faculty in
which they are studying.
Last summer a display of
contemporary sculpture was
presented on the Library lawn.
To the delight of some of the
students one piece would seem
to have been left behind.
A record was set at the Fall
General Meeting—it was so
short we barely had time to
eat lunch. In fact, nothing
much at all was accomplished
BETTY  CLARKE
. . . Historian
as ihe quorum was challenged
first off instead of half way
through  the agenda.
HONEYBUN    .
Not to be outdone by somebody's sweetheart, the Ubyssey
printed the daily diary of its
own honeybun culminating in
the splash reports on the channel swim.
Two important campaigns
were held in the fall and both
were very successful. Because of the efforts of a great
many people several hundred
Hungarian students and professors are now situated at
Powell River and Pogo is back
In the funnies.
One of our proudest
moments came when our rowing fours won their gold medal
at the Olympic Games. To
hear just after that the eights
had also placed and would
bring home a silver medal was
almost too much. The campus
literally jumped for joy and
talked of rowing for days.
LEADERS CONFER
The Leadership Conference,
although not a brand new innovation,    did    provide    the
Graduates in Arts,
Commerce, and Law
Many will find it to their advantage to consider ihe
opportunities in the life insurance business.
FOR A DISCUSSION ABOUT SUCH
POSSIBILITIES, CONTACT:
Maurice E. Thomas, C.L.U., Manager
The Empire Life Insurance Co.
815 West Hastings St., Vancouver
PActfic 8377
COMPLIMENTS .
. . GRADS
TRIMBLETONS
BAKERY
4425 West 10th Avenue
ALma 0444
spark for the Second Great
Trek. The results of the Trek
were not exactly as anticipated but they may prove to
be more beneficial than the
.original proposition. The one
thousand dollars which our
graduating class donated to
the Building Fund plus the
two other gifts which have
been received have started
the stone rolling. Let us hope
it gathers no moss before
private donations exceed the
five million dollar mark.
The Academic Symposium
was brand new this spring.
We have not discovered, however, whether the conclusions
from the Symposium provide
for the elimination of the students or the faculty in order
to achieve the greatest academic outlook on campus.
Then again, one meaning of
symposium is "an Ancient-
Greek drinking-party". U.B.C.
may yet sport a pub.
NOSTALGIA
No matter what the future
holds the Class of '57 will recall its last year with nostalgia. Although new buildings
will be constructed, new activities will take place, and new
names will be heard across
the campus, we will always
consider that in the history of
The University of British
Columbia, 1956-57 was the
most outstanding year.
BETTY CLARKE.
FEDERATION
B. C.  TEACHER'S
Wishes the Graduating Class of 1957
every success in their
future endeavors.
1642 West Broadway
B Ay view 3197
Qonqhaijudidw
to ihsL
^hadjuucrtsLdu
COLLEGE PRINTERS
and PUBLISHERS LTD.
it
PRINTERS OF THE UBYSSEY
*»
4430 West 10th Ave.
ALma 3253 PAGE FOURTEEN
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, May 21, 1957
Four Years Of A Life
This week you, the graduate, will complete a four-year period in your life.
During these four years UBC has been a part of your life, and you, each one of you,
has been a part of it. You have stood in line at the bookstore, you have spent spring afternoons at Spanish Banks, you have argued over coffee  in the Caf, you have crammed  for
exams, skipped lectures and spent long evenings in the library—you have done everything
that makes UBC what it is.
The scene confronting you as
you entered the armories didn't
increase your poise, but you
persevered and finally left
through the beck door clutching
timetable and frosh beanie. You
were a university student.
Remember your first week of
classes? A maze of faces and
rooms, names and numbers.
BUT THE CAMPUS was not
as big then as it is now, though
at the time it seemed quite big
enough. Those were the days before the Provincial government's
grant of 500 acres, before the
bus stop bookstore, before the
education building.
Those were the days too, before the British Empire Games
swimming pool. Nobody expected
the pool, nor though it would
cause an argument to split the
campus and anger the people
"downtown."
The pool was ready for swimming in 1954, immediately aftes
the Games finished. In the fall
came plans to roof it, at a cost
of $400,000, double the original
estimate. The alternative? Build
another    pool.
THE ARGUMENTS raged for
months, before a solution w«9
reached solution. The hell with
the pool. Put the money into
something else.
So the money has gone into
something else—the Brock extension. What did you learn that
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE
GRADUATING CLASS OF '57
VARSITY CYCLE SHOP
THE "LAWNMOWER SHOP"
4357 West 10th Avenue ALnvi 0023
Best Wishes to Grads of %57
Every Sucess in
Your Future Endeavours
"THE COLLEGE SHOP"
4409 West 10th Avenue ALma 2360
Qoniptaijudatw^
to the
*
Commercial Launderers
& Linen Suppliers
*
Bernard Laundry
Services Ltd.
130 West 5th Avenus
Dickens 1155
first year? That the Caf served
the worst coffee In Christendom?
That the paragraph In the calendar about attending 7/8ths of
your lectures was put there for
comedy relief? That people under
21 can, after all, get into the
Georgia.
BY CHRISTMAS you discovered that UBC was an educational, as well as a social
centre. The exam timetables
were up, and so were the Wake-
up pill sales. Most of you got
through. At least, most of you
who ore graduating this week
got through.
Then is was spring, and you
discovered Spanish Banks, You
may alio have discovered Dean
Gage's loans.
Summer, and then you were
back again, and rich. You looked
at the frosh and said, patronizingly, "God don't they look
young."
You missed even more classes
that year, and the Christmas
failure rate rose accordingly;
forty percent failed English 200,
said the grapevine.
Then at sundown, one Monday evening in Autumn, Brock
Hall burned down. Fifteen
hundred students turned out to
watch the center section of
their building gutted by a fire
started by a cigarette.
COUNCILLORS AND CAMPUS wheels rallied to raise
money to rebuild, and by your
third year Old Brock was ready
again.
Brock fire wasn't the only
blaze to flare up that fall. When
the Ubyssey published the
names of three discriminatory
fraternities, in large black letters at the top of page one,
Councillors and fraternity men
rose up against what they labeled "Thq Ubyssey's bad taste."
Pubsters threat to walk out did
not deter councillors, who moved
a vote of censure against the
Ubyssey. Pubsters, their bluff
called, continued to publish the
paper.
In March of your second year
the provincial government announced that UBC was to receive ten million dollars over a
ten-year-period.
SO IN THE FALL of your
third year bulldozers began to
move the ground north of the
Women's Gym, and the noise of
construction has been heard
around the campus almost continually since.
Also in thc fall of your third
year the Tim Buck incident occurred. The national LPP leader
was   welcomed   at   UBC   by   a
, barrage of rotten fruit and lunch
I bags, a reception which angered
not   only   Buck   but   also   the
i faculty   and   those   ever-present
j "people downtown."
I The year passed comparitively
uneventful, and you found your-
' self in your Fourth Year last
September. Now you are a graduate.
I You will leave UBC this
spring, and from now on, when
you  return to the campus, you
i will no longer be a part of the
i life lived there. You will be only
a visitor. But you will have the
satisfaction of knowing that, between the fall of 1953 and the
spring of 1957, UBC was yours.
CONGRATULATIONS
AND GOOD WISHES
CLASS OF '57
J. M. Dent & Sons (Canada) Limited
Book Publishers ♦
1300 Robton Street, Vancouver 5, B. C.
Congratulations Grads . . .
WHITE   DOVE
CLEANERS
SAME-DAY SERVICE
... NO EXTRA CHARGE
Complete Deluxe Laundry Service
4567 West 10th Avenue ALma 1688
U  and   B. C
The future
belongs to
you grads ...
and to the
Province of
British Columbia
Best of luck,
from B. C.'s
largest
agricultural
organization.
FRASER  VALLEY
MILK   PRODUCERS
ASSOCIATION
Producers of
DAIRYLAND MILK FOODS
PACIFIC AND DELTA CANNED MILKS
ARCTIC ICE CREAM
FRASER VALLEY COTTAGE CHEESE
FRASER VALLEY BUTTER
INSTANT POWDERED SWEETMILK Tuesday, May 21, 1957
THE     UBYSSEY
PAGE FIFTEEN
AWARDS
(Conlinutd from Page 10)
CAMPBELL WILLIAM ROBINSON (Vancouver)
The Heavy Construction Association of British Columbia
Graduation Prize, $50 (Civil Engineering student with highest standing in course on highway engineering):
BURKE CORBET (Vancouver)
The H. R. MacMillan Prize in Forest Engineering, $100 (highest standing in Forest Engineering):
ARTHUR JAMES STROTHER (Vernon)
Machine Design Prize, $25 (mechanical engineering student
submitting best design in course M.E. 463):
JOSEPH PETET WEST (Vancouver)
The Timber Preservers Limited Prizes (best plans and specifications tor a structure of treated timber, C.E. 476):
First Prize, $65—
BURKE CORBET (Vancouver)
Second Prize, $45—
JOHN MURDO MacDONALD (North Vancouver)
Third Prize, $25—
GEORGE JOHN PICHA  (Piney, Manitoba)
Merit Prizes, $15 each (alphabetical order) —
CHARLES ALLAN GOLDIE (Duncan)
MICHAEL JOHN RICH (London, Ontario)
JIM CLIFFORD TAYLOR (Kamloops)
Awards in Home Economics
The B. C. Electric Company Service Award in Home Economics (twelve months' training programme) :
BARBARA JEAN VENABLES (Calgary)
The British  Columbia Dietetic  Association Scholarship  in
Home Economics, $100 (high standing, proceeding to dietetic
interneship):
EONNIE ELIZABETH BROWN (North Vancouver)
The Lillian Mae Wescott Prize, approx. $60 in equipment
(outstanding in areas of clothing and textiles):
MARGARET JEAN MOIR  (North Vancouver)
The Singer Sewing Machine Company Prize (portable electric Singer Sewing Machine, high standing and proficiency
in field of clothing, and proceeding to teaching):
BARBARA ANNE CLEASBV (West Vancouver)
Awards in Law
The Allan S. Gregory Memorial Prize, books, $50 (great
merit in moot court work), awarded jointly to:
ALEC CHARLES ROBERTSON (Vancouver) and
DONALD HUGH CAMPBELL PATERSON  (Vancouver) '
The Canadian Permanent Mortgage Corporation Prize, $50
(highest standing in course on mortgages):
WILLIAM ARTHUR ESSON  (Vancouver)
The Carswell Company Limited Prize, books (highest standing in Third Year Law):
JAMES MURRAY MacINTYRE  (Vancouver)
Awards in Medicine
The C. V. Mosby Company Prizes (excellence in a field or
fields of studies) books, $20 each:
AGNES BETTY LOU RANGER   (Vancouver)
DONALD CARL MATHESON  (Victoria)
The Dean M. M. Weaver Medal (outstanding record and progress):
IAN MARR TURNBULL (Vancouver)
The Dr. Frank Porter Patterson Memorial Scholarship, $150
(special interest in orthopaedic surgery, proceeding to interneship):
BRIAN IRVING FINNEMORE  (Vancouver)
The Dr. Walter Stewart Baird Memorial Prize, $50 (best
graduation dissertation):
JOHN BARTLETT BURR (Oakland, California)
The  Dr.  W.  A.   YVhitelaw  Scholarship,  $200   (outstanding
record in medicine and general interest in education):
DAVID FRANCIS HARDWICK   (Vancouver)
The  Hamber Scholarship  in   Medicine,   $750   (top-ranking
student, proceeding to interneship):
GERALD KLASSEN (R.R. No. 4, New Westminster)
The Health Officers' Prize in Preventive Medicine and Public  Health, $100   (greatest interest  in  and  contribution  to
Public Health and Preventive Medicine in  undergraduate
courses):
BARBARA ELAINE HOSSIE (West Vancouver)
The Horner Cold Medal and Prize, SI00 (highest aggregate
standint; in the four-year course in the subject of medicine):
BRIAN IRVING FINNEMORE (Vancouver)
The Ingram & Bell Limited Prize (special award to student
with best overall qualifications in standing, interest and participation in student affairs, character and promise):
MAYNARD CHRISTIAN   (Vancmtvei)
The Samuel and Rebecca Nemetz Memorial Scholarship, $100
(special aptitude for medical research):
JOSEPH ANTHONY HINKE -(Vancouver)
The Signus Club of Vancouver Prize, $75 (best graduation
thesis on a subject in the field of cerebral palsv):
MAYNARD CHRISTION  (Vancouver)
The  Vancouver   Women's   Canadian   Club   Scholarship   in
Medicine (memorial to the Honourable Tilly Jean Rolston),
$100 (high standing and promise of ability in research):
DANIEL WALTER FROESE (Vancouver)
Awards in Pharmacy
The Civil Defence Press (all expense-paid trip to Pharmacists Indoctrination Course at Civil Defence College, Am-
prior, Ontario):
JOHN PETER BERDUSCO (Prince George)
The Cunningham Prize in Pharmacy, $50 (proficiency in all
years of the course in Pharmacy):
PATRICIA ANN BURNETT (Victoria)
The Dean E. L. Woods Memorial Prize, $50 (donated by the
Pharmaceutical Association of the Province of British Columbia)   (outstanding  record  in  theoretical  and  practical
aspects of the pharmaceutical subjects):
PATRICIA ANN BURNETT (Victoria)
$500 (for practical training through one year of hospital
interneship):
JOHN PETER BERDUSCO (Prince George)
The Merck Awards, books (highest standing in pharmaceutical chemistry):
GORDON MURRAY WRIGHTMAN (New Westminster)
(MRS.) JEANETTE GREENHUT (Vancouver)
The Pfizer Fellowship in Hospital Pharmacy, $500 (for practical training through one year of hospital interneship):
ELLEN ALMA ARNET (Port Alberni)
The Poulenc Gold Medal (highest standing in pharmacology course):
IAN WILFRED FRENCH (North Vancouver)
The Pharmacy Alumni Book Prize (outstanding all-round
pharmacist):
FLORENCE BERGER  (Princeton)
Awards in Social Work
The Canadian Association of Social Workers (British Columbia Mainland Branch) Prize, book's, $25 (academic standing and all-round activity and prom.ise, M.S.W. degree):
LESLIE WARDE LAIDMAN (Regina, Saskatchewan)
The Social Work Alumni Prize, $25 (best thesis for M.S.W.
degree):
HARRY LEE PENNY (Vancouver)
Honourable Mention—
(MRS.) BETTY MARIE MORTON (Vancouver)
Special University Prize, $25 (second highest standing for
B.S.W. degree):
MARY JULIA PARLEE (Edmonton, Alberta)
National Research Council Awards
Percy J. Bandy (Vancouver) , studentship, $1200
Ronald R. Burgess (Vancouver) studentship, 1200
John W. Coburn (Vancouver) studentship, 1200
Thomas M. Connor (England) studentship, 1200
Philip C. Eastman  (Burlington, Ont.) studentship, 1200
Herman J. Fink  (Burnaby) studentship, 1200
Rowland F. Grant (Victoria) studentship, 1200
Cleveland P. Hickman   (Vancouver) studentship, 1200
Arthur H. Houston (Carleton Place)....'....studentship, 1200
David J. Huntley (Brentwood Bay) bursary, 800
Klaus F. Hoechsmann  (Burnaby) bursary, 800
Joseph M. P. Jolicoeur (Montreal) studentship, 1200
Garth Jones  (Vancouver) studentship, 1200
Edith M. Kennedy   (Ottawa) studentship, 1200
Robert P.  Langiands   (Vancouver) bursary, 800
Marcel A. R. LeBlanc (Gravellbourg) studentship, 1200
Richard F. Lim  (Vancouver) bursary, 800
Miles T.  My res   (England) studentship, 1200.
Donald E. McAllister (Vancouver) studentship, 1200
Anthony M. MacQuillan (Vancouver) studentship, 1200
Frank A. Payne (Vancouver) studentship, 1200
Gertrude D. Pentland  (Vancouver) studentship, 1200
John R. Pritchard (Victoria) bursary, 800
Peter J. Riley (Celista) studentship, 1200
Douglas M.  Shrimpton   (Victoria) bursary, 800
Prithe P. Singh  (India) studentship, 1200
Ernest E. Swiestra (Pitt Meadows) bursary, 800
Paul R. Ukrainetz  (Erwood) bursary, 800
John R. Vail (Vancouver) studentship, T200
Robert B. Weeden (United States) studentship, 1200
Thomas B. Widdowson (Read Island) bursary, 800.
Keith Yates (Vancouver) studentship, 1200
Awards Made by Other Institutions
The Athlone Scholarship (for study in the United Kingdom,
engineering, for two years—travel, maintenance and tuition):
GRAHAM FALCONER SOMERVILLE  (West Vancouver)
GORDON HERBERT LAURIE (Cranbrook)
IAN STANLEY GARTSMORE  (Vancouver)
Ford Foundation Foreign Area Travelling Fellowship, $2000;
PAUL ERIC ALFRED ROMERIL (Vancouver)
Wood row Wilson Foundation Scholarship, $1400 (for graduate study in Economics, United States):
THOMAS ARTHUR WILSON (Vancouver)
The Viscount Bennett Trust Fund Scholarship, $2000:
JAMES MURRAY MacINTYRE (Vancouver)
NEW HOUSE
With the grant of $150,000
from the Vancouver * Rotary
Club, a new International House
will be built on the campus by
March, 1958.
The money was promised in
1952 when the Vancouver Rotary
Club, at the occasion of their
50th anniversary voted the sum
to the construction of a social
centre for International Students.
The sod will be turned at the
end of July.
Besides this appreciable sum,
donations have also been contributed by the University to the
construction of the building as
well as architectural services.
SPLIT LEVEL
The new building will accomodate 400 members and will include i large lounge, snack bar,
games rooms, music rooms and
a number of small lecture rooms
for lectures and films. It will be
built in a split-level design opposite tne President's residence
on the West Mall. A dormitory
to accommodate 200 students has
been proposed in the same area,
later.
Funds to furnish the new
building were raised this year
at the International House Fair
and at the International House
Ball.
The new International House
will  be  in  keeping  with  other
International Houses at Bcrkely,
Chicago, and New York.
PLANNING
Planning of the construction
of the building is being carried
on by a committee consisting
of representatives of International House, University Administration, Rotary Club and such
charitable services as the Zanta
Club.
The purpose and great nee<8
for the new building is to provide a social centre for International students where they
may gather, meet students from'
other countries including Canada
and to encourage the brother-
hqod of International, relationships.
PROPHECY
(Continued from Page 7)
pub-committee currently investigating his so-called "harem"
activities.
The crowd has risen to the
entrance of the President of
the University and special
guests. Next to the president
is the Chancellor, Dr. Shalto
Hebenton; in private life,
President of the B. C. Electric
Company. Present also is the
Honourable Howard Johnston,
Premier of British Columbia.
The dormitories will be dedicated by Archbishop Hamish
Simpson. Guest speaker, President Emeritus, Dr. N. A. M.
Mackenzie, intends to emphasize the necessity for larger
old ape pensions and athletic
scholarships.
Wc now move to the dedication address on which the
President of the University
complimented Mr. John MacDonald, President of Marwcll
Construction Company, on the
excellent work his company
has done with the structural
fabrication of the new dormitories. In closing the President
announced the commencement
of a second Capital Gifts Campaign adding, "11 is my fond
hope that we may all gather
here again in twenty-live years
to witness the dedication,of a
new cafeteria for the University of British Columbia." PAGE SIXTEEN
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, May 21, 1957
BEST. WISHES TO THE t j*/;   <
'   *        GRADUATES OF 1957
ELOISE STREET
TYPING
"Seven Years' Experience on the Campus"
ALma 0655-R
Austin A-55 Cambridge - - $1945
Details- Demonstration - Delivery
CALL
GORDON BROS.
CEdar 8106
10th Avenue and Alma
Opportunities in Banking are many. With more than
750 branches in Canada and abroad, this Bank needs
young men who can advance to responsible positions.
Your nearest branch manager will gladly give you
details.
THE CANADIAN
BANK OF COMMERCE
MP-57
o£ 1957
Commodore   Cabaret
PAcific 7838
PAcific 0413
Graduation
Poem . .'57
As graduates we hear about our
fellows every day
We're dewey-eyed idealists,
we're smug and too well fed—
We're anxious for security and
pensions with our pay—
We're the silent generation with
a mental mid-aged spread.
At U.B.C, however, we're
stamped from different steel
Caution and escurity are not our
game of pool.
The traffic at eight-thirty, or
one thrilling Fort Camp meal
Is enough to send the Milquetoasts to some older, quieter
school.
And as they hand us our
diplomas and we face the
cold cruel world
We've learned at least security
is not our highest aim.
We're glad we've been to U.B.C.
where our intellect unfurled
We leave the best we've ever
known to ne'er return again.
—SANDY ROSS,
Arts IV, '57.
Three Forms
Unsuccessful
As Culture
This year, the University Administration added to the campus one of the few public monuments in Vancouver.
The "Three Forms" was selected by Alexander Archipenko
and Sir Herbert Read, two
figures of international reputation. The work, by Robert
Clothier, was chosen from several other exhibits, which were
shown on the library lawn during the summer.
Mr. Archipenko liked the
statue for its "simplicity of
form" and its effective use of
sunlight and shadow.
The introduction of culture
to our campus has not been a
total success, because the statue
has obtained more than its share
of decorations. Robert Davidson,
Art Supervisor for the Depart'
ment of Extension, said, "It becomes a monument, albeit a
small one, to ignorance, bigotry
and intolerance. It can take its
minor one, with other monu-
place, even though it is a very
ments to man's destruction —
Carthage, Troy, and perhaps
even Buchanwald. The implication is there."
rwj we WHOtF
ZtFAMILV
On the fishing grounds, in our canneries
in our offices .  .  .
the men and women of
__    NELSON
^> enjoys *     Bros. Fisheries Ltd.
Share your pride in your graduation
COMPLIMENTS   .   .   .
MRS. F. M. GOW
Professional Typist
4456' West 10th Avenue ALma 3606 • 1866
CONGRATULATIONS
to the
CUSS OF '57
UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORE
•»      -«     TT
Owned and Operated by
The University of B. C.
JIul #om, Ofc 57
U.B.C. SERVICE STATION
Complete Automotive Servicing
Roy Hand, Proprietor
(Just off University Boulevard)
ALma 0524
CONGRATULATIONS
to the
GRADUATING CLASS
GEORGE    HAYES
MEN'S and BOYS' WEAR
4548 West 10th Avenue                                       ALma 3564
UBYSSEY
BEAUTY SALON
ANN GRAHAM
CONGRATULATES THE
GRADS OF  37
It has been our pleasure to serve many of the students
during the semester now closing. We extend our hearty
thanks for your patronage and hope to see you patronize
us in the future.
5736 University Boulevard
ALma 1909 Tuesday, May 21, 1957
THE     UBYSSEY
PAGE SEVENTEEN
Spectator Sports Still on Downgrade,
University Administration Must Act
The sports year of 1957 was
highlighted by the amazing
success of UBC's rowing crews
at  the  Melbourne  Olympics,
as Frank Read's crews climaxed months of training and
preparation by sweeping first
place in the Fours, and finishing second to the United States
in the eights.
1957 may also be remembered as the year when the first
positive steps were taken towards investigating and rebuilding the apathetic athletic
setup at UBC. Years of non-
winning, non-playing basketball and football teams, accompanied by a disinterested attitude or. the part of the administration, prompted an invest-
gation and publication of a full
report by a committee compos
ed   of  coaches and  students.
It was hoped that the faults
and weaknesses so well pointed out in the report will be
acted on by the Administration, and that athletics would
attain the prominence which
they should have in a University education.
Football was marked by
deacreasing crowds, increased
talent, and a record which
showed little deviation either
way from previous years, one
win tnd five losses in conference play. Through the efforts In the last two years of
Varsity coach Frank Gnup,
there has been a marked improvement in player attitude,
and an increase in the number
and calibre of high school
players turning out. With
minimum losses by graduation,
1958's version of the Football
Thunderbird will be another
step on the way towards competition on an even scale with
American colleges in the Evergreen Conference.
Jack Pomfret's basketball
quintet suffered a relapse to
their previous status after a
surprising season in 55-56, as
they dropped all but two conference games. They suffered
from the usual ailments of
height and inexperience.
UBC Alumni seldom swell
with pride over the accomplishments of their Alma
Mater, and can manage no
more than a shamefaced smile
over Varsity's athletic endeavours. It is unfortunate
that the public relations of
the University are based on
the success or failure of the
paying or spectator sports,
footbail and basketball as,
these are the only two sports
that UBC suffers an undue
proportion of defeats.
Varsity has undoubtedly
the finest rugby club in North
America, a fine soccer team,
and holds its own in conference
competition in swimming, tennis, golf, gymnastics and baseball. We also have top notch
cricket and hockey teams, and
intra-mural competition in
basketball, touch football, soccer, volleyball, sofeball, swimming, tennis, track, boxing,
and wrestling.
In order to maintain this
extensive program it was necessary this year to increase the
fees of each student one dollar, the increase going directly
to the athletic budget.
If the administration does
not mutch this student contribution, it will not be continued.
The future of sports at the
university is dependent upon
the administration realizing
the real importance of extra
mural competition on a high
level, and giving athletes and
teams the financial aid and
privileges which they must
have if UBC is to have any
athletic program at all. 1957
was the year when the first
steps were taken towards the
reorganization and rebuilding
of our sports setup, and it
will be up to the administration of the University to
formulate a definite policy,
where sports are regarded as
essential to a complete college
education,
EVERY SUCCESS
*
a&adVL   dtstaufy*
Salon*
FOR COURTESY and SERVICE
4447 West 10th Avenue
ALma 0616
Girls Top Agriculture
Commerce Classes
Grad  classes  in Commerce  and  Agriculture  have  been
topped this year for the first time in years by girls.
. ...         .     class of  '57  graduating  with
ALL GOOD WISHES
TO THE GRADS
Varsity Automotive Service
Ltd.
J. J. SMITH — J. C. REID
IMPERIAL DEALER
10th Avenue West at Blanca
(University Gates)
ALma 1201
Patronize
the
advertisers
in  this
Graduation
Edition
CONGRATULATIONS
TO THE
CLASS OF   57
FROM
Your UBC Alumni Association
UBC is interested in. you after graduation
Wc hope you will continue your interest in UBC
ii
DON'T BECOME A "LOST SOUL
When yo umarry, have children,
get a new job, change your address
Drop a note to Room 252, Brock Hall. UBC
Vancouver 8, B. C.
a B. of Com. degree was led this
year by twenty-two year old
Ruth' Krane of Balfour, B.C.
Miss Krane was informed of
her award the day before grad
lists were published, when a reporter phoned 'to check her age
and address.
"I was amazed," she said. "I
missed a month of school this
year, and I had many outside interests which I hadn't had previously. I certainly didn't expect it."
Miss Krane plans to start
articling for her Chartered Accountant's degree in June.
"But I'm getting married the
day after graduation," she says,
"So I don't know whether I'll
complete the degree."
Leading the Agriculture grad j
class   is   Geraldine   Waters,   of
Vancouver.
She    was    informed    of    her;
achievement    by    Dr.    J.   J. R.
Campbell    of    the    Agriculture j
department before the grad lists
were published.
"I led the class last year,"
Miss Waters said, "and I had
hopes that I might this year.
But I certainly had some stiff
competition."
Miss Waters, like Miss Krane,
plans to be married this month.
Her fiance, who graduated from
UBC recently, will continue his
studies in Bio-chemistry at Ber-
k'ply. Miss Waters plans to
work in research at Berkely for
one year, then take her masters
degree in Bio-chemistry at the
California University.
Compliments of
byng s. woo
Com. '56
WALKER &
WORSUY
Investment
Securities
581 Hornby St.
TAtlow 5911
SMOKES
FOR CANADIAN
MIUTARY PERSONNEL
serving with the
United Nations Emergency
Force in the Middle East
*K2 sends 400
EXPORT
CIGARETTES
or any other Macdonald Brand
Postage included
Mall order and remittance tot
OVERSEAS DEPARTMENT
MACDONALD TOBACCO INC.
P.O. Bex 490, Place d'Armei,
Montreal, Que.
This offer If tub|act to any change
In Government Regulations
Exclusive Imports from Germany
Wools, Needle Point, Petit Point
GIFT ARTICLES
Knitted Goods by Bleyle
Also Made-to-measure Articles
HOMECRAFT IMPORTERS
2348 West 4th Avenue
CHerry 2614 PAGE EIGHTEEN
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, May 21, 1957
Best Wishes and Success
to the Graduates of '57
JhsL   ComtoLbMWL   ShofL
GIFTS and CHINA
4433 West 10th Avenue ALma 1520-R
CONGRATULATIONS AND ,BEST WISHES
from
DEAN'S
"New" RESTAURANT
Serving the University Area
4544 West 10th Avenue ALma 259C
During Your Vacation
COME IN   .    .   .
AND LISTEN TO YOUR FAVORITE SELECTIONS
in our
MODERN RECORD SHOP
THOMSON & PAGE LTD.
2914 Granville Street
CHerry 5144
Park Royal
WAlnut 2*1288
Success to Graduates of '57
JACK JANZEN
SHELL SERVICE
10th Avenue and Discovery     ALma 1707
GRAPHIC INDUSTRIES LTD.
PHOTOGRAPHERS — ARTISTS
Manufacturers of "Scan-a-graver" Plastic
HALF-TONE CUTS
54 East Hastings Street
Vancouver, B. C.
PAcific 4174
BEST  WISHES
CLASS  OF  '57
Ward and Son Ltd.
CONTRACTORS
709 Agnes New Westminster
LAkeview 2-6841
Grad Class
Of 1917
To Return
More than 20 members of the
University of B. C. graduating
class of 1917 will be in attendance at UBC Congregation Ceremonies Tuesday.
Of the 30 living members of
the class about 20 will be back
on campus for the 40th anniversary of their own graduation.
The class will be present at
the Congregation Tea in Brock
Hall following Tuesday's graduation ceremonies and will hold
their reunion dinner at 7 p.m.
at the Capilano Golf and Country Club.
Class president, Dr. John H.
Mennie, now professor cf chemistry at McGill University, is
coming from Montreal for the
ceremony. Valedictorian Mrs.
Eric E. Swadell is coming from
| her home in Oakland, California for the occasion.
Other members of the class
include Mrs. Sherwood Lett,
wife of UBC's Chancellor, and
Dr. C. H. Wright of Trail.
CONGRATULATIONS
RADIO RENTAL & REPAIR
WESTINGHOUSE HOME APPLIANCES
4453 West 10th Avenue ALma 2244
Best Wishes to the Grads of '57
Success in Your Future Endeavors
Mrs.   Munro's
CONFECTIONERY
4601 West 10th Avenue
ALma 1106
Best Wishes Graduates
Bob's Quality Market
4491 West 10th Avenue
ALma 0100
9^*
INCORPORATED   2*°   MAY   1670
nmpunu
Hail UBC Graduates!
To The "Class of 57"
Congratulations Tuesday, May 21, 1957
THE      UBYSSEY
PAGE NINETEEN
Graduation Results
ARTS
THE DEGREE OF
BACHELOR OF ARTS
General Course
Acheson, Miles Malcolm (1),
' Ganges; Ainscough, Brian Drew
(2), Vancouver; Aitchison, John
Patterson (2), Burnaby; Allan,
Helen Margaret (P), Vancouver;
Allingham, Anthony (2), Vancouver; Alsgard, Stewart Brett,
(P), Westview; Anderson, Graham Leslie (P), Lake Cowichan;
\ndersen, Sidney Bernard John
(2), Vancouver; Annis William
Archibald (2), Sardis; Armitage,
Richard Evan (2), United States;
Armstrong, Lyall Ernest (P),
Trail; Asahina, Kinji Richard
(2, Vancouver.
Baltman, Louis (2), Vancouver; Barberie, Dorothy Joan
(P), Alberta; Barlow, Michael
Channing Whyte (2), Trail; Bas-
kett, Morris (P), Osoyoos; Bas-
sett, Marilyn Jill Elliott (2),
Victoria; Beach, Mrs. Olive
Mary (P), Vancouver; Beairsto,
Margaret Janice (2), Okanagan
Landing; Beck, Stanley Martin
(C), Vancouver; Bell, Gerald
McKinly (P, Deroche; Bennet-
Alder, Noel (2), Vancouver; Bil-
lung-Meyer, Wiechmann (2),
Vancouver.
Birch, Ronald George Noel
(P), Victoria; Blackaby, Henry
Thomas (2), Vancouver; Blank,
Stanley Solomon (2), Vancouver; Blois, Cecil Meek (2), Haney; Boyd, William Thomas McLeod (Pi, Ontario; Brawner,
Kenne'h LeRoy (C), Summer-
Janc!; Bri.stow, James Frederick
(P), Vancouver; Brown, Jacolyn
Marie (2», Vancouver: Brown,
Joyce Marion (2), Vancouver;
Buchanan, Donald Ernest (2),
Ontario; Buick, Anna May (P),
Vancouver; Burns, Brian John
(2), Victoria; Butterfield, Rita
Yvcr-ne (2) South Burnaby; Buz-
za, Robert Morley (2) Vanvou-
ver.
Cadeli, Theodore Ernest (2),
Vancouver; Cahoun Marilyn Fae
(P), Vancouver; Carley, Audrey
Lois (1), North Vancouver; Carl-
sen, Carl Trygve (P) Victoria;
Carney. Robert James Martin
(2), Vancouver; Cartvvright,
Richard Ian (2), Ontario; Cheng,
Richmond Man-Ching (2), Hong
Kong; Chu, Andrew Kai-Mu (V)'.
Hong Kong; Church, Frederick
<P), Powell River; Clark, Wesley
Wocdrovv Lcroy (2), Vancouver,
Clej-g, Peter Clelland (2), Ontario; Collett, Catherine Marie
(P), New Westminster; Corbett,
Peter Gerald (C). United States:
Cox, Mrs. Heather Mae (2), Vancouver; Cox, Kenneth Bruce (C)
Victoria; Cyprus, Gladys Shirley
(2). Vancouver.
Davis, Dorothv Diane (2), Van-
ecu -er: r'o h Giroday, Dorothy
Mary i.P), Vancouver; De Wot.
Marilvn Dawn (2), Victoria;
Diek, Harvey Douglas (P). Wes1-
view; Piostel. Olea Ruth Henrietta .'Pi, Vancouver; Dixon.
Mr-. Dorothv Marguerite (2).
Vancouver: Draper. James An-
rot; (2< Vancouver; Driscoll
M;my Till (2). Vancouver: Dry-
wnrydr. Berosford O'Neill ("*).
Vancouver: Duock. John Wil
r\->r <2\ Count- Line: Dvek
C--"-'n Brrnioo (2) New- Wc-"1
r-it>tcr Pvmk. Ilarccv Loonaiv"
C)   Abbotsford.
Edward*, Davis Lloyd Goor;*r
(P* Trinidad: Edwards. Williatr
Vktor C\ Cumberland: Eenor
Edward Brian (2), Vancouver
Elimtt, Halo M'>reavot (2). Vic
Wkc EMictt, Kathleen Norm-
(2). Vancouver: E11N Ho'vmV
Tl madt ro <2\ Vancouver: Flth
oiiimton Lome George (2). Vn"
rouvcr; Fc.mnns. Helen Juno ('"
^Tar"on,-e-- Emmons. Pairiri-
^ufh HV Vancouver: Eon. Geo
u(.;-rv i'\ Vrirrow: Evans Mar
tha  Lu/^l.i   <2).  Vancouver.
FCleul, Francis Miles (2), Van
couver;   Fleury,   Harvey   Alfred
(2). Ne.son;    Foerster,    Herbert
Uoiulas   (P),   Nanaimo:   Forstcr.
Ralph Wallace (P), Alberta; Fos
:--ett,   Rcnee   Evelyn   (2),   Abbot-
fore':   Foster.   Eric   Newark   (2)
Duncan:   Found,   Maureen  Eslei
Louise (2>, Vancouver; Fromson
Etta Elaine (2), Vancouver.
Ganz, Lothar Benno (P), Matsqui; Gentleman, Glenda Elaine
(2), Alberta; Ghezzi, Linda Ann
Brena (P), Kelowna; Gibson,
James Ronald (2), Chilliwack;
(2), Gibson, Margaret Norah (P)
Alberta; Gibson, Ruth Elizabeth
(2) Victoria; Gilley, Wilma
Gfacfi (2), New Westminster:
Gilroy. Marjorie Ellen (2), Victoria; Girvin, Gerald Wayne, P.
Vancouver; Godwin, Walter G.
(2) Nanaimo; Goodwin, Patricia
(2), Vancouver; Gormcly, Mrs.
Elaine Maebelle (2), Vancouver:
Gray. Robert St. George (Fi
Duncan: Green, Shirley Ann. P.
Victoria; Griffin. Margaret Col-
Jina (P). Saskatchewan: Groher-
m?.n. Herbert Samuel <C), Vancouver: Griibb, Goraldine Joyce
(P), Vancouver.
Hall, John William (2), North
Burnaby: Hall, Susan Diane, P,
Vancouver; Hansen, Joy Krh-
tine (P), Ontario; Hardie, Sheila
Elizabeth Fleetwood (2), Victoria: Harrington. Edwin Charles
(2), New Westminster;* Harritt,
Betsy Ann Margaret (2), Vancouver; Hart, Barbara Elizabeth
(2), Plcasantsidc: Hawthorn. A.
St. George (2), Vancouver; Hef-
fornan. Doughs Doyle (2). Vancouver; Helliwell! David Lee-
dem (2), Vancouver; Heron, Robert Peter Barker (P) Alberta:
Heywood. Ann Louise (2). Vancouver: Hildebrandt. Jacob (?V
Vnnroiper; Hildebrandt, Jacob
(21. Sardis; Hod!re. James Francis C-oraH (21 Vancouver; Ho-
mm". Douglas Sinclair (1). South
Africa- lTu'-'. Everett B^re (1>
Vancon'^r' H^nrlman. Barbara
Irene (P>, Penticton.
Ingram,   Herbert   Geor:;o   (2).
Vancouver;   Ireland,   Lionel   C.
Heiherinfcton (2), Vancouver; Ii
vino, Patricia Joan (1),  Vancouver;  Isaac, Alice  Katherine (2),
Matsqui:  Jabour,  Donate!  Essey
(C), Vancouver; Jennings, W. R.
(2), Vancouver; Jewitt. Mrs. Ber-
nice    Louise    (2),    Vancouver;
Jhooty.   G.   H.   (2)   Vancouver;
Johns,  Henry  Douglas  (2) Van
couver: Johnson, Philip Wallace
(2)   Lake   Cowichan:   Johnston
Howard Earl (2), Fnderby; Joy.
Francis  Paul  (P),  Vancouver.
Katarius, John William (P),
Kamloops; Kemp. Charles Lind-
ley (2j, New Westminster; Kent.
Michael Hans (2), Vancouver;
Kincade, Clare Anne (2) Vancouver; Kingham, Sheila Grace
(2), Victoria; Kirchner, David
Courtney (C) Victoria; Koop
Abram Henry (P), Chilliwack.
Kron, Ruth (2), Vancouver; Ku
jala, Stanley John (P), Alberni:
Kuyt, Ernst  (2) Quebec.
Lagnado,   Robert   Joseph   (2),
Peru;   Lambert,   Mrs.   Elizabeth
Minnie  (1),   Vancouver;  Landis,
George  B. (2)  Castlegar;  Lauc.
Jurgen Paul (2), Vancouver; La
zenby, Geoffrey John (C) Norih
Vancouver;   Loighton,   Kenneth
Henry (?), Vancouver; Leret, M.
(2),   Mount   Sheer;   Lester.  Geoffrey Austin (2), Victoria: Lewis
George    Richardson    (P),    Sum
mc-rlaud: Liddell, Louise Marion
(P).  North  Eurnabv:  Linn   Gerald   Robert   (P)   United   States
Lor-kev,   Bruce   James   (21   Van
couver;  Lofkhart. Thomas Gle;
(P)   Vancouver:   Lvtlu'oe,   Lena-
ard Franklin (P) Vancouver.
Malcolm, Sharon Anno (2)
Victoria: Manson, L'oroioy (P..
Nanaimo; Marshall, Dc-'u.L'las W
'2), Vancouver; Mason, Davie
Bruce (2), Ladysmith; Mason.
L'crek L. (P) Vancouver; Mason
Joan Easioc (2) White Rock
.Vlecki-on, William Gordon (2)
Vancouver; Mclicke. Julia Phyl
'.is (2), Vancouver; Miller. Davii
Croydon (2), West Vancouver:
"V'tinni", Louis (P) Ontario: Wi
Wa, Dorothy Yoko (2) Vernon-
Molofy, Gloria Nancy Anna, P
Victoria; Molson. Hugli Doiu/all
(?), Vancouver; Molson, Robert
Owen IP) Vancouver: Moonry.
Janet Geraldtne (2), Saskaf-he-j
wan; Moore, Mrs. Janet Gordon
(2), Vancouver; Moscovitz. Po-a
lee Leah (2), Vancouver: Mouncc '
Trudean  (2) Cumberland.
Murray,   Flora   Margaret   (2),!
Vancouver;   Murray,   John   Ry-
kert (2),  Vancouver; McDonald,;
Margaret  Christina  (2) Vancou-j
<er;   McDowell.  Robert  Harpur'
I (2) Vancouver; McGibbon, Joan
Margaret (2), Alberta; McLean.
Kenneth Leonard (?) North Bur-
nabv; MacLean, Mary Elizabeth
>'£), Quebec: McLean, Walter F.
(2) Victoria; McLennan, Arnold
Lyman (P). Vancouver; McMor-
land, Andrew Morris' (2) You-
bou; McNeill, Maureen Naomi
(P) West Vancouver; MacPhail,
John Donald (2) While Rock.
Nix, Frances Joan (2) Vancouver: Nortiiey, John Laird
(2) \Ve«t Vancouver; Nwar.ze.
Peter Chuka IP) Nigeria.
Oldfield. Edward Leonard (2)
Roya). Oak; 0'Shny, Moira Mau-
r<\2r. 12) Vancouver; Osmer?.
Helta Maria Gartrud fil) Quos-
nel; Osterberg, Arne Albert (V)
Alberta.
Pabl. Edward (P) Chilliwack:
IPalrr.cr.   Rodney   Norman    f2).
Kamlocps.   Pape.   Siegfried   \V.
(1), Vancouver; Paris, Raymond
iYHchel '2) V-»ncoi:ver: Feicrs, R
Edmund  <2)  Sardis:   PheJps,  R.
Gordon   (2)  Vancouver;  Picker-
| inf. Helen Betty-Ann (?■) Oliver:
' Pitt. The'ma Marie (2) Rossland.
■ Pot frtmill'-r.  Marion  Doreen, 2.
i Vernon:   Prentice    Mnr'otta   E.
! MV Vancouver: Pulicm Mary Al-
llpn Sarah (2). V'c'.oria.
Pamren. Diana Pitoute (21 Victoria; Redgrave. Mrs. Barbara
Ruth (21. Pouce Coupe1 Richardson. Nancv Su-T-tto (P) PenMc-
^o;i: Fobiii-on. Rohona. Claire
(2). New Erunsvcick: Robison.
'Ocnald Gordon (PV Van-oinx-r1
Porors, Robert Garland (1) Fort
Lam-lev: P-mecein. Paul Tuch-
-rd <2\ United States1 Poss, A
Cameron jr. (?) New V.'.^stiviin-
s'er: Res-1, Patricia Lvnette (P^
^'anfoiH'-or; Pu^isoc, 'Montan;e
Gavin (2) Vancouver: Pupelks,
Va'enti.ns (D United State--.
Samis. Robert Bruce Ecli-ou
(P). Vancouver; Sardar. Raiin-
dcr (P), Vancouver; Saxon. Mrs.
Barbara Ann (21. Vancouver:
Schaffer. Mary (2), Vancouver:
Segall, Harvey Georpe Alexander (2). Vancouver; Shame
James Gray (2). New Westminster; Shoemaker. Vivian Grace
(2), Victoria; Sinmson. Gerald-
ine Yale Fere'da (P) Vancouver:
Simnson, Hamish Tan Fishe'v 2.
Victoria: Skeet, Dorothy Mav
(21 Chnliwack; Sloly. Jennifer
Ann (2). Jamaica; Smith, Norma
June (21. Vancouver: Snowsell,
James Allen (P) Victoria: Sperling, Lois Maxine (21 Vancouver;
St. Clair, Harry Whitman (21
North Surrey; Stewart, Ian H.
(P), Vancouver; Stewart. Ronald
Hugh (P), Vancouver: Stolar.
Gerald Patrick (P), Ontario.
Thiesien, William James (21,
South Burnaby; Thompson, Marion Josephine (2). Vancouver:
Thome. William Barry (21, Vancouver; Todd. Ian St. Pierre '2).
Ncrth Vancouver: Todd. Mar-
iorie Lcuii;» (P) Victoria1 Todd.
Mary Elizabeth ('■?>. Victoria;
Tremaino. Sylvia 'Margaret (21
Vancouver: TnrnbuU. Norah
Margaret (PI. Vancouver: Turn-
bull, Sheila Anne C.I Vancouver: Turvev. Marv Elizabeth H
(?1. Vancouver; tlchida. Midori
Jane (11, Vancouver: Ulmer, Ar-
no Leopold (2), Vancouver; Valentine, Janet  Anne  (2)  Alberta.
Walker, Michael Ma«ee (2>
Penticton: Warren. Frederic IVT
Patrick (21, Vancouver: Warren
Mildred Louise (2), Victoria:
Weick, Mrs. Alberta Elizabeth
(2), Kelowna: Westvvick, Henry
(2). Honeymoon B.y; Whale.
Nanette Edith Sylvia ;P1, Victoria; Whiteoak, Dorothy Lane
(P), Vancouver; Wilkie, Grace
Doris (21, \'ew Weslmicister:
Wilks, Patricia Margaret (2).
Vancouver; Williams, Daphne
Sheila Stewart (2), Vancouver;
Wilson, Harold David (P\ Van
couver; Wintonyk, William (P)
Vancouver.
Wong, Carole Anne (2), Van
couver; Woo, Mrs. Elizabeth An
nette (2), Vancouver; Wood
ward, Eunice Eleanor (2) Victoria; Woolett, George Newport
(2) Victoria; Wrean, Lloyd Thomas (21, Vancouver; Writdit, W.
J. (2), New Westminster; Wyper,
Glenn Allan (2) Vancouver;
Yates, Denise Audrey Stuart, P.
Victoria.
Requirements for Degree
not Complete
Passed in Subjects Written
Antonini, Loretta Marie, Vancouver; Beaumont, Ronald C.
Victoria; Bell, John Philip.
South Burnaby; Bell, Michael D.
Bermuda; Bombardiers, Joseph
Alberta; Bravvshaw, Gordor.
Harry, Vancouver; Brand, Lorraine Elizabeth, Victoria; Brown
Jeremy John Fisher,Vancouver:
Chorncmjdz, Paul, Saskatche
wan: Cinits, Edward Angelo
Vancouver: Crozier, Ralph C.
North Eurnaby; Cvetkovich.
Mrs. Valerie Jca.i. Vane:-.iver
Down--. Sulvia Milpda. Va:iccu
ver;  Dyck, John,  Sardis.
For'..e.<. Cleric- Fr?tscr, Ver
no::; Frost. Ronald Edwin. Vancouver; Gok-j'.nith, Richard.
Vancouver: Goudic. Carol Eileen
Elizabeth, Notch Hill; Hamori.
Charles. Vancouver; Hansen,
Ponald Mark. Vancouver; Jok-
p.novich.Stanley, North Burnaby:
Marche:-e. Angela Louise; New
Wesiminstev; Matthews. Joruo
Trevor. Vancouver; Mcu'isel
Anne P^bin Mabel, Shavni'/T
j Lake: Murrav. -Tame3 Gordon.
' Grand For!:-: Quinn, Michaol
''jp.me'.. Vancouver, Parasay
Alexander Ontario1 '"nb'nso^
"or'Id "'•♦on ^"m^i-jT Porr-^rP.
P:ul Fric Alfred, Vancouver:
Smith, Patrick John. Lake Cow-
icr?in; Sniro, Grant Philio, Al-
'•eHa1 Storm. Steve Victoria:
TTlland. Mrs. LUlian Olive. New
Westminster: Weinberg. Robert
Leonard, 'victoria.
THE DEGREE OF
BACHELOR OF ARTS
Honors
Abbott,'Donald Neil, Vancouver, second class honors in
Greek and Anthropology; Anderson, Roland Frank, Vancouver, first class honors inv English Literature and Language;
Artbury, Frederick Ralph, Vancouver, second class honors in
Chemistry; Avison, Kathleen
Anne, Vancouver, first class
honors in English Literature
and Language; Baxter, Eunice
Helen, Dawson Creek, second
class honors in History and
English: Be aurnont, Audrey
Joyce, Victoria, first class honors
in*Enj?H.!h Literature and Language; Bovey, John Alexander,
Vancouver, first class honors in
History: Brambleby, Kenneth I
Michael, Victoria., second class
honors in English Literature and
L: nguage.
Carlson, Paul Erik, Langley,
second class honors in Physics;
Chang, Violet May, Nanaimo,
first class honors in Bacteriology
and Immunology; Cox, Raymond
Lee, Vancouver, second class
honors in Geology; Cr-cvvford,
Douglas Gordon, Vancouver, second class honors in Psychology;
Culley, Grace Elaine, Alberta,
first class honors in Sociology;
Daniel, Michael John, England,
second class honors n Zoology;
Estello, Ralph Amade, Alberta,
cecond cl.ss honors n Geology;
Fodoroff, Mchael, Vancouver,
second class honors n Phlosouhy
and Psychology.
Gatzke. Arnold Lee, Oyaina,
second class honors in Clie-m-
istry; Geddcs, James Herbert,
Vancouver, second clasi honor .
in Philosophy: Goodacro, Alan
Kenneth, Victor;:, second class
honors in Physics and Mathematics; Gordon, William Robert,
Vancouver, second ela^s honors
in Chemistry; Grantham, Sally
Anne. Vancouver, first class
honors in Psychology: Hacring,
Peter Charles, Kaxlo, first cl.-.s.,
honors in Physics and Mathematics; Hall, John Greenway,
Vancouver, i'ir.-t class honors in
Classics: Harris, Arthur Dorian
Shaw. Vancouver, second els:
honors in Mathematics; Hebenton, George Sholto, Penticton,
first class honors in Economics
and International Studies: Hoc-
chsmann, Klaus Fritz, South
Burnaby. first cLss honors in1
Mathematics; Hoon, Ern>t Leon
Wilheim Balthazar, Victoria, second class honors in Geology.     I
Jambour, John Leslie, South
Burnaby, second class honors
in Geology; Langlands, Robert
Phclan,   \\ ncouver,   first   class
honors in Mathematics; Levirs,
Mary Jean, Victoria, first class
honors in English Literature and
Language; Lockie, Douglas Rl-
exander, Alberta, second chs3
honors in Geology; Marrion, Alice Esther, Vancouver, first clas3
honors in Biology; May, John
Walter, Vancouver, second class
honors in Chemistry; Meharg,
Brian Albert, Ontario, first
zlazz honors in Sociology; Mocek,
Mirosl.v, Vancouver, second
class honors in Chemistry; Mun-
dell, Richard Frederick, Haney,
second class honors in English
Literature and Language.
Ncufeldt, Victor Alfred Yarrow, ,'eeond class honors in
Eiig'isn Literature and Lang-
u.gc: Penner, Tcrrence Minard
Ian, Itinidco, tint class honors
in Latin; Puree-, Roger Alexander, Vancouver, second class
honors in Mathematics; Riddle,
Katharine Agnes, Victoria, first
cl;ss honors in English Literature and Language; Rotenberg,
Larry Abraham, Vancouver,
first class honors in Psychology; Sharp, James Harry, Victoria, second class honors in
Chemistry; Shrimpton, Dougla*
Malcolm, Vancouver, second
class honors in Botany; Smithi
Barbara Joan, Vancouver, first
class honors in Spanish; Souk-
oreff, Fred William, Grand
Forks, second clcss honors in
j Chemistry; Stanton, Charles Er-
I nest, Alberta, second class han-
J ors in Zoology.
Walker, Leonard George,
Vancouver, second class honors
in Chemistry; Widdowson, Tom-
as Benjamin, Read Island, first
class onors in Botany; Wilson,
Tomas  Artur,   Vancouver,  first
i class     honors     in     Economics;
; Wocdouse, Edward Albert, Vernon, second class honors in Physics and Mathematics; Wright, Ian
Glaiiby, Vancouver, first class
honors in Chemistry; Z.jac, Ihor,
Vancuver, second class honors in
Geology.
FACULTY  OF COMMERCE
AND
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
The Degres of Bachelor .of
Ccmmerco
Anderson, Malcolm Bain (2),
Victoria; Barth, Tor Bjarne (2),
Norway; Bertram, Donald James
(2), Vancouver, (posthumous);
Alexander (2), Vancouver; Bris-
toll, Charles Henry Kanbury
(2), Vancouver; Broad, Alan Edward (2), Vancouver: Bruk-Bos-
nic, John (C), Vancouver; Buchanan, Ronald We;ley Archibald (2), New Westminster,
Campbell, D:vid Vincent (2),
Vancouver; Clarke, Betty Marion
(1), Vancouver; Con, William
(P), Vancouver; Corbould, Brian
Bernard (C), South Burnaby;
Crowthcr, John William Ferguson (2), North Vancouver: Currie, James Edward (1), Vancouver.
Dawson, John Charters (21,
Vancouver: Dilwoilh, Dorothy
Anne (2), Vancouver; (Posthumous): Dixon, Selma-Jo (2),
Nanaimo; Doig, James Ian (P),
Manitoba; Donaldson, William
Robert, B.A. (2). Revelstoke;
Drozdzik. Charles Anthony (C),
Vancouver.
Eng, David (2), Vancouver;
Erickson. Keith Roland (2), Vancouver: Esko, Sandtord Ingvar
(F). Alberta; Ezzy. Albert Roland (P), Vcncouver: Faulkner,
Robert William (2), North Vancouver: Fors^ren, Norman John
(P), Alberta; Fyi'e, William
Georfec  (C),  Vancouver.
Gillis, Dale Bliss (P), Vancouver; Glaspie. Michael Beale (2),
Vancouver; Greggor, Robert Er-
skine (2), Victoria; Harstone,
Campbell John (P), Vancouver;
Holm, Arnold Lew (P), Nanaimo; Hor.-ey, Eciward Franci3
(C), Victoria: Housez, Vernerd
Jack (2), Vancouver.
Jefferson, Peter Norman (2),
Vancouver: Jenkinson. William
Graham (2), Vancouver; Kennedy, Maureen Isobel (2), Nelson; Killick, Ronald Muter (2),
Vancouver;   Krane,   Ruth   Julia
(Continued   on   Page   21)
See   GRADUATION   RESULTS PAGE TWENTY
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, May 21, 1957
riMfci
The Changing Face of Our Campus
wyfx^vt     \ *•**"''        >
"*"$*
'  /*      *■        *      v«
. <«*        +   V
*.•■'' '■"' *T w
Most recent of
architectural
additions to the
UBC campus are the
new Arts Building
(above, still under
construction) and
the Brock Extension.
Both buildings will
be ready for use
by students very soon.
1957 Graduating
Class has seen
many such changes
during its four
years ct UBC. * Tuesday, May 21, 1957
THE     UBYSSEY
PAGE TWENTY-ONE
GRADUATION   RESULTS
(1),    Balfour;    Kueber,    Philip
Thomas (C), Duncan.
Langstaff, John Howard (2),
Salmon Arm; Leckie, Walter
Merrill (C), Vancouver; Lee,
Kendrick James (2), Vancouver;
Lewthwaite, Roy Clarke (2),
Vancouver; Logic, John Dee (1),
Kelowna; Long, Ralph liany
(C), Vancouver; Loomer, Herbert
Myer (C), Vancouver; LoiiPoy,
Ronald (2), Victoria; Lucas,
John Neil (2), Vancouver.
Mann, James Gilmore (P),
West Vancouver; Marchak, William (2), Vancouver; Miller, David Miles (C), Deep Cove; Miller, Harry (P), Vancouver; Mil-
ley, Vernon Robert (P), Vancouver; Mise, Anthony George (P),
Vancouver: Miyazaki, Elizabeth
Masumi (2), Lillooet.
McArthur, John Hector (1),
New Westminster; McCulloch,
Hugh John (P), Ontario; McDor-
mid, John Cochrane (2). Vancouver; McDonald, Donald Bain
(2), Aobotsford; McLean, Ter-
rence Wilson (2), Vancouver;
McQueen, Robert William (1),
Vancouver; MacSorley, Charles
Clare (2), Vancouver; MacTag-
gart, Allan James (2), Vancouver.
Neil, Rupert Cleveland (P),|
Vancouver; Olah, Andrew Joseph (P), Alberta; Oliver, Ed- j
ward (2), Penticton; Paget,
James Francis Noel (C). Vancou-I
ver; Pickett, Thomas George;
(2), Vancouver. i
Rae. James Douglas (1). North
Vancouver;    Randall,     Michael
John Gurney (2), Trail:  Rayer,
John  (2),  Cedar;   Ribarits,   William    Joseph    (P),    Vancouver;,
Robertson, Donald  William  ',2).,
North Burnaby; Robertson, Gordon Thomas (2). North Burnaby:
Robertson, John Harry (Pi. West;
Vancouver; Rolfe, Marten  Hav-
elock    (2),    Vancouver;    Rosen,
Lawrence  Sydney  (1),  Vancouver.
Sandford, Keith" Victor (P),
Victoria; Savage, John Kenning
(P), Vancouver; Shelley, Mrs.
Mary Ann (1), Vancouver; Sher-
ratt, James George Anderson!
(P), Victoria; Shields, John Henry (2), Vancouver; Shippobotham, John Peter (P), Vancouver.
Smith, Douglas Charles (2),
Vancouver; Sparke, Mrs. Carole
Lynne (2), Vancouver; Staugh-
ton, Douglas Vicary (2). New-
Westminster: Stewart, Ronald
Kolosoff (P), We-t Vancouver:
Stobbs, Douglas Henry (P), Mission; Sweet, Donald Arthur (2).
Vancouver.
Tahara. Michitaka (P), Vancouver; Thackrey, Allan Douglas (C), Victoria; Thomas, Brian
Verran (P), Horseshoe Bay;
Thompson, Elizabeth Anne (P),
West Vancouver; Tripp, Leigh-
ton Osborne (P), Vernon.
Verchere, Arthur William (C).
Ladysmith: Weick, Edward
Ralph (2), Ocean Falls; Williams.
Bryan (C), Comcx; Williams,
Charles Brian (2), New Westminster; Wooster, Anthony King
(C), Vancouver; Wyrnan, Richard
Bruce (2), United States; Yama-
moto, Noboru (2), Port Edward.
THE DEGREE OF
BACHELOR OF
EDUCATION
Graduats Program
Bayfield, John Turner, B.S.A.
(2),   Chilliwack;   Bcvan,   George <
Henrv,     B.A.     (Manitoba)     (21. i
North   Surrey:   Blake,   William
George,  B.A.  (2),  North  Burna-
by;   Eryans,   Mr.-:.   Alice   Agues..;
B.A.  (2),  Comox;  Cameron,  Eu- j
gene Francis,  B.A.  (2),  Vaneou-|
ver;    Cherry,    Douglas    Henrv,;
MA.    <2),    Vancouver;    Clark,
James Francis, B.A.  (Manitoba)
(2),  Laugiey   Cole.   Myrtle   Em-j
ma,    B.A.    ^Sa-kaichewan)    (1>.
Vancouver;     Cronkhite,     John!
Morrison,   B.A.   (2\  Vancouver:
Curteis,     Thomas     Noel,     B.A.
(2),    Victoria:    Curtis,    Bertram
Edward,   B.A.   (2),   North   Vancouver.
Dalzell. Finlay Gibson. B.A.
(P). Nanaimo; Daniel, Howard
Walter, B.A. (2), New Westminster; Devvar, Douglas James,
B.A. (2i, New Westminster: Dickson, Scott. D., B.A. (2), Clear-
fcrook; Disbrow, Harry Lee, B.A.
(2), Abbotsford; Donaldson,
Christopher Storrar, B.A. (2),
South Burnaby; Epp, George
Henry (2), Yarrow; Ewen, John
Stephen, B.A. (2), New Westminster; Farley, Kenneth Frank,
B.S.A. (P), North Burnaby.
Greer, Clifford Augustina,
B.A. (P), Vancouver; Hill, Hazel
Amelia Euldean, B.A, (Toronto)
B.S.W. (2), Trail; Kelly, Clive
Alexander, (B.A. (1), Victoria;
Knapp, Karl Keever, B.A. (1),
Kamloops; Loucks, John Edwin,
B.A. (2), North Vancouver;
Moyls, Frederick James, B.A.
(2), Burnaby; Murphy, Margaret
Looretta, B.A. (2), New Westminster; McFadden, Raymond
Earl, B.A. (Saskatchewan) (2),
Clinton; Mclntyre, Peter Rodney, B.A. (2), Nanaimo; MacKinnon, Kenneth Ballentine, B.A.
(2), Vancouver; Nixon, Cyril
Howard, B.A,  (2),  Vancouver.
Olds, Mrs. Marjorie Paulina,
B.A. (P), Vancouver; Ornes,
Norman Lamont, B.A. (2), Vancouver; Pritchard, Frederick
Charles, B.A, (2), Vancouver;
Purvis, Audrey Bernice, B.A.
(2), New Westminster; Radcliff,
Vera Elsie, B.A. (2), Vancouver;
Retallack, Henry Rex, B.A. (2),
Vancouver; Riddle, James Bar-
ratt, B.A. (2), North Bend; Robertson, Archibald Philip, B.A.
(P), Qualicum Beach.
Saunders, Ambrose, B.A. (Mc
Gill) (2), Chilliwack; Sherritt,
Norman Albert. B.A. (2), Cloverdale; Sinclair, Robert Elmer, B.A. (2), Vancouver;
Spearing, Lawrence Francis,
B.A. (2), Nanaimo; Sulymka,
William, B.A. (P), North Vancouver; Tippett, William George
B.A. (2), Nancimo; Wootton, Mrs.
Edith, B.A. (2), Vancouver;
Wright, Francis Robert, B.A.
(2), Haney: Young, Raymonds
Simpson, B.A. (2), Vancouver.
Secondary Program
Kuhn, Alfred William (2),
Kelowna.
Elementary Program
Davenport, Leona Nancy (1),
Vancouver; Gray, Doris Eleanor
(2), Victoria; Henderson, Mrs.
Eunice Bertha (2), Dawson
Creek; Kerr, Eleanor Marilyn
(2), Vancouver; Lower, Mrs.
Thelma Muriel (P), Vancouver;
Markle. Sharen Allisen (2), West
Vancouver; Noakes, Hubert
Francis (2), Terrace; Paton, Cora
Louise (2), Saskatchewan; Sherry. George James (1), Nanaimo.
Connolly, Mrs. Elaine Edith
Maxwell (Hist. 102), Vancouver,
(P).
THE DEGREE OF
DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY
Lemarche, Joseph Louip
Gilles, B.A., B.Sc, (Montreal;,
M.A., Physics, Quebec.
Mayhood, John Edwards,
B.Sc, M.Sc. (Alberta), Physics,
Alberta.
McMinn, Robert Gordon, B.A.
(Brit. Col.), M.S. (State Col.)
THE DEGREE OF
MASTER OF ARTS
Cadman, Frederick William,
B.A., Classics, Vancouver.
Canagaratnam, Pascarapathy,
B.A.. (Ceylon). Zoology, Ceylon.
Devries, Alcon Gysbertus,
B.A., Phsychology, Vancouver.
Fulton. Beverley Joan, B.A.,
Physics,  Ontario,
Knight, William Rixford,
B.A., Mathematics, Quebec.
Mibus, Sidney Albert, B.Sc.
(Melbourne), Physics, United
St.-tes.
My res. Miles Timothy, B.A.
(Cantab.).  Zoology,  England.
McAllister, Donald Evan,
B.A.,   Zoology.   Vancouver.
McAllister, Mrs. Nancy Anne,
B.A. (Oberliu), Zoology, Vancouver.
Owens. Noel Arthur Scott,
B.A.,   History.   Vancouver.
Parker,     Robert     Ray,     B.S.
(Univ. of Washington), Zoology,;
Ala-ka. ~'   j
Pickford, John Henry, B.A..
Psvenelogv,  Port  Coquitlam.
Schneider. Harvey Roy, B.Sc.:
(Alberta),   Physics,   Alberta.
Ward, Frederick James, B.A...
Zoology,  Vancouver. j
West wick, fJoy.  B.A.,   Mathe
matics, Honeymoon Bay. I
(Continued  from  Page   19)
THE DEGREE OF
MASTER Or SCIENCE
Carswell, Henry Thomas,
B.A., Geology, Vancouver.
Drews, Reinhold Eldor, B.A.,
Physics, Chilliwack.
Webster, Arthur Hubert, B.A.,
M.A. (Queen's), Metallurgy, Vancouver.
Gale, Robert Earle, B.Sc. (Alberta), Geology, Alberta.
Greggs, Robert George; B.A.
(Queen's),  Geology,  Vancouver.
Harkness, Alan Chisholm,
B.A., Chemistry, Vancouver.
Hunt. Kenneth, B.A., Chemistry, Vancouver.
Papezik, Vladimir, B.A., Geology, Vancouver.
Robertson, Mary Chalmers,
B.A., Animal Nutrition, Penticton.
Trettin, Hans Peter, Ph.D.
(Hamburg), Geology, Vancouver.
Vail. John Randolph, B.Sc.
(Rhodes), Geology, Vancouver.
THE DEGREE OF MASTER
OF APPLIED SCIENCE
Chown, Edward Holton Mac-
Phail,  B.Sc. (Queen's),  Geologi-
| cal Engineering, Ontario.
Critoph, Eugene, B.A.Sc, En
gineering Physics, Vancouver.
Girling, Peter Richmond, B.A.,
Sc, Civil Engineering, Vancouver.
Komarnicky, Walter, B.A.Sc,
Chemical Engineering, Victoria.
Morley, Gordon Arthur, B.A.Sc,   Engineering  Physics,  Van-
: couver.
!      MacGregor.     Edwin     Robert,
j B.A.Sc, Metallurgical Engineering,  Pitt  Meadows.
Payne, Frank Aldcn, B.A.Sc,
Engineering Physics, North Van-
, couver,.
Saaremaa, Eino, B.A.Sc, Met-
: llurgical Engineering, Quebec
THE   DEGREE   OF
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN
AGRICULTURE
Bowden, David Merle, B.S.A.,
Animal ..Husbandry, Agassiz.
Darcel, Francis Clift, B.Sc.
(Reading), Soil Science, Vancouver.
Ebner, 'Kurt Euwald, B.S.A.,
Animal Husbandry, Pitt'Meadows.
Hollander, Keith Geoffrey,
B.S.A., Poultry Science, Ontario.
Jokanovich, John, B.S.A.,
Horticulture, North Burnaby.
Vescly, Anthony Premysl Jar-
oslav, B.S.A., Animal Husbandry, Vancouver.
THE DEGREE OF
MASTER OF FORESTRY
Spiers, John James Kennedy, B.Sc. (New Zealand), New
Zealand.
THE   DEGREE   OF   MATER
OF BUSINESS
ADMINISTRATION
helley, Melvin Jack, B.A.c,
Kelowna.
APPLIED SCIENCE
The Degree of Bachelor of
Applied Science
Agricultural  Engineering
Lacy, Harold Ord (2)  Fulford
Harbour.
Chemical Engineering
Croil, Thomas Arnold (2), West
Vancouver; Dey, Walter Ross
(1), New Westminster; Duncan,
Dennis, B.A. (2), Vancouver;
Dyrmose, Lawrence (P), New
Westminster; Fevang, Ronald
Keith (2, Victoria; Fraser, Donald Cameron (2), West Vancouver; Hatch, William Randolph
(P), Britannia Beach; Jim, Harvey (2), Vancouver; Kelly, Robert John (2), Osoyoos.
Matheson, Donald John (P),
Deep Cove: Matzen, Egon Johannes Peter (2), Vancouver; Morrison. Gary Cnnnell (2), Royston;
McCartney, Brian Colin (2), Alberta; Rutledge, William John
(2), Ontario; Shalansky, Carl (2),
Vancouver; Somerville, Graham
Falconer (H), West Vancouver;
Wiginton, John Cameron (2),
North Vancouver.
Civil Engineering
Assimes, Leonard Thomas (21,
Vancouver; Brown, Archibald
Collier (2), Chilliwack; Clarke,
Roger Wallace (P), New Westminster; Corbet, Burke (2), Vancouver; Dirom, Ian Carter (2),
Duncan; Fletcher, Norman Ward
(2), West Vancouver; Goldie,
Charles Allan (2), Duncan; Grais,
Gary Scott (2), Vancouver; Harmful, Charles Kingston (2), Vancouver; Jftnos, Colin Rankin (2),
Vancouver; Juzkow, Tony Peter,
<2), Boston Bar; Kingham, Rowland Ian (2), Victoria; Little,
Robert Francis (P), Nanaimo.
Ng, Chung Lai Paul (P), Hong
Kong; O'Connell, Kevin Domin-
ick (2), Penticton; Ott, Richard
Phillip (2), Vancouver; Paget,
Norris Raymond George (2), Victoria; Picha, George John (P),
Manitoba; Round, Robin Peter
Douglass (2), Victoria; Scott,
Robin Adam (2), West Vancouver; Taylor James Clifford (1),
Kamloops; Widholm, Ole Raymond (2), Vancouver; Zickman-
tel, Hans Joachim (2), Falkland.
Electrical Engineering
Anderson, Carl Allen (P),
Chase; Bagot, Trevor Richard
(P), Vancouver; Balcom, Graeme Sterling (P), Victoria; Basa-
rab, William Alexander (P),
Richmond; Bell, Sidney Frederick (2), Victoria; Berry, William
Douglas (2), Langley Prairie;
Bhatti, Kesar Singh (2), Vancouver; Carlson, Edward Paul (1),
Courtney; Carmichael, John
Roderich (2), Vancouver; Chevel-
dave, Harold George (2), Castle-
gar; Chew, Roland Bing Gan
(2), Vancouver; Connell, Peter
Stuart (P), Vancouver.
Fornasier, Oswaldo Eno (P)<
Natal; Hlk, William (P), North
Surrey; Horcoff, Michael Samuel
(P), Robson; Karas, Alexander
Nestor (2), Vancouver; Kodama,
Sadao '(P), Kamloops; Kwan,
Robert Kwok-Leung (2), Hong
Kong; Laidlaw, William Skene
(P), Victoria; Larmour, Robert
Lampman (P), Ganges; Legg, Edward Roland (P), Vancouver;
Lim, Richard Fong (1), Vancouver; Martin, Robert John (2),
Creston; Mastin, Walter James
(2), New Westminster; Mawds-
ley, Jack Stanley - (P), Trail;
Millar, William Raymond (2),
North Burnaby; Moir, Lewis
Ernest (2), Salmo; McFarlane,
Donald Gordon (2), Vancouver;
Noble, George Patrick (2), Chap*
man Camp.
Picha, Joseph Louis (P), Manitoba; Regehr, Jacob Peter (2),
Vancouver; Russell, Francis
Page (2), Victoria; Shewaga, William Joseph (2), Revelstoke;
Sugimotto, Mamoru (2), Alberta;
Taylor, William Benjamin (2),
Cobble Hill; Tebo, Gordon Ross
(2), Ontario; Trapp, Robert
George (2), Prince Rupert; Van
Sacker, Kenneth George (2),
Vancouver; Vernon, Jerrold Edward (2), Vancouver; Whiteley,
John Thompson (2), Ontario;
Wilson, George Alexander (H),
Vancouver; Wong, George Timothy (P), Vancouver.
Forest   Engineering
Elder, Howard (2), Victoria;
Strother, Arthur James, B.A.Sc.
(Mech.Eng.) (1), Vernon.
Geological Engineering
Adamson,' Robert Sidney (P),
Westview; Altan, James Frederick Stewart (2), Nanaimo;'Archer. Alan Richard (2), Vancouver;
Ashwell, Lewis George (2), Lady-
smith: Darke. Kenneth Harrv
(P), Trail; Davidson, Donald
Alexander (2), Vancouver: Fuchs.
Hubert Peter (2), Alberta; Mur-
aro, Theodore William (P), Kim-
berley; Peebles, George Allan
(2), Vancouver; Rayer, Frederick
George (2), Cedar; Read, Peter
Burland (1), Vancouver; Saunders, Clayton Raymond (P), Saskatchewan; Williams, Frederick
Michael Gowar (2), Victoria.
Mechanical Engineering        I
Abbott,    Brian    Michael    (2),
Campbell      River;      Blackburn,
Robert  William  (2),  South  Burnaby;   Bradshavv.   Albert   Dean!
(1),  Alberta;  Bradshaw,  Lee H.!
(2),  Alberta;  Broder,  John  Pat-;
rick    (P),    Vancouver;    Cawley, |
Ross    Floward    (2),    Vancouver; I
Couling,   David   Lyall   Graham;
(2), Vancouver; DeCourcv, Don-;
aid Elwin (P), Vancouver; Drum-j
mond,  Alastair  Milne  (1),  Van-1
couver.
Evanol'f,  Stephen Stanley  (2),;
Crescent  Spur;   Evolfson,   Thor-
stein Magnus (2), Prince Rupert;
F'-aser,    William    Clarence    (2),
Salmon    Arm;    Friend,    Ronald!
George   (2),   Penticton;   Futcher,
Ralph    James    (2),    Vancouver;
Gartshore, Ian Stanley (2), Vancouver;    Gayton,    John    Wilmot
(2),    Vancouver;   Greifenberger,
Albert   Withold   (2),   Pitt   Meadows;   Hume,   Philip   Grey   (P), I
West Vancouver; Hunt, Charles/
Edmund   Lawrence   (2),   West
Vancouver.
Johnson, Kenneth Montague
(P), New Westminster; Johnston,
Murray Caister (2), Vancouver*
Jones, Kenneth Stuart (2), Vancouver; Kalnins, Janis (P), Vancouver; Kempe, Arthur Joseph
(2), Vancouver; Lunder, Hans
Jakob (2), Norway; Mah, Gordon
(1), Vancouver; Matychuk, Nick
(2), Alberta; McLeod, Kenneth
Griffiths (2), Vancouver; Mc-
Neilly, William Robert (1), New
Westminster.
Olsen, Clifford LeRoy (2),
Vancouver; Peters, Terence
David (2), Vancouver; Pousette,
Ronald Daniel (2), New Westminster; Rohloff, Lyn Hamilton
(P), Alberta; Taylor, George Edward (2), Vancouver; Wallis,
George Graham (P), Vancouver;
West, Joseph Peter (2), Vancouver; Wiber, Harold Graham (2),
Alberta; Wilkinson, Clifford
Henry (H), Parksville.
Metallurgical Engineering
Davis, Robert Archer (1), Kin-
naird; Holmes, Brian Wilkie (2),
Victoria; Holmes, Ronald Lead-
rew William (2), Vancouver;
Laurie, Gordon Herbert (2),
Cranbrook; Pople, Keith Neale
(2), Trail; Toop, Gerald Wesley
(1), Terrace; Wootton, George
Claude (1), Vancouver; Hales,
Frederick William (2), West Vancouver; Jeffrey. William Neill
(P), Vancouver; Laird, Alexander Morris (2), Invermerie; Lind,
John Arnold (2), Vancouver;
Trenaman, Roland Trevor (1),
Boswell.
Engineering Physics
Beer, George Atherley (2),
Salmon Arm; Danard, Maurice
Beverley (P), South Burnaby; de
Faye, Philippe John (2), Vancouver; Huntley, David John (H),
Brentwood Bay; Mitchell, Ronald Reid (2), Vancouver; Nyberg,
Donald Walter (H), North Vancouver; Orme, John Edward (2),
Sardis; Pritchard, John Robert
Gilbertson (2), Victoria; Roberts,
Donald Earl (2), Vancouver; Sil-
versides, Richard Henry (H),
White Rock; Simpkinson, William Vaughan (2), Trail.
Civil Engineering
Jones, Joseph Alan, Vancouver, Civil Eng. 480, Cond. Chem.
255; Lawrence, Edward Frank,
Vancouver, Cond. Math. 350;
Lee, David Manuel, Vancouver,
Civil Eng. 460; Molloy, Joseph
Raymond, B.Sc. (St. Francis
Xavier), Quebec, Cond. Mech.
Eng. 371; MacDonald, John
Murdo. B.P.E., North Vancouver, Civil Eng 455, Civil Eng.
461, Cond. Civil Eng. 370; Rich.
Michael John, Ontario, Civil
Eng. 460, Repeat Civil Eng. 461,
Cond. Civil Eng. 355; Wood, Neal
Arthur, Revelstoke, Civil Eng.*
470, Repeat Civil Eng. 476, Cond.
Civil Eng. 351.
Electrical Engineering
Day, Clifford Allan, Vernon,
Elect. Eng. 467, Civil Eng. 469,
Mech. Eng. 375; Rawson, Donald
Alastair, Kamloops, Mech. Eng.
375.
THE DEGREE OF
BACHELOR OF LAWS
Anderson, Michael Ernest,
B.A. (P), Vancouver; Badovinac,
George, B.Com. (P), Vancouver;
Brais, Helene, B.A. (McGill) (P),
Quebec; Cant, Eric George Douglas, B.Com. (2), Vancouver; Car-
ruthers, Kenneth Burpee, B.A.
(Queen's) (2), Vancouver; Chert-
koff, Gary, B.A. (McMaster) (2),
Vancouver; Christcnsen, William
Frederick, B.A. in Bus. Admin.
(Washington) (P), Vancouver;
Clark, William Gilmour, B.A.
(2), Vancouver: Cvetkovich, Joseph, B.Com. (2), Vancouver; de
la Giroday, Michael Robert
Charles Boyer (2), Vancouver.
Dent, Norman Gareth, B.A.
(P), Vancouver; Donegani, Francis Torrawe (P), Victoria; Ed-
wardson, Alfred Magnar (2),
Vancouver: Esselmont, William
James, B.Com. (2), Haney; Esson,
William Arthur, B.A. (2), Vancouver; Freeman, Samuel MacDonald, B.A. (Acadia) (P), Vancouver; Fiijisavva, George Kiyo-
shi, B.A. (P). Vancouver; Greb-
ski, Edward Stanley, B.A. (P),
Vancouver; Harrison, Elouise
Roads (P), Duncan; Herbrik,
George Rudolf, B.A. (P), Nelson;
Horn, James Thomas Franz, B.A.
(Continued on Page 22)
See   GRADUATION   RESULTS PAGE TWENTY-TWO
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, May 21, 1957
GRADUATION   RESULTS
(P),   Kelowna;   Hudson,   Ralph
Edward, B.Com. (2), Vancouver.
Kirstiuk, Julian, B.A. (P),
•Vancouver; Lecovin, Gerald
Jack, B.Com. (2), Vancouver;
Liddle, Laurie Keith, B.A. (2),
Vancouver; Lougheed, William
Elgin, B.A. (Toronto) (2), Vancouver; Morton, John Roy Hazel
(2), Vancouver; McCarthy, John
Leigh (2), Vancouver; MacDonald, James Colin (2), Vancouver;
McFarlane, Gordon Allan (2),
Vancouver; Maclntyre, James
Murray, B.Com. (2), Vancouver;
Neely, Gerald Adam, B.A. (Western Ontario) (2), Victoria; Nord-
man, Vormar, B.A. (2). New
Westminster; Norris, Charles
Macaulay, B.Com. (2), Vancouver; Nyack, Kenneth Luther,
B.A. (La Sierra College (P),
Granada.
O'Rourke, William Garry,
B.Com. (2), Vancouver; Pater-
son, Donald Hugh Campbell,
B.A. (2), Vancouver; Pipella, Edward Stanley (P), Alberta; Prom-
islow, Barry Joseph, B.Com.
(McGill) (2), Vancouver; Remesz,
Louis Conrad, B.A. (2), Alberta;
Robertson, Alexander Charles,
B.Com. (2), Vancouver; Sanjean-
Krohn, Mrs. Kathy Inge Irm-
gard, B.A. (Sask.) (2), Vancouver; Scherf, Norman Herman,
B.A. (St. Lawrence Univ.) (P),
Vancouver; Schultz, Ronald
Frederick, B.Com. (2), Vancouver; Stark, Marvin Nathan, B.A.
(2), Vancouver; Steel, May (P),
Vancouver; Sjekloca, Mihajlo
(2), Vancouver.
Tinker, Robert Percy, B.Com.
(2), Naramata; ..Vanderburgh,
Alan Eric (2), Ontario; Walden,
Adelene Mary, M.A. (P), Vancouver; White, Harry Alton (P),
Vancouver; Whitley, William
Edward  (2), Vancouver.
AGRICULTURE
The Degree of Bachelor of
Science and Agriculture
Honors
Dummett, Winston Anthony,
B.A. (1), British Guiana; Duncan,
Douglas Wallace (1), North Vancouver.
General  Course
Baumbrough, Harold (2), Vernon; Christie, Helen Wood (2).
Fanny Bay; Glascow, Stanley
Keith (P), Jamaica; Gruger, Ronald Paul (2), Richmond; Gubbels,
Gerardus Hubertus (1), Victoria;
Haqq, Samuel Ainlu (2), Trinidad.
Hoes, Josephus Antonius Johannes Marie (2), Vancouver;
Hogenkamp, Henricus Petrus
Cornelis (1), Vancouver; Hynard,
Malcolm David (2), Vancouver;
Kronstrom, Lawrence (2), Port
Alberni; Leach, Arthur Lome
(2), South Burnaby; Maddex,
Ethel Loverne (1), Vancouver. '
Roelants van Baronaigien,
Hendrik Willem Marius (2), Vancouver; Schaedle, Michael (1),
Vancouver; Waters, Geraldine
Ann (1), Vancouver; Webster,
John Maynard (2), Vancouver.
Requirements for Degree and
Complete
Passed in Subjects Written
Honors Course
Donawa,    William    Geoffrey,
Trinidad.
General Course
Bowland, Frederick Harvey
Chester, Ontario; Windt, Thomas
Alan, Quesnel.
PHYSICAL ED
The Degree of  Bachelor
of  Physical  Education
Ashdown, Bruce Richard (2),
Vancouver; Bilesky, James (P),
Trail; Buker, Beverley Joan (2),
Vancouver; Davies, Gordon Stan-
ley (2), Vancouver; DeHeck,
Eugene Valen (1), Vancouver;
Green, Winford FitzHerbert (2),
Jamaica; Hansen, Theodore Hector (P), Little Fort; Heal, Louise
Margaret (2), Victoria.
Hughes, Clive Rollason (P),
Vancouver; Hunt, Edmund Arthur (2), Vancouver; King, Alan
John Campbell (2), Ontario;
Kronquist, Roger Alexander (P),
Vancouver; Morris, G 1 c n d a
Wynne (P), Cloverdale.
McCallum, Elizabeth Mary
(Pfc Alberta; McCormack, John
Arthur (2), Westvicw; Sinclair,
Gary Dane (2), Vancouver;
Smith, William (2). Burnaby;
Van Ackeren, Joan Lillian Rose
(2), Kelowna. i
ARCHITECTURE
The Degree  of Bachelor       1
Of Architecture
Allen. Arthur Lewis (2), Alberta; Arajs, Uldis (P), Vaneou-,
ver; Ewing, Roger Keith (2),;
Saskatchewan; Feistmann, John
George (2), Chilliwack; Graham,!
[Gordon Richard (1), Vancouver;!
Howard, Ronald Bassett (1),'
Vancouver; Jones, Norman Sid-,
ney (2), West Vancouver. I
Mann, Richard Colburn (1),
Vancouver; Naito, Joseph (2),
Kelowna; Pinckston, Don Leonard (2), Alberta; Rand, Barry
Allan (2), North Vancouver; Ska-
kun, Casey Anotoly (2), Alberta;
Smeeth, Roger Watson (2), Vancouver; Uyeyama, Kanau James
(2), Kelowna.
The Degree of Bachelor
of Science in Agriculture
Honors
B.A. (1), British Guiana; Dun-
mn, plant Sc. 421. Repeat Zool.
408; Charles Stanley (P), Vancouver; Doroschuk, Eugene Valen (1), Vancouver; Green, Win-
ford FitzHerbert (2), Janaica;
Hansen, Theodore Hector (P),
Little Fort; Heal, Louise Margaret (2), Victoria.
(Continued from Page 21)
Campbell (2), Ontario; Kron-
qvist, thur (2), Westview; Sinclair, Gary Arthur, Penticton,
Zool. 306; Smith, Patricia Anne,
Vancouver, Eng. 429, Eng. 431.
HOME ECONOMICS
The Degree of Bachelor
Of Home Economics
Brown, Bonnie Elizabeth (2),
North Vancouver; Cleasby, Barbara Anne (2), West Vancouver;
Daem, Clara (2), Enderby; Daly,
Marion, Georgina (2), Vancouver; Fergusson, Geraldine Ann
(2), Vancouver; Fowler, Margaret Elizabeth, Sidney *(P);
Gough, Sylvia Marianne (2), Victoria; Grove, Glenda Marie (2),
Vancouver; Henry, June Marion
(P), New Westminster; Kong,
Eleanor Ying Faan (P), Hong
Kong.
Lapworth,   Norma   Rae   (P),
Port    Moody:    Moir,    Margaret
Jean (1), North Vancouver; Murray,    Kathleen    Ada-Mae    (P),
Langley; Nelson, Margaret Max- j
ine   (2),   Vancouver;    Parmley,!
Margaret   Jean   (2),   Penticton;
Perdue, Aileen Jean (2), Alberta;
Reader,   Dorothy    Colleen    (1), |
Port  Moody;   Sherry,   Margaret
Jean (2),  Hope;  Venables, Barbara Jean (2), Alberta; Webster,
Lynn Rossmond (2), Vernon.
ARTS AND SCIENCE
The Degree of Matter
Of Socal Work
Angel, Jerome Harvey, B.
Comm., B.S.W., Vancouver.
Bateman, Ellen Leona, B.A.,
B.S.W.. United States.
Bodlak, Stanley Frank, B.A.,
B.S.W.,  Vancouver.
Daggett, Jessie Catherine,
.A., (Alberta), B.S.W., Vancouver.
Freer, Mrs. Nell Wilson, B.A.,
(Lynchburg), B.S.W.. Vancouver.
Howarth, Lionel Doyle, B.A.,
B.S.W., Abbotsford.
Laidman, Leslie Warde, B.A.,
(Saskatchewan), B.S.W., Saskatchewan.
Merson, Stanley >Rae, B.A.,
B.S.W., Vancouver.
Morales, Dolores Averna, B.A.
(Xavier), B.S.W., Virgin Islands.
Morton, Mrs. Bettv Marie,
B.A., (McMaster), B.S.W., Vancouver.
Maclntyre, James McEwan,
B.A., B.S.W., Britannia Beach.
Penny, Harry Lee, B.A.,
B.S.W., Vancouver.
Sharp, Patricia Louise, B.Sc
(Nursing), (Saskatche wan),
B.S.W. Saskatchewan.
Taylor, Audrey Rothnie, B.A.
(Manitoba),   B.S.W.,   Vancouver.
Toren, Cyril Kirby, B.A.,
B.S.W., West Vancouver.
Wilson, Mrs. Lucille Deborah
Sprague, B.A. (Washington),
B.S.W. Vancouver.
Wright, Mildred May, B.A.,
Vancouver.
SPECIAL COURSE
Not Candidate for Degree
MacKinnon, Dolina Finlayson,
Victoria (Joint Thesis.)
|       Passed  Subjects  Written
!     Beighton,   Alan   Lloyd,   B.A.
' (Manitoba),    B.S.W.,    Manitoba;
I Brown, Mrs. Constance Julia,
B.A., B.S.W., Vancouver; Francis, Joseph, B.A., B.S.W., New
Westminster; Lawrence, Mrs.
Edna Marion, B.A.| B.S.W,, Vancouver; Morritt, Robert Alan,
B.A., B.S.W., Vancouver; Wharf,
Brian Worth, B.A., B.S.W., Victoria.
THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR
OF SOCIAL WORK
Andresson, Edda, B.A. (2),
Vancouver; Armstrong, Geraldine Anne, B.A. (2), South Burnaby; Belknap, John Victor,
B.A. (2), Port Alberni; Berg-
und, Bruce Theos, B.A. (Washington) (2), United States; Black-
lock, Donald John, B.A., West
SUmmerland; Brown, Ethel
Christine, B.A. (AlBerta) (2), Alberta; Campbell, Margaret Anna,
B.A. (2), Vancouver; Chin, Beverley, B.A. (2), Vancouver; Currie, Alison Carol, B.A. (Toronto)
(2), Ontario; Donnellv, Mrs.
Marie-Claire Germaine, B.A. (2),
Vancouver; Driver, Clifford
Ryerson, B.Ed. (Alberta) (2), Al-
berta.
|     Fyvie. Aileen Ruth, BA (Alb-
| erta) (2), Alberta; .Gardner, Patricia Nan, BA (Alberta) (1), On-
l tano; Hillaire, Mary Ellen, BA,
West Washington College of Education, (P) United Slates; Hunt,
Lorraine  Lois,   BA   (2)  Vancouver;    Jones,    Clil/ord    Stewart.
BA.   (Acadia)  (2),   Nova   Scotia:
Kennedy, Romona Frances. BA,
(Saskatchewan):   Kvle,   Marilyn
Audrey,   BA,   (2) Vancouver.
Salter, Nancy-Jean, BA (2)
■ Ontario; Smith, Robert Roger.
. BA (2), Vancouver; Svmons,
Chrystal Pearl, BA (2) Vancou-
j ver: Vaneden, Jacques Henri,
! BA (2) Vancouver; Vea. Asbjorg
I Sylvia, BA (1) Vancouver; Watson. Charlotte Eleanor, BA (2),
I Mission; Wiedeman, Frank Vic-
I tor. BSc (Alberta, 2, Alberta:
| Williams, Mrs. Joan Margaret.
. MA, (Aberdeen) 1, Kamloops:
i Woolrich, Mary Lou. BA, (2)
j Vancouver: Wright, Faye Lco-
| nore, BA (2) Vancouver.
MEDICINE
The Degree of  Doctor
of Medicine
Basted, Robert Merrifield (2)
West   Vancouver;   Brummitt,   J.
Redvers   (2),   Vancouver;   Burr,
1 John  Bartlett,  BA  (2),  Vancou-
; ver;   Burtnick,   Walter,  BA   (2),
; Vancouver;  Christian,  Mavnard
| Spaulding,   BA   (Stanford)   (2),
Vancouver;  Clark,   Michael  De-
; Lacey, BA (2), Vancouver; Cos-
1 grove, Theodore Joseph (2), Vancouver; Dawkins, Oswald Syva-
to
Setter Jjviivj
Saving isn't the
whole story of Better
Living... but it's the
chapter that holds
the key to a
lot of good things
APPLY FOR YOURS
AT...
TO I 0111100 UMtlH
Iflffl]
Bank of Montreal
Your Campus Branch in the Administration Building:
MERLE C. KIRBY, Manager
WORKING      WITH      CANADIANS      IN       EVERY       WALK      OP      LIFE      SINCE
1  8  I  7
nus (2), Jamaica; DeJong, Bernard Peter (2), Vancouver; Dick,
Kenneth David York (2) Vancouver.
Finnemore, Brian Irving G.,
BA (1), Vancouver; Forbes, F.
Duncan (2), Englewood; Forward, Alan Douglas (2) Vancouver, Fredrickson. John Murray,
BA (2) Vancouver; Froese, Daniel Walter, BA (2) Vancouver;
Fung, Edward Wine, BA (2),
Vancouver; Gill, Gurdev Singh
(2), Youbou; Gillanders, David
Alexander (2), Vancouver; Go-
ertzen, Gerhard (2), Vancouver;
Goldbloom, Theodore (2), Vancouver.
Hakstian, Robert Wilfred (2),
Vancouver; Hancock, Ronald J.
BA* (2), Vancouver; Hardwick,
David Francis (2), Vancouver;
Harlos, Mrs. Mary Sharon, BA
(2), Vancouver; Hinke, Joseph
Anthony (2), Vancouver; Hossie,
Barbara Elaine (2), West Vancouver; Klassen, Gerald Arthur,
New Westminster; Koch. Peter
Rudolf David, BA (2) Vaneou
ver; Lahay, William Douglas, 2,
Vancouver; Martin, Donald Carl
(2), Vancouver; Matheson, Donald Craig (2) Victoria: MacDonald, Alexander Edward (2) Pen- s
ticton; Macrae, Donalda Catherine (2) West Vancouver.
Ran?eT, Agnes Betty Lou (2),
Vancouver; Saunders. Alexander Michael (21 Vancouver;
Smart. John Morris. BA (2) Vancouver: Stewart. Donald Watson (21 North Vancouver;
Strang. Robert Ian. BA (2) Lyt-
ton: Sutherland. Roy Arden,
BASc. (2). Peachland; Symonds,
John Gary (21, Vancouver.
Tan. Ens Seng (P). Singan^ro;
Tchorkeznff. Alexander (2) Vancouver: Thomas, Arthur Norman (2), Vancouver; Trafton, W.
David. BA (21, Vancouver: Turn-
bull, Ian Marr (2). Vancouver;
Wheeler. John Sargent (2). Vancouver; Wilbee, Godfrey Stanley
(2). Vancouver: Yamanaka, Geo.
Joji, BA (2), Vancouver.
PHARMACY
The  Degree of Bachelor
In Pharmacy
Arnot, Ellen Alma (1), Port
Alberni; Baker, Stanley Bernard, BA (P). Vancouver; Beck,
Kenneth Wallace (2), Kamloops; v
Berdusco, John Peter (2), Prince .
George; Berger, Florence (2)
Princeton; Burnett, Patricia Ann
(1), Victoria: Chong, Ronald
Low (2), Lytton; Didcott, Philip
Ralph (2), Now Westminster;
Falk, Jack Norman (2), North
Surrey; Findlay, Edward (2) Canoe; Fortin, Leo Neil (2), Vancouver: French, Ian Wilfred (VI
North Vancouver; Fyfe, John
Stanley (P), Vancouver.
Greenhut, Mrs. Jeanette (1),
Vancouver; Lee, Thomas G. (PI, <
Natal: Moody, William Murdith
(2), Vancouver; Morris, Gerald
David (P), Vancouver: McCon-
nell, Ronald Ray Nelson (P),
Vancouver; Mackay, Marilyn K.
(2), Vancouver; Netherton. Mary
Louise Evanne (21, Penticton;
Nichols. Cyril Edmund (2) Haney; Nielsen. Shirlev Mae (2),
Osnvoos: Osborne, Harold Eugene (P) Cranbrook- Pope. Au-
drov Elizabeth (PI, Saanichton;
Porte. Robert York (21 Vancouver: Raposin, Alvin (P) Alberta;
Pevell. Margaret Rose Grace, 2, *
Victoria; Fosenbaum, Minnie. 2,
^nskn^howaiv Simocs. Louis C. *•
BA (Sask.1 (PI yanrnuver: Stevenson. Roberta Ci>nninahnm
(21 Nel«nn: Stewart. David (2),
o^o-mi P^rk- W^son Trevor
McKnight. T\\ (Manitoba (2),
Vnnpfiiivor: Wo"". Allan Henry
(?1, Vancouver- \Vri?htr->"n Gt-
''^n Murray (1), New Westminster.
FORESTRY
The Dor-re* of Bachelor #
of Sci«*""« in forestry
HONORS
Bell. Marcus Arthur Money,
Vancouver: Smith. Richard Barrv. Vernon: Clark, Alexander,
RA. (PI Vancouver Davidson,
John Gerard Noel (?). Vancouver: Devitt. William John Bm~o
(21. Ruskin; Duggnn, Robert E.
("1, Victorh1 EldsvtU- Harold K.
(O) Prince Funert: Gilbert. Phi- »
Un Gonv<?p Oi. Vancouver; Hindley.   Farl   Walker   (21   Vnncnu-
(CorUinued on Page 23)
See GRADUATION RESULTS »> *
Tuesday, May 21, 1957   y
THE      UBYSSEY
PAGE  TWENTY-THREE
FIRMS,   SOCIETIES,
AWARD   GRADS
(Continued from Page 6)
GRAHAM   G.  SOMERVILLE
Applied Science
ROBERT  P.  LANGLANDS
Arls and Science
GERALDINE ANN WATERS
Agriculture
A. JC.   "Sandy"   ROSS
1957 Graduating Class Poet,
was also Editor-an-Chief of
The Ubyssey during the past
year. Class Poem is on
Page 16.
PATRICIA L. SHARP
Sociel Work
LEONA DAVENPORT
Elementary Teaching
Best Wishes
to U.B.C. Graduating Class of '57
FRANK TEAROE CONSTRUCTION
CO. LTD.
1424 Clyde, West Voncouver   WA 2-1274
Coke puts you at
your sparkling best
You taate the difference .;:
even the bubbles taste better:
You feel the difference .. ;
there's life, there's lift in Coke:
RUTH J. CRANE
Commerce
It Pays To
Patronize The
Advertisers
Graduation
(Continued from Page 22)
ver; Jaokson, James. Kirkpatrick (2). Vancouver: Jeanes, Trevor G?oi?e '2). Victoria; Kennedy, Larry Le Roy (2), Alberta.
Little'.en, Dennis Gerald Lee
'2). Aibeini: Loman, August A.
(2) V?ncouv?v: Meagher, Michael Desmond (2) Oliver; Munro,
Bo en jVeil (2h Rosedale; Mc-
I e'lan. John Frederick (2) Victoria: >.'vlar;d, Edo 'P), Vancouver: Pi'iecn, Henri Joseph (2),
New Westminster Pringle, Roderick Charles (2), Vancouver;
Richard*, Pouslss Perry (2),
KaminopR1 Savola, Raynind Albert (2), Vancouver: Smyth. Nell
Patrick (2) Vancouver: Valg, L.
(2). Vancouver: Winkworth, Alfred Victor (2) Vancouver.
Pasted in Subjects Written
Neuser. Ernst F., Germany.
STATISTICIANS
REQUIRED  FOR
Dominion Bureau of Statistics
at Ottawa
Up to $5,940 to start
There are numerous opportunities fmcl the
work   is   intercstirg       Fringe   benefits   are
generous.
Candidates must be university graduates,
preferably with specialization in economics,
commerce, mathematics cr statistics. &r.i
ivi\--.\   have  a  ba.sie  knowledge  of  statistical
fteveiai vears nt ex-
tiiCicy and methods.
perienee in statistics will be required fur the
l.itc-rmecliate and more seniur positions.
For details, write to
CIVIL SERVICECOMMISSION, OTTAWA
Pltase csk for Circular 57-G9S
CONGRATULATIONS   GRADS ...
Hew York Cosfinne Salon
- RENTALS -
M. GOODWIN     -     AUBURN DEAN
ALma O!) 4397 W. 10th Avenue
Congratulations to the Graduates
Pifsnen Business College Ltd.
1490 Westt Broadway CHerry 7848
'Coke" it a registered trade-mark.
C-30
COCA-COLA LTD
WITH BEST WISHES TO
THE '57 GRADUATES
SCOTT - FOSTER
Welding - Abrasives - Safety
1215 Clarke Drive
Vancouver, B. C. PAGE TWENTY-POUR
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, May 21, 1937
Inbo Metals at work m Canada
In the platinum refining process, low octane platinum speeds the chemical reaction that changes
naphthas flow through a bed of tiny pellets contain- the low octane naphthas to high octane compounds
ing approximately 0.5% platinum. Contact with the    — the basis of most modern anti-knock gasolines.
INCO PLATINUM helps produce
high octane gasoline in Canada
u
sing one of the world's most precious metals
—platinum—many of Canada's oil companies
are producing high octane anti-knock gasoline
more economically than ever before! That is
because the platinum causes a catalytic reaction
that changes low octane naphthas into high
octane fuel, and does this with maximum yield
of marketable products.
A substantial proportion of the platinum
used in Canada's oil refineries is Inco
Platinum, mined by Inco workmen right
here in Canada.
Platinum is one of the seven precious metals
present in the Sudbury ores in recoverable
quantities.
In oil refineries and other important
Canadian companies manufacturing
chemical, electrical, dental and medical
products, and jewelry, Inco Platinum helps
provide jobs for Canadians and better
products for you.
This is another way that Inco helps stimulate the growth and development of Canada's
economy.
MIDI      M A • «
Writ* for a free copy
of tho Illustrated booklet,
"Tho Romance of Nickol".
THE   INTERNATIONAL  NICKEL COMPANY OF CANADA, LIMITED
2B    KINO    STRUT   WIST,    TORONTO
Producer of Inco Nickel, Nickel Alloys, ORC Brand Copper, Cobalt, Tellurium, Selenium, Iron Ore and Platinum, Palladium and other Precious Metals.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0124574/manifest

Comment

Related Items