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The Ubyssey Sep 22, 1959

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 UBYSSEY
Needs
YOU
VANCOUVER, B;C, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 1959
No. 2
PROBLEM
IS STILL UNSOLVED
"Now where is my car?" muses an unidentified co-ed, plodding her painful way through the half acre of parking lot she shares with another 1000 drivers.
—Photo by Colin Landie
Win Scholarships
High School Students
Eight outstanding B.C. High
School students have been
awarded scholarships to U.B.C.
;'Two students were awarded
Chris Spencer Foundation Special Scholarships, valued at $500
per year for a maximum of five
years. They are Miss Muriel
Watney of University Hill High,
and Miss Muriel Croker of Lester Pearson High.
Three other Chris Spencer
Scholarships, valued at $275
each, were awarded to Walter
Warkentin of the Mennonite
Educational Institute, Linda
Webster of Burnaby Senior High
School, and Miss Evelyn Maurice of Burnaby  Senior High.
Standard Oil of B.C. awarded
two scholarships valued at $500
per year for four years. Donald
Duggan and Sarah C. Bence
were recipients of these awards.
A scholarship valued at $250,
was awarded to Elizabeth Sinclair by Inland Natural Gas Co.
Awards were made on the
basis of academic record, personal qualities, and participation
in student and community affairs.
THE UBYSSEY NEEDS YOU
If you can write coherently
and have- a yen for newspaper
work of any kind, please come
to the Publications meeting at
noon taody in Ubyssey offices
in the basement of the Brock.
Twee it Classes
MEN'S ATHLETIC ASSN.
All managers must attend
meeting, 12:30 p.m. today in
Men's Committee Room, Brock
Hall.
^f* ?& Pf>
DANCE CLUB
Get acquainted . . . come to
tea dance, in Brock Wednesday,
3:00-5:00 p.m. Admission free.
U.N. CLUB
Present executive aijd all interested meet in the Clubroom,
Brock Extension No. 256, Tuesday noon.
v    v    *p
ENGLISH RUGBY
First Practice on the Gym
field, today, 3:30 p.m. and
Thursday, 12:30 p.m.
•*••$•       *r
THEATRE
AUDITIONS for ARMS AND
THE MAN, Wednesday, September 30, Auditorium, 3:00-6:00
p.m. Open to all.
v      *rt     ^f*
THEATRE
A Technical Apprentice group
introductory meeting will be
held Wednesday, Sept. 30 in the
Scene Shop at noon. All interested are welcome.
•P •*• **•
PRE-NURSING
Students thinking of entering
Nursing next year report to
School of Nursing, Westbrook
Building, before October 1, 1959
(Continued on Page 6)
Dean Cage Announces
Indus trial Awards
To Ten Students
Names of ten scholarship winners were announced by . Dean
Walter.H. Gage, awards commii;-
tee chairman.t v " '
Scholarships and winners are;;!
John Grillingham, 3995 Nootk^
won the Better Business Bureau
Prize of $50 with an essay on
ethics in business; Miroslav Mo-
cek, 3203 West Tenth, won the
B.C. Sugar Refining Scholarship
of $350 for research; George
Heiman, 4205 West Eleventh,
won the Vancouver Women's Canadian Club Scholarship for History; Eda Marie Ciriani, Fernie,
won the BC Parent-Teacher Federation Scholarship .on Planning
for $100 for proficiency in Home
Economics.
Ken Snaggs, British West Indies, won the B.C. Electric Company Scholarship in Planning
for $500 for regional planning;
Edward Clark, Nelson, won the
B.C. Dental Supply Scholarship
of $200 for proficiency in "dentistry at the University of Alberta; Arthur Whittles, Court-
enay, won the B.C. Telephone
Scholarship in Engineering of
$700.
Robert Kydd, New Westminster, won the Super-Valu Stores
Scholarship of $500 for highest
standing in Grade 12; Robert
Mason, North Vancouver, won
the Burrard Dry Dock Co.
Scholarship of $1000 for academic standing and interest in
school affairs; and Maureen
Auld, Chilliwack, won the University of B.C. and Chris Spencer Foundation Scholarship for
University Entrance of $500 also
for  high  school standing.
Opinion Poll Reveals
Widespread Displeasure
Parking is rapidly becoming the number one  cut-throat
activity <m campus. : *V
t-■" Studejit parking Jots -are able te accommodate 4458 ears
while 5100 parking stickers have been issued by Buildings and
Grounds. ,
Also, enrollment is up substantially over last year and t«
date has exceeded the 10,000 mark.
Only 260 spaces are available
in Lot G for the 1000 eligible
graduate students. Restriction
will be automatic; when the lot
is full, ^those with the black G
stickers will he forced to park
in Lots A, B, C, or D.
Parking lots A, Br C or D are
open to students with any one of
the 4 stickers. They may riot
park in Lot G or in Faculty
parking zones.
Wise boys will use Wesbrook
and Agronomey entrances in order to avoid the 8 a.m. traffic
jam.
A student poll revealed frustration to disgust on the part of
upper classmen, and bewilderment on the part of most frosh.
However, few infractions of the
rules occurred. By 8:15 a.m. all
parking lots were filling up,
with the exception of Lot G.
"Parking? It's a wonderful situation for taxi drivers," stated
Joel Richardson, Arts II.
"I think we should thank the
authorities for moving the traffic bottleneck 200 yards," said
Marilyn McDonald, Education I.
Meanwhile, improperly parked Faculty and. Staff cars will
be impounded and released only
after payment of a $5 towing
charge at the Accountant's office.
All students owning <Out-of-
province cars must register them
with the local motor vehicle office. There is no charge for permits. Check-up slips will be
given out for failure to comply
with this regulation.
Lumber ^ iillionaire
Finances Scholarships
A $50,000 scholarship fund
has been awarded to U.B.C. by
H. R. MacMillan, local lumber
tycoon.
The fund, which will commemorate the Royal Visit, is
available to graduates in any
field. Announcement of the
scholarship was made when the
Royal party attended dinner at
the new Faculty Club.
The first of the five $1000
awards available this year will
be announced this month. PAGE TWO
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 22, 1959
THE UBYSSEY ■* SsO*   MALL FACTORS
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Authorized as second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa
Published three times a week throughout the University year
in Vancouver by the Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society,
University of B.C.
Telephones: Editorial offices, AL. 4404; Locals 12, 13 and 14;
Business offices, AL. 4404; Local 15
Acting Editor: Elaine Bissett
Reporters and Desk: Kerry White, Brad Crawford, Al Chernov,
Wayne Lamb, Irene Frazer, Sydney Huckvale, Sandra Scott,
Wendy Barr, Stu Robson, Al Springman, Bob Hendrickson, Ralph
Henderson, Ann Pickard, Mike Sinclair, Allan Graves and others.
Tuum Est
'"It is not often that a campus paper finds itself in the
position of the Ubyssey.
... In. the .past-eight months the names of eight different
editors have appeared on the masthead.
There have been emergency meetings of the student
eouMeil, faculty council, and the Senate concerning the
state of this paper. ,
Wide issues dealing with questions of atheism and
C&^tiahity, freedom of Speech and censorship, youthful
japj^aiice swrcii got><£ taste have been discussed* iri connec-
IfttMik'"wit&L %f>tng^ssey frqm Christ Church Cajthedral in
5fo*bntoto '.jj^jfe,Jpe®l^nS- the Vancouver Province.
However, these issues are not the concern of this
editorial.
'     What concerns us is that the history of th© Ubyssey
djuring the,pas| '^i^b^J^ j$T with a reputafioia. o£ incpm-.
'""'"" '"i!t^kv*%s.'P»?N&$,, grottod! wMu the adpaini-
,s^^|^,,jsta^^%|^^i^^|j-1^^."pf;: fhe. tlntyetp^,'
W«^ belMswf: M Jis ^s^ gositiqiai of a campus paper to, be
an organ of irite|l^nt criticism. Tlus should rje tfie guid*-
hag, prioeipte'of th^JP^sMjp--criti<>ispt GondSuct^m/go^d
tes#.
Wha.t.can be done to achieve this aim?
Tb« answer is the formation of a creative and enthusiastic staff. It sets the tone and degree of quality. Only
with good writing can a reputation for competence and
integrity be regained.
Quality is present, but not in great enough numbers.
Today at noom an organization meeting will be held in the
Publications Office in Brock Hall.
It is up to you to meet this challenge.
STUDENTS!!
WATCH FOR IT
THE GRAND OPENING OF THE
LAUNDROMAT
4460 WEST ICth AVENUE
What is Mr. Krushchev really
after?
Some authorities on the Soviet Union feel that Mr. K. is
after respectability. That is,
he seeks recognition as the legitimate ruler of the Soviet.
Russia and its satellite states.
Others agree that Krushchev
has no greater objective than
the photograph he hopes will
be taken of himself and Eisenhower smiling together at
the White House. The front
page of each newspaper in
every satellite will publish
that photo to give the anti-
Communists the impression
that they have been abandoned
by the West.
Krushchev managed to
amaze the Western world by
proposing total disarmament.
But even the mildest cynic
cannot help doubting that such
a Utopian proposal could be
fulfilled.
There are several inherent
problems. A mutually agreeable system of supervision
presents in itself many serious diplomatic problems. Will
small countries containing allied bases tolerate thorough
scrutinizatipn by Soviet
agents? Every country must
be rendered unable to guess
at a given date in order to protect the world against "eleventh hour" tyrannies.
Unfortunately, these problems may never draw first
breath. We cannot ignore the
possibility that Krushchev's
proposals are nothing more
than  Soviet tranquilizers.
Certainly Krushchev is taking advantage of any opportune
ity to put Russia in .a more favorable light. The president
of a large movie company
cited his rise from immigrant
obscurity as typifying opportunity within a system of free
enterprise. Krushchev immediately countered with his own
rise under Communism from
the status of the son of a coal
miner.
On several occasions, Krushchev has successfully cast an
unfavorable light on United
States. Upon being refused admission to Disneyland for security reasons, Mr. K. retorted,
"I expected to come here as a
free man."   ■
What, if anything, has the
United States gained from Mr.
Krushchev's   visit?
The hope was that Krushchev would agree to a "guaranteed corridor" between West
Germany and West Berlin.
Hope was also held that he
would agree to helping restrain Red China from new aggressions in the Far East. The
principal hope was that Krushchev would be impressed by
American strength and determination.
Now the results are clear.
Krushchev has given away
nothing, while gaining prestige
behind the Iron Curtain.
YOUR HELP IS
NEEDED FOR
THE  PUBLICATION
Of
THE UBYSSEY
By KERRY WHITE
Some undiscerning folks
might mistake this for the calendar of a university's first
term.
—Wide-eyed Frosh milling
around the campus asking in-
umerable questions: "like
where do I park yet?", queried one cute little Froshette.
—Frosh dances, designed to
encourage "togetherness" —
like one big happy family —
but serving only to prove that
each is really a stranger in a
fairly large town.
—Hazing day • (remember
when it was a week?) wlhen,
for the first time in their
slightly tarnished history, the
red shirts are forced to solicit
the aid of the farmers.
—First   week   of   lectures,
which   tend   to   give  innocent
^ frosh a light, independent feeling, but will turn to a queezy,
panicky feeling comje . . .
—Exam time, when the most
frequently heard comment is,
"I could have passed easily, but
I didn't study", and new leaves
are sprouting en masse out of
season.
—-Football1 season, and this is
the year. The 'Birds have so
much new material and have
gained so much in experience
they'll probably challenge the
Lions, spotting them 14 points.
—Engineers, and the many
would be's, but won't be's.
—Club's day, with the usual
side-show air and new crop of
joiners.
—VOC's getting "lost" in the
woods.
—Mock Parliament, with
lofty ministers being escorted
from the^ House for behaving
Lines, Lines, Lines
Editor, The Ubyssey,
I should like to taxe this opportunity to voice a few complaints about the present registration system. I feel they are
well founded and generally
held.
UBC has a traditionally
chaotic system of registration.
For the sake of something nebulous (the university equivalent of togetherness) which is
the student-advisor relationship
students and staff creak
through an archaic registration
procedure.
Getting queued up is the student's first introduction to UBC
when getting clued would be
would be more valuable.
Lines, lines, lines, etc., etc.,
etc. To pay money, to fill out
cards, to register for classes, to
get medicals, and about everything «lse is met with the UBC
panacea, "That line over there".
Students have been known to
spend as much as eight hours
before they have finally arrived
at the end of the last queue.
Other larger universities have
more efficient systems and the
question to be answered is —
"Why not UBC?".
Students embark on their
education with a bad taste in
their mouths, and an aching
feeling in their feet. Both discomforts can be avoided.
I suggest that the registration be mechanized and that all
students go through the same
process and when a problem
arises that the machine cannot
solve then and only then the
student be handed over to the
clutches of the frustrated bureaucrats who people UBC.
Students arise, all your lives
will be spent in line! Faculty
arise or you'll be spending
more time on registration than
education.
—Allan Springman.
like college students.
—Noon-hour lectures on the
latest blundering error made
by the U.S. and the usual self-
appointed patrons of the downtrodden Soviet Union.
—History professors, with
unbiased lectures.
—Aggies, and puzzled Guernseys.
—The new group of long-
hairs (two months at University and they're intellectuals
yet).
—The Powder Puff Bowl,
with breath-taking runs, unladylike tackles and profanity,
and those charming cheer
leaders.
—And, as usual, more complaints about the student newspaper.
Now this new Faculty club.
Fabulous, isn't it? It should foe,
it cost $750,000.
And you and your club can
enter part of it, provided you
have a legitimate, important
reason and get clearance from
President MacKenzie's office,
and provided no other space is
available, and provided . . .
If you are fortunate and get
into the club, take time out to
see the wine cellar, it's a dandy.
Rumor has it that the cash
set aside by the Koerner fund
was to be spent on a joint student-faculty club. When J will
the first student function be
held in the building?
Tradition, too, seems to have
been forgotten. The interior is
lavishly decorated in Danish
modern. Sharp, contemporary
lines, abstract oils and the like
predominate.
The first thing you're bound
to notice, for it is unique, is the
parking space. This is symbolic.
And the view! Glorious Bur-
rard Inlet, pride of the west,
from the front Window, squalid,
crowded Fort Camp from ttte
side, and that parking lot from
the front door. This, too, is symbolic.
Seriously,  the  new Faculty
club is a beautiful addition to
the campus and .what could possibly be more important^
*  *  *
Be this a warning: provocative, amusing, and non-libelous
letters addressed to this column
will be included with thanks,
if space allows.
Please make them short,
sharp and frequent.
Parking  Suggestions
The Editor, Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
After thinking about the
parking problem for two hours
this morning while driving
about the campus looking for
a parking space, I feel I might
be able to make a helpful suggestion.
Couldn't a parking lot be
constructed just west of the
University Golf course on what
now appears to be bushland.
Special buses operated by the
university could pick up students and drop them at various points about the campus
proper.
After mulling over this point
during the hour-long hike from
my car to the campus I felt now
the university co.uld really expand.
I understand the real reason
desperately needed classrooms
have not been built is because
the university board of governors are afraid of a student
(and faculty) mutiny if present
parking lot sites were used to
raise buildings on.
There should be some way to
solve the problem, hmmm???
(signed) —Skooter. Tuesday, September 22, 1959
THE    UBYSSEY
Page Three
Extension Dept
To Teach Radio
Communications
Six courses in communications
will be offered by'the UBC extension department and the B.C.
Association of Broadcasters this
fall.
' A preliminary course entitled
"Introduction to Radio" will begin October 8. Guest lecturers
from the U.B.C. faculty and
Vancouver radio stations will
give the course.
Courses in broadcasting, commercial writing for broadcasting, research methods and measurements, the television program, and film production will
be given in  subsequent  weeks.
A seventh course, News for
Broadcasting, will foe offered in
January. A seminar for radio
station managers and two-weekend film workshops are also
planned.
■ Fees for each course vary
from $10 to $25.
In the new year, off-campus
courses will be offered in Prince
George and Victoria.
A brochure is available from
the UBC extension department.
Volkoff Visits
Kiev, USSR
University of B.C. professor
G. M. Volkoff of the department
, of -physios was one of three Canadian delegates who attended
the annual International Confer-
- ence on High Energy Physics
held in Kiev, USSR.
\    'Dr.  E.   P.  Hincks   of   Chalk
• River and Dr. E. Lamon of McGill _ University were also invited by the Russian Academy
of Sciences.
The Russian conference marks
the second held outside the
United States.
University
Professor's
Mourns
Death
Dr. Alex M. Agnew, 59, head
of the U.B.C. Medical School's
department of obstetrics and
gynaecology, died August 11 in
Vancouver ..General Hospital.
Born in Clinton, Ontario, Dr.
Agnew received his medical degree from the University of Toronto.
He was associated with Wel-
lesley Hospital, Toronto, and
the Vancouver General Hospital
where he was head of the department of obstetrics and gynaecology.
Dr. Agnew was a past president of the Vancouver Medical
Association and the Society of
Obstetricians    and    Gynaecolo-
Big-Little Sister
The Big-Little Sister Banquet,
designed for freshettes, takes
place Wednesday evening, September 23rd, at 5:30 p.m.
Freshettes will meet their
"Big Sisters" at the armouries
for the banquet, from there moving to the women's gym for
songs, skits, and a film. Voting
for frosh queen will also take
place here.
The freshettes are asked to
wear clothing which' depicts
them as "little sisters"—snort
skirts, long socks, and bows and
ribbons.
Tickets are 90c, and are available at the bus stop, the main
floor of the library, and in
Brock, Tuesday and Wednesday
at noon.
gists of Canada, He was also a
•fellow of the Royal College of
Surgeons.
He had held his post at U.B.C.
since 1950.
BIRJ> CALLS
All address, and phone No.
changes must be handed in to
the co-ordinator of publications
office by 5:00 p.m. Friday.
COFFEE   DAN
Dine  and   Dance
THE MOST POPULAR SPOT FOR ALL
Students Announces:—
"THE BIG COMING BACK PARTY'
DANCING
Friday, September 18     9:00-2:00
Saturday, September 19  9:00-1:00
For Reservations Phone: MU 4-4034
352 Water Street
Across from Eaton's Customer Parking Lot
FRATERNITY
RUSHING
Register Now at
A.M.S. Office
Until September 28
INFORMATION  BOOKLET
NO CHARGE
Library Wing
Soon Constructed
Construction has begun on a
new wing for the U.B.C. library.
Scheduled for completion by
1960, the new wing will resemble the style of the north end annex which was added in 1948.
Seating capacity will be for
more than 800, on four floors.
Plans call for reading and seminar rooms, carrels, and eight
levels of stacks.
Construction is being carried
on by A. R. Grimwood Ltd., 1129
Kinsgway, who were lowest of
eight bidders with $1,053,810.
Midnight Oil To Burn
For Evening Classes
More than 5000 persons are
expected to register for 150
adult evening classes beginning
in late September at  U.B.C.
A wide range of .liberal arts
and science courses covering
such subjects as astronomy, economics, history languages, and
the fine arts will be offered during the  1959-60 term.
According to the extension department, there is a 15% increase in the number of courses
offered  compared to  last  year.
A brochure giving full details
of courses and fees can be obtained by writing or telephoning
to the UBC extension department.
.. AND WEAR OUT YOUR SHOES
WHEN YOU FEEL YOUR HEARTBREAK...
Sore feet and higher education will apparently by synonymous in  future  years.
The centrally located main
parking lot opposite the registrar's office will be the future
site of the $1,500,000 fine arts
center.
The center will house the
school of architecture, a theatre, an art gallery, fine arts and
mugic departmente and an anthropology museum.
The   nearest   parking   lot   at
THE UBYSSEY NEEDS YOU . . . IF YOU
CAN WRITE OR ARE INTERESTED
present is  the  small lot beside
the pharmacy building.
Blows A Beauty
A University of B.C.'s physics department glassblower's
entry was the only Canadian
piece accepted by "Glass—
1959."
John Lees' glass totem pole is
one of 200 pieces being exhibited by more than 23 Countries.
The exhibition will tour 18
months and appear at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New
York and in art centers in Chicago,  Toledo, and Virginia.
COLLEGE SHOP
OPEN DAILV IN THE BROCK EXTENSION
11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
COME IN AND HA VE A LOOK AROUND
FEATURING
faculty sweaters and crests
pins for all faculties and clubs
crested UBC jewellery - cufflinks, tieclips, charms
UBC scarves
UBC jackets - for both fall and winter wear
UBC blazers and crests
shorts, faculty and UBC T-shirts
sweat shirts, sweat pants, hooded sweat shirts
school supplies and UBC stationery
and many other items
LOST AND FOUND
OWNED AND OPERATED BY  THE  A.M.S. PAGE FOUR
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 22, 1959
BLOCK SMOKER
Here is your chance to meet
the Varsity Coaches at the annual Frosh Smoker.
Sponsored by the Big Block
Club, this event will again be
held in the Brock Lounge, on
Wednesday, September 23rd at
7:30.
Come out and get acquainted.
As side attractions entertainment, refreshments and the
Frosh Queens will be added.
Fellowships Go To UBC Chemists
From Canadian Chemical Institute
The Chemical Institute of Canada has awarded fellowships to
four U.B.C. men.
Dr. S. D.'Cavers, Dr. G. G. S.
Dutton, and Dr. R. Stewart of
the chemical engineering faculty,  and Dr.  H.  G. Khorana  of
the Research Council received
awards at the Annual Conference in Halifax.
Dr.  Cavers  was  also  elected
chairman of the Vancouver Section of the C.I.C. for 1959-60.    "
WANTED:
Student living in East End
to drive handicapped girl to
school on 4300 West 10th.
Apply Miss A. Hill - HE
4-7052. Pay $5.00 per week.
Welcome Students
Your Headquarters For
RECORDINGS - MONAURAL & STEREO
POPULAR - CLASSICAL - FOLK
and  ETHNIC
Special to Students
ALL LANGUAGE & SPOKEN WORD
RECORDINGS 10% DISCOUNT BY
PRESENTING STUDENT CARD
Alexander & Axelson Appliances Ltd.;
4508 W. 10th Ave.        Vancouver 8, B.C. PHONE: ALma 2544
Presidents Report
Recalls U.B.C, Past
President Norman MacKen-
zie's annual report contained an
extensive review of UBC's history.
The President says "the history of the university runs parallel, in many respects, to that
of the province. It has prospered
with the prosperity of the province. It has also felt' the pinch
of hard times even to the point
of threatened extiction."
Pointing out the expansion he
notes that in 1915 UBC had 435
registrations and offered courses leading to a bachelor of arts
and the first three years of bachelor of applied science. In 1958
there were just under 10,000
students, 15 degrees in nine faculties and seven degrees in the
faculty of graduate studies.
Reviewing the development
fund of 1957 and 1958 the president terms the appeal an "overwhelming success". The fund
currently   stands  at  more than
$9,000,000, and it is expected
that wtithin the next year the
University will be able to more
than meet the provincial government's offer to match all contributions up to $10,000,000.
On the subject of the UBC
development plan he points out
that the present campus population is about equal to the population of Kamloops and by
1961 the enrolment will be the
equivalent to the population of
Nanaimo.
The plan envisages a teaching
campus of 215 traffic-free acres
with parking lots on the periphery of the campus.
"My very brief history can
have no tidy conclusion. Summaries of the history of an institution can be made only when
it is static or dead.
"The University of B.C. is
very much alive and I hope it
will continue to develop as it,
has done in the past."
ARTS
Quicker, surer stops with
KAUFMAN
Golden Jets
— the basketball shoes scientifically designed
to improve your game
Wear the sh(5e chosen by so many well-known Canadian basketball teams . . . Golden Jets. New non-marking ripple® Soles
lengthen the stride, propel the foot forward for fast-get-aways, or
"dig in" for instant, non-skid stops.
Golden Jets let you play longer without tiring because cushion
action of ripple® Soles absorbs shock, reduces foot fatigue.
You'll want these other Golden Jet features too:
* PROFESSIONAL LAST (narrow at heel, wide at ball of foot)
* SHOCK-ABSORBING CUSHION ARCH PR0TCCT0R
* "BREATHABLE" UPPERS of long-wearing heavy duck
Golden Jets come in white
with golden trim. Ask for
Golden Jets at your nearest
sports or shoe store.
Made by Kaufman Rubber Co., Limited, Kitchener, Ont.
Oltj*  Inlptjina
IN A GARDEN BY THE SEA
Lunches - Afternoon Teas-Dinners
 $l-.oo and up
Special —
Faculty Lunches
Receptions of all kinds — Good home cooking
6080 S.W. MARINE DRIVE
Near the University of B.C.
Closed every Monday and Tuesday
AL. 7962 Tuesday, September 22, 1959
THE      UBYSSEY
\
Meredith Thompson Appointed
New English Professor
PAGE FIVE
Dr. Meredith Thompson has
been appointed associate professor in the department of English.
The former head of the department of English at United College, Winnipeg, Dr. Thompson
has been teaching at the University of Southern California
since 1947.
He obtained his bachelor of
arts and master of arts degrees
at the University of Toronto.
He    has    done    post-graduate
work at McMaster University
and Oxford and was awarded
his doctor of philosophy degree
by the University of Breslau;
Before joining the staff of the
University of Southern California, Dr. Thompson taught at
Wesleyan College, Middleton,
Connecticut.
Dr. Thompson's special interest is English philology and old
and middle English. He has edited Middle English works for the
English Text Society.
Applications Now Being Accepted
ForP.R.O. Of Student's Council
Applications are now being
received for Public Relations Officer of Students' Council.
Miss Salleye Delbridge, the
PRO appointed last year, has extended her stay in Europe, vacating the post for the coming year.
The Public Relations Officer
is in charge of organizing the
press releases, advertising and
general public image of the
Council. He or she is a non-voting member of the Council, but
is otherwise afforded the full
rights and privileges of a class
"A" office.
Persons interested in applying
for this position must provide a
formal letter of application * setting out their qualifications and
.experience. These letters should
-foe addressed to Miss Lynn Rog-
-ers, Secretary of the Council,
and must be received by her be
fore 12:00 noon, Friday, October
2.
Frats Seek
New Members
Fraternities on campus are
looking for new members.
Informal social functions will
be held from September 29th to
October ■■ 12th to acquaint prospective members with the various fraternities and the fraternity system.
Information and registration
forms for rushing may be: obtained from the AMS office.
Forms must be returned to this
office before 4:30 p.m." Monday, September 28th.
There is no cost or obligation
in rushing. To be eligible, men
must have at least 12 units of
First Year or its equivalent.
Campus
Barber   Shops
DROP IN AND SEE US SOON
PETER VAN DYKE
2 Locations
North Entrance, New Brock Extension
and ^734 University Boulevard
Extension Department
Program Aired
The communications division
of the UBC extension department, headed by Alan Thomas,
will produce the series over a
period of eight months beginning in September in cooperation with CKWX.
Arrangements for the grant to
UBC were made by the late F.
H. Elphjcke, former manager of
CKWX. The Leon and Thea
Koerner Foundation has also
made a grant to the extension
department to support the series.
Active planning of the program, which will explore the
character of modern city life,
has begun under the direction of
Bilil Ballentine, a UBC graduate
and former president of the UBC
radio society.
The series will include docu-
mentaries, music programs,
round table discussions and reports of current and civic affairs.
News and reviews of Vancouver
theatre, radio and television productions will be included as well
as book reviews.
Original creative material by
Vancouver authors, composers
and artists will also be broadcast. New techniques for report-;
ing civic affairs and presenting
cultural activities will be explored, Mr. Thomas said.
A number of correspondents,
many of them UBC graduates,
currently living in overseas centers, have agreed to act as correspondents for the series and
to send taped documentary reports for broadcast.
The correspondents, located in
such centers as Berlin,. Vienna,
Singapore, Hong; Kong, London
and Hamburg, will compare civic
development in those centers
with that of Vancouver.
Mr. Thomas said program directors would attempt to build
a continuous relationship with
the audience by encouraging suggestions for programs. "We also |
hope to set upt a board of advisors representing political, religious, business and professional organizations," he added.
The new series is part of the
expanding communications division of the UBC extension department. Several courses in
communications were given as
part of the summer school of
the arts. Courses included speech
for broadcasting and a film production course directed by CBC
Television producer Ron Kelly.
New Members
Proclaimed
New appointments to the senate and board of governors of
UBC were announced recently
by President N. A. M. MacKenzie.
Mr. Kenneth Caple was elect-,
ed by the senate to succeed Mr.
Justice Arthur Lord on the
board of governors.
Mr. Caple has served on the
UBC senate since 1945 and he
was a member of the board of
governors on two previous occasions.
President MacKenzie also announced that the Right Reverend R. S. Dean, bishop of Cariboo and acting head of the Anglican Theological College, has
been appointed to represent the
college on the UBC senate.
on
Crab Specialist For
Three-Year Research
University of B.C. zoologist
Dr. Paul A. Dehnel received a
$32,800 three-year grant from
the National Science Foundation
in Washington, D.C.
The assistant professor will
use the grant fdr basic research
on a crab known as Hemigrap-
sus.
Dr. Dehnel will be assisted by
two graduate students and technician.
The professor has been doing
research on the crab for five
years.
ENGINEERS & ARCHITECTS
of tomorrow
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Campus Representative
Barry MacFarlane
1 PAGE SIX
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 22, 1959
Neurological  Courses
Offered Tliis Term
Department of Neurological
Research will offer two new
courses during the fall term on
"The Physiological Basis of
Human Behavior" and "Neurological Genetics".
*    Professor William C.   Gibson
will teach the first two-unit
course and Dr. James Miller will
teach the second one-unit course.
Lectures will be at 7 p.m.
Mondays in Hut B-5.
For further information call
the Dept. of Neurological Research, AL. 4600, local 269.
Pan-Hell House, Buchanan Addition
Contracts Awarded    To   Firms
University building contracts,
valued at over one million dollars have been awarded to two
Vancouver construction firms.
: Burns and Dutton Concrete
and Construction Company will
build a new L-shaped addition
to the Buchanan Building.
It will consist of a three-storey
classroom block and a four-
istorey office block.
Total cost of the addition, now
being constructed on the parking
lot east of the existing building,
Will be $1,300,000.
A second contract, for construction of' the Panhellenic
THouse, .was  awarded to Turn-
bull and Gale Construction.
This building will contain
rooms for the 9 sororities on
campus and offices for the Panhellenic Association. Cost of the
stucco and natural wood structure will be $94,000.
'46 Packard, good condition,
$100.00; useful for transportation of riders; seats 7 comfortably. ALma 3449-L, 4463 West
15th.
Wanted — Brock Hall ride
from UBC at 5:00 p.m. to 14463
West 15th. Contact "Andy" at
A.M.S. office, ALma 4404 (day).
FUND CHAIRMAN
APPOINTED
The. dean of the faculty of
medicine has been named chairman for the $1,000,000 Queen
Elizabeth Children's Research
Fund.
Dr. J. F. McCreary was appointed head" of a six-man board
of trustees to administer the
fund, an Ottawa release said.
The fund was established for
research into children's diseases
in honour of the Canadian visit
of Queen Elizabeth and Prince
Philip.
Choir To Perfor m
Performances for both university and city musical circles
will be presented by the new
University Choir, the Department of Music has stated.
Dr. Robert B. Morris, former
director of choral activities at
the University of North Carolina, will direct the group..
Choir rehearsals will be held
Monday through Thursday at
4-.30 p.m. Students may participate from 2 to 4 hours each
week.
Those interested are urged to
apply for admission during registration week. See Dr. Morris
in Room 101, Music Building, between IQ7I2 a.m. and 2-4 p.m. or
telephone him at ALma 1794-R.
iaeiiaj NEW in Laundry Service
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LAUNDRY IN LESS THAN 1 HOUR AT 50% SAVING .
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25c
9-lb. Load
Choose your own time - we are open round the
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coke and a book, or go shopping while your
wash is being done. Clothes come out bright,
fresh and lint free.. Then fluff dry them in the
large 50-lb. dryers in a fraction of the usual
time and cost. '
Dry
10c
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Bring This Coupon For Free Opaque Laundry Bag to 2858 West Broadway
WHITE-WAY   LAUNDRY
2856 W. Broadway at Macdonald Phone RE 3-3022
NEW   LOCATION   FOR
TEXTBOOK   SALES
All textbooks are now on sale in the FIELD HOUSE,
immediately south of Brock Hall.
This FAST SERVICE Center closes October 4th
. . .avoid the rush, get your books today!
Operated by the
MB9IY BOOK STORE
Lashionable Frosh Flaunt Lrilly
Frocks On Thursday
The Frosh Fashion Show will
take place Thursday, September
24th at 3:30 p.m., in the Brock
Lounge.
FROSH RECEPTION
TO BE REAL GAS FOR
ONLY TWO CLAMS
This Saturday, September 26,
the FROSH RECEPTION dance,
the highlight of Frosh Week, will
be held at the UBC Armouries.
The tariff for Frosh is $2.00 per
couple; for upperclassmen, $2.50
per couple. Tickets can be purchased at the AMS office in
South Brock.
The highlight of the evening
will be the crowning of the
Frosh Queen. Music will be provided by Ted Lazenby and his
Jazzsoc Orchestra.
Martyr To Speak
He was fired for alleged political   activity.
Dave Barrett, who lost his
Civil Service job for allegedly
seeking the CCF nomination in
Dewdney, will speak at U.B.C.
Wednesday noon.
Mr. Barrett's firing caused
great controversy and brought
harsh criticism on the Social
Credit government.
Personnel staff t raining officer at Haney Correctional Institute before the incident, Mr.
Barrett will speak on "Criminal
Corrections."
The meeting is sponsored by
the   UBC-CCF   club.
The frosh queen candidates
will be the models, showing the
latest campus casual and date
dress.
Admission cost is 15c. Punch
will be served afterwards.
Academy Pres.
Polgass Reelected
Dr. William J. Polglass of the
University of B.C. department
of biochemistry was re-elected
president of the B.C. Academy
of Sciences.
Other officers elected were
Dr. H. F. Batho, vice-president;
Dr. Alan Paterson, secretary;
Dr. Carl Cramer .treasurer, and
Dr. E. S. W. Belyea, editor.
The academy represents all
science fields and promotes original research and publicatioa
of papers.
"TWEEN CLASSES
(Continued from Page 1)
FRIENDS   OF   DR.   ALBERT-
SCHWEITZER—
There will be a meeting on
Thursday at noon in the auditorium to discuss formation of
a Schweitzer Club. Possibility of
bringing Dr. Schweitzer to Canada and UBC campus is excellent. All those interested please
attend this meeting.
v      ^r      *!•
GRADUATE STUDENTS—
There will be a meeting ift
Bu. -100 at 12:30 p.m., Friday,
September 25. Topic: A Common Room for Graduate Stu*
dents. Dr. Shrum will outline
the possibilities. All grads out.
Puff after puff
of smooth
mild smoking
Sportsman c,o„ETTE,
Ul PLAIN   OR   FILTER
The choice of sportsmen everywhere
JMVE
at the CLUR
224 EAST BROADWAY
*
Open Every Evening 7:30 p.m. till Midnight
FREE professional instruction given if desired
Members
$1.00 per night
Non-Members
$1.50 per night
CALL TRinity 2-1343
y Tuesday, September 22, 1959
THE      UBYSSEY
PAGE  SEVEN
WOMEN'S SPORTS
Editor: Stu Robson
BILL CRAWFORD
JACK HENWOOD
underbids Slosh
idl'ST W3Sf 6/ay f°/ *t0cky Pe°^e- A»  e—l  ^iner  named Khrushchev  raised
tf £kU^a7 ,°   "7^^ ^ a SaWed-°ff f00tbaU halfback.^d Henwood
foo in the second quarter, the
#$Sirds ha,d been unable to
fbount a Sustained attack. Dropp
#ed passes and fumbles, partly
due to the 'heavy fog' about,
had cut short all Bird threats.
Then Henwood, last year's quar-
terbackj this year converted to
half .grabbed.a screen pass from
qjuarterback Jon Bilorris, waited
for his blocking, and easily beat
the Cavalier safety.
In the; third quarter, Henwood
.apa|h^scored, when he took a
p«tctij>ut from Morris,  and bi|l-
lftedj: 60 yards down the  right
sidelinesifor the major.
A safety touch in the fourth
quarter, and two converts by
eadbave Barker ended the UBC
scoring.
The crowd of 600 saw an extremely one-sided game. Seattle's unimaginative spread formation got nowhere. Their deepest penetration was to the Bird
43, and that came on a fumble
recovery. The huge Bird line did
not help either. This wall, which
averages 220 pounds, made Seattle's up-the-middle attempts look
humorous.
UBC standouts were Henwood, Bruce Allardyce (who ran
the ends very well), quarterback
Morris, and the starting line-
Argue, Beck, Hoar, Crawford,
and Turpin.
The Birds play this Saturday
at Saskatoon, against a Saskatchewan team which was swamped recently by Alberta. Their
opening home game of the Western Intercollegiate Conference
wil l'be on October 3, when they
meet the Alberta Golden Bears.
A pep meet will be held on Friday, Oct. 2, which would indicate that this game is the Big
One. The surest way to shaft the
new conference would be to not
attend. Get the angle? Kommen
Sie!
Men Wanted
The Public Relations staff for
Men's Athletics . is looking for
men. If you are between 4 and
75, with play-school graduation
or better, contact your nearest
P.R.O. recruiter.
He will, in his Friendly Way,
tell  you   the  work  is   light.   It
involves attending UBC sporting
events, exclusive of quaffing contests at the Cavalier Room, and
filling in a short sheet with pertinent facts. You will meet the
stalwart sportsman of UBC, and
will    be    rendering    invaluable
help  to  Men's Athletics. Please
apply, even if your only connection with sports is Athlete's Foot.
Leave your name at the Ath
Jetic  Office in the War Memo
Hal Gym, or contact
Len Cox—TR 6-4928 or
Stu Robson—AL 0018-R.
Your name   will  then be returned, unblemished, at our con-
♦enience.
WRESTLING
If your mother is the type
who regularly attends Exhibition Garden wrestling with hatpin at the ready, you would be
well advised to join the UBC
wrestling team.
But family references are not
necessary, so if you're a boy,
and are interested in learning
amateur wrestling and in trying
out for the team, you should attend the organization meeting in
Room 211 of the War Memorial
Gym, on Thursday, Sept. 24, at
12:30.
UBC will be entering a full
wrestling schedule, including a
Western Intercollegiate Wrestling Tournament at Edmonton on
March 5, 1960.
Paul Kemeth is the new
coach. He is chairman of the
AAU Wrestling Committee and
v/as coach of Canada's 1958
B.E.G.   Wrestling team.
West Point Printer
And Stationers
Brief   Casjss  —   Slide   Rules
Drafting Instruments
4514 W. 10th AL 1245
ROWERS
RECRUITS
Long-distance swimming has
gone the way of six-day bicycle
races and swallowing goldfish,
and new methods are needed to
give college men pleasure. Thus,
rawing was concocted, something which has. greatly added
to the UBC's prestige. Our
crews have long been Canada's
best,'' and this year is no different. Blue arid Gold oarsmen, to
coin a ridiculous image, this
year walked off with a second-
place medal at the Pan-American games. The experience
gained in Chicago (in rowing)
will make our rowers even
tougher.
All members of the "silver
medal" eight will be returning,
so newcomers trying for a seat
are going to have to work hard.
During registration, oarsmen
have been picking out big,
strong-looking young freshmen,
in an attempt to get new blood.
All this is not as sanguine as it
sounds: Captain Bud Stapelton
merely hopes to have three boats,
Freshmen, J.V., and Varsity. If
this can be accomplished, UBC
would row in the I.R.A., the biggest rowing event in the U.S.A.
UBC would be the first Canadian crew ever to compete in
the I.R.A., which is not the
Irish Republican Army.
First meeting is on Thursday,
October 1, in Physics 200, at
12:30. There the training schedule for this^ year will be discussed.
If you don't want to join that |
long lineup for required P.E.
classes why not sign up for an
Extra-mural team and get out of
those two periods of prescribed
physical jerks?
Interested in Archery, Basketball (Boy's or Girl's Rules),
Bowling, Badminton, Curling,
Grass Hockey, Gymnastics, Golf,
Figure Skating, Swi mming
(Spe'ed or Synchronized), Skiing,
Track and Field, Tennis or Volleyball? If so, we need you.
Surely there is a sport here:
that you have played in High
School Or . on auother college
team. Sign-up sheets are' posted
in the Women's Gym and, for
residents, in the Dorms.
Practice   times   will   be   announced   next   week, so   watch
these sports  pages for  further
information.
Golf
First meeting of the Women's
Golf team will be today at 12:30
in the Women's Gym. All those
who signed up and other interested "link ladies" are welcome
to attend.
Tennis
More Tennis players are still
needed lor the first event of the
Western Canadian Athletic Union. If you want to play all winter keep.that racket put. Interested players Gall kathy Stahr-
man at TR 9-1025.
Curling
W.A.A. Curling will again be
held at the Pacific Curling Rink
on Fourth Avenue.
Practice   times   available   to
team members are Tuesday,
Wednesday and Thursday 8:30-
12:45; Tuesday 3:15-5:15; Wednesday 1:00-5:00. Students interested are not expected to play
at all times mentioned unless
they don't wish to graduate.
To curl sign up at one of the
W.A.A. sheets in the Women's
Gym. Manager Ruth Ann Senz
will contact you concerning
team meets. '   .-,
Grass Hockey '
First practice for all inspiring
stick handlers will be today,
Tuesday, at 3:30 on the field
behi^^wc^.:Hail. All girls .yjgtg
sighed up are urged to attend^'
with or without strip, to hear
about this year's hockey programme.
UBYSSpY
Do you think that you can
write a better newspaper story
than this? All first year English
studenls must know how ta
write ., . We need Women sports
writers to cover all Extramural!
and Intramural sport activities.
Interested? Get hold of_W.A.D.
President Marg McLaveman (AL,
0454-R) or P.R.O. Ann Pickard
(AL 0974-M)  today.
Another issue of this paper
comes out later this we« k and'
we must have writers.
University Hill Unittd
Church
Worshipping    in     Union    College
Chapel
5390 Chancellor Blvd.
Minister —  Rev.   W.   Buckingham
Services   t1:00   a.m.   Sunday
TOTEM  SHOES
4550 W. 10th Ave.—AL. 2540
VANCOUVER 8, B.C.
problem!
No "just-off" colours but
guaranteed colour harmony !«6o, for tea at
the Dean's or cokes at the corner it's
the new Kitten matching skirt and
sweater in heather-mix lambswool. , .
soft as a handful of Scottish mist
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THE SWEATER: Wing-neck,
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THE SKIRT: slim and half-lined,
sizes 8 to 20, price $17.95.
Look for the name/@&ZfO THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 22, 195§
Dr.   Myers   New   Dean
Of   Applied   Science
Professor David M. Myers, past head of the department
of electrical engineering at the university of Sydney, in Sydney,
Australia, has been appointed dean of the faculty of applied
science at the. University of British Columbia.
Announcing the appointment,
President MacKenzie said that
Professor Myers woud take up
his duties on January 1, 1960.
He succeeds Dr. Henry C. Gunning, who resigned as head of
the faculty last year to become
a consulting geologist for the
Anglo-American Corporation in
Africa.
: Professor Myers has been P.
N. Russell professor of electrical
engineering at the University of
Sydney since 1'949, and was
elected dean of the faculty of
engineering there in 1955.
Dr. Myers' research interest is
in the field of mathematical
computing^ and jits application
to engineering problems. He has
been responsible for the development of computing devices for
solving differential equations,
and since joining the university
of Sydney he has headed a team
of scientists developing digital
and electronic computers. This
research has culminated in the
construction of a general purpose transistorized computer
which is at present undergoing
performance tests in Australia.
Professor Myers, who was
born in Australia in 1911, received his B.Sc. from the university of. Sydney in 1931. Two
years later he received the degree of Bachelor of Engineering,
graduating with first class honors, and winning the university
medal in electrical engineering,
from 1933 until 1936, he did
post-graduate work at Manchester and Oxford, England. In 1938
he received his doctorate, for
contributions in the field of
computing.
Canadian
Found At
By LORNiE BOLTON
(Delegate to NFCUS Seminar at
the University of Montreal)
As a delegate to the Second
Annual NFCUS Seminar held
in Montreal from August 30 to
September 5, I went with mixed
feelings and preconceived ideas
as to .the form and outcome of
such a Conference. From such a
suggestive theme as "The Influence of the various cultures on
Canadian Development", I expected to be very much out of
place sitting around a huge oak
table in a dimly lit room discussing, with bearded, pipe-
smoking theorists, philosophical
aspects ah<f probles Of Canadian-
culture.
STRONG DELEGATIONS '
However, such was not the
case. We met in an atmosphere
that could only have been obtained in French Canada — an
atmosphere of old and new, rich
in history and optimistic of .the
future; an atmosphere strengthened by dynamic delegations
from Canadian universities, interested   in   gaining   a   greater
If you think this is great . . .
You haven't heard true Stereo
Hear the true difference between plain monaural reproduction and true
stereophonic "listening in depth." You'll thrill to the excitement of enriched,
undistorted sound from stereophonic records. HBC's expert and courteous
staff will be happy to demonstrate a set and discuss your own requirements.
Come in now and see the complete selection of Electrohome, Fleetwood,
Philips, and RCA Victor precision engineered stereo sets.
HBC Music and Records, sixth floor
INCORPORATED 2»   MAY 4«TO
Nationalism
NFCUS Seminar
knowledge of the contributions
that the various ethnic and geographical groups have or could
make to the social, economic
political and artistic life of Canada.
From the outset, the Conference was a study in comparisons
and contrasts—a study of diversity yet unity. The delegates
came from all parts of Canada,
as far east as Newtfoundland and
as far west as Victoria.
CROSS SECTION
Culturally (I use the term in
its broadest sense), they represented a cross section of Canadian University life. One delegate had been in Canada but
two years having come from
•England;, another was a girl
from the Far East whose father
worked for the United Nations.
Her home had been in many
countries including Canada.
Some were brought up on the
soil—on the small farms of B.C.,
Ontario, Quebec and the Mari-
times, and on the large open
spaces of the Prairies. Still
others came with a city background, from Montreal, ToroDtt,
Vancouver, and Quebec. Tfceir
outlook on life, their idea- and
education srere all different, reflecting the influence of the particular part of the country from
which they came.
TOPICS STIMULATING
The lecturers and their topics
were equally diverse and stimulating. The agenda took us from
the present to the past to the
future; from the general to the
specific and back again to the
general. Saul Hayes of the Cana
dian Jewish Congress set the
tone of the Seminar by delivering a realistic picture of Cana-?
dian Unity today. Our basic differences still persist. "We are
bilingual, but we are not; we
have a bicultural state, but we
have not; we have a national
flag, but we have not; we have
a national anthem—perhaps two
—but we haven't; we have a
Canadian citizenship of sorts."
With this in mind and with the
value of hindsight, we pursued
the events which precipitated the
relationship existing today between the French Canadians and
"les anglais".      . ;
Regional aspects of a National.
.Culture came under close" scrutiny by Dr., Laidlaw of the Cooperative Union of Canada, and
Lister Sine1 air. More-specific' and
detailed reports on the Aeadians,
the Indians, Newfoundlanders
and oth.«r Ethnic groups also received consideration.
GREATER ^
UNDERSTANDING
F'or those of us from B.C. we
came to fully realize just how
far away we are from the centre
of Canada and just how little
we knowi about the Maritimes
and French Canada, even about
the "gqings on" in Ottawa. Also
how different we are in B.C.
from other regions in outlook,
ideas, dress and ideals. More
specifically, we left the Seminar
with a greater understanding of
the British influence in Ontario,
B.C. and the Maritimes, of the
European influence in the Prafc
rjies, of. the French influence in
Acadia, and of the religious influence on the life of the French
Canadian.
Bachelor of Music
More than SO courses will be
added to the music curriculum
over the next 5 years under the
new bachelor of music degree.
Five new teachers have been
added to teach the new program,
bringing the staff total to 12.
The program provides for an
honors course in music for the
B.A. degree and a major in music
for the B.Ed, degree.
Majors will be offered in
general music, music history and
literature, composition, orchestral instruments and voice.
A major in piano will be offered
in 1960.
Purpose of these majors is to
train students as directors of
orchestras, bands and choruses
in public schools and to provide
the basis for further study in
such fields as musicology or
voice, stated Prof. G. Welton
Marquis, head of the department.
The department will organize
a symphony and chamber orchestra, a concert band, string,
woodwind, brass and piano ensembles for regular free public
performances.
A "Collegium Musicum" for
faculty and students will also
be established.
The music department will be
a part of the new $1,500,000 fine
art centre now being planned
by the U.B.C. architects. The
music building will contain a
large rehearsal hall, numerous
practice and teaching classrooms and studios.
FOR SALE
Remington Standard
TYPEWRITER
In Good Condition
$25.00
ALma  1299-Y
About 1000 friends of the
great Doctor Schweitzer,
now vacationing in Europe,
will meet at noon today in
the Auditorium to discuss
plans for a Friends of Doctor Schweitzer Campus
Club, Project No. 1.
Bring him here before his
return to Africa.
JACK WEBSTER
Chairman
SEE YOU!
ROOMS FOR RENT
Pleasant room in modern
home.  Kitchen privileges
$35.00
PHONE MRS. PEDERSEN
ALma 1299-Y
FOR RENT
New  & Furnished
Self  Contained  Suite
For   2   (possibly  3)  girls
PHONE AM 6-6061

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