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The Ubyssey Nov 5, 1959

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 D
-.Ci
-.- i C U    ••-■ /-. ,
^01/5   d
TODAY
(/8 YSSEY
VOL. LXVII
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 1959
No. 21
Homecoming Rally
In Armories at Noon
Kings IV Will Headline
Two Hour Show Today
The Homecoming Pep Rally, featuring the King's IV, goes
on today at 12t30 in the Ajrmourles. Voting for the Homecoming Queen will take place at the Rally. The football team
and coach Frank Gnup will be introduced. The programme
includes:
The Queen will be crowned by
Dean E.D. MacPhee at the Friday night Homecoming Ball.
Admittance to the Pep Rally
is two bits, or four for one
dollar.
THERE WILL ALSO BE A
POLLING BOOTH FOR THE
QUEEN CONTEST IN BROCK
HALL UNTIL 5:00 P.M.
• The King's IV
- • The Booster Band,   Majorettes, and Cheerleaders.
• Professor Al Cox, folk
singer and guitarist.
• Presentation of Homecom-
in Queen Candidates.
The Booster Band, Majorettes
and Cheerleaders will put on a
top-notch twenty minute show of
music, cheers, twirling, and
dance routines.
Thirteen outstanding campus
cuties are candidates for Homecoming Queen. Of these, one will
be crowned Queen of Homecoming, and the two runners up will
be Homecoming Princesses.
I'fween classes   I
BIOLOGY CLUB
WILL DISCUSS
BIOLOGY CLUB
The Biology Club will meet
for a discussion period on Friday at 12:30 in Biol. Sc. 2000.
Everyone is welcome. Come
along and defend your ideas.
PHYSICS SOCIETY
The Physics Society sponsors
a film on "High Speed Flight"
at noon today in P. 200.
v    ^p     •*•
INDIA STUDENTS'
ASSOCIATION
There will be a general meeting at 7:30 p.m. tonight in Bu.
222 at which elections will be
held.   New members welcomed.
V V V
ALPHA OMEGA SOCIETY
All Ukrainian students please
attend a general meeting at noon
on Friday in Bu. 216.
•J* *J* •!•
NFCUS PHOTOGRAPHY
CONTEST
Enter the Canadian University
Photography Contest. Money,
prizes. Black and white enlargements or color slides accepted
until Nov. 30. Rules and entry
forms available in NFCUS Office, Rm. 165, Brock.
PHRATERES
There will be an All-Phi
meeting Friday at 12430 in Bu.
106.  All attend,
v        *r        *X*,,
CAMERA CLUB
There will be a meeting in Bu.
203 "on Friday af iftodh at which
John Davidson will speak on
"Composition  in  Photographs."
(Continued on Page 8)
%,«,
"!**
DANCERS  NEEDED
Attractive, talented people
of "all sapes - and sizes are
needed by Marcia Rowland,
choreographer for this year's
Mardi Gras.
Chorus line tryouts will be
held on Nov. 10 in the Brock
Hall Music Room.
Girls: from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m.
Boys: from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m.
Call Marcia Rowland at AL.
3861-M or Cam Dagg at AL.
0111-R for information.
KING'S IV
4,750 Sign
Petition
"Over 4,750 signatures for the
petition on behalf of the Hungarian students have been obtained so far," announced A.M.S.
President Meekison on Wednesday.
"The petition is well supported
in the East, and we expect a total
of about forty thousand signatures from Canadian students,"
said Meekison.
University of Toronto is passing the petition around now.
McMaster, Queen's, Western, and
Ontario Agricultural College
have pledged their support. Universities of Alberta and Saskatchewan will start collecting
Signatures within the next few
days, and NFCUS headquarters
(Continued on Page 10)
NFCUS News:
Gerlin Coming,
Contest Soon
An NFCUS commitee meeting held Monday made the following announcement:
Jacques Gerlin, NFCUS chairman, will visit UBC from Nov. 14
-17.
On Nov. 16, he will take part
in a panel discussion on the topic
"Should Canadian University
Students Dabble in International
Affairs?"
; The Special Representative
of the U;N. High Commisioner
for Refugees, Peter Casson, will
address students on Nov. 13 on
the topic of World Refugee
Year.
Entry forms for the Fourth
Annual Photography Contest
are available in Room 165,
Brock Extension.
Money prizes will be given in
two categories; black and white
eight inch by ten inch enlargements and colour slides.
Entries close Nov. 30.
A Canadian University Song
Book is being prepared by Mc-
Mjaster University. Contributions should be taken to the
NFCUS Office, Room 165, Brock
Extension.
PROFESSOR STEWART JAMIESON is shown here
speaking on the future of socialist thought. He is presently, working on a book with several prominent Canadian socialists, in which they are analyzing present - day
society and showing how the CCF. must redirect its
thinking in conjunction with arising problems in order to
make it more meaningful. ,
W. CUP CONFERENCE
PLEDGES SUPPORT
Representatives .at the annual
Western Canadian University
Press Conference pledged their
support to the "Save Hungarian
Teenagers" campaign by sending a telegram to Premier
Khrushchev and Prime Minister
Diefenbaker, protesting the execution of the students.
University Press spokesmen
from Canada's four Western
Universities, representing over
28,000 students, met last weekend in Edmonton to discuss the
possibility of better inter-varsity
co-operation and the extension
of international university news.
Individual newspapers were
asked to research oh information
sent in from the CUP central
office in Ottawa.
A motion was passed to investigate discrimination against
West Indies Students in housing,
fraternities, public places and
student offices.
Discrimination of this sort has
been found at Chalton University in Hamilton.
The possibility of Ham Radio
service instead of telegrams between the four Western Campi
is being probed.
The use of Telex, a new wire
service is also being investigated.
Doug Parkinson, National
President of CUP asked the students to take a stand condemning the new Ottawa Student
Mianual.
The manual, published this
fall by the University administration, states rules of conduct
for all students.
A motion was passed to exchange sports news and pictures
which have inter-varsity interest.
The advance sports coverage
is also to be expanded.
It was suggested that the university press encourage high
school interest in university afr
fairs by sending copies of their
paper to the provincial schools.
CUP has been asked to work
in conjunction with NFCUS in
setting up a national literary
magazine to be published quarterly.
The conference representatives were also asked to look,
into their provincial educational
systems. " '
Features on Czechoslovakia
and Poland will soon be coming
over CUP wires.
British Debaters To
Attend Student Forum
The Student Forum will be
held at 12:30 Monday in Bu. 104
instead of November 12 as previously stated.
This Forum will feature the
two distinguished British debaters, Roger Tilbury and James
Gordon, who will be coming to
UBC on Saturday.
The resolution: "Resolved
that Fraternities and Sororities
are a very good thing" will be
upheld by Laurie Moss. .'
When the debaters have con«
eluded their speeches, the resolution will be thrown open to
the floor for discussion. PAGE TWO
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 5
THE UBYSSEY
Authorized as second* class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa
MEMBER CANADIAN   UNIVERSITY  PRESS
Published three times a week throughout the University year in Vancouver
by the Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society,. University of B.C.
Editorial opinions expressed are those of the Editorial Board of The Ubyssey
and not necessarily those of the Alma Mater Society or the University of B.C.
Telephones: Editorial offices, AL. 4404; Locals 12, 13 ana 14;
Business offices, AL. -4404; Local 15
Editor-in-Chief: R. Kerry White
Associate Editor .. Elaine Bissett
Acting News Editor  Bob Hendrickson
C.U.P. Editor Irene Frazer
' Club's Editor ..__ Wendy Barr
Features Editor Sandra Scott
Head Photographer Colin Landie
Senior Editor: Irene Frazer
r Reporters and Desk:
Diane Greenall, Derek Allen, Gail Merilees, Carolyn
Blackall, Fred Fletcher, John Russell.
OUTLOOK
W.U,SG. Evaluated
■-   '■-       v.--    •'.•■'    ">■■-i        f ■   '■» •:'::- ; -s ?:.',* i %*■%*>*
The objectives of World University  Service,  with headquarters in Geneva, are to develop inter-university contacts,
co-operation and understanding.
Last weekend at the Western Regional Canadian University Press conference at the University of Alberta, two of the
Ubyssey's delegates caught a glimpse of an energetic and efficient W.U.S.C. committee at work. In comparison, UBC's
committee is virtually impotent. ;...,...
Students at UBC barely realize the existence of W.U.S.C.
They have a hazy idea that part of their AMS iees goes to <this
organization, they are aware*of exchange students^ and monthly
talks.
But the UBC committee of W.U.S.C. does not justify its
existence because it does not reach the individual student.
Each UBC student pays $1 per year to W.U.S.C. With this
money, more than $10,000, the committee performs five activities.
The committee gives a yearly donation of $750 to W.U.S.C.
national office for expenses, a yearly donation of $1500 to the
International Program of Action, which assists universities in
Reed, supports five exchange students, gives receptions for exchange students and Canada Council scholars and sponsors
monthly talks on current events.
If the UBC committee believes that they are accomplishing
with spirit the true objectives of World University Service, they
are mistaken. ■
The W.U.S.C. committee at U of A serves as good comparison. Students at U of A support W.U.S.C. and are aware
of its existence because it is active and dedicated to its objectives. The committee at Alberta is able to operate from the
profits of the W.U.S. Treasure "Van", a' display-of handicrafts
from almost every culture in the world. About $5,000 was made
at U of A last year from this Van. Twenty-five percent of the
money earned goes to W.U.S.C. national office and what is
left is sent back to the artisans of the various countries.
A compulsory student levy does not exist at U of A, but
Students' Council this fall authorized a $.15 levy per student
from their fees. Four exchange students are attending U of A
this year. ;^..;•;.
University of Alberta W.U.S.C. activities are not limited
to the organizations of Treasure Van. During October, for instance, more than 150 student Canvassers raised more than
$2500 for a "Health for Bong Kong" drive. The money will be
sent directly to Hong Kong, to be used to establish health
services.
We of the Ubyssey suggest to the UBC committee that
they innovate activities closely relating to the national committee's objectives,  or consider dissolving the present  group
entirely.
S. M. S.
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
The Editor,
' The Ubyssey.
-Dear Sir: j
On making  a  quick survey
"'"of Filmsoc's program, we have !
'found that out of 17 scheduled j
showings,  six have been  can- ►
'celled   and   three   have   been
''substituted.
The   Tuesday    noon    series
i which, in the past, have been
very succesful were cancelled
completely.
Of the few presentations
'which this club has managed
t& rjita, Wehavebeen subjected j
to' aji impressive array "ef in-'
competence,"-' ranging from'.
switching reels to * "complete*
breakdown in the middle of a
showing.
Furthermore the sound has
been indistinguishable for a
five-week period; has anyone
thought of having the amplifier checked?
If Filmsoc is unable to satisfy its audience, direct competition should be allowed.
Why has the AMS permitted
this bungling to go on under
their auspices? Hpw long can
ijilm Society run on past performance?,;,
.    John F,-Watson;:
Engineering I.'
Bill Shellard,
: -V    Arts IV.
The other day one of a group
of Russian economists visiting
this country made an unconscious admission of the poverty
of the Russian economic system
as compared with ours. He mentioned how unnecessary it is in
Russia to use the advanced advertising techniques employed
here.
In his country, he said, the
government is in charge of advertising, and all that is necessary if the people are to be told
about the availability of a new
product is to make a simple '
announcement in the news-
papers, with a list of stores
where the article may be purchased. Special display methods, special slogans, titillating
jingles, competitive claims,
all tthese  are  unnecssary.
None of these American advertising devices, in themselves,
are going to be discussed here,
either pro or con. This newspaper carries advertising, and
obviously its employees, including the undersigned, look
favourably upon it. But that is
not the point of why advertising
of the kind that hard-headed
U.S. businessmen buy eagerly,
is useless in Russia.
The basic difference that lies
behind this seemingly superficial difference is that goods
are abundant here and are in
short supply there. The Rus-
siansdon't need to advertise
most goods for somewhat the
came reason one dosn't need to
advertise food to the hungry.
In contrast, our business people
feel they need to advertise their
goods to the public so that
they'll get their share of the
market, against the competition
of other businessmen who
are simultaneously advertising
their wares.
Not only is the above true,
but it is probable that shortage
of goods, at least in a relative
sense, are inherent in the system of government ownership
of all means of production. In
other words, though the Russians, led by Khrushchev, now
boast their system is rr.ore efficient than capitalism, it probably is less efficient for the satisfaction of human desures. And
though they predict they are
going to catch up with and surpass America, the probability
is that—except through warlike
conquest, or through our own
loss  of  dynamism  from  other
causes—they can only come
close to catching up and can
never surpass us in all-around
economic measurements.
These are broad claims, of
course. Though they rest on
logic they can't be proven, and
they also seem to fly in the face
of some recent events such as
the moon shots. Proof of scientific kind is impossible in these
situations. Such proof depends
on the predictability of results
from controlled world experiments. That can be done in the
world of physics, but in economics experiments can't be
controlled, because there is no
way of limiting the factors that
might affect the results. A war
abroad, or a new invention, or a
cataclysm of nature can change
things, as for instance when the
Middle Ages plagues raised the
rates of pay and improved the
working conditions of the commoners who survived.
The facts which seem to
throw doubt on the efficiency
of Capitalism are two. One is
that in recent years the Russian
economic system seems to hSve
grown faster than ours, at least
in such major products as steel,
coal and oil. The other is that
Russia is undoubtedly ahead of
us in rocket power.
However, comparative rates
of growth of the two economic
systems depend on which periods are used. Since World War
II the Russian rate has been
more rapid, but so has Western
Germany's, under a system just
as free as ours. If the U.S. and
Russian systems are compared
over a much longer term, studies made under the auspices
of the National Bureau of Economic Research show, our rate
of growth right up to date looks
just as rapid if not more rapid.
*     *     *
As for Russia's greater gain
in rocket power, that has nothing to do with Communism
or Capitalism. It was a decision
within the Russian government
that started that country on
the road to better long-range,
powerful rockets and it was a
d e c i s i o n in our Government
that prevented an equally early
start. The few men who had
the decision to make in Russia
were as a group more alert to
the propaganda and military
advantages than the roughly
equal number of men who took
part in the corresponding deci
sion here. The competition on
this score has been between
governments and not between
economic systems, at least so
far.
But even outside this field,
in the purely economic field,
true competition between the
two systems under anything
resembling laboratory conditions has not existed and does
not exist. The reason is that as
long as the Russians are catching up they have the enormous
advantage of being able to ccpy.
Not only can they copy -autos,
or tractors, or machine tools,
or other individual items of
machinery, but they are also
able to copy methods, ideas and
totally new products. To forge
ahead or stay ahead requires
invention. To catch up requires
only imitation.
*     *     *    .
And the great advantage of
free Capitalism over Communism is that it releases the inventive abilities of millions of
human beings. Imagine what
would have happened to Henry
Ford if he had had to await
Government approval before
starting to produce automobiles.
Imagine the opposition his
ideas would haVe aroused
among bureaucratic committees asked to review the proposals. Consider the probable
result of polling a cross-section
of government people on the
question of permitting waste of
any of the nation's resources
on such foolishness as a horseless carriage.
Even if the decision had been
made to go ahead, the purpose
would surely have been some
largely military one, with the
thought of mass production or
commercial production wholly
left out—just as is the case
with today's space experiments.
In contrast, what gave the auto
industry its start and its growth
was the hope of making a product that would sell commercially.
If the Russians ever do catch
up oh a fully comparable basis,
which is doubtful for the fore"*
going reasons, they'll probably
soon fall back again unless they
copy our system itself, as well
as i*s products.
—GEORGE SHEA.
Oct. 26, 1956.
The Wall Street Journal.
Dr. Norman A. ,M. MacKenzie,
President,
University of British Columbia,
Vancouver 8, B.C.
Dear Mr. MacKenzie:
The staff and students of the
University of British Columbia
have once again demonstrated
their responsibility as good
citizens in a most practical
way.
At the Blood Donor Clinics
held in the University Armouries from 5th to 9th of October, 1959, there were 1,747
members of the staff and student body who presented themselves to donate blood, in order
that those less fortunate may
be given a better chance of
survival, and to live a useful
and productive life.
The rejections were fewer in
number than at previous clinics. The net collections were
1,691, an increase of some 168
over the October, 1958 clinics.
;:,. ,The>; serum donors were
again'contacted, and 109 received injections, Of- this group
102 dohateW'biood, resulting in
a saving of some thousands of
dollars in the production of
testing serums.
We are most grateful for the
CQ-operation of the staff of
UBC, student committees, and
especially thankful to those
who gave so generously during
a period when so many demands are being made on their
time and energies.
Yours very truly,
W. H. Chisholm,
Blood Donor Panel Organizer,
Vancouver Branch,
Canadian Red Cross Society.
letter to the Editor of The
Ubyssey with the hope that he
will print it so that all those
who gave blood will know of
the success of the clinics.
With all good wishes,1
Yours sincerely,
N. A. M. MacKenzie.
Dear Mr. Chisholm:
Thank you for the very kind
things you have to say in your
letter of October 19th about
the Blood Donor Clinics held in
the University Armouries during the week of October 5th. I
am very pleased to learn that
the response was so immediate
and enthusiastic; on the part of
the staff and; the student -.foody.
rI amisendlng "a copy* 6t your
The Editor,
The Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:
Due to the uncontrollable
actions of some of the upper-
classmen on campus, we have
consistently been losing campaign pictures of our candidate
for Homecoming Queen, Miss
Fern Owen. Because of this
psychological need of some of
these upper classmen, we regret to inform the student body
that from now on we will be
unable to replace any more of
these missing pictures.. Respecting their judgment of Beauty.
Yours sincerely, ;,
Frosh Campaign Committee.
■■<'.  '■*>.:' 4-' HOMECOMING
EDITION
VOL. LXVII
THE UBYSSEY
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 1959
HOMECOMING'
EDITION
No. 21
The Honorable James Sinclair was presented the Great Trekker Award by Peter Meekison,
President of the Student Council, and John  Goodwin, Chairman of the Homecoming Committee. —UBC Photo Service
Sinclair Receives
Trekker' Award
The Honourable James Sinclair has been named as 1959's
Great Trekker. The award was made by AMS President Peter
Meekison Monday afternoon.
',""" *^'T wa£mdst surprised"  (to get the award)  said Mr.'Sinclair, "bait, no}nearly as surprised as most of my classmates
: of; *28 would be."     " —_	
The Great Trekker award was
inaugurated by the Students'
Council in 1950, to honor an
alumna or alumnus who has
achieved eminence in his or her
chosen field, made a worthy and
special contribution to his community, and evidenced a keen
and continued interest in his
Alma Mater.
Great Trek of '22
The award was named after
the Great Trek of 1922, when
the student body, disgusted with
the university facilities in the
•"Fairview Shacks", trekked to
the Point Grey campus to draw
government attention to the situation. Several buildings had
been started in 1914, but construction was halted during
World War I and had never been
resumed. The shells of the buildings had stood untouched for
eight years.
During the trek, the students
each picked up a rock and piled
it in front of the uncompleted
Chemistry Building. On this site
the rocks Were later fashioned
into a cairn.
Highest Award
The Great Trekker Award is
the highest award the students
can bestow upon an alumnus of
the University.
■Graduate of '28
Mr. Sinclair graduated from
UBC in 1928 with his B.Sc.
While at UBC he was Editor of
the Ubyssey and President of the
Men's Athletic Committee.    He
was a Rhodes Scholar and attended Oxford from 1928-31.
During his career he was or:
ganizer of the Liberal Party in
B.C.; Secretary to the B.C. Minister of Mines in 1939, and Member of Parliament for Coast-Cap-
ilano from 1940 to 1958.
Off io War
The advent of World War -II
interrupted his political career.
He served with the RCAF in
Libya, Malta and Italy, and rose
to the rank of Squadron Leader.
In 1948 he became Parliamentary assistant to the Minister of
Finance, and became Federal
Minister of Fisheries in 1949. He
held the latter post until  1958.
At present Mr. Sinclair is
President and Chief Executive
Officer of the Fisheries Association of B.C.
Member-ai-Largs
As an alumnus, he is a Mem-
ber-at-Large on the Board of
Management, member of the annual Fund-Raising Committee, a
member of the committee studying Financing, and is concerned
with Fisheries Research at UBC.
The tremendous contributions
the Honourable Mr. Sinclair has
made to the University, to the
Fisheries Department, and to
Canada, make him very deserving of the Great Trekker Award.
Presentation Saturday
Formal presentation of the
award will be made to Mr. Sinclair by Peter Meekison during
halftime at the Homecoming
football game Saturday afternoon.
INSIDE
• p. 5—New Buildings
• p. 9—For Alumni
• p. 6, 7—Queen Candidates
• p. 10—Sports
Judges
Meet
Queens
The annual Homecoming
Queens' tea was held yesterday
afternoon in the Mildred Brock
room in Brock Hall. It was
termed a success by the Queen
candidates, the Student Councillors, and the Homecoming committee members in attendance.
Five judges Were present to
evaluate the faculty represented
queens. They were Mrs. Winni-
fred Mather, Fashion Editor for
the Vancouver Province; Mrs.
Sylvia Krisman, fashion expeft
dealing with teens in Vancouver; Mr. Art Sager, Executive
Secretary of the Alumni Association; Professor Ron Jeffels,
Assistant to the President and in
Romantic Studies; and Mr. Roily
Ford, fashion, glamour, and commercial photographer.
The results' of the judging accounts for 40% of the final standings. The other 60% will be the
results of the student vote. Voting will take place today at the
Pep Rally. For those unable to
attend the Rally, a poll will be
open in Brock Hall from 2:30
to 5:00 p.m.
FOR STUDENTS
Homecoming '59. What does it mean to you? To the students a time of fun and enjoyment. To the Alumni, a time to
enjoy the friendships and spirit of old.
We sincerely believe
that you will enjoy yourself at Homecoming this
year. Another step forward in the way of entertainment is being taken.
Your support will ensure
continued progress in the
years ahead.
Not only is Homecoming a week-end of enjoyment, but it is a time
when we should pause to
evaluate ourselves and
the place of this university in our province and
our nation.
It seems obvious the
provincial gover n m e n t
believes that the public
feels UBC is not important enough to warrant badly
needed funds. It is apparent that our campaign to educate
the citizens of this province of our needs must begin
now. Education of this nature will eventually convince the
public of the serious situation with which we are faced.
We must meet the challenge!
—JOHN GOODWIN, Homecoming Chairman
FOR ALUMS
Many students, as I used to, must be "asking the question,
"What is Homecoming and what can it possibly mean to me?"
Until the last few years, Homecoming has often been a
sort of lame excuse for a big student party on the pretext that
the students were hosting
the returning grads.
There was a vague feeling that perhaps they
owed something to the
old codgers, and besides,
they have all the jobs and
all the money.
These grads who actually turned out to one
of the affairs usually became lost in the general
festivities or became bewildered onlookers. There
was often little, if any,
separate organization for
and by the grads themselves. (!
A healthy change has
taken place in recent
years, and the alums are now taking the lead in their own
programme but working closely with the student Homecoming
Committee to tie all the plans together.
Greater interest in Homecoming is only part of the picture. It is the natural outcome from a greater general interest
that grads have shown in the University. This interest is in
part based on the knowledge that higher education means more
to their own children than ever before. As parents of children
who are:, in many cases, not even in high school yet, they are
interested in accommodation, student orientation, counselling,
curriculum and finances.
Students nearing the end of,'their university courses may.
be saying to themselves that once they get Out of the place
they never want to see it again. This is not an uncommon reaction which may last up to ten years while the graduate is*
getting established. Statistics show that the alum then begins
to take a second look'at his old Alma Mater. After that, the
longer he has been a graduate, the keener becomes his interest. - I
* In welcoming grads back for 1959 Hbmecoming, I wish to?
point out the obvious—the visible results of alumni giving on
the campus. I wish also to point out the less visible, the growing liaison between the Alumni Association and the student
body. Take a good look at them both during your Homecoming visit this year.                      .
—KING HARRIS, Alumni Committee Chairman
Welcome Home, Alumni1. FAGEFOUR
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday; November 5
HOMECOMING EDITION
EDITOR-MICHAEL SONE
Blue Blazer Rep. .. John Goodwin
Comptroller '. "Dredge" Driedger
Janitor       Nick Omelusik
..Entertainment Barbara Bennett, Judy Jack
Masthead Editor ' _ - _ Bill Elliott
Reporters—Bruce Ward, Fran Charkow, Mac Brown,
Jim Banham
Desk—rBart Reemeyer (mahogany)
Spirit Of Homecoming
Homecoming should show to the undergraduate the true
significance of his university education. It is the time when
:the ^graduates return to their Alma Mater to have their class
reunions and to see the ever-changing face of the campus.
'. The purpose of attending a university is to aspire to new
'heights   in educational' experience.   The   graduates   represent
those who have achieved this result.
There is another important significance of Homecoming:
the,people returning to the campus illustrate their continued
interest in the university. The Great Trekker award, is presented to a person who has. greatly supported the university
even after graduation, and who has made valuable contributions to the community in his chosen field. y
'While we are undergraduates, we have the advantages of
gaining knowledge inside ,the classroom and out. Our days on
the campus are rich and rewarding, and are often described
"as the best days of our lives. We should not take an education
for granted, as there are many who are deserving and have
hot had this opportunity.
- Homecoming is the one time of year when the students
should realize that their affiliation and responsibility to the
university does not end with graduation.
—PETER MEEKISON, A.M.S. President
Welcome, 'Alumni!
,.. Every Homecoming year since 1945 has beentbigger and
better .than the one before it. This year, we hope, is no exception., But Homecoming 19.5& is different because it sees the
"new look" firmly established. What in 1958 was an experiment becomes in 1959 part of a tradition.
Last. year something for .the mind" was added to the programme of events. It was so well received that'npw.the intellectual'content balances the athletia-and social. And this is
■as 'it should be because while graduates want fun .they also
".want.vto face up to the challenge of this age "of clatter and
buzz, of gape and gloat". Football excitement and reunion nostalgia do not by themselves satisfy-the alumnus of 1959.
All Homecomings have one thing in common. They are
planned for the purpose of reuniting. the University family
..qf teacher, student and graduate. And there have been few
.times in the past when family solidarity was so badly needed.
tJ,B.C. is a big university. Getting bigger fast—and bigness
preates problems that must and can be solved. There. are demands'for new institutions of higher learning; these may be
encouraged but we must be on guard lest hasty decentralization
'bring a lowering of standards. As always, there is a shortage
■of money for education — sad commentary on the values of
resource-rich Canadians.
Only a united family can solve these and other problems.
Certainly there must be a frank exchange of opinion and constructive criticism, and even then we may not always agree.
*But we must eventually agree oh basic principles and we must
always agree on the importance of higher education. We must
;be prepared, as a family, to fight anti-intellectualism wherever
it appears, remembering that the. best friends of Communism
•are those who talk of "eggheads".
Welcome home, Alumni! We hope you like the cake we've
—ART SAGER, Alumni Director.
Trek
THE CAIRN
(Note: The . Ubyssey requested-members of faculty
and administration who took
part in the Great Trek of
1912 to record their personal
reminiscences of that event.)
By AUBREY F. ROBERTS
Assistant to the President
and Director, UBC
Development Fund
You ask for some personal
reminiscences of the Great
Trek.
I remember that it was a
very crowded day—up at dawn
(or so it seemed) as we had an
early meeting of the campaign
committee with the parade
marshals at'7:00 a.m. Then to
the Georgia Street viaduct
where the parade formed under the direction of Al Buchanan and his marshals.
I had a double-barrelled job
that day, for in addition to my
committee duties I Was covering the event for The Province.
So I wandered in and out
among the floats, bands and
marchers making notes for my
story. When the parade started
to move off at 10:00 a.m. I
hustled over to the Province
office and wrote my story.
By the time the parade had
reached Victory Square — it
went along Main, Hastings and
Granville to Davie—I was able
to join the crowds on Hastings
Street and listen to the public
reaction, which was good-natured and friendly.
The parade disbanded at
Granville and Davie and we
boarded a fleet of street cars
for the ride to Tenth and Sasa-
mat. It was a noisy trip, with
" songs and yells and banners
flying out the windows.
At Tenth and Sasamat we
formed by faculties and classes,
led by the Varsity Band and
cheer leaders. Each class carried a banner with varying
slogans—"Point Grey or Bust,"
"We're Packed—Let's Move,"
"United But CrowdedV" etc. I
remember that we started off
quite briskly but arrived at the
main mall rather less smartly.
Here we gathered before the
steel skeleton of the Arts Building (now Chemistry), gave our
yells, sang some songs, and
listened to the speeches.
After forming a big UBC on
the ground for the newsreel
camera—I had enlisted the interest of three news reel companies—we swarmed onto the
steel girders and displayed our
signs to best advantage.
As a final gesture we picked
up stones of all sizes and car:
ried them to the cairn which
had  been started in outline  a
few days before.
I should point out once more
that the trek was only a small
part of the campaign though
perhaps its most dramatic
event.
.We didn't call it a trek in
those days — it was the "pilgrimage" to Point Grey and it
was the climax of University
Week which in turn was the
culmination of our long campaign. Incidentally, I wish I'd '
thought of calling it the Trek
—it would have given a lift to
my story and been a help to
the headline writer.
The campaign committee
was' formed in the . spring of
1922 and worked all through
the summer circulating a petition urging the government to
action. Every student took
home copies of the petition and
canvassed his home town.
When UBC opened, the campaign tempo stepped up—we
had a house-to-house canvass
in Vancouver, speeches in all
the movie theatres and to all
the service clubs. Everyone
heard about UBC and its needs.
I was asked to organize a
press bureau to serve the
dailies and weeklies of British
Columbia as well as the Vancouver newspapers. There was
one radio station in Vancouver
then—CKCD—and we received
enthusiastic help from it.
The parade and the pilgrimage climaxed University Week
and a delegation of student
leaders—A. E. Richards, president of the Students' Council;
J. A. Grant, campaign chairman; J. V. Clyne and Percy
Barr waited on Premier John
Oliver to present the petitions
—56,000 in bundles which were
later carried into the legislature by the pages and placed
before the Speaker. The legislature adjourned to the members room where Ab Richards
and Jack Grant made impressive presentations.
One week later the premier
announced that work would be
resumed on the Point Grey site
and $1,500,000 voted immediately to start construction.
PROFESSOR ALLAN H.
FlNLAY (Science '24)
I had two special jobs in connection with the Great Trek.
Jack Grant and I moved the
resolution which authorized
the Students' Council to organize the Publicity Campaign.
This was at the spring meeting
of the Alma Mater Society.
After the campaign was under
way W. H. Powell and I sur
veyed the Point Grey site to
determine the placing of the
Cairn. The^frame of the cairn
was set up a few days before
the parade and the student
marchers tossed their stones
into the opening. The large
rocks for the cairn had been
moved to the site by student
work parties before the trek.
Angus MacRitchie, a stone
mason, completed the construction afterwards.
DEAN WALTER H. GAGE
(Arts '25)
I was just starting my second
year in arts when the trek took
place. During University Week
our class undertook a house-
to-house canvass of the Grand-
view district to obtain signatures for the petition. Then we
marched in the parade—I was
lucky and rode on the '25 float
—through downtown streets
and later meandered along the
wagon road which led to the
campus. It was quite a day.
We didn't get any studying
done that first week of the
1922-23 term.
DEAN ,BLYTHE EAGLES
(Arts *22)
I had left for Toronto for
post-graduate study when the
Trek took place but I participated in the scramble for signatures which went on all summer in 1922. The Aggies had
several meetings before, during
and after exams to prepare for
the campaign. I was proud of
the Agriculture float in the
parade even though I wasn't
there to see it.
HON. J. V. CLYNE (Arts '23)
I will never forget the visit
our delegation made to Victoria
to meet Premier John Oliver
and members of his cabinet.
We were presented by Hon. Ian
MacKenzie, then MLA for Vancouver. We spoke to the cabinet, and later to all the MLA's
in the members room. Afterwards we watched from the
gallery while six page boys
brought in cur 56,000 name
petitions, roll after roll, and
placed them before the Speaker's throne. It was quite a
thrill.
DR. JOHN ALLARDYCE
(Arts '19)
As president of the Alumni
Association I was drafted for
the campaign committee to enlist the help of all graduates in
circulating the petition and in
making speeches. I regret to
say I missed the Trek itself,
however.
See THE GREAT TREK
(Continued on page 10)        ; ^       Thursday, November 5
T HE     U B Y SSEY
PAGE FIVE
W--A ■ ffi
Changing Face Of UBC
•*    !
COMMON  BLOCK
59 Brings
New Look
On Campus
The bliilding boom at UBC
continues. Starting in 1958, so
many structures have mushroomed that even the recent
alums would not recognise the
old Point Grey campus.
The Buchanan building, which
was erected at a cost of over
$2,000,000, has been in use since
1958. It was officially opened
in September of that year by
Premier W. A. C. Bennett. The
majestic glassed-in structure is
the pride and joy of UBC's Arts-
men..
Faculty, too, are enjoying the
facilities of a new building.
Money contributed by those
good friends of the University,
Mr. and Mrs. Leon Koerner, was
used for the Faculty Club Building.
Students are already using the
new one and a half million dollar
Chemistry extension. The windows in the south side produce
a colorful effect at night. Official opening is slated for early
1960.
Another million dollar structure is the Biology Extension.
Labs, lecture rooms, and offices
will make up the Extension. Also
housed there will be the Fisheries Research Department.
Student contributions, Canada
Council contributions, and a gift
from the late industrialist, J. G.
Robson, made the men's residences and the Common Block
possible.
The Residences' Common
Block will provide recreational
and dining -facilities for more
than 800 students. Completion
date will be early 1960.
BUCHANAN BUILDING
CHEMISTRY BUILDING
FACULTY CLUB BUILDING
~t
European Barbers
INDIVIDUALLY STYLED
HAIRCUTS
UPPER TENTH BARBER
AND  TOILETTRIES
4574 West 10th Ave.
Just inside the Gates
y^
BIOLOGY EXTENSION
FRIDAY   9:00 p.m.   SATURDAY
HOMECOMING
BALLS
JERRY   GRAY   &   HIS   ORCHESTRA
HOMECOMING   QUEENS
TICKETS $3.50 per couple at AMS. OFFICE 1959 HOMECOMING
X
MISS FROSH—FERN OWEN
MiSS FH¥SiCAL EDUCATION—JUDY JACK
miss forestry-hom:
*
•
*
•*     „«■      ***•$&
^A."?*?, ^A-jS
«.'        ii    '*■       V-.  ".4*-:-      ,    ■-       ; --'.
MISS ACADIA CAMP—-MAXINE SLATER
I ....       &•
MISS MEDICINE—MA
MISS SOCIAL WORK—BERNIE REID
MISS FORT CAMP—SHARON BUNCE
MiaS LDUCA1ION- £~#AT BUSS
MISS ARTS & SCIENCE—SUZY McMAHON
iv^^a EiSGii.\£jLftlhiO—.\AiOA Ci*EKiNEiNK.OV
SEN PEARSON
IEILA LEES
MISS PH \KM U ^ -ANN \ I i'l»
MISS AGRICULTURE—EDIE DUERKSEN
. 'If   '-'"TJK.-i    *M,' PAGE EIGHT
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 5
STUDENTS BUSY TOO
? #      %- tf v- ■*
THREE SHOTS FOR A DIME" - TARGETS ARE RICHY, MIKE, JOHN, BART, BARB, AND DREDGE
*
*
COMING? . . . HELL, ITS HERE!
*
*
*
*
Peanuts for the monkeys!—and it only takes "peanuts" to
get your ticket to a tremendous dance. Tickets on sale at
the AMS office and they're going fast!
—UBC  Photo  Service
*
*
The versatile King's IV are featured at today's Pep Rally
in the Armouries. Admission is only 25c.
Rounding up recruits, for the Birds' game against Saskatchewan is Jack Henwood. Football Queen Merren McKillop
would be a welcome addition to anyone's teem. TJnarstoy, November 5
TH1    SpfSSi: Y
PAGE NINE.
Al U
COMING   HOME
...TO   THE  ALMA  MATER
For Visiting Alumni
U.B.C. graduates returning to the campus for Homecoming
celebrations on November 6 and 7 will be offered "something
for the mind" at three discussion seminars with the general
title "The Challenge of science today".
Tickets for all three panel discussions are available to students
and must be. picked up before 4
p.m. Frid;y at the AMS office.
Opening the discussion series
Friday evening will be G. L.
Hollingsworth, director of the
Boeing scientific -research laboratories, who will speak in Room
106 of the Buchanan building at
8 p.m. His topic will be "The
challenge of outer space".
Mr. Hollingsworth will deal
with the topic from three viewpoints—the benefits to be derived from space explorations,
the challenge to technology and
propulsion and guidance problems.
On Saturday at 10 a.m. two
panels will meet in Brock Hall
to discuss nuclear fallout and
the question, "Is the Artsman
educated for the scientific age?"
Chairing   the   nuclear   fallout
■ panel   will   be   Dr.  William   C.
i Gibson, head of UBC's department of neurological research.
Panellists   will   be   Dr.   Harold
j Copp, head of the department of
' physiology; Dr. G. M. Griffiths,
of the department of physics;
Prof. James Foulks, head of the
department of pharmacology,
and Mrs. John Norris.
The panel on the education of
artsmen for the scientific age
will be chaired by Dean S. N. F.
Chant of the faculty of arts and
science. Panel members are Dr.
Malcolm McGregor, head of the
department of classics; Dr. G.
M. Shrum, head of the physics
department and dean of graduate studies; Dr. C. M. McDowell,
head of the chemistry department, and Mr. Hollingsworth.
PANEL DISCUSSIONS
TO BE HELD mm
Alumni are reminded that
the Panel Discussions will be
held in Buchanan 106. Buchanan or BU for short, is the
modern - looking glassed - in
structure across the mall from
Brock Hall:
""Students are reminded also
that 'tickets for' any of these
Seminars will be available in
the A.M.S. office. Students
wanting tickets must get them
before 4 p.m. Friday.
Hundreds Ol Alums
Return Home
Thousands of graduates are expected to return to the
campus Friday and Saturday to indulge in nostalgia, social
events and reunions with old classmates.
Champion
Birds Meet
Huskies'
Graduates attending Homecoming on Saturday will be able
to see the winningest football
team in UBC's history in action
against the University of Saskatchewan.
So far Frank Gnup's Thunderbirds have steamrolled all opposition in the reorganized Western
Intercollegiate Athletic Union.
They have beaten Saskatchewan
once and Alberta twice and will
represent the west in. the national collegiate playoffs in Toronto during November.
At halftime of the football
game the students will stage entertainment and present the
Great Trekker award to an outstanding graduate.
On Friday night the 1959 Thunderbird basketball team will
meet former UBC players in the
War Memorial Gym at 8 p.m. A
dinner for past basketball greats
will be held in the War Memorial Gym prior to the game.
G. L. Hollingsworth
Dean S. N. F. Chant
BIRD CALLS
50c
- Brock
- Quad
The 1959 Homecoming is. the
most ambitious ever attempted
by the Alumni Association. "It
has to be extensive," according
to officials. "Graduates are more
interested in their university today than at any other time in its
history because of the Develop-
•ment Fund and the building program."
With construction going on
everywhere and buildings occupying sites which were once
parking lots and bush, many returning graduates will scarcely
recognize the campus they knew
in the '20's and '30's.
Faculty members will be on
hand in Brock Hall at 9 a.m.
Saturday to bring grads up to
date on campus developments at
faculty coffee parties.
At noon, following two panel
discussions in Brock Hall, the
annual Homecoming luncheon
will take place in the main
lounge of the Brock. The 13
winners of Alumni Regional
Scholarships, which are supported by donations from graduates, will be at the luncheon.
Following the football game
the graduates of six years will
meet at various campus points
to talk over old times and relive
the past. Classes gathering for
reunions this year are 1924, '29,
'34, '39,  '44  and  '49.
On Saturday night alumni will
crowd into Brock Hall for the
annual Homecoming Ball which
will feature the music of Ernie
Prentice and his orchestra and
the singing of Eleanor Collins.
ALUMNI PROGRAM
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 6
6:30 p.m. — Medical Alumni dinner at University Club.
8:00 p.m. — Lecture: "The challenge of outer space", Bu 106.
Mr. G. L. Hollingsworth of Boeing Research.
8:00 p.m. — Basketball, Oldtimers and 'Birds vs. Grads:
Half-time, Student Council vs. Faculty soccer.     ;
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 7
9:00-9:45 a.m. — Registration ' and  Faculty Coffee  parties in
Brock Hall..      ,.| , '
10:00-12:00 — Lecture Discussion Panels:
—Dean Chant, "li the Artsman educated for the
scientific age?" . /
—Dr. W. Gibson, "Nuclear Fallout—hazardous or
harmless?" /
12:00 noon — Annual Alumni Homecoming Luncheon in Brock
Hall. /
2:00 p.m. — Homecoming Football Game—Stadium
UBC vs. University of Saskatchewan.
Half-time: Queens and presentation of Great
Trekker to Jimmy Sinclair.
6:00 p.m. — Class Reunions: 1924, .'29, '34, '39, '44, and '49.
9:00 p.m. — Alumni Homecoming Ball in Brock Hall.
Homecoming Queen will visit. £AGE TEN
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 5
'ft. If'
<** .Site '."■
":S; J i ?M J 1~ »>': ^ I II ■ IlMf - *v Hit* ■ *- ■■-
THE   U.B.C.   THUNDERBIRD  FOOTBALL TEAM - W.C1.A.U.  CHAMPIONS  FOR   1959 -60
4,750 SIGN
(continued from page  1)
will inform the Maritime Universities.
Night School students who are
members of the AMS will also
have the opportunity to sign
their names when the petition
twill be passed around during
evening classes.
* More than 400 students of
Delta Junior-Senior High School
in Ladner also gave unofficial
support with their signatures
iwhen hearing of our nationwide
drive to free the young Hungarians.
The Department of External
Affairs issued an official statement Oct. 30, confirming: "Some
trials took place last summer
in Hungary and these were reported in the press at the time."
The U.N. General Assembly
appointed special representative
Sir Leslie Munro to investigate
the situation in Hungary, and he
is expected to report in the near
future   to   the  current   session.
Deadline for the AMS petition
is today at 4:00 p.m.
The petition is posted in Brock
Hall, and anybody who still
wishes to sign is urged to do so
at the AMS office.
T.HE GREAT TREK
'(Continued from page 4)
PROFESSOR HUNTER C.
LEWIS (Arts '23)
The Arts men, of which I was
president, had a big portion of
the house-to-house canvass and
we spent hours and hours organizing it.-In addition we built
the famous "Old Woman in the
Shoe" float which attracted so
much attention. I also remeih-
ber helping plan formation df
the letters "UBC" on the
ground in front of the steel"
frame. Each group knew where
to march and the whole thing-
worked rather well.
DR. G. HOWELL HARRIS
(Agriculture '22)
I was on my way to Oregon
for post-graduate work when
the Trek took place, but I was
an active member of the Aggie
team which did a large share
of the canvass for signatures.
May I add that never in UBC's
history was so much done by
so many.
Important Meeting
For Hotkey Players
Hockey players and all those
interested, there will be a
meeting in TRoom 216, Memorial Gym at noon today.
•■■■Go;   if   you   aren't   at  the
Homecoming Pep Rally.
ESSAY TYPING
: Reasonable Rates
Accurate Work
RE 3-3780 - Evenings
I
Nick's Restaurant
•   FINE FOODS
•    DELICIOUS HAMBURGERS
•   FOUNTAIN SERVICE
•   SOFT ICE CREAM
•   ORDERS TO TAKE OUT
ONE BLOCK FROM MEMORIAL GYM
5778 University Blvd. ALma 1679
U. B. C.   Players   Club
.   ROMANOFF and JULIET
by Ustinov
November 12, 13, 14
TICKET SALE STARTS TODAY
AJVI.S. OFFICE
ridge
theatre
16th at Arbutus
RE 8-6311
T. F. S. - Nov. 5, 6, 7
The Lilting Music of Strauss
.returns in
"The Great Waltz"
8:55
Miliza Korjus
Fernand Fravet
Plus
J. M. Barrie's great comedy
"The Admirable
Crichton"
Color
7:00 and 10:35
Ken Moore, Cecil Parker
Cartoon
Saturday Matinee, 1:45
"The Law vs.
Billy the Kid"
Cartoons - Serial
Little  Rascals
M
11
T. W. - Nov. 9, 10,
New Orleans in its
Gay Festive Attire
Color
"Mardi Gras"
8:50
Pat Boone, Sheri North
Plus
"7th Voyage of
Sinbad"
Color
7:00 and 10:35
Kerwin Mathews
Kathryn Grant
NEWS
MATINEE AS ABOVE
Wednesday, 1^45
STUDENT PROGRAM
THURSDAY,  NOVEMBER 5
12:30-2:30 — Pep Rally in the' Armouries. King's IV,
Homecoming Queens. '"•'■'£'M
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 6
12:30 p.m.— Film "Tuum Est" in the Auditorium.
Free Adrnission.
8:00 p.m. -— Basketball Game, Grads vs. Thunderbirds.
Half-time entertainment.
9:00 p.m. — Homecoming  Ball,  Armouries.   Jerry   Gray  and
his orchestra.  Crowning  of Homecoming Queen.
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 7
2:00 p.m.—Homecoming Football Game—Stadium.
UBC vs. U of Saskatchewan.
Half time: Presentation of Great Trekker Award,
Homecoming Queen, Cheerleaders, Dance Routine
9:00 p.m. — Homecoming  Ball,   Armouries.   Jerry   Gray   and
his orchestra. Homecoming Queen and Princesses.
Tickets for Homecoming Ball are now on sale at AMS Office,
South Brock, $3.50 per couple.
WIN   A
SWISS  VACATION
FOR  TWO!
Enter the Swiss Vacation Contest
today. No obligation! Nothing to
buyl 200 exciting prizes!
COME IN  FOR YOUR FREE
ENTRY BLANK TODAY!
FIRST PRIZE
15 Day Vacation in Switzerland plus
$500.00 Spending Money
Vateitij Jeu?eiterJ
4517 West 10th Ave. ALma 3104
Contest closes November 15th Thursday, November 5
THE      UBYSSEY
PAGE ELEVEN"
FIVE-THIRTY CLUB
By   FRED  FLETCHER
Ubyssey Staff Reporter
Efficiency almost reigned at
last Monday's  council  meeting.
However, order go! stamped
on, as usual, before the meeting
ended.
When a report comes to council no one seems to know quite
what to do with it.
Jim Kaeekisdn, Frosh committee chairman, produced the
Frosh Orientation Report for
lt>59 and discussion began.
It wen: something like this:
Jim Meekison: "I move that
this report be approved, or is it
received?"
President Pete Meekison: "I
think we approve it."
Treasurer Dave Edgar: "How
can I approve it; I don't approve
of Frosh Retreat being held off
campus—granted it's a good
thing but it's not worth the expenditure."
Lynn Rogers, secretary: "But,
procedure is to approve it—we
receive reports from Faculty
committees but we approve reports from council sub-committees."
Russ Brink, Brock co-ordinator: "Can't we receive the repori
and then approve individual
recommendations?"
Pete Meekison: "Well, we
have to do something with it."
Voice from the gallery:
"Chuck it out the window."
And so it went. Motions were
rescinded and counter-motions
proposed; arguments—oh! excuse me, I mean discussions—
took place and Edgar kept muttering: "But I don't approve of
it."
Finally, after an hour's discussion, the report was first received and then approved.
Perhaps this was done in an
attempt to please everybody.
There is no evidence that this
attempt succeeded, however.
Edgar is probably still muttering: "But I don't approve of
it."
&     *f>      *£
If you are interested in student government, Pete Haskins,
of the "Haskins Commission" nc
ess, wants your briefs.
He feels sure that somewhere
•n this campus someone is walk
ng  around with   a   brief  in hi.c
lead that will solve the student
government problem at UBC.
So don't get caught with your
pants down all you student government friends—(all 3 and a
half of you)—get your briefs in
lo Pete.
Incidently, the Haskins Commission begins reviewing briefs
November 12.
*
*
COUNCIL QUICKIES
Ramblers budget of $150 came
back unchanged from UCC and
was passed by council.
V *T 'V
Ian Stewart brought the cold
light of reason to bear on council's long meetings and stated:
"We have been bogged down for
the last three weeks on details
that should be handled by committees."
rf, *f, vf.
Be sure and see the athletic
event of the year when students'
council takes on the faculty at
six-man soccer during the half-
time at the Homecoming basketball game.
v       v       3r
This space would like to remind students of the seriousness
of the petition being circulated
by students' council, regarding
the Hungarian executions. We
feel that every student should
give this matter grave and serious consideration.
Present Hazing Methods
To Be Abolished
GEORGE S. ALLEN, Dean of
the Faculty of Forestry at the
University of British Columbia, has been named to the
Board of the B.C. Research
Council by the UBC Board of
Governors.
HALL AND CATERING
SERVICE
Special Attention for
University Functions
2723 W. 4th Ave.
RE 1-2814 - WE 9-3827
Attention University
Students
Canvassers wanted. A new
easy selling itam. Just on the
market. For information call
MU 1-0735 from 9:00 to 4:30
and after 4:30 from G:00 to
9:00 call FAirfax 5-9252, also
Saturday and Sunday.
New World "Book Store
SALE THIS WEEK
Schaum Outline series carried
189 E. Hastings      MU 3-5139
Pocketbooks
Magazines
Students Welcome
Blue Jay Library
4410 W. 10th Ave.
AL 0617
Student's Council received and
ipproved the Frosh Orientation
Report for 1959 at their regular
meeting Monday night.
The major recommendation
stated "That 'hazing', as it is
presently known on the campus,
be abolished."
It was further stated that a
survey of other North American
universities should be taken to
gain information that would enable UBC to establish a new
form of hazing.
This new initiation should encourage group and campus spirit.
All frosh .hazing would be'
abolished ii, and only if, no suit-,
able alternative could be found.
According to Jim Meekison,
chairman of the Frosh Orientation Committee, the main reasons
for this recommendation were
the lack of general participation
and the high risk of injury with-
resulting adverse publicity.
The report stated generally
that emphasis should be shifted
from social activities to the
learning of university student
life, student government, and
academic realities.
RENTAL & SALES
• Full Dress
• Morning Coats
• White and Blue Coats
• Shirts and Accessories
• SI.00 discount to
UBC Students.
E A. LEE ltd.
623 HOWE MU 3
2457
WELCOME  BACK,  GRADS
4548 W.
10th Ave.
Near
Sasamat
(jewqe Hai^eA
Men's & Boys' Wear
Phone
ALma
3564
Jhh h an EXPERIMENT
Its purpose is  to test  the hypothesis  of envelope marked 1, 2, 3 or 4.
Exira-Sensory   Perception  (ESP),   in  other You are to try and guess, as well as you
-  words  that a person can  acquire informa- can, the order in which the cards appear in
tion by other means than the known senses. each pack,  by writing  a  letter  over  each
Is ESP fact or fiction? of lhe dashes Provided below.
„     ^ , . x  . '       . x Boxes   are   provided   for   your   answer-
By taking part  in  this  experiment  you        ^^ gt the Bus.st        the Quad/ lhe West
can help us to try and answer this question. entrance io Buchanan,  and the South en-
The "target" is four well-shuffled packs irance to Brock,
of   cards,   kept   in   a   Safety   Deposit   Box, Your   answers   should   be   in  by   6  p.m.
kindly offered for our use by the Campus Friday, as the "target" will be opened  at
Branch of the Bank of Montreal. that  time   Resuits  will  be  announced  as
They are not ordinary playing-cards, but soon as possible,
specially designed cards, each of which is We will greatly appreciate your co-opera-
printed with one of the following letters: tion.
B,  C.  D, F,  K,  R.  Each  pack  consists  of TL     1%                   LI           C     • *
thirty   cards  and  is   sealed   in   a   separate /»C rarOpSyCnOlOgy JOCICty
PACK No. 1 :	
PACK No. 2-	
PACK No. 3 ; ■_ _ ■_■-	
PACK No. 4- - -:- -  - -
Please indicate whether you       Q] Yes      Q No               Q Male     Q Female
Consider ESP  possible
Name, Phone, Address  .„    '.. .........;
YOU'VE GOT A DATE
Mr FT
m i_l   -
MR. "BRASS EYES"
JUST
895
He's cute : t »
He's slim and trim
He hugs you tight
Here's the shoe you'll be seeing
on the campus, in the class, at
parties . ; . bold as brass! It's
"Mr. Brass Eyes" ... this season's
most sought after shoe! You
MUST hove a pair in nil of
spring's popular shades. Sizes
4 to 10, AA and B width*
&Y CREATIVE
Sold at all Department Stores
and Better Shoe Stores in B.C.
* iii of coursi PAGE TWELVE
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 3, 1959
(Continued, from Page  IK
CARIBBEAN  STUDENTS'
ASSOCIATION
Mr. John Donaldson will give
a book review oh the "Sufferage
or Elvira" written by a brilliant
West Indian novelist. It will be
in Bu. 102 at 12:30. All are invited.
•*•        •** •**
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
General meeting on Friday at
12:30 in HL. 1,
WAD GOLF TEAM
All girls interested in playing
golf meet in the Field House on
Thursday, 4:3,0 to 6:00. Equipment provided.
Sf,      Sfr      ¥
•WOMEN'S CURLING
Curling eliminations are to be
held ot Sat., Nov. 7.at 3:15 p,m.
at Pacific Curling Rink. All
those who are' interested please
attend.
•*• "*• *!•
S. C. M.
The Right Reverend R. S.
Deane, Bishop of the Cariboo,
will speak on "The Challenge
of Christian Worship" Thursday
at noon in Bu. 205.
**•        •**        V
NFCUS SONG BOOK
Contributions for a Canadian
University   Song  Book  will  be
^gratefully    received    by    Ruth
Kidd, NFCUS Office, Room 165,
in the Brock Extension.
*    *    *      •
GERMAN CLUB
German Folk and U. songs
will be on records in Bu. 205 on
Friday at noon.
V       v       V
HAMSOC
Morse Code classes conducted
by Hamsoc will be held in P. 301
at 12:30 on Friday.
ACQUA-SOC
There Will be a meeting in
J3u. 217 at noon. The theory
exam will be written and all
members are urged to be present. Also, there will be pool
training tonight at 6:15.
V V        V
E. I. C.
The film "Nickel Mining at
Sudbury" will be sown at a general meeting on Friday in Eng.
201.   Everyone welcome.
V *f*        *!•
MEN'S GRASS  HOCKEY
There will be a practice today.
If the fields cannot be used
there will be a meeting in HL. 1.
RIDE from 41st and Main for
8:30 lectures. Mon. to Sat., mornings only.  Phone FA. 5-1120.
CLASSIFIED
SUITE FOR RENT — 3-room
bedroom, kitchen, living room,
bathroom, twin beds. $70 per
month. Private entrance. 4333
W. 13th.  AL. 1437-M..
PANEL DISCUSSIONS
All alumni "are reminded
that the seminars on "The
Challenge of Science Today"
will be held in Buchanan 106.
The Buchanan is that immense modern-looking glassed-
in structure opposite Brock
Hall.
Tickets for students must be
picked up in the AMS office
before 4 p.m. Friday.
Married Accommodation
in Acadia available for under:
graduate students, all years.
Call at Housing Office
Rm. 205-A, Physics Building
A. U. BAIRD
Housing Administrator.
TYPING
ESSAYS, THESES, NOTES
MIMEOGRAPHING
MRS. F. M. GOW
4456  W.  10th Ave.
AL 3682
RIDE   urgently   needed from
41st  and  Dunbar  to  and from
UBC.   Contact "Andy"  in AMS
office.
RIDERS wanted, West End
area for 8:30 lectures. Phone
MU.  1-1677.
GERMAN student taking
French would like to help and
be helped by French student taking German. Phone Kareen at
AM. 6-0730 after 7 p.m.
LOST on Fri., Oct. 30, man's
wedding ring. Reward. Date on
inside of ring. Gordon, FA.
7-1629.
Essays Typed
Phone CY 8-2090
Reasonable Rates
AAeekispn Refuses To
Apologize For Rumour
Pete Meekison, president of
the AMS council, today vigorously denied rumours that he was
going to apologize to Premier
Bennett.
It was rumored that Meekison
intended to apologize for rowdies, presumed to be students,
who heckled Premier Bennett
during a speech at the Social
Credit League rally last week.
Meekison, however, denied
this report. He said "Bennett
assumed   that   they   were   stu
dents" and that there is no proof-
that such was the case.
He further stated that he
would not have apologized if
such proof had been offered.
"Because a person attends university he doesn't lose his rights
of free speech," he said.
He felt that students' council
could not accept responsibility
for the actions of students in
this sphere. In this case they
were acting as citizens and not
specifically as students.
DO-NUTS
made up for parlies
We make fresh do-nuts
every day
DO-NUT DINER
4556 W. 10th AL 3580
FOR ALL YOUR CAR REPAIRS
ALL YOU NEED TO REMEMBER
is
MAINLAND MOTORS
TRIMBLE ST. & 10th AVE.
AL3864
MEN
TWO BARBER SHOPS
TO SERVE YOU
inside  the  gates
• Brock Hall Extension
• 5734 University Boulevard
In this connotation ... a
'Double Faced' sweater called
Panda Shag. The trick is in
the collar: flip it down and
it's wide and luxurious; flip
it up and voila—a hood! Compatibly combined in soft "OR-
LON" pile fabric with wool
knit collar and cuffs. Soft,
warm, and cuddly for sports
car riding. Sketched in loden
green, also see white, black,
red and camel. In small, medium and large sizes.
Sportswear, Second Floor
OPPORTUNITIES FOR
GRADUATES and  UNDERGRADUATES"
with the
CIVIL SERVICE OF CANADA
A representative of the Civil Service Commission will be
at the Personnel Office, Hut M-7, U.B.C, on the afternoon
of the 9th and 10th of November to answer enquiries.
Please make an appointment at the Personnel Office.
Written examinations for graduating students—Nov. 14th.
S&v&n Bmutifyud dla&b. 9n
%teat&h Oana)JLW£/i
Accommodation from 25 to 4,000
#   SMORGASBORD
i>   HOT MEALS
•fr    COLD BUFFET
it   LIGHT REFRESHMENTS
Prices ranging from $1.25 to $3.00 per person including all
li.
Jn.
ri  r L
5802 Fraser Street
FAirfax 5-7411 TRinity 6-5143
UNIVERSITY BOOR STORE
HOURS:    -
SATURDAY:
9   a.m. to   5   p.m.
■    9  a.m.  to   Noon
LOOSE LEAF NOTE BOOKS
EXERCISE BOOKS AND SCRIBBLERS
GRAPHIC ENGINEERING PAPER, BIOLOGY PAPER,
LOOSE LEAF REFILLS, FOUNTAIN PENS and INK,
DRAWING PAPER
Owned and Operated by . . .
THE UNIVERSITY OF BX.

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