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The Ubyssey Sep 25, 1936

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 INITIATION DATES
Regalia worn        Sept. 28-Oct.   8
Frtshette   tea Sept. 28
Frsihette dinner    Oct.    1
Froih smoker   Oct.    1
Froih Reception  Oct.   8
xiy
A.M.S. DATES
Clau election!   Sept. 30
A.M.U.S. elections  Oct.   1
Intramurals begin Oct.   5
Song and yell Sept. 30
First stadium game Oct.   3
Published Twice
Publications Board of the
Weekly by the
University of British Columbia
VANCOUVER, B. C, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 1936
No.
UNIVERSITY
OPENED WITH
TUESDAY MEET
Chancellor and Deans
Welcome New
Students
The University was formally
opened at a meeting of the faculties on Tuesday, starting at 15.00,
when President Klinck, Chancellor
R. E. McKechnie, the deans of the
faculties and the dean of women
addressed the students iu the Audi-
tori u m.
President Klinck formally welcomed the newcomers, upperclass-
men, and members of the faculty
who were returning from summer
vacations or leave of absence. He
spoke of many improvements which
have been made recently, such as
that in the system of physical education.
"The opportunity to gain a
university  education   is  still
golden   and   priceless,"   said
President Klinck.    "Brighter
days   are   at   hand,  and  the
world  is in  need of university  men  and women.    The
upward   trend    has   created
problems   in   the   university
due to an expansion of activity, but these problems are
on the whole gratifying, and
we rejoice in tribulation."
Chancellor R. E. McKechnie was,
in his own words, "a student speaking to students."    Although his remarks  were  addressed   mainly   to
the  male  division  of  the  student
body,   "for."   he   said,   "the   female
division can look after itself, as it
has always done,"  he advised all
students to beware of drifting. "You
come here to get a foundation for
your future life work," said Chancellor    McKechnie.       "You     must
make your ideal and stick to it."
Haniel Huchanan. Dean of the
Faculty of Arts and Science, spoke
regretfully of the fact that his lifelong ambition to become an engineer on a locomotive had never been
realized. He also regretted never
having broken Into print with a
headline, and suggested that the
streamer: "Russian students sweat
to get into the university— V. B. C.
students sweat to stay in" should
feature in the I'byssey under his
name.
"An epoch of stability and
inertia is generally followed
by one of creative ferment,"
declared    Dean    Buchanan.
"There  are   changes   in   art,
literature,   morals   and   religion,    The youth of today is
not accepting the universe on
the basis on which the men
and   women   of  the   pre-war
era   accepted    it.    Youth   is
challenging  —  and   It   must
question with an open mind."
.1.   X.   Finlayson,   the   new   Dean
<>t' Applied Science, answered President   Klinck's   welcome on   behalf
c>:    lie newcomers.    "The main rea-
st :.   for  going   to   College,"   he   declare'!    "is   to   learn   to   know   the
GET TO USE
THE BOOK
EXCHANGE
Student Organization
Offers Great
Saving
The Freshman's life is full of
variegated woe for the first few-
weeks of his existence on the campus. Probably his own modesty is
the greatest reason for this grief,
but running that ailment a close
second is the problem of text-books.
Such a complicated array of texts
is required for nearly all his courses that he sees his budget shattered at one stroke.
Several years ago, students
on the campus who were experiencing difficulty in making contacts to sell their old
texts, although they knew a
great many people were very
anxious   to   buy   them,   conceived the idea of the Book
Exchange.    This was simply
to be a convenient means of
contact between students
having books to sell and students   requiring   these   same
books.    It was to be run by
the students themselves.
The procedure evolved to accomplish this was simple.    It  remains
essentially the same today. A student  bringing his  old  text-books  to
the  Book  Exchange is given a  receipt, on which Is entered the name
of each book accepted  by  the  Exchange   for   resale.    This   receipt
bears a number which  is stamped
in each book before it Is set on the
shelves.    The  books are  then sold
at their value, which is determined,
not by their age. but by their condition.     Thus,   students   realize   a
fair pike for their books.
At the end of about three weeks,
upon presentation of the original
receipt, the student is given a cash
voucher, showing books sold and
the price realized for them. Any
books unsold may be left with the
Book Exchange for sale in the second term. Upon presentation of
the cash voucher to the Accountant
of the A.M.S. at the Students' Council Offices, the student receives the
priced realized for his books, less
In per cent, which is the fee levied
by the Book Exchange for its services.
.Iust now, at the beginning of the
term, the chief difficulty of the
Rook Exchange is the lack of books.
Students are reminded that the
sooner their books are brought In
the greater Is the chance of their
being sold.
Council Talks It Ovei
PASS SYSTEM TO BE BROUGHT
FORWARD AT A.M.S. MEETING
October Gathering Will Discuss
Proposal Rejected By Board
Frosh Impressed
By Tin Gods'
Addresses
John Witbeck
fa Ik. over
sfers     Our can'-'c: c<
:■"' conference    The r
'he sfors  below
Photo  l.y  Staff  PhotoKrnpher.
Beth Evans, Dave Care\ ana Aud re', Horwood
lans   for  freshrnan  initiation  on   the Auditorium
nera caught this one of the tin gods
suits of their ^;ehborciticns are sef
out
//
//
Pop   Concerts
Planned
truth   : ■ it'l
cloud*  ■!"<
cause .
the  true
Dr.  A   '
the F'acui
Dean  Flnl,
ourselves in:
"to assist am.
gress.    Kduca'
to do this.    Th.
till  you  full  of  i
ihout in you tin
Miss   Bollert.
speaker,   spoke   prim,
heiietit of the women m   .
'old them of some ticlii• ■ -
• duration   made  by   worn.
be able to tell  It.    War
threatening  Europe  be-
diplomats did not  know
■lurss, Acting Dean of
Agriculture, followed
"We   want  to  fit
future," he said,
resist world pro-
will prepare you
ulty  Ik here to
;iml  to bring
■   !>■ to think."
the   last
for   the
'is, and
i   uts in
Mi    the
The weekly popular concerts
which have proved successful in
London and Boston, have been
planned for the Vancouver public.,
The venture is not a money-making
affair and is designed to bring before the people some of the best
available local concert performers.
Besides instrumental and vocal
solo work, choral and orchestral
ensembles and chamber music, there
will be short dramatic sketches and
one-act plays. It is proposed that
this series of "pops" will be held in
the old St. Andrew's auditorium, at
the corner of Richards and Georgia
streets. An admission charge of
25 cents will  be made.
GAY GREEN GLENGARRIES
AND BRETONS FOR FROSH
Wearing of the Green Officially
Starts Monday; Sophs Alert
Green Breton bonnets for women, green Glengarries for men, and
placards and green nail polish for both, will be what the well-dressed
Frosh will wear for the next two weeks—or else! The ensemble must
be purchased at Mr. Home's office in the Auditorium before the end
of this week, and any Freshman appearing minus his green garb after
Monday morning may expect a watery grave in the Lily Pond, according to latest bulletins from Sophomore headquarters. Plans are also
afoot to re-establish the shoe-shine stand where offenders may do
fitting penance at the feet of upperclassmen.
The initiation period will end
with the Frosh Reception on October 8, to be held this year at
Happyland. an innovation which has
met with wide approval among the
student body due to the increased
floor space and surrounding attractions,
Beth Evans, Audrey Horwood,
John Witbeck, and Howie McPhee
are responsible for this year's initiation program, which commences
at noon today with an athletic
meeting for freshmen. Women will
meet in Arts 100, and men in Applied Science 100, to be addressed
by their athletic representatives.
A song and yell practice for
Frosh will be held at noon on Monday in the Auditorium under the
auspices of the Pep Club. Freshmen
are asked to bring their handbooks
and sit downstairs, the balcony being reserved for sophomores desiring to lend their inspiration and
advice to the meeting.
Freshettes will be the guests of
their Big Sisters at a tea Monday
afternoon in the cafeteria from
3:30 till 5:00.
The date for the Frosh Smoker
has been set for October 1, at the
Moose Hall. The Freshette's Supper will be held the same evening
in the University cafeteria.
Troubled Caused By
Ambiguous Sign
In Caf
Mr. Underbill, the genial chap
who runs the caf, was slightly
puzzled on Tuesday when his
notice was drawn to the sign on
the water stand. The sign read,
"Put your empty glasses in the
wash  room.'
Alan Morley prohibitionist)-
cally inclined Campus Crab,
drew Dixie's attention to the
double meaning of the sign.
Dixie told Jean the story and
Jean took the story to the boss.
A hurried conference followed.
The next morning the sign
read: "Put your empty glasses
on the counter."
Another attempt will be made
this year by Student Council to
have the Pass System introduced
on this campus. Although the
student body, at a special meeting
in March, discussed the proposal
and passed It by a 3 to 1 ratio majority and referred It to the Board
of Governors, that body refused to
sanction the raise iu fees that
would be necessary.
The Pass System will likely be the major topic at the
semi • annual Alma Mater
meeting in October. It Is
known that Council favors introduction of the system At
the March meeting there was
six short of a quorum, which
fact probably influenced the
governors' ruling.
As outlined in the I'byssey last
term, the Pass System Is designed
to increase attendance at university functions and to bring about a
better campus spirit. Quoting an
interview with President Jay Gould,
the system would mean a |3 Increase in fees for every student.
"For an extra $3 Alma Mater Fee
which would raise $5000," Gould
stated at that time, "every student
could have a pass to the Players'
performance, the Musical Society
show, two English rugby games,
Signifying the end of three Canadian rugby games, all de-
period for the "green bates, and many other minor functions.
"Some of the money could be devoted to sport equipment, which
would help along the intra-mural
program. In troduction of the Pass
System would mean more than
double the attendance at university
functions and would aid campus
spirit by bringing together the student  body oftener."
Last term, the main objection to
the proposal seemed to come from
Science   students  and   others   who
Council Members Explain
Their Jobs to
Newcomers
Still wide-eyed and gaping, some
5d0 newcomers assembled iu the
auditorium on Wednesday noon to
learn from Student Council members exactly what the score was.
President Jay Gould explained
briefly to the bewildered the functions of the- Student Government,
that their work was concerned only
with routine matters, and that the
student body themselves held final
power.
Audrey Horwood, president
of the Women's Undergraduate Society, warned the newcomers of the dire penalties
awaiting the freshest of frosh,
those   who   attempt   to  doff
their insignia before the expiration of the time set.
"No more bonfires, no more snake
parades," said John Witbeck, speaking   for   the   Men's   Undergraduate
Society.    The annual  freshette tea
will  take  place on Sept. 2S in  the
gymnasium.
Oct.   1   freshettes  and   freshmen
will  attend  a  supper and   smoker
respectively
the training
o-es." the Frosh Reception will be
held on the Mh or Mb of October.
Beth Evans and Dave Carey, women's and men's athletic representatives, want to see a large attendance at the meeting on Friday,
where their executives will be able
to explain iii detail what the university has to offer in the way of
sports. The meetings will take place
in Arts Ion for the girls and in Applied   Science   loo for  the  boys.
All clubs of a non-athletic nature
are included In the Literary and
Scientific Executive, on which John   teh ,hat the-v would »ot <lerlve fl'"
Logan spoke briefly. Those interested in joining clubs were warned
to watch the boards for notices
about applications and try-outs.
When Lyall Vine, treasurer, arose
to  speak,  wild  calls,  hoarse  yells,
wli
Class Elections to Be
Held Wednesday
Student Coimcil decided Monday
• . iiing to Imld all class elections
li'M Wednesday at noun hour. The
fn simian class will not elect others until after the Christmas ex
.initiations.
Cntll that time, the (lass of '40
will be vended by the Junior Mem-
b< I. Howie Mel'hee. As Mcl'hee
will not register until Oct. 1(1. his
dniis with the frosh have been
deh i:ated to John Witbeck, Men's
I'ndet'Lrad rep. Witbeck will also
look alter rooms and dates.
CIRCULATION
With this issue the circulation of the "Ubyssey" has
been reorganized.
NO papers will be distributed from the Publications
Office, nor will any be placed
in the hall of the auditorium.
Before noon on the day of issue they will be placed on
tables in the Kaf, in the corridors of the Arts, Science,
Applied Science and Agriculture buildings and in such
other places as are found
suitable. Application for special deliveries may be made
to the "Ubyssey" office, with
the reasons for such delivery
stated clearly.
A ruling of the Discipline
Committe forbids distributing
papers from the office or in
the   auditorium  hall.
MUSICAL SOCIETY
A large number of applications for membership in the
Musical Society have already
been received, and those
wishing to join should send
in their applications as soon
as possible. The date of the
first general meeting will be
announced in the next issue
of the Ubyssey. The dates
and particulars of trials for
prospective members will be
determined at this meeting.
REPORTERS WANTED
Wanted: Reporters and Assistants for Student Publications. Apply at the Publications Office at
noon as soon as possible.
May Have Union
Bldg. In Year
Money Promised Will
Build One Unit
An actual total of about $45,000
has been raised for the proposed
Brock Memorial Building. Another
large sum has been promised by
subscribers who have not as yet
handed over the money. All, iu all.
it is expected that enough will be
on hand at the end of this year to
go ahead with part of the building.
If present plans are carried out.
the central unit of the I'liion Building will be raised during the summer of liCIT. The rest of the building will be completed as soon as
funds are available.
For the Information of new students, the I'nion Huilding was proposed last year as a memorial to
the late Dean and Mrs. H. W. Brock,
tragically killed in the summer of
liCio. An active campaign was carried out last term, the students
completing their quota by authorizing  a   loan of Sin,nun.
This year, it is believed, another
campaign will be held to raise
funds for a permanent stadium. In
the meantime, money is still being
received for the 1'nion Huilding.
I benefit from the increased fee.
With such objections still being
heard, It is to be expected that the
Council will have a hard fight at
the Alma Mater meeting.
Early announcement of the meet-
and   stamping   feet   Indicated   that \ big will be made in order that every
of
there   was   a   slight   sprinkling
Sciencemen in the gathering.
"There are two kinds of students,' 'stated Jay Gould in concluding the meeting. "They are the
'ins' or mixers, and the 'outs,' or
forgotten men. Take an active part
In your university life," he advised,
"for it will be a pretty tough four
years for you if you remain one of
the 'outs'."
student will have a chance to attend and air his views.
Premier Pattullo's Message to U. B. C.
On rhe occasion of the twenf\-f
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Ubyssey Staff
Takes Hold
The I'byssey staff for this year
will be under the direction of Zoe
Browne-Clayton, editor iu chief. In
charge of the Tuesday edition,
Kemp Fdmonds has been promoted
from his place as Sports editor last
year. The other Senior Kdllor,
Dorwin Baird, has occupied that
position since January. He will put
out  the  Friday issues,
With the resignation of Milt Taylor, who was to have been Sports
Editor, it is expected that Hick Elson will take on this position. Assisting Ititn will be Frank Turner
and others from  last year.
Ken Grant and Norm DePoe will
be associate editors, but, In the
event of the latter not returning
to I'. B. ('., an appointment will
have to be made. ,lini Beveridge
and Peggy Higgs will attend to the
Totem. Handbook editor was Dorothy Cuinniings, now an assistant
editor.
Stu Culverts will occupy a new
position for the I'byssey. that of
stalY photographer. His handy Con-
tax camera will be on hand to snap
campus celebrities at every function.
.Many   positions   have   yet   to   be
tilled  on   the   I'byssey,   and   a   call
has been issued for new reporters.
Final    appointments    will    be    an
nounced
Big Sisters Fill
Urgent Need
Freshettes to Be Taken
Care of By Seniors
The worries of the freshettes are
no more. The seniors have everything under control, and each freshette has been taken under the wing
of some senior who Is known as a
"Big Sister." Any newcomers to
the university who have not yet
gotten in touch with their sponsors
should do so by applying to the information bureau In the south end
of the Arts building.
The duties of the Big Sisters are
not confined to shepherding their
charges around the university,
helping them to get accustomed,
and introducing them to others of
their kind. They must also take
them to several traditional social
functions
The first of these is a tea in the
cafeteria on Monday from .'{..'{(( to
a p.m. The following Thursday is
set for the Senior Freshette supper,
also iu the cafeteria, at (I o'clock.
The Frosh Reception, the first
big dance of the academic year, will
be held on October the Mb. ln
previous years Big Sisters have
provided freshettes with dates for
the dance. This year the procedure
is changed, and Big and Little sisters  will go together.
All
BUDGETS
tentative   budgets
for
all campus organizations
must be in the hands of the
treasurer of the A. M. S. by
Wednesday evening. Two
THE UBYSSEY ANNIVERSARY NUMBER
Soothing Syrup
By the CAMPUS CRAB
liiliiiliiiilllliin.
Director
:nday, September 25,  1936
Charlei H. Scott
EDITOR IN CHIEF
ZOE BROWN-CLAYTON
SENIOR EDITORS
TUESDAY    kemi> Liiinond, FRIDAY    C-. r^ .-. t5a r ^
SPORTS EDITOR
D 'k t'l,on
Hell, ain't It?
Me being back again after all
these years, I mean. Already I can
hear the rustle as some of you
scramble for cover, and notice the
sudden chill in the air as others
elevate their noses to the extreme
angle of plunging tire and gather
their garments about them for fear
of pollution. It warms my crustacean soul to think that I shall once
again, as In old times, provide an
additional campus annoyance for,
the sweetness and light boys, and
no longer linger In the Inoccuous
desuetude that has been my portion for the past season.
COUNCIL AS USUAL
First thing to catch my eye, of
course, Is the perennial piffling of [
our Council. This time they have ■
attempted to scratch MY shell, all
unaware that I have been sharpening up my claws for action in these
chaste columns again. But they
shall not escape!
Having devoted a year to Investigating the peculiar conditions under which the Discipline Committee Is forced to work, I had the
pleasure of submitting to the Powers that Be last session an amend-!
nient to that article of our constitution dealing with drinking at
University functions.
According to the report ln today's
I'byssey, Council has demonstrated
Its Infantile sense of humor by lab
elling It an attempt to "make the
campus safe for drinking," and
shelved the matter, "feeling that
Inebriates need little protection."
THE OLYMPIAN FALLACY
With my usual unwarranted optimism, I had assumed that the
new council would, though not remarkable for Its brilliance, possess
at least, a few rudiments of common sense. Alas!--what cruel disappointment awaited me!
I see that I must draw a diagram
for the baby class, making plain to
them a few facts that the dullest
(non-Council i intelligence would
have been able to discover for itself.
First: It has been demonstrated
for several years that the Article
in force at the time has not prevented college students from appearing at University functions under the influence of liquor.
Second: That the amendment to
the Article passed by Council last
spring did not change the safeguards against this, as it only legalized a procedure that had been In
practice during the life of the Article, but that violated, not only the
letter of the law, but also the spirit
of decency and justice.
Third: That having restored the
status quo ante destroyed by the
sudden return to life or a formerly
Inert Discipline Committee, the
Council apparently believes It has
solved the problem that has vexed
it for several years by leaving
things exactly as they were before.
(This unusual Inspiration Is remarkable even In my somewhat extensive experience of Council pro
cedlngs.)
FACULTY  STEIN  SONG
Fourth: That their smart little
slogan about "making the campus
safe for drinking' Is a neat measure
of Council Intelligence, demonstrating that the plainest facts and indications, which it Is their duty, as
Kent Grant
ASSOCIATE EDITORS
N -rinan Depoe
Fraii   :,.'■:■-
ASSISTANT EDITORS
Cirottv, Conon eg-- Da^e 3m <>• Bi o-
STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
Stev.jrr Cai.ort
Advertising Office
Pa. '■-  P'.oUhers   L m lei
■ '   Pr,v. ive EuOf'-g   Vol  n,   Square   Va"~-.-.-.er   [■    '._
Teeil    e   TRINITY 1945
Advertising Staff:
Oar!.?-  H    Munro    t-PwaM  D   Fiercer
Ai1 j-luv: ; p1   s mncjied '}■   ub vel,  P,  Pa: f     Pu!.-" -tier,   L
WELCOME !
The Publications Hoard takes great pleasure in welcoming Class '40 to the campus. We must admit that the newcomers are about the best-looking crop we have seen around
these halls for a long time. Hy the time they get a few of
the edges knocked off they ought to be able to resurrect
the now long-defunct I'niversity spirit in great style.
We have, however, a complaint to make against the
Initiation Committee. As we understand it, the purpose of
initiation is to give the freshmen class spirit by making
them look so small and ridiculous that they must realize that
the only way they can survive is by sticking together. This
year, however, the Initiation committee has done their very
best to increase instead of diminish what personal attractiveness the freshettes and freshmen possess. The Breton bonnets and Glengarry caps worn by Class '40 are more alluring
than the majority of headgear sold on Granville street.
Instead of giving the freshmen the customary inferiority
complex, the initiation regalia will this year make them
more superior than they are, if that is possible.
We can at least thank the powers that be for Honest
li. .Ids brain wave of last year—the green nail polish. If the
freshmen develop into a fine spirited class it will be the work
of last year's Junior Member, honest R. J.
THANKS
We should like to take this opportunity of thanking the
authors of a certain petition which was sent to Council last
spring for the many helpful suggestons. However, in future
we should like to suggest that such reports be delivered to
us personally in the form of a letter. Then we would be
able to repy through the medium of the paper.
governing body of students, to take
into consideration, are cheerfully
aud wilfully ignored by our solons.
Council was Informed, through a
signed notation on the bottom of
the amendment submitted to them,
that it had been carefully considered and revised by the Faculty
Committee on Student Affairs, and
approved by them as a measure
most likely to aid iu Improving the
conditions It was aimed at, conditions which Council's present measures have utterly failed to correct.
In   my   time   I   have   unearthed
some startling and almost unbellev-!
able deviations from duty on this
campus, but even I balk at that one.;
It has remained for Council to In-!
sinuate, by means of a shallow and
feeble wisecrack,  that the  Faculty \
Committee, a body whose strictness
It   has   more  than  once   protested
against, has commenced an active ;
promotion of Intemperance on the
campus.
PLAIN  FACTS
Plain facts are the things that
Council Is afraid to race.
The plain facts of this matter are
that It Is better to control drinking
than to make pious resolutions to
abolish  it   when  it cannot   he abolished.
It is better to try ami devise some
means of enforcing an anti-drinking
law, than to make a law that cannot be enforced.
It Is better to make some detlnite
body of people responsible for enforcing the law than to make it
"everybody's business."
It Is better to make that detlnite
body one that may be able to enforce the law than to leave it In the
hands of a body that has proved
that It Is physically unable to enforce the law.
It is better to assume that a body
of duly elected student officials will
try to do their duty, than to be
afraid to trust them with a duty
to do.
Filially, a few more smart-alee
decisions of this kind, without due
attention to the facts of the mat
ter, aro likely to make us believe
that It Is better to have no Council!
at all than one that insists on making a fool of itself.
WHERE YOU MAY BUY
THINGS most easily and most
profitably are advertised in tbe
pages of THE UBYSSEY.
CONGRATULATIONS
To
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
On It's
TWENTY-FIRST BIRTHDAY
The splendid record of those years is an inspiration
for the years to come. Born in the opening stages of the
Great War, its growth impeded by that tremendous
cataclysm, it has lived and thriven to take an honoured
place among the older seats of learning and has made a
noble contribution to the development of this great
Province.
BUREAU OF PROVINCIAL INFORMATION
Victoria, B. C.
THE VANCOUVER
SCHOOL OF ART
Corner Cambie and Dummuir
DAY and EVENING COURSES
Telephone Trinity 2651
For Prospectus or  Information
Miiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin
CORRECT JEWELLERY
AND STATIONERY FOR
EVERY FRATERNITY
ON THE CAMPUS.
< >•<>«
A  n.oe   laok'ng crop of   freshettes  »h -,   .ear sa,
all tbe soplvst cated senior men     N:e bo^ng   >es
hot   not  perhaps qu.te  so  smart   bo^ng as   the r
in; re Irvj.vng s--ters   the Sophs     \*.oIP that   s eas\
t    reireT,      AH   the',   have  to do    -■ '■ j q-, do-.\n  to
MADAM! RUNGE on South bran-.. ee a,,d f nd out
what  '•■'.; rea' ,  *eii dre^e.l    ,-e<1   , .'.ear ng   There
j,v   tho   Pose-   i.t   Barron,   Engl sh   t.\eei   toproats
File.   are  a     na'-shl,   ta ; red   and  u'ltr.mmed  and
i, i- '   per'e't   'or an,   i nd  v.f   sampus   .'.oathe'      For
If't'.re-.    Madan'e     >    soo'Oor ng    -AO0     dresseo    im-
p. rt.'-d ■' 'iii En^;and   pr ~e! 'rem ': 1 .">'/.: up     Frechette, are ,i'n g. n.g  to tie tor ed   nto green, so wh,  net ilea   a rvardi
kr.   the   'ii.tvit jii   -onim ttee  and  g.-  green   ,n  one cf   the>e attra:t \e
dre.-.e.     A  [ ,jr:   ulari.   -onarl  model   'eatured  at  Madame Runge 3    , a
Ergot  green  ,\ .j    ■:■,•   .er',   s'l'pp,  *■"' a   large brown  bobble at   the
threat atta tied t.   the : pper tastener ,\h Ii run, do'.'.n all tne v.a,     A
(jre,-:  >j  ,\ n ai'.    c ed , heart     So freshette.   -t ,-oj  ,\ant to mate me
o   grad'- a' W   p  pa-,  a \ st   t-  Madame Runge
*        *        *        *
StudenN lUod n-J'P old oP'S d'..r ng the sumner DP .uu hear about
L1 o.! Ho'hdeu At'. ' spe"'t !''•; o.mriior lur ng all the oed bug-.. a.:d) 'r^nl
h      felp'A - .\ ,^ or,   'n   a   I. 'J'J '-2    ~a,rl>
And then ii or-.- ,vere the ,'udenS ,\h. v.ere err.pl. >ed dre'tng
Ju-.' ee v-s h.r-. around the- " '. V. e ' me, eoj'dn t ha.e done be'ter than
p 0 re • th,. r '! ent, p., A8ERS ."i ■ -e >rg a Street to ge* tne he,t <xo, b'e
tiu-'i'.enT,. (-,' the r -la, ' sanoo.-.er Aber reprodires tne rea1 \ ;■.. o a
eh  ■ .jr^.n      Veu     .old   na.e   no   he'ter   re :ord   of   -eo.r   ' r,t   year   a'
v ar-, t,   t",-v'  a
a- a  Freshman  tak'n  b\   Aber
* * *
(. 1 ■/,■. a"'er tht- e da. ,nt t- 'Ap1: v.e
In a a Lire ». r that j-,-t g.- up to the
LINGERIE   SHOP   . n   S"utn      -.,.,, ee    and   Mr,
(bit n v.P ,.,; p>, ,.),, o. '■', n,j ,;* her So't
.-lug ra , jr.e, oh -h are 'I'lvr'id 're'1' So. hand
flii-. ■ 'ie- ■ j" ■;?'' r- t , , i jn. e'Oernole
<v !   are   o.O ' made   ?      h .g   a     ■    eJ -.    '"r  at     i-
g    : RAE-SONS BUDGET SHOP, ar    . , i   }   re
I- -)-,.- , '-- mj - ' r j' :: .rje, :.. E>uJt.i Tn.-r,. 'h,.. Pe... ;i-e m. •
(Jce 'ao'n a.-'ftme''' ;' sh. •.• ho- -,'"h'rta!ve t.in', that :,.,; -!r p
,iii) - -eds 'a't , 1 ed suede gh h-es n a:i tl'e newest ,hade, o' pro.'.n
an i biaT Ds rmoiatuig tre,hettes would do well to convder the
P-ngue'sl luedo t-Prd, wh di are so leverp st-tslie-i and wli-:h oome
■ n iip.es green- bia-S , taupe and hrown Or there am the peobled gran
leathers n gre> tan. or tda:k. oasoai enough tor oampu, wear \e'
dre,.\ enough \:r tfiaf ik^i'l:^.^ tea date One of Pie m:est ttong-,
al'iout the budge' shop o the reasonable proe -.jo Q tor ever\ par ot
shoe-,   m   the   shop
* * * *
Those g rP around the soror P tables look worried Can t be
e^ams that are bothering them No, the open season on Sophomore
women has begun The w;se rush.ng .-hairman who knows her business
realises that >n order to make an impression her teas must be better
than an> other teas The question is how to make them better Wli>
not phone BROWN BROS, at Seymour 1-I8T and get them to deliver a
i-enfrepie-e for \our tea table that will impress the most blase rushee
One of Brown Bros most stunning arrangements makes use of those
penoPthn tapers whi.rh oome m harmonizing shades The tapers are
plaoed m the moist ot the flowers and look exceptionally attractive
when lighted Brown Bros can supply all the bowls and candles necessary for your de:oration scheme They always give ev:ephona!l\ quick
service so get them fo do an arrangement in your sorority color3 for
your next rushing  tea
* *        *        *
Ladders m -vlk stocking^ won't impress any sor-
ohty g;r! so you'd belter be careful, rushees But
we know a way to insure against such embarassmg
occurrences Get a paT of those famous service
chiffon sold at PHOEBE'S HOSIERY shop at 7P->
Dunsmuir Street Ttiese stockings are built to give
extra wear and service and are still iust as sheer
as the -'ollege girl desires Only cost a dollar, too
It you prefer crepes Phoebe can supply you with
a pd'r wh'ch ha-, the extra Esle top for longer ser
y oe Try some of the new colors, su'h as jaunty,
deep night    "a'e   'P're and ta lieur     Phoebe s proes range 'rLm up
* *        *        *
Most every -ollege g.rl is Pott ng these days If ,ou are ;''e et
the many whv not na, a vst to the WOOL SHOP at .12:'7 \\e,t list
Avenue, and mo, w II show you bow to make something so smart that
0 w II turn your soro-r ty v,ter-, green w th envy Thev feature vi'leT
the wool that male, up Ike rabbi ha-r and , sob as m-.tledown It
.-erne, m a" manner o* entrjrvong color- and you are sure to ' nd •■>'<•.•
that »ii ! t n u th ,onr ,-wn pet .dor s'heme Leather good, aro also
made I; i r for at the \\ ooi Shop and you om >\,\ leather button,, belt
ai'd g.ove, to mjfh your new In tied hi t Th nl how stunn ng a potto.'
..,, t si '."o ' 'ho ne,\ lean, .y.-nbt look trmmed With the mo, Sard and
Pro'.yn leather pi.tlon. tha' M:: no,y ,n ,|,p!a\ n ths hjonjtng ,h -p
'Ah,   r..f   get   the   ,yeoi   r gtir   a.vd\   a'd   -tart   Pi't'ioj   w th    , :te  I
"Visit us at our new home.'
mm & LANGE
Seymour at
Dunsmuir
SEY. 2088
PERSONAL JEWELLERS TO EVERY MEMBER OF THE FAMILY
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Young Men's
Clothing
Specialists
SUITS and OVERCOATS
;'   '■     '  Made-ts-Mea .-ure
$22*0andup
See us for  your Tuxedo
DEEM and LONG
498 SEYMOUR, at PENDER
Trinity 2212
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The Accounts
of tht
Faculty and
Students
of the University of
British Columbia
are welcomed.
RANKOF
MONTREAL
Established 1817
WEST POINT GREY BRANCH
4458 10th Avenue West
A. B. MOORE, Manager
T,;-3' A,ses   n ;P ~;, .' J-'".? )2 . ".'
"Let me serve your car, and
your car will serve you."
"FRANK" FICKE
U.B.C   SERVICE   STATION
24-Hour Emergency Service — Complete Repair Facilities
SOUTH END OF McGILL ROAD                          PT. GREY 53
Where
Do You Fit in the
Economic Picture?
In this day of swift changes,
who can prophesy what field
of endeavour will prove profitable in a few years?
The views and comments of
those who hold prominent
places in the world today,
combined with a broad conception of popular opinion,
will, perhaps better than anything else, serve as a yardstick in judging the economic
trend.
Daily—facta, figures and the
opinions of world known figures appear in the Sun. A
highly trained editorial stall
has its fingers on the pulse
of local conditions, while the
most famous nf internal tonal
correspondents furni-li a
clear picture of \iial happenings all over tin globe.
The trend of present day
events is ileaiT>   reflected in
THE VANCOUVER
SUN
(Jot a clear vision of the fu-
(Urt. — subscribe to Vancouver's Home Town Paper,
TRIN 4111 Friday, September
25,
in
36
THE UBYSSEY ANNIVERSARY NUMBER
Three
They're Going to Gillardes I
V. B. C. Co-Eds Know Style and Value
— \M) HAVE MADE GILLARDES THEIR HEAD-
(H VHTERS FOR COATS AND DRESSES THAT
EMBODY EVERYTHING NEW AND SMART IN
CLASSROOM CHIC!
The Reasons Why—
1. The finest selection of coats and dresses.
2. Quality—more than a promise.
3. Values you cannot afford to miss!
4. Unusually low prices.
5. A credit service to suit your college budget.
RUSTY BUT WILLING-
COUNCIL STARTS WORK
GILLARDES
726 GRANVILLE STREET
Opposite the Hotel Vancouver
:*,.*
Ladies
Wear
UNIVERSITY
BOOK  STORE
LCCSc - LlA-     '.
AT REDUCED PRICES
<..-ra;:i'. :   t.-ci '•;-:'■
Re'  s  Fo.,-'ta "> re-
r     "',.   f-ai c
_ .  p   r- , .      .   -.
"     ci ■  0   l-   a ..  -  o,
rc    bat j'Ja, s -y am   t _ 1 p m
rCC'o    A\b    SC;m. kL!-"kS
ALL YOUR
ta'       BOOK SUPPLIES
r       - SOLD HERE
Let's All
Graduate
This Year!
That  is
Dancingly
Speaking
■  L a-
.:■- c,.i.it-c
LILAS   MOORE
709 WEST GEORGIA
Trinity 1710
RIDE WANTED
Wanted: Transportation from the
West   Ktid.    Sev. 6tltt2.
DRESSES FEATURED
Featured at the Marguerite Shoppe
are street and afternoon dresses.
Located at 3754 West 10th Avenue,
these dresses are priced unusually low,
ranging from $3.95 to $12.50. Do give
us a call and see them. We, also,
recommend our high-grade silk and
crepe hose at 75 cents and $1.00.
Shop at the Marguerite. Remember
the address: 3754 West 10th at Alma.
The phone is Bayview 2568-Y.
By  DARBY
A little rusty from Inexperience,
and not a little unaccustomed to
their new found dignity, members
j of Student Council gathered Monday evening for their first meeting
of  the  1936-37  academic  year.
| No serious business of any import was on the agenda, but routine matters kept the tin gods busy
for a couple of hours. After the
usual meal, Including council olives,
the eight present got to work.
Lyall Vine, treasurer,
thought it fit to note that
"chleelere" who attended the
council banquet laat spring
raised the cost from the expected $45 to S87. Nothing
could be done about that,
Gould commented, but such
things would be watched this
year.
Alan Morley's attempt to "make
the campus safe for drunks," as
the proposed amendments to the
constitution were called, was debated. Council, feeling that inebriates need little protection, shelved
the matter. The Tbyssey reporter
left before this, tint we are told
that  that  was  the decision.
Audrey Horwood thought it worth
wlille mentioning that one freshman, after being shown over the
campus and given tea in the cafe,
actually thanked Mr. Cage for the
trouble taken, (iotild regretted
that no names were available on
tills matter, its such a person should
be carefully  watched.
Dave Carey got a motion through
in order that is pairs of shorts
could be purchased for the English
"Rugger" boys. While shorts were
the topic. Audrey Horwood mentioned that the women's undergrad
wanted to stage a tea dance after
the lirst big game. Duly approved
and  passed.
Mention of the year's social
program brought forth another spurt from Miss Horwood, who introduced the
question of having minor
functions run from 8 to 12,
because "some mothers want
their daughters home at a
good time."
fiould was against this. In the
McCieer logic, he pointed out that
they wouldn't go home, but would
proceed to raise the evil one in
the local dens of ill repute. "The
S to 12 hours would put us hack
iu the high school class." he stated.
This year may see the abolition
of the Cairn Ceremony for the frosh
If some members of the council
have their way. It was proposed to
give the Cairn talk to the seniors
who have developed a "true love for
the university." The matter was
left  to  the freshman committee,
An example of council procedure
was shown in the handling of a
motion Introduced by Beth Evans.
Nobody seemed to agree with her
during the discussion, so at the
suggestion of Jay, they took a
straw vote and the "no's" were
overwhelming. So the defeated motion didn't go into  the minutes.
When the matter of a chinch
service for the frosh came up, Witbeck begged off handling the matter, saying that he had little of the
crusading spirit. Hob McMaster and
the freshman committee will work
out the details, which are probably
to be found elsewhere in this
paper.
LA CANADIENNE
l Students, preferably of the third
and fourth years, who are interested In a French club, are asked to
apply to Evelyn Prlsk, Arts Letter
Rack, in order to receive proper
notification of the first  meeting.
NEW POST IS
ASSUMED BY
PROFESSOR
Col. H. T. Logan Goes
To Fairbridge
Farm School
With Colonel H. T. Logan leuv-
ing the I'.H.C. campus this fall to
assume his new position as principal of tlie (-'airbridge Farm School
at Duncan. V. I„ the university will
lose one of its most active and
popular workers. Colonel Logan
has been granted a two years leave
of absence from this university to
take  up his new duties.
The announcement followed the
Hoard of (loveruors meeting of
June 11. Colonel Logun has been
for a long time a professor In the
department of classics, as well as
a worker in the C.O.T.C., the Student Christian .Movement and other
campus groups.
John Logan. L.S.E., representative on Student Council, will carry
tin the family tradition of service
coupled with high scholarship.
ADVERTISERS IN THE
UBYSSEY gitv dependable set-
lice.
Specialized Courses In
Practical and Saleable Art
FULL and PART-TIME
DAY and EVENING
CLASSES
also
CHILDREN'S SATURDAY
MORNING CLASSES
A knowledge of Advertising Layout is
essential to Editors, Advertising Salesmen,
Printing Salesmen and Business Men and
Women who write their own advertising.
Problems of design, copy fitting, choice of
illustrations, editorial message, etc., cannot be solved without it. Professional assignments in Commercial Design, involving
Monograms, Letterheads, Greeting Cards,
Book and Catalogue Covers, are also fully
analysed and discussed by the Instructor,
Mr. R. C. Mills. The earnest and ambitious student will find the work interest-
ng, diversified and intensive.
STORY  ILLUSTRATION—
Mr. Clark Stcu'iiMin treat- this work in
a wry practical manner, with an eye always
towards the requirements ui reproduction.
VKance students will he interested in the
Portrait   Painting  section ot  this division
MURAL PAINTING and WATER COLOUR—
(ieneral Water Colour work, and I.lie
Drawing leading to Mural Painting, are
under the direction oi Mrs Kate Smith
Hoole. known throughout the West for her
animal   drawing  and   painting
CARTOONING—
Acquire a professional technique from
a professional cartoonist Mr Ic H. Mc-
Taggart is the Instructor He has successfully free-lanced on
the Pr<nnitc lor the
past two years, under
the initials of "|- H
M " (Inly one evening per week of your
time is necess.irv.
CRAFTS—
Modelling and Sculpturing, and Wood
Carving of animals and decorative household accessories are under the guiding hand
ol  \1 iss Maisie Robertson i Dip. \ S I) A.A. I
PHOTOGRAPHY-
(iener.il. Amateur and Professional Courses arc ottered hv Mr W II Ik'st, I RSA,
A K PS. one of the best-known authorities
on this subject in Canada. Amateurs will
be especially interested in the l-.lementarv
Itt-I.essoii  Class.
Saturday Morning Classes
An excellent place to park that precocious
younger brother or sister Miss Irene Sanderson's qualifications and ability will soon
make him lor her) the pride id''the family.
SPECIAL CRAFT CLASSES—
Miss Sanderson is also holding classes in
Interior Decorating. I eatherwork. Stitcherv
uppHque and cross-stitch i , and Period
I urnittire
ENROLL NOW FOR FALL CLASSES
I he  I res are  low.
I he   I .ocatioti   is  com cnient.
I ho. Prospectus 1- vouts fnr the asking
No. 6, 7 and 8 PUBLICITY BUILDING
710 SEYMOUR ST. at GEORGIA    VANCOUVER
Phone Seymour 3697
+•	
BALLARD CARPET
CLEANING WORKS
1260 Venables
High. 413
DUFFUS
about your Business Training
Seymour b Pender — Trinity 2574 — Day fir Night
 *
BETTER BILT
UPHOLSTERY
Ov-No^n ! : Suites Mj e to
Or.x-r
N. NELSON CO.
2437 Granville Street
Bayview 724
The Nearest Bank is
The Canadian
Bank of
Commerce
Tenth and Sasamat Branch
A   general   banking   busnecs   c   transacted   a"d   a"curts   c*   the   Fa cult,
and   Students   rJ   the    Un-,ers-t>    O
br t ih   C' 'uti'-p a   are   v.ehcmed
Bankers to the
Alma Mater
Society
C. R. MYERS, Manager
"BEAR IN MIND-
—the car in rugged condition is the car that Is
cheap to run."
—WALLY ARTHUR
WEST POINT
GREY GARAGE
4378 West 10th Avenue
Phone: Pt. Grey'560
j Barcelona
I Y Hi (Hit i/   Stifnii ;.
I       « *
f      »• 3799 We»t   —»
j      J{ 10th Avenue    :
DINE	
again at
The GABLES Inn
Betide University Hill Post Office
Specials For The University Student!
LOOSE LEAF HOOKS
REAL VALUE!
Zipper Loose Leaf Hinder
llxo'j     :i  Standard   Rintra   and   100
Faint    Killed    Sheets.      Kliminateu
tost pui'i'i-4. e/% ak
Complete ?4lW
Hi'Bvy Canvas Covered I,. I.. Hinder
Size llxS'.j, with \K riniM t£« «■
and   100 sheet*  foi- ^Al«9
Imitation Leather I,. I.. Cover. Size
llv"., with .1 rintts and f| 4 A
100  sheets,  fur ^X«XU
Semi-stitT I.. I.. Cover. Size llx**'a,
with ;f ritiK- ami 100 sheets, BA^
for 3VC
Many  Other Styles  and Sizes   Popularly
Priced   for  You  to  Choose  From.
All   Our   Loose   Leaf   Refills   are   Made
From  (iood  (Juality   Paper.
EXERCISE BOOKS AND
SUNDRIES
210-patre    Stiff    Cover    Exercise    Book.
Regularly "jOc each,  for YK^
tach **V
lOO-paire  Kxercise  Hooks,  Hlack  \ Aj4
and  Assorted Covers.    Each ■kw^l*
10  lor 75c
U50 Sheets,   llx*1.,   Typewriter  9Bjjt
Paper,  for m9^i
:i00   Sheets,   llxKO,   Yellow 2St£
Second  Sheets,  for •w^»
100   Linen   Loose   Leaf  Reinforce-   11^
ments, for "t*1
Venus   Velvet   Drawint!   Pencils,      |^t
(iraded.     Each *T*
Drafting  SUs.
From
Drawing   Ink.
From
630 , $7.50
130 u. 400
Waterman, Parker. Wahl and Shaeffer Fountain Pens $2.50 Up
All Makes Repaired by Experienced Mechanics.
MITCHELL-FOLEY LIMITED
Stationers — Printers
522 Hastings Street West Opposite Spencer's
Congratulations to the U. B. C.—
USED BOOKS
BOUGHT AND SOLD
Highest Prices Paid
LEWIS BOOK SHOP
Down  the  Steps at 433  RICHARDS STREET
Charm
of HOLLYWOOD
ROOM 214   -   VANCOUVER BLOCK
Trinity 5916
Accenting the Appealing Charm of Your Personality
b\
**       *+       »* cf  being  chc-Km-'q co"  be ev bune :  guile oj.i1.
Quito o'ton  rho coirjrcit h-e.iuf.  of -.our foi leu co-e is is gujlifie : overs i:> Lvjub   neat-v*
•-■'''okcc.  ' t:. ■ jrticuijr CcKO. d" ; dMonhon fo 'ho ^ i'1    jn '
•• *   0,,urso'     jjf.rul    n.^o-u;         \ uU     roo    CJn   hdU'   J   -0" ^ he f ro^h  I0volm0-S n-jclc ; O-ibk' k   tlvso ; -0. 'L-rcc Ccin-.Ot
,ii.|r.i ,,h ,,, be j xejujtob   .:o^"ntv:      ton ..irv ar :u:..   ip'o'eJ  to CJil
0!»   'he  CHARM   ^jio-'     (.M'Onona  i  Cham eioq^K   \\A\   he
x ol'   fc • •' i.cn'v cci'i ho (."'h.irvo-: b\   the su;-enor : ro; jr.-:- vhghu- ;  to qiu   c eu j hh'[T  SKIN  Vq ^[.\ SIS b\  jlcumt-
'!o"- j" ' 'c-'lvc- C'f Ct'Ah\1 c(  Holhuoo'      The : rohk-ni e\-e'     briegir-g out  cc-e.r   i-i-:,-.i :i.i..il  ;i'V"jl-!,
COJfTlETICS
HOUYUJOOO Foi
THE UBYSSEY ANNIVERSARY NUMBER
Friday, September 25,  1936
Freshmen look like
In our Sportswear
Department you'll
find exactly what it
takes to make an A-
plus college wardrobe of casually correct c 1 a s s r o o m
clothes . . .
. . . (right) a white,
rib - knit, turtle-
necked, belted
sweater from Britain .. . $1.95—over
a black and white
check wool skirt . . .
$2.95.
. . . (left) a beautiful peasant red cardigan from Austria
. . . $6.95 . . . tops a
distinctive black and
red plaid skirt of
imported tweed . . .
$2.95.
(Below) We wish we could sketch more than juat one
of  our grand  collection  of  blouses—there  are  many
styles, colors and fabrics from which to choose. The one
shown is of white silk crepe, well-tailored and
daintily  trimmed   with  tucks  and  faggoting
. . . $2.95.
—Sportswear, third floor, at THE BAY.
(Above) Our Sweater Shop is over-flowing
with exciting and interesting styles in
glorious new shades . . , here's classroom
chic in an adorable shrimp pink and gray
rib-knit wool pullover from England, $3.95.
(Right) Spotty—sturdy—and stylish enough
for football games and ull the campus trotting
you'll be doing this season—these well-fashioned, flattering brogues in calf combined
with pebble leather have the new, smooth
looking moccasin vamp . . , $6.50.
—Women's Shoes. Main Floor, at THE BAY.
CLEVER U.B.C.
STUDENT DIES
IN RHODESIA
Gordon Cummings Was on
Geological Survey
News of the death of Alfred Gordon Cunimings, a brilliant graduate
of the University or British Columbia, was received In Vancouver on
Sunday,  September 13.    Mr. Cum-
\ mings, the only son of Mr. and Mrs.
| Alfred   Cummings   of   1672   Beach
! Avenue,  died  of  typhoid  fever ln
! Abercorn,  Northern  Rhodesia.
!     While   at   1'nlverslty   here,   Mr.
' Cummings was president of the G.
M.  Dawson  Geological  Discussions
Club,   a   member  of   the   Flayers'
Club, aud Sigma Mil Delta fraternity. Culminating a brilliant scholastic career, he was the only member of the class of Geological Engineering   to   graduate   with   first-
class honors.
Mr. Cummings left last April to
work as a geologist for the British
South Africa Company, and had
only been in the field about six
weeks when he contracted typhoid
1 fever, though he had been Innocu-
; lated for It shortly before leaving
Vancouver.
Mr. Cummings was born ln Fertile, B. C, where he was well
known. Besides his parents he
leaves two sisters, Virginia and
Dorothy, the latter a student at
U.B.C.
RIDE WANTED
Transportation wanted from 41st
and Dunbar.   Kerr. 7897L.
FIRST TERM TRIO
The Mathematics Dept. would
like to draw attention to the fact
that Triguotnetry and Analytic
Geometry are given in the first
term this year.
Frosh Tour The
Campus On
Monday
"[ wonder how I'm going to get
! any   work  done  this  year?"  were
Jay Gould's first words as he surveyed   the   beaming   faces   of   the
new Frosh class Monday afternoon,
describing  them as  "broad  shoul-
! dered, mature men, and the women
! a galaxy of  beauty."    Iu spite of
! wet weather more than 300 fresh-
j men arrived on the campus to hear
! the Alma Mater Society President's
address and to make a tour of In-
; spection of the buildings.
Professor    Walter    Gage,    who
heads   this   year's   Initiation   committee,   welcomed  the  newcomers,
apologized for the "unusual weather," and explained the mysterious
ritual   of   standing   while   Council
; members and other dignitaries en
tered   the   Auditorium.     Following
! his   address,   Constable   "Bill"   Orchard   of   the   Provincial    Police,
; briefly outlined  local traffic  regu-
1 lations for the benefit of car-owners, and asked  for their co-operation In  keeping the roads safe for
student traffic.
Following the addresses in the
1 Auditorium, the freshmen were divided Into parties to tour the cam-
I pus under the direction of benevolent sophomores in billowing gowns.
Dodging from shelter to shelter In
: the rain, the groups inspected the
Intricacies of the Library, listened
to a lecture on Library methods by
Miss Lannlng, explored the long
smelly corridors of the Science
Building, the roaring depths of the
Power House, and the equipment of
the Applied Science shops and laboratories. The boundless knowledge
of the "Information" men was supplemented at strategic points by
special lecturers, who explained the
methods of their particular departments.
STUDENT DIES
IN TRUCK
CRASH
Gerald Sweetnam Killed
In July; Was In
Arts '39
With the death of Gerald Sweetnam in the city last July, the University lost one of the most promising young men in the class of
Arts  '39.
Coining to the University last
year, Sweetnam had completed his
first year course in Arts with good
standing, He intended to take theology eventually and enter the service of the Church  of England.
Sweetnam was working for an
Eburne ice plant during the summer when he met his death. The
truck which he was driving skidded
i suddenly on faulty pavement, and
overturned,  Dinning  its driver  be-
| neath the cab. Injuries sustained
were unfortunately serious enough
to result in death.
j     Sweetnam   was  extremely   popu-
| lar with all who knew him.    One
or the few freshmen to make the
Senior  soccer  team,   he   played  a
consistently good game all season
at  left   half.    His  untimely  death
was probably most deeply regretted
; by the members of the team, every
| one or whom admired him for his
j clean playing and good sportsmanship.
SPUDS... leave your mouth fresh
10
FOR
10c
25
FOR
25c
tt       CORK TIP or PLAIN
Also, Spud Fine-cut Tobacco for rolling your
own, 10c the package.
ROCK CITY TOBACCO COMPANY, LIMITED, QUEBEC
Canadian and Independent
Constable Stresses
Traffic Rules
Constable William Orchard of
the Provincial Police, addressing
the Freshman class Monday afternoon, emphasized the following
points for the benefit of car owners.
(1) Driver's licenses must be
carried at all times.
(2) Traffic signs have been reduced to a minimum on the
University area, and must be
obeyed.
(3) Cars leaving the University
gates at a greater speed than
20 miles per hour are liable
to arrest by both City and
Provincial police forces since
the gates are on the boun
dary of the city limits.
(4) No parking in front of the
Gymn after 9 a.m., due to
tire regulations.
15) No stickers may be carried
on the back window. "U.B.
C." stickers belong on the
lower right-hand corner of
the   windshield.
(6) Cars must not be overloaded
with passengers. Students
are the worst offenders.
(7) Observe all school zones
throughout the city.
Constable Orchard is willing to
answer questions at any time, and
requests the co-operation of students during the coming year.
The courae at the
VaneouTer Itenotype
Coaching School pro-
pare* th* atndent to
do mor* than Juat
take dictation "fMtar
t h * n anyone can
talk." A fully trained
■teaotypUt ia an all-
round aeeretary-eten-
ographer — on* cap-
able of compelling
and editing hualneaa
oorreapondono*.
rail tlm* atudenta
can graduate in alx
month*. livening- atu-
denta ln a year.
STENOTYPE
STUDENTS
KNOW what they'll do
when they graduate
Stenotype Students at the Vancouver
Stenotype Coaching School know that
when they graduate they will not have to
join the ranks of shorthand-stenographers, thousands of whom are today out of
employment. This Is a day for experts—
only those with special training are assured of steady employment, advancement and a good salary. Only above the
crowd can one find the better job, the
higher pay. the richer life—those things
every business entrant seeks, Steuotypy
is the greatest opportunity today for
those keen, alert and forward looking
young men and women who recognize
the unlimited opportunity for the trained
Steiiotypiat—the specialist in recording
speech, in both business ami professional
offices and In the field of curt, convention and parliamentary reporting. Personally investigate Stenotypv. Phone for
an appointment, or (onus in and see a
demonstration.
DAY AND EVENING CLASSES
These advantages at" available to all—
to those who are employed and to those
who can devote full time to study. Coaching School facilities are available continuously  from  S:H0   a.m.   to   10:30   p.m.
522 Pender W., Vancouver, Phone Sey. 5406
Arcade Bldg., Victoria, Phone E 9824
THE VANCOUVER STENOTYPE
COACHING SCHOOL <;.-
t '       i -~ "
THE UBySSLY ANNIVERSARY  NUWBER
History Record of U.B.C. Began Decade Before Vancouver Was City
professors NEW DEAN TO FILL PLACE
promotes VACATED BY R.W. BROCK
Summer Changes Made by     J.  N.  Finlayson to Head Applied Science;
Board of Governors m. Y. Williams Promoted; Other Changes.
Affect Several Filling   the   position   of   Dean   of       	
Tii.' board of governors, at their   Applied Sri.■nee. vacated a year ago Scholar   Honored
1 'Ml'-     U     tueetiu..     prnmoteil     live    1, v   t lie   I van ie   deat ll   of   I lean   U.   W. , ,     , , . . , , 	
,   ,   ,,       ,   ,,       r,,;,.   ,.  :,..   ,       I,     .,'      .        ,   ,        v       ■           .■•   i -^    scholar   and    an    advocate   ot    eouver  ceased   to  exist,        hat   hap-
.!• Illhel's   <>|    the    I  ni\el'slt>    teaell-    llrock.     ,|ohn     \otTlson     I-lllliivson .                  .,,.,,,,                            ,       .
,   .,      i...  ,    , ,.  I-    n    o, „.,,,.,I                    ■   .    i .    ..      r-i...     .   ',:• i international    goodwill.    Mr.    Inazo   pened   L'l   vears   nvn,   the   occasion
n-   statt.     I'rotesor   !•.   II.   toward,   was apomted  to the  I ,|!.( . stutt  by ...    ,                           ,    ,              , ,       ,          ,                  ,        , .
:,,.     , ,, ,■   . . ,,,    ,■  I,:,,,,,,,   i,.,.   .1     ,        ,    ,■            ,                i  Nitobe was recentlv honored li\- the   which  marks  this  vear as  the  end
iSMH-late   protessor  ot   lllston,   has   the boa I'd ol  Liov.-rnors on  June  -.). ,                     ,,   .                            .      ,                   ,                                           ,      ,
 i    ,       ,i        ,       ;,:            ,>         ,,            ,.■    ,                                   i When     tie     I  ntversltv     receive!      il     of   lie    I  lilversilvs   Vi alt 1111 liens
■leeii   promote.I   to   the   position   ol       Dean  Huhnson,  innnciiv  proles- ,                  , .
P,-..f..,.„r  i„  i li.- same  department,   sor of civil eimi.ieeriim a,'the ('ni- fntverstty     of     liri.ish     Columbia       I.  was „■ J:»-T that delini.e steps
Irmessor  Soward   has  a  Canada-   versitv  of   .Manitoba,  will  hold  the *m  "f « -'"l"""^' lantern and ^ar-   were   take,,    |,v   Dr.   II,   K.   \.,....«.
api-   reputation   as   an   interpreter   dual   position   heiv   of   dean   of   the ('1,11' <•""»«'•'' '»>' "i""^ "> ""' '""'■    -MIniKt.-r of  Kdueanon.  to  establish
■I     current     events.     His     recent    ,-,< -ult v and load of tin- civil eiiKin- '"' "M"'   Xi!"1"''    l'lrsH"llli"" ns    the  rniversi,y  when  he introduced
-.  ,.f   talks  over  the   Canadian   eermu department      The  new  dean ,lla,h'   ""   Au'U,lsl   -1"1'   last   l,v   ,h"   »    "''"i v.-rsit v     ,;,ulownie„l     Act"
Kadi..    Commission     followed     tlm   is   w Iv   known   a>uo„,   ,|,e   men- »""»•  »<"■   ls,,ii-  ('""sul "r 'hl',an  in    Tllis   Al'<   u',s   followed   in   l!ms  hy
-am- trend.                                                he.-s of the eiiuueerinu institute of llriiish   Columbia.                                     an Ad establish!,m and in.-orpornt-
I'rofessor   T.    Larsen,    associate   Canada,  and   has    in  I'orn.er  vears, '"'   xi"'11"   was   a   distinguished    ing   ihe   I'niversity  of   llritish  Col-
:r..fr>sor,.f Km'lish. has also been   exor.-ise.l   his  profession  in   llritish teacher on three continents.                 unibia and repealing th'- old Act of
..used   to   full   professorship.     I'm-   Columbia, lMtn-1.
.ess,,,- Larsen  is  Hon.  1'ivsident  ,,f       Dean   Finlav-oii    was   the   pi.si- Al»ril 1'7 l.oard m<- tinu.    Dr. Swan-
vers' Club nnd Arts   ::\ and   dent  of the   I'rot'e-ional   Lngineer- s""  has  l»'1'11 ""  ""'  s,al1  '"'  h""1
a.is sponsored many recent changes   in-    Institute    of    Manitoba    since Slant.,rd   and   Wisconsin   I niversi-
,n  the fonner organisation.                    LH'.i.    lb- was born in Nova Scotia, '"'^
A third promotion trom associate   and edin-ated ai  I'ictou and  Mctiill, 1,r   M'   Y-  ^'iUi1""^  professor in
•o  full  professor has  been  made in   graduating   with   li.Sc   in   Dims  and ""'    (1''!,;''''ln""'    "r    -u''*'3 "^ >'•    has
W1IILK this year, l!»3ij. marks the 1'lst anniversary of the opening of thc I'niversity of
llritish Columbia, it is an interesting fact that the creation of a I'niversity of llritish
Columbia was first advocated its long ago as 1S77 by Superintendent Jessop.    However, it was not until .1S!»0 that thc Provincial Legislature passed an Act establishing a body
politic and corporate named "The I'niversity of British Columbia."
In liHlt; an Act was passed incorporating the Iloyal institution for the Advancement
of Learning of British Columbia which, in t lie same year, established at Vancouver the
McGill University College of British Columbia. The scope of the work undertaken by this
college was gradually increased until 1H1." when it was taken over by the University of
British Columbia.    It was giving three years in Arts and Science, and two years in Applied
Science. With the opening of the
I'niversity of British Columbia.
.Mctiill   I'niversity  College  of   Van-
Vv'c
E> tc
id Congratulations
fo
the U. B. C,
SEY. 3284
E.
J.
GIBSON
Limited
HOWE AT DUNSMUIR
'he   case   of   Professor   L.   Kichard-    ,\|,Sc.   the   foil
iWlll-     Vent'.
been   promoted   to   th"  head   of  tin
-on    of    the    mathematics    depart To the vacant  position of profes-   department   and   protessor   ,,r   pa|-
cent.      Also    in    that    department,   sor and   head of  l lie depart im-nt  of   neiitol.my   and   st i a! igr.,phy.     With
'loiessor    Waller   CcL-e   has    been    mechanical and electrical >-m:ineor-
a loni; record of 1 i ■ -1»I  work, stretch
Hie an associate proles.,,,-.   |„  ,he    Jul; tin- api .tlm-nt  has I,.-en  mad.-    '">'■-  •''■""'  ''"■ 'i'1 ' l,is graduation
pct-liiient of D-ulnsij, <:. Davis llf ,„.. ,,,.,.„„. ,,,,,,,, MacLeod, pro- <'''"•" Vale in 1!M_ to his appointment to I'.II.C. iii I'lC'l, Dr. Williams   \\ as   1'ecolli llle||.|e.|    to   tile   tnV-
ernoi's as ha \ iu- an i xo-Ilent hack
ees jiroinoied l'i'oin a--i-ian!   to in-   fessm'  of   .-1. clrical   .-ngine.-i-ing   at
-tructor. the   | 'ic vi i-sji \    ot'   Alberta. '
Dr.  Ma.-Lend is a  -raduate of Mc     '
Hill and   llannr.l. hoidinc  his  I'h.D.    ^''Ulud   for   his   ,,,-w
I'm m   the   latter   iu-t it ut ion.     Since
I!'J I   le-   ha -   be. n   a~- ooialed    with
'lie   Alberta   university
111'     Cia I .-ace    ( )     Swa iisoii .    head
. if    L'eolo" ;,     a I    tile    \| ll   lliL.I 11    Techno-
11 fS . .   . // ioL'ical    S.   I !.    «',!-    eh,,s,   n     |,\      I'    It.
C       [llC     t!|e     |,, ,  . |     O |      | j 1". .' e-  so)'     III'     III j IL -
■raloj \      and     1" ' i    - rapliy     at     tin-
Little Theatre
Reopens With
Springtime
Spiinct line for i t •iir.\-." a bub-
cm- . .im My in Me- -ophist icat.-d
. in  si.n-i-i-iic;   I '.I i.e.  and  ex I '.I! C.
' ,1 '   .IS,      Wi 11     li i VI I      Li! t I-        Til'   a I I'e
, 'ii I j. in .-,    toiii-- lit    a ud     t. i|!ii.ii-. iw
Vetdlig    ill    special    11. ■ 11. - I i t     pel'l'iil'lll-
i a. .-s Inn,, prim.; ( ci;.- (1 lover, u ho
plans to study drama at the role-
bra fed \. w Tlcri lr.- iu X.-w York.
Mr. (Ilovr. dither;, star of the
pla'.' and lah-iited \'aurouver ama-
leiii-, is known for his more than
impotent   work   in   Little   Theatre
.ml Progressive Arts club offer-
:nus, havim; travelled p, Mtiawa
'his spring with the explosive
. nd-Is' pl,i;c. "Waitiuc for L. I't>c"
11 is not retiorully known that (lii\-
> a I '. I! C. c raduat.- an I l.muur.s
:na n in  th" iiudi ama I ie  li.-hl of /. n i-
' Spi'iac ' Hie-    i,, ,r    lb iiry,"    w hi. h
: '• ro.rm.p up •■ in i J'la :li um Sam:;.- r
'I'll.-a '!'.- i .... huh i ,rc,i:, iza ' ion i- pi'---
-■ n ' in" t. ii, je ||,'.. [.- ■ r; p i ri 11; i!: < •■.. 1 i!-; • - -
■'.ise    featured     in     the     (Cist     Luni.e
\le\aiider, IMayer.-' Club star: Mar-
cer\- lieiisoii of Victoria, and Dill
Lii.kiiiL'hani.
Tickets for the sprightly l'..-u
l.e\-y comedy are on sale at tin- ,1
■A'.    Ke||\-    I'ialle    llollse.
Compliments
PACIFICPU3LI5HERS
LIMITED
Province Building    —    Victory Square
Vancouver,  B.  C.
LINDE CANADIAN
REFRIGERATION
COMPANY LIMITED
500 Campbell
BEATTY BROTHERS
LIMITED
910 Granville Street
Trinity 6121
ELMO MARSHALL
Chiropractor
470 Granville Street
Seymour 6021
ORANGE CRUSH
(B.C.)  LIMITED
3675 West Fourth
Bayview 3571
CANADIAN  BOXES
LIMITED
Manufacturers of Corrugated
Fibre Boxes
281-3 Industrial Street
Phone: Seymour 8481
Vancouver, B. C.
Jas. McCowan and Co.
/.ai/),-.'   air.!   (,i»/C   Tailor
431   Homer St.
Sey. 1947
IRIS STEAM BATHS
1235 W. Broadway      Bay. 9274
KUMFORT
FURNACE
COMPANY
5669 TYNE
GORDON b BELYEA
LIMITED
101 Powell Street       Sey. 3131
HODGSON LUMBER
COMPANYLIMITED
1728 E. 20th Ave.        Fair. 56
SPROTT-SHAW   SCHOOLS
Vancouver, B. C.
AMERICAN CONSUL
GENERAL
JOHN K. DAVIS
CHAS. W. BRYNE
710 Seymour Street
H. R. MacMILLAN EXPORT
Company Limited
LUMBER and SHIPPING
Vancouver, B. C.
SHARP b THOMPSON
C. M. OLIVER b COMPANY LIMITED
LJlVd-.c'd,
640 West Hastings
Seymour 8024
The
COMMODORE
CABARET
Limited
Wislics Man) Hti['[)) Returns
tn the Unit visit} on its 2 1st
Birthday!
MORRIS  EIGHT
The   Aristocrat   of   Small   Cars.
The only British car built by SPECIALIZATION.
We have no other interests but thc servicing of MORRIS CARS.
OXFORD MOTORS LIMITED
1147 HOWE STREET TRINITY  1593
REEVE   A.    M.   GRAUER
MARPOLE
!    \
\ isres to tve
U B.C.
JANTZEN KNITTING MILLS of CANADA Ltd.
10th Avenue and Kingsway Vancouver, B. C.
VICTORIA
BIRD   b   TALLING
LIMITED
INVESTMENT  COUNSEL
INSURANCE
790  DUNSMUIR   STREET
Corner Howe
VANCOUVER
CHILLIWACK
NORTHERN CONSTRUCTION CO.
and J. W. STEWART LTD.
736 Granville Street
Vancouver, B. C.
MOHAWK   LUMBER  COMPANY
1210 Columbia Street
NEW WESTMINSTER. B. C. TMl UtYSSf.V ANNI.LkSARY NUMBlF
* CONGRATULATIONS TO T
The
Western City Company
LIMIT!--.!)
WESTERN    CITY    BUILDING
544    HOWE   STREET
\ AM (II   \UK.    CAN \!>A
From  .  •  •
E. G. BAYNES
On uer-Maitaxer
GROSVENOR HOTEL
840 Howe Street
Best  Wishes to the
"[)"
from
ALFRED HYAMS
NEW YORK FUR
Company  Limited
797 West Georgia
Best Wishes'
FIRBANK & LANGE
Jewelers
DUNSMUIR and SEYMOUR
Compliments
of
DR R. E McKECHNIE
8. C. Provincial Commission
of the
Canadian Legion
of the
British Empire Service League
dittaiUtme Jtonhc
802 Robson Street
(>\r(i(j(r< ■ /((/(uin'ti
Phone Trinity 3741
' L-.••■   ■:.   ■   • >■■.-
C- " ;rji.djti   -
R.   C.   P U R D Y
CHOCOLATES
675 GRANVILLE and
2843 GRANVILLE
Let's Go!
ALMA DANCING
ACADEMY
3695 West Broadway
Congratulations from
ANDERSON PRINTING
COMPANY LTD.
455 Hamilton Street
Best   Wishes  From
C. P. FOSTER b CO.
LIMITED
Commercial and Educational
Stationers
592 Seymour Street Sey. 5070
GEO. T. WADDS
.     The
Photographer
1318 Granville Street
From FRANK PANVINI
COMMODORE
RECREATIONS
840 Granville Street
SWAN BROS. LTD.
Expert Cleaners & Dyers
12th & Kingsway —Fair. 6200
Branch:
537 Richards St.        Sey. 6200
A Regular Meeting
Place for I'. /J. ( .
Men   and   Women!
SCOTT'S
CAFE and BAKERY
722 Granville Street
With Every Good Wish from
Novikoff b Platowa
Dancing School
560 Granville Street
Seymour 1968
f'V
Maitland, Maitland,
Remnant and Hutcheson
I'       I'  : L.
NIAGARA HOTEL
435 Pender Street West
Wells Air Transport
Limited
W. Hunter Wells,  President
GRANVILLE CABS
SEYMOUR 7777
1054 Granville Street
STANDARD
WAVE SHOP
510 WEST HASTINGS
Opposite
DAVID SPENCER'S
SEYMOUR 6560
General Equipment
Company Limited
319 West Pender Street
Seymour 5073
Mil in   Happy   Relnriiy!
University Service
Store
University Hill
W. Thurby, Prop.
From  NURSE ADELE
( )m Ht'r   and   Ofwt \it tn
WHITE ROSE
STEAM BATHS
1518 W. 13th Ave.       Bay. 785
Johnston  National
Storage Limited
Canadian National Freight
Terminal
Main Street
BORLAND ICE CREAM
COMPANY LIMITED
1520 West Sixth Avenue
BAYVIEW 1524
BURRITTBROS.
Cjrpct  and   Linoleum  Layers
Seymour 3445
Rear: 570 Hornby Street
:*r
•■•if J <
?:i cir J.'
iff f»t ^
f!
filll
I* 13 . t- W!UsHI
mm
l
"SS.  I  r     V..
■<■ i&x*i »
H»Ti
i     /■ i r%
•Til
*il
SCIENCE BUILDING
UNIVERSITY ST B.C.
T
hi: U' ..•:■
L'v'-cjvc.
-j -■
mmmmmmmmmmmmmi
C;:...-:
TV.
'.. -.'
1.'.- ■'
U-
•:-.i
1,  in Canad,
* ' V-.
■ •• '
em
j'-enr site i
~\',r
c'.... . .
■:-  L\
.* v.
~,i interrupt-;
C:-
-•   '.;.'
; -   c
do, the Univ
w j.
^ he
■- c
- * --C-.
;r 1 5 and 1<
-   ■    ;
• w
.;  U'
1 . C""
iitds \outh.
■ i  :
'!';■ r
Id"
.e Cities     It
:■..-::'
;' j-
: _h-;
:    The attracti1
:■ L':
.   f:-
-    5.;
,S:on  17'3:-:
.".     t
,: c;
'   vd
-::d
the-,   have :
''   C '
!;-. i!;
- -   ,". <
- h e
University
:uj
;■ re
' re ?•
:-n<ed in the
w      -
1- J"
-.  fir
"'"    ci
1 : I'^dividual
CASCADE LAUNDRY
& DRY CLEANERS
Complete  Laundry Service
Seymour 4672
HEMPI
1365 Gra
Smith, Davidson b
Wright Limited
1198 HOMER STREET
Seymour 1431
g:
STAR CABS LIMITED
790 Richards Street
Remember  the  Phone:
SEYMOUR 9151
ARARAT   ORIENTAL
RUG CLEANING CO.
"The  Best in  the  West"
2219 Granville Bay. 2904
Lc
U DRIVE LIMITED
520 West Georgia
SEYMOUR 5030
I ,„m   \
'ittii on t it\   J'fvw/t'r  Dai
and   ln\tnnmtttv\ —
Mi
r. and Mrs. Fran
Dumaresq
938 Robson Street
Seymour 3752   * F--iHr>     V-rMf-vIv   .">'
ti-ii   ijRYSSi:v A\'Mr.■;'!■-SA
h ' I I'l -1 f
U.B.C. ON 21st BIRTHDAY *
* -
.... *<   *
III 11    II
%
'IS
<.*
\
Jfi<j
4 \ « ?*
_     HI
II
"U'V"J»i)i g..
in ii
''''...-■■    ; *  "■'''
'm:
..M^K
i^~s 'jffi! iV
..•ft.S.   ■;...  /#■*#.
Mi*
eesioo anj murber
hpr -cf
Oi   a to'al 0(   14.--ljrg-;.,r  ir,  'r,
In \T3.:,-2 eossib'e b. tho tragn-ncont suecco accor e : I    tne
pl\  gi.en  the Births,   Nknbor k The Ubc.so.   is a" ens
once, come, ing their best v.sko on the eccas!:° ac1 : 'or' th-.
[our e.er>, nee..' can, he coisib a'v: co^e'ek. sa'^h-c- '     /"" ■
|e-cj is prominent m its ajrocuk fie' :    S: sj-.e coo o.      .' I
KVishea F-ro'v, . . .
IESEL
IEERING SCHOOL
at Seymour 7979
A',: vA\
RDES
L A D I E S'
WEAR
Opposite the Hotel Vancouver
CORSET
SHOP..
711 DUNSMUIR
STREET
Seymour 1201
F. L ANSCOMBE
Tailors  and  Dry  Cleaners
4433 West Tenth Avenue
Ell. 1540
Inowlton's Limited
//','     I'/iKU'v-
li    llapl>\    Ketimn
\5 Hastings Street West
p     Seymour 656
S. SHIRAKURA
Vancouver, B. C.
tne:! m I "-15 — 21 ;,oa-$ ag: It was in I'll tha' the Fee
|re\ to the University On this soo. construction we-r>. was oci r:c
of war cenaitions. Work wae recurve ! m 1 "23, am: m the s.i"'-.-
Jnmencoc; work in its new guoOeto at the begc-eccc z' Sc^ic- i
jn which occasion honora-. ceg'oes were grantee! b, the Urn.oret
ia\ the Unuersi';. of kitOi Cki-kcia is a i'envcinoo '!. eOct1
Icorr.rr.ecrcrate trie coming o: :o>e of the Unncrsit'. tne ;. ■•_.-.•.■' ' s. ■
PRO-MADE GOLF CO.
'  0"-\
c
Sey. 8618 117 W.Pender
Quality
Personal Attention
WILSON'S
Gloves, Hosiery and Lingerie
575 Granville Street
Phone Trinity 2801
BEGG MOTOR CO.
LIMITED
1062 West Georgia Street
MACDONALD'S
PRESCRIPTIONS
LIMITED
Medical-Dental Building
24-Hour Service    Trinity 3456
"Your Messenger"
Northwest Messenger
Company
506 Richards Street
SEYMOUR 9241
PHOTOGRAPHS are PRECIOUS
at
ex
933 West Georgia St.
Phone Trinity 633
u:.r-i-:- v;-,'
New FALL HATS
DOMINION
HAT CO.
918 Granville            Sey. 6686
ROBT. STRAIN b CO.
Optometrists and Opticians
738 Granville Street
. Telephone Trinity 416
k   r . ir  _;   ^ co' -
C- ■'' j rollout    ".
MELROSE
CAFE
716 West Hastings
Mam   Happy Returns
from
ZEIGLER CANDY
STORES
ZEIGLER CANDY CO.
977  Granville  Street
PIONEER LAUNDRY
and Dry Cleaners Ltd.
'.;: l
Seymour 8334
Good Luck
Varsity!
Ll LAS
MOORE
709 Georgia St.
W.   Trin. 1710
DALE'S ROAST
CHICKEN SHOP
Store No. V—585  Granville St.
Store No. 2—110 W.  Hastings
TURPIN  BROS. LTD.
655 Granville Street
Telephone Trinity 3527
EMPRESS MFG. CO.
LIMITED
1106-1110 HOMER STREET
Phones: Sey. 5250-5251-5252
VANCOUVER, B. C.
WESTERN SCHOOL
of PHARMACY
1524 West Sixth Avenue
Bayview 6493
Robbie T. Robertson
179  WEST   PENDER   STREET
VANCOUVER DRUG
CO. LTD.
Head Office:
456 BROADWAY WEST
GORDON CAMPBELL
LIMITED
78 East 2nd Avenue
PACIFIC ENGINEERS
LIMITED
1044 BEACH AVENUE
Seymour 8331
EMPIRE CLEANERS
LIMITED
FAIRMONT 1291
Cor. 4th and Ontario
BRITISH PACIFIC
PROPERTIES
LIMITED
VANCOUVER, B. C.
PIERRE PARIS
51 WEST HASTINGS
Seymour 4716
GELIN BROS.
626 West Pender   Trinity 2604
R. H.GALE&CO.
LIMITED
Congratulations!
WHITE LUNCH
LIMITED
HASTINGS STEAM
BATHS
766 East Hastings Street bciht
kin uBYSSk   ANNIVERSARY NUMBER
kday, September Ik,
UNIVERSITY TO SPONSOR
DEPT. OF EDUCATION
Robert England Appointed to Direct
New Work at U. B. C.
U.B.C. Has Unsurpassed Site, Stately Buildings
Art School Fills
Real Need
The   Ih'iKirtiiu'iit   of    I'tilvt'i'slty '
Kxti'iision     Adult     Education     be-
i-iiiiU'S a pri'inaiH'iit part of the University   this  year  under  the  direction nf Robert F.iioland. M.A.. newly   ^«_»_ J!SM        L
appnintml   Associate   rrofessor   of   vOllaQlan    QV
i-m-mis   i niversuy.   was  invvmnsiy ,W,V"'   ■   ■▼■««*
New Institution Offers a
- Varied Course
Dr   \X/alljar^   VJnl\/       1''illill^r  a  loi'K-l't'lt   want   in   Van-
■■    ▼▼   OHQWlG   V^llljr    tl,iivm'   for   a   school   that   teaches
art of both a practical and saleable
nature, the Canadian Institute of
Associated Arts now offers courses
in Advertising, Story Illustration,
.Mural I'aiiiiiiiK, Photography, Car-
Vigorously attacking  the  Culver-   tmniinu;. Wood Carviu,, and Animal
'In'   Western   manager  of   the   De-       > i-Uor
pjii-iui.-iit of Coloni/.ation and AKrl-   slty  lilV  o(  lhis ''"'"i'"'"1   l'"<ause   l>iawinK.
;1"""'. '" ;"".,.""v,k" 'VxvVmii it i* stai'vint; emotions while cram- Advertising and  Coininercial   l)e-
l„m.  tor the I.  V  K.  at   Winnl- ^.^ ^  stmW.n|H. hl,a(ls wilh fll(.ts sign, in the form of I.aymit for ad
■ H.u      lb'   is  the  author ot  se u-iai ^.^    ^    in,(,iii.^ent   man   could vert isemetits    In    newspapers    and
publications, the latest <>'«'<»" „„,,    ,„    a    wt,|l.l,1uipped    library, magazines; Copy willing, or the ,.,v-
"llm t olon.zation ot Western (a  -                            (.   WaUa(.(, of             -^ paralillI1 ,„• „„. wr111.■ 11 material for
ada. '     Ihe  new  director  is  a  rel- _ , _ ..........     .,,io i    c. ..„.., i..i    i >...■:     i..
low of the Hoyal Kcotioinic and
.\tnei'icati (leonrai)hical societies
;ind has done postgraduate work in
I'niversitv made a plea that the ads; ami Commercial Design in-
rniversities undertake seriously eluding lettering, creation of mono-
their full respotislbility for the ciil-   Krams,   letterheads, greeting cards,
'l'e  l!as>\^ad'''l'nucli,>expe'i'-   ,ural lil'' "l' ""' I"'"!'!'' <>f this con-   book   aud    catalogue   covers,    lr
iciice in eastern educational circles   t"u'"t
hand      perspective,     etc.,      will      be
Dr   Wallace was the only Can-     handled by Hex C. Mills. M.A. tl
int.
0f     Col.   P.t^.'i).     .Mr.   .Mills  received  hii-
Mr.  England has just returned       Mil|s College.  Oakland.
from the Vimy Pilgrimage.    Dur-        The beautiful surrounding
this   cont iiu-nI.     'Che   long   tlowiti
.    del'    the     direction     of     Mrs.     Kat>
and has carried out a  thorough in-
vistitiatiou    of    Adult    Kducation, adian speaker, amongst a score
both on this continent and in Scan- °th«"-  outstanding   men,  who  ad-     t-arly   art   training   in   .Minneapolis
plinavia       He   has   been   honorarv dressed   the  Plenary  Sessions  of     and later i„  London, K.nglaud.  Dm-
Treasurer  of   tl„.   Manitoba   Adult the recent  World  Student Chris-     'ng  the past   live years he has had
.Munition   Association tian    Federation   Conference,   at     publicity    ex p. rieme    with    I'nion
      -   " -   • ■   --■ Steamships,    Ltd.,    besides    having
s of the   work   accepted   by   Addison,   Lewis
,                  .     .                      . Cnlil'oriii'ili     CullcL'e    ('ailil)lis    Were    '^'   Associates,   (>|'   Minneapolis,
ing the war he was twice wound- ^ amni ni.in   nuiist    lampus   win                                             ,    ,.
i     a-           t :\    iiei't'cct    selliiiL'   for   one   of   the        Water    ( oloiir    and    Lite    (   a-s
ed   as  a  commissioned  officer of ll   '" '"ll   stiinig   101   om    m    un                           ,,,,..
_        ,     „         i-          r.     -^-   l most     nietui'i'Sfiue     ir'itberiiitrs     on    leading   to   Mural   Painting   are   uu-
the    Royal    Canadian    Regiment most     pnuuisqin     M»» uh^    on
,nd   was   awarded   the   Military
Cross. 	
...               ,     ,, silt;s   nt'   llli>   Orient   Wel'e   i'l'ei 111 I - n I lv     >eals    at    tile     \ a II ci ill Ve 1'    Sm1|ppii|    I
Ihe   recent   organization   of   the SUKS "' ""   ll|"nl "'"   ii''imiiu,\
■                              ..ii fn     lie     seen     'is    (leleiei tes     I'l'olll      I"     Decorative    alld     Applied     Art.     1: ■ ■ \\
Intension     Department    has    been '"   "'    M ' "   as   (nutans   umii    i-                          ,      ,-                      .   ,      ,
.,  ,       ,                ....                             .    , eipllllll-ies   IliiI'lIel'illL'   tile    I'■! ci tic   coll -     klloWll    ilS    tile    \allCOllVel'    Sclno      ol
made possible hv a s.'.n.no grant  bv i mint i n s m n n< i nm i m   i ai un   ton                                                        ,.,.,.
,.•■,,.                     .         ii tVrrcil    tii-'etliei'   im    their   coinmon    Ar''     Mt's-   Iloolc   lias   e\lulii|p,     ic
'le    Pl'liVlUcm     (elVel'lUUellt   all!     llV    l1111"     IO-III1I1     on    un u     omiiii  ,.,,,,.,
,,         .                     ,     .            ,               ,  ' I..•,,l,i,,in--                                                            f.'uiiLm.    1-.Ireland ;       ol-;\o,    .apaii;
.docatun of lunds troin the regular   l""idein.-..   '
fuiversitv   icant.      La.t    vear   the I'ne  of  the  most   spectacular  de-   .Vm„na    ..:dl,,;>    . ...awa;   L. ( .  A.
Kxt-nsinti   Service,   which   has   ,'„,• veloptncts   v,c,   th.'   umw.h   „f   an    >''   ">'eal;    Son-.y   ...   ..r.ip,,!,-   Ar-
•     i ii     miil,.i'st'in(liii"-   lip.tu- i   tin.  Cliille-e     ,|s,0     lololilo;    lllslltllte   n     All;    O-c
-'■vera!   \ears   carried   oil   a   small uuuet'-tanuiiu  intuiiuiiii   i nun   <
,,,,,   t()   ,.x. and   Japanese   r.-pivs, ,,,ai ives,     Ai    Seattle,    and    the    S an,..', v,-r    An
'irst   the   tension   was   vi-ry   notic..    Dalbrs.
Pianoforte Teacher
Is Accomplished
". . . not only an accotnpliHlied
exponent of his instrument, but a
teacher of enviable (pialitications."
This was the opinion expressed
recently by "U. J." in the Vancouver Daily Province of Kenneth
Ross, head of Vancouver's Kenneth
Koss   Pianoforte   School.
Member of the Incorporated Society of Musicians, London, Kng-
land, Mr. Uoss studied personally
with the famous pedagogue, Tobias
Matthay in London, from 1!t:hi to
1!'.'!-'. At his school in Vancouver.
Mr. Koss gives private lessons in
technique, repertoire and interpretation. In the curriculum also are :
a normal course for young teachers
and pianists, lectures on Matthay
principles, preparation for examinations leading to degree, and for
recital and radio. Playing classes
are held every other week' and
serve to provide opportunity of
performing before a musical audience.
SITUATED on the promontory which forms the western
extremity of the Point rev Peninsula, hounded on three
sides hy tho Gulf of Georgia, tho permanent site of the
University of British Columbia is undoubtedly not surpassed
in the grandeur of its location hy any other University site
in the world. In all directions appear snow-capped mountains, strikingly rugged and impressive. Tho site-comprises
an area of 548 acres, of which approximately one-half is
campus.
The buildings of the University, planned to meet the
requirements of latin students, are
of a permanent and seini-permaneiit
character. The former were designed by the I'niversity architects,
Messrs.  Sharp  and  Thompson.
In the I'niversity Library there
are more than luu.unn volumes and
about lH.niin pamphlets. It is one
of the three Canadian Repositories
of the Library of Congress Catalogues, a collection of more than
1 ,."1111,111111 printed cards, valued at
?i!."i,iMMi, The Library also receives
regularly about (isn magazines and
periodical  publications.
Hat and Gown Shoppe
552 Granville St. Vancouver, B.C.
The Smartest Shop in  Toitn
gowns of India and the rid. colon,!   s"'i">  """''•• mMrucress „,i' eich,
(lf   th(,   silksof.be orient wee f„.„„e„.lv   >■"«'•*   »'   'It,-   \a„e,,„ver   s.-h
ii'ioiuit   (if   work,   was   a
puiid   its   s'-rvices   hy   means   of   a
O'l.wn   ('ane-gii-  u'rniit   when   more
varsity   pi'ppfp-.--Hi's  bn'h  durii
winter and .-iiininer months.
able,Inn  after a number of iuiOriual
toL'elller, Il.i-Ollldel'.
■leafed   away   and
Life   Chi
■ading   to   Story    11
cull lel'eUc
In-(ration    and     Portrait     Pninii;,.
will  lie i ■ p i; i p i u. tei|   he  I 'lark  S'i \ ■ i
11 i p p I   at   lit
Mian   'un   1'si ui'es   were   mvn   tin
,,.   (i1(,   standiii'- -   Wei-.'   c	
friend-hips    wen-    huill.     The   two """■     M ''■   Sl' w
,1.-lecath.n-  plan  tn exdiaiuce  visit- ''"'"'"'■'.ia    li.-iiiut,.   of    I-":t..■   Art-.
to   „.,..   another's   countries   daring S'ul    '■'•■"M-i-co.    and    al-o    a.    Il,e
THT    r>AUY    PROM™   „f   ""'   em-itlm:   vear   and   tn   slav   in ,:,'ilMl1   IV|"ral   Srh""'  '"   Arl'   N,w
7 lit    DAIL1     I KUliLLM   0/                               •                                  • VorkCitv.    There he  was awarded
,    .          i       ;          ,      i   .      ./ .    each olli.r s home-.       I don t  kuou ■        '
what  and   nhcrc  to  fritx  things                                   ,         ,  tl,,.    bronze     medal     for     Portrait
.... ; .      how   I   will  explain  this  idea   to  ms
may be solved by consulting thc   ,,;„,,,,s ;m,,  rn,,„|s, |ml   Ul.v.Ttlu■- |)j""i'1-''   «l'il"   i»   \'111""1'"1'    i!1
advertising    columns   of    THE   |llSS , ,,,.,„  (II ,,, ,,,,.„„,-,,  „.,„, It.- l^-.    '"'    i'"cetv,,|    the    iieatme
UBVSSCY.                                             ,„,,.  snt.len.   i-.-i.Ii.-.l   wl.-n  queried s,"n"   ■\,'"1;i,1  ,"r   l!l;",k  iM"1   Uhi!"
,           ,.,,.     ,.   ,,           , .   ,      , at   lie    oca    Art   da h-i'v.
as   to   how   dilluult   H   Would   be   to
.    ,.        ,           ,- ,i     ,. I li''   ('raits   department    will    he
 -^^_^^____^________.   carrv out.    At  the close ot the ( on- ,   ,       ,,.
supervised   by   Miss   Maisie   pohert-
son,   (Dip.   V.S.D.A.A.;    scliolar.-hip
Vi^^^^W^^AV^WAWWWAfti   1'ei'ence   the  Chinese  and   .lapane
The Makers of
Felix Ginger Ale
ci'Ugi atutiite The rbyssey on
at tan ing its 'J I-* birthday. . . .
■When yi ci wi-h .o ci imnu-morate
an tintiivei'sary or birthday, be
.-ure  to  specify   FKI.IX  .  .  .  the
perfect  mixer.
went  mi  a  two-day trip together In
Yost-mite   Park.
Leader dlip      for     tile      Conference
wa- drawn
I'roin all over tin- world
award- third and fourth years i. She
has been most successful iu tie
wood carving of animals    a leinun-
dene\a.   Mis-   Sara-Cliako  of  India,
Dr.   T.   /..   Koo   of   China.   Dr.   \'nti
Thadden   of   dermany,   and   I
Mai ki"  of   l-au'land.
i i 10 ••--■. 11 i. 111   ii'oin   I'.riii  li   Co
«,!-- one ot  tin.  la i ■-'' -1  fro 11
erati ve  and   at I racti ve  -|n .-ialty.
.Miss   Ireiii-   Sa nih-r-i m,   u In i   has
I U    lllo-l    Mice. — fill    ill    (  l.ihll'i-ll'-
work,     will    be    iii     charge    ,,['    lh,
t' ,  -1     -1    1 ■ ■       . 1 M
( li ild 1'eii --    > i! nnla >■    M om ! tic    s-. i
tioti.       \!i -s    Samb-r-on    \,„,\,    p.,. t.
gradtiat'     Work   at    ihe    V;
Arl    Sol I.   i
ill's x    f ft^k'tf     WM
Mixes With the
licst Com pa in/
of      tile      Cllihlrel
for   three   years
w a -   on   lie-    -1;
s   dallei'v    Cla--
Cartooning    is    under    the    abh
a ti\ -iti-c !■• I 'in vi r-lt>c It iticiuiii d
deiii'frc>' Smith. Alfred Kitchen.
Mo-es   Long.    Kae   Farqilhar,   Won
Leung,   Daze!   Dunbar.  C„-„vk,-  Tan-   l:uuUm,r  ,,,   Ml,   ,,•    [;    M-Tagcait,
aki,  Hob  McMaster and \ \\k\n Tak-   ,.|,.   R   M .. n,- ,,,,, Vancouver "Daily
'''Ul>'"' Province."   where   he   has   success-
  _. fully   fi'eelanced   for   the   past   two
Warner Baxter Delighted
With Park Near U.B.C.
"So delighted was Warner Maxtor
and his family with the loveliness
of the surroundings when here this _   . .   . , .
summer that they spent an entire      Calgary Women s Musical
afternoon in the park.'   Tins was     Club Engages Tenor
C. Horthy Recital
revealed yesterday bv Walter Haulier of the Jubilee Park. Vancouver's prettiest and most unique
pleasure park'. "(n'ten in the afternoons," added Mr. Haiuier, "Dr.
McKechnie also comes and has tea
in   Ihe   park,"
Located on South Marine Drive
directly behind the I'niversity. .In-
bib", park is ju-t live minutes'
wa lie fri uu tin- cam pus. In a ln-a u-
tiful sylvan settiuti iu the forest
belt nt t he l'ni vi-r-il y's I lepart men!
of forestry, .he park edges the
wooded cliffs which rise i i-i>ni the
sea. Ami fi'iun your tea tabic in
tin-  [park, on.'  may  look out   upon  a
llia^f iliclit     View     ;e  l'o-s     till-     Cull'
of  (o ni"..:ia.
Most       ill lefi-sl ill"'       is       tile      g'l'ape
vinery, w Inch c. pu-^isl - of a n arbor
of inure 111,111 Inn yards in leiiuth.
and covei'ed with main- vines
i it In r a nn-nit ies in  t he pa rk  include
a     -llllg     lea     roolll      Willi     npell      lire
plai o. a dance (lo.ir moi'e t hail ."in
feci 11111 l: . and un-urpa --ed nmil
hone- i   M.kiuc.
The Cakary Women's Mu.-ical
Club announces that Carl llorthy.
distinguished N'aitcouver lydic tenor, will open their next season in
Calgary wit h a recital on t ictoher
L'V
Pos-essiiiL'   a   Voice  ol'  exoopl iou.'ll
bi'eadt Ii of vocal range, ,\l r. | lorl h>
lias frei|iiently thrilled eager audi-
p'liees in recitals in \'a in-i iii v er, Sr-
allle and \''ctoria. In Kiiclaud Ihe
siiim-r has hroadeaM for i he |',rit i-h
Hroadcast inc   < 'orp. ucit ion,
Mr.   1111 i't 11 v' >   repertoire   is   most
extensive,    ' i p 111 |H'i s i 11 c    no    le-s    (hall
1 ."in domain Loider. as well a-
inanv of tin- Italian, l-'reiich and
Kng|i-h i la-- ii s and songs of t In
tin ii'"   modern   composers,   together
Willi     Si'Vi   l'a I    I ipefas.        I lis     Voice    is
lenor of the "I .irioo Spinto" I > p.-,
and is of extraordinary fiv-hiiecs
and   purity,   with   a   rang"  owt  t\u>
octaves,       \eiy       eyell       throllghoul.
Though of II iiugurian ex. rant ion.
Ihu'lh.v 's voice has tin- true Italian
ipialit.'. and he has often h.-i-n i u i -- -
la ken    for   a    mil i ve    u hen    singing
lllele.
RD    II   j.   r   I        I   r\ ['ilsl'  iuan\'  -iiiger-.  he  -larled  a-
ussian Ballet School Opens ;| ,.,„„,,, .„|,lisl .,, ,,,„ ;,,,, ,„• ,..,
So   -in ces-ful   was   tin-   hallet   ar- wlinb  In-  coiiliinied  tn  i\,<  until  hi-
ranged    |,y    I in 1 !■■ n i in    Tatiaua    Pla voice i hanged    Al   I H  he  ua-  -lud\
town  and  pr. ---. ■ n l. -. [  in  the  Kmpivs- ing    fur    an    operatic    career    ule-n
Tin-alee   ki-l   -p-a-on   .thai   the   Hal- war   bml,..  out    I in im-d ia I e| \   p-nli.-i
lei'iiia   has   tin-   ii-;ii'  escihlished   in ing    with   llm   Canadian    force.-.   In
\'am .iiivcr  a   dun,,-   -ilimd   foi'   the -p,ait         n-ar   iu    l-'raiue    In-fur..
training   of chihlriii  and   adults   for heinc.   -. \.-rel>    wounded   al    V|U'es,
woik   \s ij!i   the   Xi-w   York and   I.on- in   Juno.   |'i|i;.
Kii'-iah   Pallet   con.paiic ;   al-o.   for        A,',,,,-    111.■    war    Mr.     Ibu'thy    iv-
woik  in  nipptioii   picture   pi'iiibn lion, sinned    hi-    studies    with    h-ading
radio  and   |. -lev isimi   art, t,.a, hers   in   America    h.-ippiv   going
H.lllel'ilia      PlaloUa     1-    assisted     by      tl,     ||:llv     ;m,|     ,,t|,e|-    Klll'npeail     cnllll
her    hioilnr.    Ikilh-I     Ma-Or    Moris tries,    wheP'    In-    stmlied    six    n-iic
X.i\ik..ff.    diiiplipi'   ot'    tin-    Uu-.-iau with   sm li    well    known    \o,-al    M;n-
An.' ih.in      I'.alel      , .unpaiiy,     \eu Sl ri a- ( 'a ,-on t:a .   M ora 11 i  a nd   Vh I or
'i ork     \b trop.diiaii    i ip.-ra       I le    i-        p,     \0m,-i,u \. r,     Mr      i I.. i -111 \     in
thi      si a -mi    arranging     halh t     lor -irin-l-    in     voi, ,      prndui I ion    and
" ' a ml   op, ra   jn    l-nig la ml cuade s    m    i ip.-ra    in    llm    I i'-rina u.
1 b.-   \'-\ il-.off and   Platou a  Sd 1 |.'|-,.hl h,    [t:ilian    and     Icimli-li    chi-
a'   o   |, a. In -   i la-  -n ah   n,nib I'll   and -i, -     a! ...   tn,,,|, ru   -nice -    Pi'.-,    audi
,,;' 11'' ""'   da m ing t j,,,,..   |,i;l.,   }„.   |liir|   pv   ;i pp,,ini ue tit
r   .   ..   .
H.
Faulkner
Sm
th School
of
Applied
and
Fine
Art
Marine Building
Vancouver,
B. C.
l'rii
Moil
I'ii'iil:    II.    loi
aii-'   H.c.  ef   ."
I.i Ml. a
.,   Si,,i
I-.ncl
Smith,
h   K. is
.Ml.
Silv. :'
lir "... n,
Co
CFTlk
4X
CANADIAN  BAKERIES LIMITED
601 West Tenth
Fairmont 44
DIETHER5
LTD.
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Granville Island
Phone: Seymour 6761
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475 Howe
: Street
EMPRESS DAIRIES
LIMITED
1002 West Hastings Street
Trinity 344
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CROWN  LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY
•170 Granville Street
VANCOUVER GRANITE COMPANY LIMITED
1007 Royal Bank Building
Vancouver, B. C.
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JOHN C. DOIG
Tailor
522 West Pender Street
J. EDWARD SEARS
Suite 409-10 Rogers Building
Telephone Seymour 6184
Residence: West 553R1
CAPILANO   BREWING
Company Limited
1445 Powcl! Street
Vancouver, B. C.
SPALDING EQUIPMENT
Quality Service Price Guaranteed
MARSHALL-WELLS   (B.C.)   LIMITED
573 Carrall Street
Vancouver, B. C.
ERNIE CLARK
Manager
RAINIER  HOTEL
Va
ncouver Tin
Baths
kish
744
West Hastings
Seymour 2070
Street
At Your Grocer and Druggist—
SOVEREIGN
TOILET TISSUE
SMITH,  DAVIDSON  and WRIGHT Friday, September 2j,
oo
THE UBYSSEY ANNIVERSARY NUMBER
Nine
FROSH GIVEN
PRESIDENT'S
WELCOME
Klinck Addresses New
Students Tuesday
Morning
Newcomer* to the university received the personal welcome of
President Klinck at a meeting; held
in the auditorium on Tuesday morn-
inv, "I wish my welcome to be not
just formal, but personal as well,"
he stated.
The president praised the work
of the various organizations which
have done such a creditable job In
preparing for the opening of the
university, and offered his sincere
thanks to the Committee of Faculty
and Students under the direction
of Walter Gage, the Students' Information Bureau and the Editorial
Board of the Students' Handbook.
"These organizations have done
yeoman service in the opening of
the university," Dr. Klinck said.
"The Students' Handbook is of
invaluable assistance to students,"
he stated. "It is compiled hy stud
ents for students, the tested experience of past years, and it emphasizes the fact that Academic life is
not narrowly pedantic or unsocial
. . . that it Implies a sense of cooperative pride." He stressed the
fact the work of the various organizations has had a force in breaking down the tendency to departmentalization in the university by
acting as a cohesive influence between students and faculty.
President Klinck discussed the
problem of scholarships and bursaries and explained the origin of
the bursary as being a matter of
a body of public spirited citizens.
At the present, bursaries are dependent upon these people and
what funds the University is able
to contribute. "This year it has
been impossible for the university
to give as much to this fund as usual
and I do not want those who have
made applications to feel that if
their application is rejected that it
is indicative of their scholastic ability," he said. "There Is a loan
fund which is available, but of late
this has been neglected by the
students."
In pointing out what lay before
them he referred to the student attitude which he suggested was, In
part, attributable to modern home
conditions where the student was
expected to carry on his usual social life regardless of the fact that
he must keep up with a heavy academic course.
"I congratulate you on your decision to come to the I'niversity,"
stated Dr. Klinck. "You have here
a golden opportunity in the advantage of your freedom in arranging
your activities and work.''
Following tlie speech of the Pres
ident, Dean Buchanan added his
words of felicitations and welcome
to those of Dr. Klinck and made
announcements and explanations of
courses, bursaries and athletics.
In athletics, women are to report
to Dean Bollert's office or to Miss
Moore at the Gym, while men, Including all those who wish to make
use of the gymnasium, must report
to Mr. Van Vliet at the gym.
Mr. Riddlngton, librarian, welcomed the students on behalf ot
the Library. He pointed out to the
assembled students that the tradition of the university was a reading tradition and that an educated
man or woman was one who uses,
knows and loves books.
RETURNS
LETTERS CLUB
The Letters Club will meet Tuesday noon, Arts 108, to elect a new
president.
PITMAN'S
Day and Night School
ENROLL NOW—FALL TERM
Students   may   enter   nt   any   time.
Pitman Shorthand, Gregg
Shorthand, Stenntypy
Complete Secretarial and
Bookkeeping Courses, Public
and High School Subjects
Individual  attention
NHIHT SCHOOL, RATES: $3.50 Month
Write   to
F.VKMNK  A.   C.   RICHARDS
Principal
Cor.   Granville   and   Broadway
VANCOUVER,  B.C.
JIM FERRIS
Jim Ferris, who returns to the
campus this vear. It is expected by many that Jim will
be active in the work of the
Parliamentary Forum. He is
an ex-member of the B C.
Bo\s' Parliament.
NOT A PUBLIC PHONE
Editors of the Ubyssey wish to
point out that the telephone ln the
Publications ofllce is not intended
for general student use. As usual,
student officers may phone from the
Ubyssey office on official university
business. Purely personal calls can
be made with the pay phones in
the Arts Building, or. if Mr. Horn
consents, with the Student Council
phone.
The permanent human element
is the character—the will. — Sir
Oliver Lodge.
The destiny of the Individual depends largely on himself, — Sir
Oliver  Lodge.
Opportunity Is more powerful
even than conquerors and prophets.—Reaconsfletd.
Men call tyranny what a century
before they had called freedom.—
Andre Maurols.
It is the spiritually minded men
who have led the world and will
continue to lead the world as long
as it spins through space.—Daniel
C. Beard.
New Film Society
To Start Here
May Affiliate With
National Film
Society
It has been suggested that those ;
members of the student body who ',
are interested in the motion picture
should form on the campus a film
club affiliated with the National
Film Society of Canada, Vancouver
Branch, which lias Just been formed.
The chief objects of the society are
to encourage and promote the
study and appreciation of motion ,
and sound pictures and television,
and it plans to Import some of the
foreign films of outstanding merit
and originality, and to hold private
exhibitions for its members.
The society will give its first
public exhibition of films on Wednesday, Sept. 30. at 8 p.m., iu the
Little Theatre, There are ten programs In prospect for the session
1936-37, and films to be shown will
Include "Kameradschaft," by the
German producer, Pabst; the
French film, "Cathedrals," the American surrealist (llm, "Lot in Sod-
am," and the Russian film, "The
Bedbug."
Professor D. O. Evans, who is Interested In the society, has announced that If a club of students
Is formed on the campus, members
will be able to attend the performances at the special terms of $2 for
the session, Instead of the regular
price of $6. Only a limited number
of student members can be accepted. I
The Film Society is also anxious
to assist in education In the use of;
films, principally iu the university.
ALL EXCHANGE STUDENTS
arc requested to be at the Ubyatey
office at 2,30 this afternoon.
Psychology Club
Applications are now being accepted for admittance to the University Psychology Club. Any person attending the University may
apply for admission to the club who
has taken Psychology I, or under
the old division, Psychology Ia. The
only other prerequisite for admission is the intention on the part of
the applicant to either major or
minor in Philosophy or Psychology.
The meetings this year will probably be In the main iu the form
of a psychology clinic .
Applications mutt be in by Monday, Oct. 7th. at 12 noon. As the
membership is limited, any persons
interested are advised to hand In
their applications at once. Applications should be addressed to
Chris. J. Loat, c o the Arts Letter
Hack.
^^W^^^^^^^^W^^^^^^^^^^^^WM*
STAR CABS *
Manager: Hob Strain. '33
With the Pen That
Students
Rate Highest
BY ACTV.il. VOTE
Invented by m Colletfe Profeasor
To Brlntf You Ultfhwr tirades
Due to Double Ink Capacity and
Full-Lkngth Visible Ink Supply,
it s/iows Days Ahead when Wa
running low—ends pen failure
In Classes and Exams
A college professor noticed that
poor grades are often due not to brains
running low but to pens running dry!
So he worked out un utterly differ,
ent and liusirully better pen principle
—and Geo. S. Purker engineered it to
perfection.
Thus came the revolutionary Parker
sacless Vucumatic tliut bus super*
scded every old-stvle pen both sac
type and sucless. See whut this has
done—
Hecently the student editors of 30
college pampers asked 4,6')9 of their
reuders, "Which muke of pen do you
own? Which pen do you prefer?"
To both questions more students
unswered "Purker," thun named any
other two makes of pens COM.
BIN ED!
One reuson is thut the Vacumatie
ink supply is EYEIi-VISlBLE, the
full length of the barrel. It isn't
merely lunt-drop visibility—doesn't
merely show when your pen is empty.
It shows days ahead WHEN fTS
RUNNING LOW, so it can't run
dry against your will.
Another big reason is the patented
Parker filler. This requires no sliding
piston pump immersed in ink. The
Vacumatic's working parts are sealed
in the top WHERE INK CAN
NEVER TOUCH TIIEM-can never
decompose them. That's why this
miracle pen is GUARANTEED
mechanically perfect.
And the Parker Vacumatie has no
rubber ink sac or lever filler—hence
has room for 102% more ink than
old-style without increase ia size.
Its luminous, laminated Pearl
■tyle has won every pen Beauty Contest bv 2 to 1. And its SCRATCH-
PROOF Point —of precious Platinum and Solid Gold—is upturned
•lightly at the tip so that even big-
fisted pressure cannot make it drag.
Go and see it and TRY it today
at any good store selling pen*. The
Parker Fountain Pen Co. Limited,
Toronto.
To Melt* Any Pen Gun Itttlf
Try this utterly different writing ink —
Parker Quoi*—an ink that
dissolves deposits left in pens
by ordinary inks. Quoi*
cleanses a pen as it writes—a
Parker or any other pen. Ends
pen-cloKKinK.GetQuiM* at any
store selling ink, 15c upward.
Congratulations on the Twenty-first Anniversary of Our University
566
SEYMOUR
PARKER PENS SOLO AT
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Stationers—Printers and Engravers
VANCOUVER
B.C.
ALWAYS A COMPLETE STOCK OF PARKER MERCHANDISE TO CHOOSE FROM
THE WILLSON STATIONERY
COMPANY LIMITED
830 Pender Street West Trinity 6291
Just V/i Blocks Off Granville
AT
MITCHELL - FOLEY
LIMITED
522 Hastings Street West Seymour 1085
Just Opposite Spencer's
University Students!
Coronas and Careers
The favourite with college
men and women for more than 25
years! Sinoe 1909, when Corona
became the first portable typewriter known to the general
public its meohanioal perfection and beauty in design
early won the discerning approval of University
students. Pioneer in its field, the Corona portable of
today reflects all the benefits of this great portable
design and manufacture, and continues in 1936 the
unquestioned favourite of college folk.
Specials!
REBUILT  TYPEWRITERS
Opening Term Specials: Rebuilt Standards and
Portables for every purse and purpose. Trade in your
old typewriter for down payment. Free delivery.
The
CONSOLIDATED TYPEWRITERS
Limited
416 RICHARDS STREET SEY. 7394 Ten
THE UBYSSEY ANNIVERSARY NUMBER
Friday, September 25,  1936
|   The VANCOUVER
jj       SYMPHONY
i SOCIETY
Bj Announces
Hi Season
S at   the
1
1       STRAND
I THEATRE
| Sunday
1        OCTOBER 4th
I at 3.00 p.m.
SI Conductor:
|p ALLARD de RIDDER
I| Soloist:
m ODETTE de FORAS
Bi
Players' Club Plans
For Year
Freshman anxious to become
members of the I'niversity Players'
Club are advised to till out application forms and deposit same In the
Arts Building box before 5 o'clock
Tuesday, September J!». F'revlous
experience is unnecessary in trying
out, since enthusiasm for acting
and theatrical work as well as potential dramatic ability will manifest   themselves   in   try-outs.
The Players' Club plans this year
to supplement its customary plentiful activity with new courses in
voice training;, under the direction
of Dorothy Somerset, brilliant Vancouver theatrical director and drama worker. There is also a possibility that classes in mind will be
inaugurated under Miss Somerset's
guidance. Play-reading groups and
performance of four one-act plays
at Christmas, with the major work
of the Spring Play in March, constitute the body of the Club's scheduled  activity  for the year.
Student tickets for the Summer
Theatre performance of the comedy
"Springtime for Henry," are on
sale at the modest price of 35c, and
may be obtained from members of
tile  Players' Club.
Health Depends on Exercise
(iood health, perenial youth, happiness—it is today almost a platitude to say that these things are
dependent upon right habits of
living. Most important of these
habits is sufficient exercise. Experienced in teaching l.li.C. students
is Miss Grace (ioddard, who taught
the University's lirst gym class arranged by Constance lllghmoor, of
which Vivienne Jones became the
star pupil and the Normal School
instructress. Miss (ioddard lias
also coached .swimming classes at
Chalmer's Church Pool arranged by
Miss  Sylvia  Thrupp.
Classes are now being held by-
Miss (ioddard at Vancouver's Crystal Pool on Monday and Thursday
mornings and Wednesday evenings,
consisting of corrective exercises,
tap and classical dancing, followed
by a swim.
There is no one more unfortunate
than the man who has never been
unfortunate, for it has never been
in his power to try himself. —
Seneca.
Only the deeply religious people
of our largely materialistic age are
the earnest men of research.—Albert  Einstein.
My list of the four most preferable things in life is: first, wisdom;
second, domestic happiness; third,
recognition and encouragement;
fourth, welfare of one's country.—
Dean   Inge.
To bring together and to reorganize ;i true family of nations is
the outstanding human need of the
time iu which we live.—Nicholas
Murray  Hutler.
You  will achieve nothing if you
do   not   begin   hy   believing in   the
possibility   of  achieving.  — Andre
Maurois.
Women Hear
Miss Bollert
Miss Moore Tells
Of Gym Classes
At 10.45 on Tuesday morning the
; women entering the University for
j the first time listened to short ad-
! dresses by .Miss Bollert, the Dean
of Women; Miss O. Moore, the director of Physical Education for
women on the campus, and Mrs. E.
V. Lucas, the head of the University   Health   Service.
"We want you to be prepared in
every way for the work and play
ahead of you." said Miss Bollert,
as she spoke informally to the girls,
"I want very much to meet each
girl in the freshman class person
ally before Christmas. We, the
professors, always start a new
year as if it were a new adventure,
and we want you to give us all the
opportunity to help you that you
can. If you have any difficulties
that can't lie straightened out at
home, please come in and tell me
about them and I will do my best
to help you.
"I want to say a little about conduct on the campus," said Miss Bollert. "This is a young university,
and it is without many of the
marks of the older Universities
which Induce reverence and respect. But it is an institution of
higher learning, and you will not
be less respectful than you would
be in an older Institution. A college is not a school for vocal students: it is rather an orchestra,
which must play all together. I
think that college spirit shows Itself in the linest way when it shows
regard for college institutions."
Miss Bollert explained that she
would talk to the girls about how
to study a little later on. But she
advised them to get all the fun out
of their professors that they could.
Following Miss Bollert, Miss
Moore spoke to the girls for a few
minutes. "There are three things
to be considered iu arranging your
physical training," she said. "One
is the establishing of health habits
so that you will do your best work
in the university and afterwards.
Another is the developing of your
physical condition and skill. The
third is the developing of a permanent interest in recreational sports.
We hope that every woman here
will   register  In   the  (lasses."
Mrs. Lucas spoke of the health
service and its prevention program.
She asked the freshettes to watch
the Ubyssey and notice hoards for
detlnite notice of the place and
time  for medical examination.
%Ap %Ap %Am %A$ ^^ Jj^i J^ Jj^r ^^ %£p ^^ ^^ ^^ ^p $j£p  ^> ^> <^P ^P
Music, Drama and the Dance
Edythe Lever Hawes
Dramatic Soprano
3015 WEST SECOND AVE.
BAY. 3954
Member nf  U.  C.   Musio   Keilenition
EILEEN HAYES
PIANO and THEORY
2676 West 1st        Bay. 2162L
FRANK
HAINES
VOCAL STUDIO
603 WEST HASTINGS
SEY.
9489L
ELSA G. DISNEY
A.T.C.M., L.T.C.M.
PIANO - THEORY
Studio: Room 14, 817 Granville
Phones: Sey. 7755, Sey. 9563L
CECILIA McLEAN, L.R.S.M., A.T.C.M.
PIANO  —  OR(.AN  —   COMPOSITION
School  of   Harmony,  Counterpoint,  Theory
IIIO'C    successes   in    recent   exams,     first   C'luss   Honors
Private   lessons studio   Chili Recitals Class   Work
Studio: 1895 West 13th
For Appointments, Bay. 7343L
Margaret McCraney Fergusson
Director—V(incomer Baby Orchestra
3350 Cypress
Phone: Bay. 310
The pleasures of philosophy are
like   the   heights   of   love,   to   which
no mean  soul can come-- Will  I>u-
rant.
Read not to contradict and confute, nor to believe and take for
granted, nor to find talk and discourse, hut to wei^h and consider.
Home books are to be tasted, others
to lie swallowed, and some few to
be chewed and digested.—'Francis
Hacon.
DANCING LESSONS —
GRACE MacDONALD
3657 West 9th Avenue, at Alma
THORA THORSTEINSSON SMITH
1..R.S..M.   i London'
^'_ ''■ Cl'~*[>'  C'   i:\cj-l\o-
FESTIVAL  nnd   \:\ AM I NATION   Sl.'CCKSSKS
Studio: 2191 W. First Avenue Bayview 1253X
NOVIKOFF
b PLATOWA
F-
DANCING SCHOOL
Phone: Seymour 1968
560 GRANVILLE STREET
,. „ „ »„» „..,..,,„■,.,„„.,„,,„..
; KEEP FIT — Join
: Grace Goddard!s j
Class at the Crystal Pool
7  "•   ' ..    I ■'■'■   c      'a;
C dc    a   [..ar'' ' "0  a- .1
S,    'T-,:,   CJ
; BALLROOM DANCING :
! FOR U.B.C. STUDENTS :
Masonic Hall • 10th & Trimble;
Fairmont 2128 R
ETHEL FERGUSSON
F.T.CL, M.R.S.T.
Vancouver School of Expression
Sey. 8627
Sey. 438
603 Hastings Street
West
Carleton
Clay
' S ' . ' r '.    '''L'l . ; • a, -\
; ;■.. va ' if;   / .. t    [-a;   r
709 W. GEORGIA
Trinity 2082
Across From Hotel Vancouver
KENNETH   ROSS
Pianist-Teacher
Just Published . . .
"INSTANT ABC's FOR
SUCCESS"
By Kenneth Ross
Price $1 Postpaid
646 Seymour St.   Seymour 4214
TRINITY   COLLEGE
of   MUSIC,   LONDON
The Most Rev. A. U. de Pencier, O.B.E., D.D.
Public Distribution of Diplomas and Certificates Friday, November 6th,
in the Georgia Hotel.
A"   \dc.n.   -   .-.      : f  g ;€--■   : ,
-■  ■:   ■  -   .'.    _    V;i :.-.'.'   I-   .•".: \     '   !•' • ■■■•   :.. ../r:ca
Secretary: EDGAR C. GLYDE, L.T.C.L., L.R.A.M.
3719 Third Avenue West Vancouver, B. C.
George
COUTTS
Pianist and Teacher
Studio:
1158 West 13th Avenue
Telephone Bay. 7558 L
'.}'»«'*"«''S'l>'»<'a"«»«'*<».S<lS'W«»«»to:»*«'«l!>
j ALFRED   W.   CHARD
j                                          L.R.S.M.,  L.T.C.L.,  A.T.C.M. !
!                                                        Teacher of f
j                 PIANO — ORGAN — THEORY I
I -z-r :,:::■:-,::	
J                                         Member,  I!. C.  Mimk' Teachers'   Federalion >
I   1425 W. 14th Ave.      3519 W. 26th Ave.      3301 E. 45th Ave. I
Bay. 4711R                   Bay. 1685                 Carl. 1116L j
CLIFFORD LAIDLER
A.T.C.M.
1936 Master Class, Juilliard School of Music, New
York, with Alton Jones for Solo Performance ^nd
Guy Maier for Teaching Method.
PIANO and THEORETICAL SUBJECTS
3755 WEST 7th AVENUE BAYVIEW 6773R
HILKER  SCHOOL  OF MUSIC
Mrs. H. M. Hilker
RECENT   EXAMINATION   HESl
Deirrce »f  Concert   Performer,
L.K.S.M.   (2).
Final   (.rude    Distinction   (21    (only
distinction!)  in   cityi.
Advanced   (irndc — Honorable   Mention   i First  Class   Honors I,
Intermediate     tirade   —   Distinction
(only distinction in cityi.
Higher    Division—Distinction    (only
one   in  cityi.    Honorable  Mention
(21.
Theory pupils obtained  marks  ranging
Studio:    1109    Devonshire   Crescent,
l.'IS.'l   Fust   I2th   Avenue,
Margaret Hilker, L.R.S.M.
I.T8— ASSOCIATED   1!(>AKI>
Lower    Division — Distinction    (2)
(two  out   of   three  distinctions   in
cityi.    Honorable Mention.
Transitional tirade    Distinction  (21.
Honorable   Mention   (21.
Primary  tirade.
Harmony,    various   tirades—Dlstinc-
tion   {.'It.   Honorable  Mention   (III,
ENID HITLER awarded Silver
Medal for all Canada in
(.rude Vlll.
from Hi  to (Is  out of possible 99.
Telephone Bay. 76/5
c
A
R
L
HORTHY   Tenor
\ ciCr  i ro :u:f'.v'   c
3890 HUDSON AVE.
BAY. 6500 Friday, September
I03G
THE UBYSSEY ANNIVERSARY NUMBER
Eleven
JOHN LOGAN
John Logan, representative
of the Literary and Scientific
Executive on Student Council
His department covers alt
student clubs and organizations other  than sport.
Physics Club
The Physics Club gives Its members an opportunity to give, hear
and discuss papers on subjects of
particular Interest to students of
Physics. The membership Is open
to any student who is taking or has
taken a course In Physics. The announcement of the first meeting of
the term  will be made later.
Phone Bayview 215
Expert Corsetiere
Vancouver Institute
To Open Soon
Lecture?, nt the Vancouver Institute will commence on Oct. I1', with
l)ean J. N, Kiuliivson as the initial
speaker. He will discuss the future
of industry.
These lectures, held Saturday
eveuiiiKs ii the university auditorium, are open to the public and to
students. A full program will he
published in the  I'byssey soon.
Govt. Grant to Help
Science Faculty
The Provincial (iovcriuncnt's
#5000 Kraut to I'.li.C. will he u-etl
til relieve the congestion in tin-
faculty of Applied Science, stated
President 1„ S, Klnck on Thursday.
The university was faced with an
acute problem this year when 42
extra students registered in science.
An immediate move to relieve thc
situation was necessary, and the
Kovcrumcnt came to the assistance
of   the   university.
The Kraut will be used to provide
extra laboratory space aud additional    supplies.       Professors    will    have
I their time increased, with sal.isy
raise. The president pointed out
that there would be no use bllildilK
new   structures  at   this  time.
i It is possihel that the science stall
will be increased in order to meet
the   crnei'iicucy,   it   was   stated
English Farmer Well
Off Says Dean
l)ean K. M. (.'lenient, back from
his trip to St. Andrews I'niversity,
Scotland, wherif he attended the
World ('undress of Agriculture this
summer, told reporters Thursday if
farmiiiK conditions in the < >ld  Land
"The Kiinlish farmer is a practical
scientist," he stated. "He Uses all
modern equipment, and his state oi
prosperity is much better than that
of the Canadian farmer. In fact,
conditions in Lowland arc, on the
whole,   much   better.''
Dean ('lenient said that the ma'-
ketiiiK control in this country wa<
well advanced in comparison vvilh
other countries represented at tin-
colluresv        There      Were      dclcyate-
from _M lands, with 11 <. 11 < -  ironi  Italv
'♦       The dean will resume his work ,i-
head   of     the     agriculture     facult v ,
vv Inch  w as carried mi   bv   I )r.   A.   (■'
liat'ss during the  summer,
Best Wishes Lioni
Mrs   Letts Wilson
CORRECT    CORSETS
"Correct Foundations Correctly Fitted"
Complete Line Cortitclli Hosiery
"Tell a Friend" 2636 Granville Street
PURSE  MISLAID
Lost: UuhI colored purse on the
campus Thursday. Kinder please
return to I'Yonla Snyder, Arts Letter  Hack.
j     The  wealth  of  the   mind  Is  the
only  true  wealth.
UNIVERSITY-
BUSINESS COLLEGE,
NORMAL  and  SCHOOL
BOOKS BOUGHT and
SOLD.
#
BUSY "B"
Book Store
'♦< #
508 RICHARDS ST.
PENS
and
PENCILS
for
SALE
Wishing tbe University Many Happy Returns!
FOUNTAIN PEN  HOSPITAL
AND SHOP
A   t    YOU Mi ,   Crop
I- ' n!    and Carl', for AM Milt-, of Pens
670 RICHARDS STREET
To the U. B. C —
Congratulations
W P: 8 T K H N"
SCHOOL of COMMERCE
Robson at Granville   -   -    -    -   Trinity 4010
Compliments
of
NUNN &
THOMSON
:'i'V CAMBIE
From Park Avenue
To Park Avenue
John Walpurtfis strode into the
Kxchaiitfe. iJeterininatiuii was written mi his cleancut KMI'i American
lace. He looked like a man wlr>
knew every twist oi the market.
He WAS a man who knew every
twist  ol' the market.
As casually as if asking the time,
lie inquired about I'. S. Steel.
"KM," said the shoullder-howed
man, as he turned to the hoard.
A smile, quickly repressed, and
John Walpur^is strode out. Determination was stll written mi hi>
by now at least IJ4'; American lace.
Anything which dims the hope
of reward reduces the willingness
of men to work, reduces their willingness to suffer privation, and reduces their willingness to run risks.
—Juines P. Warhurg.
Grad Caught In
Spanish Revolt
To Speak
Bill Gibson, a graduate of U.
B. ('., will speak in Arts 100 at
12.15 on Tuesday. Mr. Gibson
has just spent a summer which
was a little too interesting for
comfort. He went to Spain to
do medical work, and landed
right in the midst of the Spanish revolution, at present an
unhealthy place for a person
ambitious to live to a ripe old
age. He was lucky in being able
to leave the country on a convenient American warship. His
experiences in Spain will form
the subject of his address.
After leaving U. B. C, Mr.
Gibson took some of his medical
work at McGill. He is at present
ut Oxford on a scholarship.
THE ADVERTISERS REPRESENTED IN THE UBYSSEY
make possible the size of your
student newspaper. They will
appreciate your patronage.
Women to Meet
There will be a meeting of the W.
U.S. at 12.30 on Monday in Arts
1U0. All women students are requested to be present.
John W'alpurgis strode into the
exchange. His face would now have
passed inspection by even Mr. W'il-
lian   Randolph  Hearst.
Calmlv as ever, he asked about
Am. Tei. & Tel.
"ISO."   said   thc   man.
Kxcitement showed for an instant
in the face of this young Napoleon
of Finance.
WIEMAN FUR CO.
vVe ran remodel your old fur
garment into \9\C-il style, or
take   il   in   trade   on   new   furs
3783 W. 10th Ave.    Bay. 2179
{j'LLARN     POPULAR     PIANO     PLAYING     BY     COPYRIGHTED     METHOD"
SID
MULLETTS
School of
POPULAR MUSIC
Studio Phone: SEY. 4804
817 GRANVILLE STREET
Opposite Capitol Theatre Over Bank of Commerce
ii
HARRADINE
Phone
Sey. 8735
Commercial and Academic College
710 SEYMOUR STREET (Publicity Bldg.)
Our Scale of REDUCED FEES
Phone
Sey. 8735
nf tort)-, the student the most economical and satisfactory course obtainable
As1  our graduates about the Harradme College-  They are all employed.
^ALL  TERM  STARTED  AUGUST  31      -      ■      -      ENROLL  NOW
PADLOCKS
15c to 60c
Our 60c padlock
is a "MOOSE!"
HEWER'S HARDWARE
4459 West 10th
Phone ELLIOTT 1552
JUBILEE PARK
South Marine Drive
Directly behind the University
Bring your party, and enjoy this most beautiful
spot ... the grape vinery,
which is decorated with
Japanese lanterns, is
something unusual in
beauty
FOR YOUR PLEASURE
The prettiest and most unique pleasure park around
Vancouver. . . charming tea room ... a floor large
enough to really dance on ... tea tables outside under
grape arbors . . . good home - cooked food that is
unsurpassed.
MAKE THE JUBILEE PARK YOUR PARTY
HEADQUARTERS IN 1936-37
A worn ler fill open tire
every evening avail
able for private parties,
social meetings, and
dances phone   Point
Grey    ] • Twelve
THE UBYSSEY ANNIVERSARY NUMBER
Friday, September
21
io3r>
•U«i>uaMHM||B*|iw|iaiHM||a>llw|
SUPERIOR CURTAIN
CLEANERS
1221 Davie Street
Sey. 9414
PEN L08T
Laminated black-aiul-pearl Parker Duofold fountain pen, between
Art8 and Science buildings, Thursday morning. Finder please return
to Lost and Found.
MAKE YOVR PURCHASES
of those necessities and services
which yon require through the
advertisers represented in THE
UBYSSEY. You will find many
special offers listed.
ROYAL PORTABLE TYPEWRITERS
$45 - $65
De Luxe New Quiet Model — $75
Typewriters of all makes
for sale or rent
Byrnes Hume Typewriters
Limited
THE CRYSTAL POOL
Extends to the U B.C.
Best Wishes on Their
21st Birthday
NICOLA and BEACH
Co-Ed Gown Shoppe
Announcing
the arrival of carefuly selected, latest 'Fall Fashions, at
very special prices.
Sole agent in oint Grey for
"ORIENT" HOSIERY
4519 WEST TENTH AVE.
(Bui Stop)
eyrles CIVIL SERVICE
Business College
38 WILLIAMS BLDG., 413 GRANVILLE STREET VANCOUVER, B. C.
(Opposite PottoHice)
SEYMOUR 2615
BAYVIEW 6969R
CLARENCE IDYLL
Clarence Idyll, ex-treasurer
of Student Council, now in
charge of the Book Exchange
Clarence and his assistant,
Malcolm Brown, are endeavoring to supply books as fast as
possible They are asking
upperclassmen to hand in
used books On Page One of
this issue, the workings of the
Bool< Exchange are explained
* *
t Public Stenographer *
* Neat, Accurate Work *
* At Popular Lending Library   *
$4489 W. 10th AVENUE        P. G. 67$
Freshman Shows His
Sir Walter Raleigh
Instincts
The atfe of chivalry is not
passed. There is a Freshman
loose on the campus. A frosh of
high ideals, with the spirit of
ir Galahad burning in his breast.
Beneath his green hat smoulders
the brain of a potention S.C.M.
—or.
The first day of lectures, this
excellent young man was seated
in the street car, Fresh from a
pep talk from his nuimma, he
was just bursting with politeness. He heard the rustle of
skirts behind him, and promptly
rose to his feet with u graceful
bow, and offered his seat to the
lady. Hesitatingly, three damsels of the ripe age of 12 years
gazed blushingly at him. They
nudged each other, and finally
sat down. Proudly our Jack
beamed at the conductor, feeling
that he was at last shaking from
his feet the uncouth High School
ways.
What un example for the rest
of his class! What a precedent
for the Student Body. We may
yet, my comrades, see the
mighty Senior offer his seat to
a Freshette. A new era has
dawned.
Make
McLennan, McFeely & Prior, Ltd.
Retail Store—556 Seymour St.
Your Headquarters For
ALL SPORTS
Requisites
Phone: DOUGLAS 21
W^^^^^N^^*N#N^^^*N^^»N^^^^**^^^^^^^^^^^
STANDARD
SHOE
REPAIR
Your good shoes demand
qualify   shoe   repjmng "
4437 WEST 10th AVENUE
Phone: Point Grey 608
-M— ee*w in    ll ■■ W) I
Compliments of
ST. GEORGE
APARTMENTS
George Roadnight, Mgr.
FuiT'hc-J and Unfurnished Suit?,
jt  Reasonable  Rate
1045 Haro Street
Seymour 3580
HELLO CO-EDS!
THIS IS THE
ROSE   MARIE   DRESS   SHOPPE
With Prices That Will Please You!
Wishing You Congratulations
ROSE   MARIE   DRESS   SHOPPE
2186 WEST 41st KERR. 2874
VANCOUVER
COLLEGE
Under the Management of
THE CHRISTIAN BROTHERS
OF IRELAN D
Courses
SENIOR  MATRICULATION
School
Lour  years  High
GRAMMAR   DEPT     From  Gra,
School Entrance
e  Three   to   High
ResicJf'ftt jnJ Non-Rom'lent  Students
38th and CARTIER
KERR. 1480
Dr.  Wilbur S. Watson
DENTIST
RESIDENCE OFFICE:
4494 West 9th Avenue
3.00 to 8 p.m.
Telephone: Point Grey 652
NOTICE TO CLUBS
The I'byssey will only uccept responsibility for those notices which
are typed and dropped through the
letter slot on the counter.
The wise are instructed, by rea- j
son; ordinary minds hy experience; i
the stupid, by necessity; the brutes
by Instinct. -Cicero.
"WELCOME BACK, STUDENTS"
Meet Your Old Friends
at
A Bowling Party
at
Ihe £a Salic iterations
945 GRANVILLE DOUG. 649
Home of the Inter-Fraternity League
SPECIAL REDUCED RATES
bnironmenl        Atmosphere -    Service
S. LECHTZIER, BSc.E.E, Manager
The management of a home
should be considered an art us difficult and honorable as typing letters or connecting telephones. --
Will I Hi runt.
DON'T MISS Shopping with
Mary Ann on the Editorial Page,
Corsages  -   -
\\r  are   ,u,l   as  ri^jr  iT-   \<«ir
phone
75C and $1M
Pre*.-    l.-l-u-r*   .v-lK n   (.'.',
knit,
VARSITY CHRISTIAN UNION
Members und till those Interested
are urged to attend meeting Mon
day, IM.IT), in Arts 2()(i. Plans and
activities for the coming year will
be discussed.
NOTES LOST
Lost, small loose-leal with one
day's notes in ducation, on cliff by
Captain Vancouver memorial. Kinder please return to Darrel otimery.
Ritchie Bros, w Gramme street Sey. 2045 j
We took you in your
infancy . . . Let us take
you now, in the year of
your majority!
BRIDGMAN'S Studio
TRACK
All Freshmen Interested In track
turn out Monday at 12.30 iu Art8
lot). Also, .hinloi' Managers are
wanted.
* *     •
Special student tickets for this
Saturday's Big Four Can. Rugby
gunie may he obtained at noon today ut the CJuad. box office. Price,
ili'ic. They are not available down
town.
* *     *
For Junior manager for the Canadian Rugby Club. Hand iu applications to G. Grant, through the
Arts Letter Rack.
<..*~*..t..«..«..*"«..«..*..«..«..«..«..*..«..«..«..*..«..«..«..«..:
ReliglouH faith Is a firm conviction that the highest value must,
in the nature of things, persist and
prevail.—Dean Inge.
iiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiNiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiim
Voeux sinceres pour la prosperite de l'Universite cle la   I
5
Colombia   Britannique  et   le  succes de  ses  etudiants.   .    |
3
P. AUG£
Consul de France.
IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIW^
TAILOR and DRY CLEANER
Your Old  Friend
F. L. ANSCOMBE
Note New Address!
4433-10th AVE. WEST
ELL. 1540
Almadene Cleaners
Wo Call and Deliver
PHONE BAY. 2689
3667 Broadway West
The   Sweetest   Congratulation!
ZACKS
CLEANERS and DYERS LTD.
Head Office:
1103 Commercial Drive
HIGH. 36
SASAMAT BARBER
SHOP
UiJie-,'  and  Gentlemen's
Hairculting
4473-10th AVE. WEST
FISHER tor SHOE REPAIRS
LOCATION
CORNER 10th AVENUE and SASAMAT
Adjoining Home Gas Station
Nan Asltumrth
GOWN and SPORTS SALON
Half Sizes a Specialty
3763— 10th Ave. West Bay. 520
WESTERN TUTORIAL
SCHOOL
Coaching  in  First   Year  Subjects
422 RICHARDS ST. - Top Floor
ELLIOTT 1716 R
ALMA SERVICE
STATION
fM-Hour Garage Service
Broadway at Alma
Bayview 74
«&
IV.I Wislvs'
G. L. Donovan b Sons
Typewriters Adding Machines
Calculators
AM    M.|lr        IK,-. I    JNd    MrtV
508 West Pender St.   Sey. 282
Students'
Valet Service
BAY CLEANERS,
DYERS & TAILORS
2594 Sasamat, Cor   10th Ave.
BUS and CAR TERMINUS
Opposite Vancouver Drug
PHONE: PT. GREY 118
C)Jlc%na&i'4
Vbte
,   CIs' iHdl A   S I KIsisT  W
!. CK AN V 11,1,1s  STKKKT
\ AM'OU VIsK,   It   C
AKIISTS PHOTOF NC.RAVFRS f IF C TROfYPF RS Ml RFOTYPtRS
CLELANDKENT
ENGRAVING COMPANY LIMITED
r,34 CAM 1111. SI   VANCOUVER   B  C
FOUNDED 1898
CROFTON HOUSE
A   BOARDING   AND   DAY
1005 JERVISST.
VANCOUVER, B.C.
SCHOOL   FOR   GIRLS
Courses from
Kindergarten
to
Matriculation
GOOD MUSIC,  ART,  ELOCUTION,  DANCING, GAMES,
GYMNASTICS AND RIDING
For Prospectus, write to the Headmistress
MISS GORDON  .     .  Phone Trinity 737 Friday, September 2},  1936
THE UBYSSEY ANNIVERSARY NUMBER
Thirteen
»/ P O rVT,
Football Will Enter Strong Team In
Big Four: Rugby Loses Many Regulars
Jim Harmer and Ed Gudewill
Join Thunderbird Squad
It seems almost incredible,
but although the English \
rugby team has lost nine
players, yet it is a safe bet
the boys will be around when
the cups are handed out.
The gaps for Coach Dobbie to
fill in are many. Missing from last
year's scrum are Pearson, Lea, Ma- j
guire, Mitchell and Harrison, while
the backfield will lose such stars
as Robson, Mercer, Roberts and
Smith.
But the material to fill the gaps
is both excellent and plentiful. |
Pyle, Andrews, Colthurst, and Pov-j
ter will again be in the scrum. Dobbie will complete the forwards from
Jim Harmer, a fine all-star High
chool player; Harrison, Preston,
Billings and Leckl Ewlng.
Carey will be again scrum-half
with either Ellis or Lumsden from
Kitsilano at five-eighths.
Stratt Leggat and Lyle Wilson;
will return on the three-quarter
line and will have Ed. Gudewill,
former Rowing Club star; Howie
McFee, Watson and Andrews as
possible mates.
Bardsley Returns
jiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimtttti»iiiiniiiiiMnmi»»Mininmiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimtttti
DON'T LET THIS
HAPPEN TO YOU!
When you are invited to play golf, don't be among
those who ask for a handicap—feel sure that you
have the same chance of getting under par! Hal
Rhodes, well-known golf teacher and author of
"The Golf Swing," offers you, at a nominal charge,
individual, scientific golf instruction. Be able to
play golf with the best of them!
HAL RHODES' GOLF SCHOOL
1155 WEST PENDER
■ww www ww
SEYMOUR 2533
11IItttttt tttllttti
WWWWW^^^^^^^rt^W^^^WWWW
USED CARS
WE HAVE NO $50 CARS-WE ARE
NOT JUNK DEALERS, BUT RELIABLE CAR DEALERS.
A MONGST our stock of used
rL cars we have six dandies,
in Al shape, between $100 and
$300.
See
JIMMY DEE
Seymour 5224
at
:• :-rstjn   Limited ■■■■ MX   West   Georgia   Street
Authorized Ford Dealers
VWWWW^WAWVWVI^V^WVWVWWS^^
Sterling's
Sox
Suits
Shirts
Scarves
Sweaters
Suspenders
Presenting
THE GREATEST CLOTHES VALUES
ONE WOULD EVER HOPE TO FIND!
SUITS and
OVERCOATS
TUXEDO
SUITS
$20up
.$25
Sterlings
LIMITED
Men's  Furnishings
866 GRANVILLE
Graduation Breaks Up Fine
Football Line
For two weeks now Doc
Burke has led hia "Dawn Patrol" of Canadian football
players out into the mist of
September mornings. As usual many of the old faces are
missing. Of that fine heavy
line of last season's only three
stalwarts remain—big Barney
Boe and Art Debtford, tackles, |
and clever little Bill Hodgson, j
a guard.
But the "good Doctor" is not
discouraged. He reminds us that <
this year his boys will be playing!
a game they are used to and against j
city clubs and not crack American |
teams. The three other squads in j
the "Big Four" are the V. A. C,
Lions, the North Vancouver Wolves S
and the Meralomas—all three of
which are considerably weaker!
than formerly. j
PLENTY BACKFIELD MATERIAL
Burke will have most of his
trouble flllliiK In the line. Framp-
den Price may return to the game
to play centre, but the squad will
still have a weak front wall with- ]
out experienced ends.
There  is  an  abundance of  ma-i
terial     for     backfield     positions, j
"Burp"    Willoughby    will    again;
demonstrate his ability as an elus-|
ive broken-field runner on the half-
line.   Other  experienced   backfield
men   are   Jack   Charlton,   Shadow
Grey, Runkle, Parkinson, Wark and j
Lewis.   Among the Freshmen tryouts for the backfield positions are
Freshmen    Tom    Williams,    well-
known in local football circles; Milt
Angus and Lee Straight, a brother
of illustrious Hal.
Hoop Stars
Return: Prospects
Are Bright
Mathison, Bardsley and
Willoughby All Back
Some years the Varsity
hoopers seem to migrate in
droves. When they do a whole
Senior B outfit is forced to
battle valiently only to finish
in the doldrums.
Fortunate it is for the Thunderbird hoop reputation, that when the
wandering basketballers return,
they also return in droves. There
will be at least five former wearers
of the "blue and gold" on Doc
Montgomery's squad if all goes
well. Jim (Bugs) Bardsley, play-
maker supreme and top scorer of
two years ago, heads the array of
talent. Jim is just about considered "tops" in local hoop circles.
Along with Bardsley come three
other members of the 1934 Championship team—Art Willoughby,
Bill Swan and Jack Ross. Art or
"Burp" is almost as well known as
Bardsley for his ball-handling,
while Swan and Ross were the two
top spare men on the 1934 squad.
MATHISON TOO
Then from New Westminster
comes the surprise package in Rann
Mathison, aggressive little lacrosse
and basketball star. Rann is either
a guard or forward and has been
right up with the top scorers for
two years.
Of particular pleasure to Coach
Montgomery is that George (Joe)
Pringle will be back for another
year, Joe was placed on a mythical
all-star team by the city sport
scribes last year. He is an expert
guard and one of the cleanest players to perform in the City League,
Other aspirants for places are expected to be Lloyd Detwiller, Al
Lucas, Bruce Miller and Kyle Berry
—all of last year's squad.
Another possible member of this
year's Thunderbird squad is "Porky"
Andrews from Victoria's Champion
Dominoes. According to unconfirmed rumour, "Porky" has enrolled.
IIIHIIIIIHIItlimilK
'HI    and
y    M a d e
SWEET
CAPORALS
Captwrite
"The purest form in which tobacco can be smoktdi.-fyncet
SPORT NOTICES
CANADIAN FOOTBALL
Season tickets for the Big Four
Canadian Rugby Karnes may be obtained at the Students' Council office. Fourteen games guaranteed.
Price, S2.r>n.
MEN'S ATHLETIC
I'resldent Dave Curvy has called
a Men's Athletic meeting for TODAY Noon  in  Applied  Science  lnti.
Elections for all offices Will he held,
and Freshmen especially are asked
to turn out.
RUGBY
Knglish rugby. Freshmen apply
for positions as junior managers,
also two upperclassmen for associate managers. Address applications to Syd Walker, Arts Letter
Hack.
ROWING
A (JEXERALjjj
THRRE WILL BE
MEETING OF ALL THOSE INTERESTED IN ROWING ON MONDAY AT 12.15 In Applied Science
104. Watch the notice hoard In the
Quad.
I GET MY CLOTHES and
FURNISHINGS
|I from
H   CHAS. CLAMAN
315 WEST HASTINGS
College
Styles
FOR
College
Men
Style-conscious Undergrads
will find in Regent Clothes
the latest reflections of st\ les
worn in the leading British
and American  Universities
A LARGE SELECTION OF
MATERIALS   TO   CHOOSE
FROM
Tailored to Your   Individual
Measure at
21
The
REGENT
324 W. HASTINQS
Tailors
IT  Iff   SCB.VCD    TO    JVr«L€TS6      IMMeOlAT^iy
B€Tos.e     important   &am«.    •M9MMM,
•••••AMI   MWNTBAt, fcUMMAMfN  cZl)*ir
ON TCA.    ITS    CTFCCTS    AD«    LASTING—Y€T
+)€*«'$ AN AMAZING *ACT«-TEA MCLPS VOU OtX
A (3000   MOSCOW'S?   £&BBPV
MAW    PA»»   CAN   VOW.
MlffcTlPtV -mese piGuwes ?
A SKNGLC" CUP OP TEA TAKES
s-ecoNO*  opft tue  timc
«rauiR.eo on this or. any
OTM&a.    MENWU   TBOBJ-CM.
T1A  NlfcAS  ¥•«• VMINN
2.V*. -riMCs -rue   stze
01s  Tmf   €Mt»l«€    tTATe
BUfJLOlN&wTMAT'S    T-H«
SUCK.    Of    -A     V-CA-R'S
SUPPlV  Of VACKCO  TTA
. POPWfcA*
IN   TMt
»?
HOW TCA IS MAt>€ von
*OOT& ALL TRAIN I NG-
TABi.es. USE PAMMtV
•OlblNA WAtW foot
rf OV-CBL XMC -fifA,
USING- AT 1*AST OSB
T€A$POOWr<jL TO £ACM
COP. AllOW IT TO
STAND fOU. -NOT ieSS
THAN 5 MINUTES. Atn
MllK   AINO    SU&AR..
b  mms  try
Drink more T€A
-CMC PAMOUS  CllPP««   S«lPS.
•AIMMC CdAVr  ■*««   •«*!
■PCANNCO  &OL6ty  fO CARRy  fPA .     T«TA
is rum TftVI  CANADIAN   ININH
PAST*ST
W — W£R6
MR.T.POTT'S T!A TIME TABU   /
11 a.m.—Try a cup of tea   /
for a  real   mid-morn-   /
ing pick-me-up. /
4 p.m.—Try tea to over- /
come   that  mid-after
noon drag.
11 p.m.—Try a late-
evening cup of tea
for the relaxation ^
it gives you.
for Vitality/
MOON Fourteen
THE UBYSSEY ANNIVERSARY NUMBER
Friday, September 25,  1936
Budget Plan
College Town Suits and
O'Coats may be bought
on our budget plan if
you wish . . . one-
quarter now and three
monthly payments . . .
no extras ... no interest.
. . . so we are printing our invitation to you Ubyssey folk in your own paper — a
cordial invitation to make Spencer's your shopping rendezvous—to let us show
you how Spencer's are out to please you — in eye-and-pocket book-appeal . . .
you always get the Best at Spencer's.
• for the
smartest
clothes in town—
SPENCER'S
MEN'S SHOP
College Town
Cloth
es
You'll like these brand new College Town suits and overcoats.
You'll recognize them as the University man's idea of being "well-
dressed." There's nothing too extreme ... no unauthorized
innovations . . . just tremendously good looking styles . . .
skillfully tailored of fabrics selected for their adaptability to
university clothing. But you are the judge—so come in and try
on the style you like and see for yourself all the fine points that
go into
COLLEGE TOWN SUITS, TOPCOATS
AND OVERCOATS
at
$20
Other Spencer Suits and Overcoats at $22.50 to $50
*t
Classroom Classics"
2.PIECE MINED ALL-WOOL SKITS
What should you wear in the classroom? Clothes that are comfortable,
take practically no care, will wear forever, cost little and have definitely
a "classroom chic". That is what you will find in these 2-Piece All-wool
Knitted Suits. In novelty weaves with plain skirts, they
have a neat zipper fastening or fancy tie, and are trimmed
with smart wooden buttons.   Sizes to 38	
—Sportswear, Spencer's, Fashion Floor
$12-95
TAILORED JACKETS-in Scarlet!
Just in ...
Have you thought of what you will wear
when you clash from one building to another and what you will don on extra cold
mornings in the lecture rooms? Or have
you thought of making an extra outfit by
getting a jacket to go with your sweater
and skirt? That's where these jackets
come in! They are so well tailored they
will be the envy of your college crowd.
They have the new bi-swing back, and two
useful pockets. In brown, CEF OS
navy and scarlet.   Sizes to       3>^»V5
20
—Spencer's Sportswear, Fashion Floor
Twin
SETS
TWEED SHIRTS
Spencer's always go through to a finish.
After choosing gay sweaters for campus
life, they have selected smart tweed skirts
to go with them. Tweed . . . because they
won't crease, are warm as well as smart.
They have a freedom-giving kick pleat in
front, two handy patch pockets for 'kerchief, pencils and compact, and come in
checks, plaid and plain ^qe t a ne
materials.   Sizes to 40. *3V5-M*y5
—Sportswear, Spencer's, Fashion Floor
Be a Sweater Fan. Have lots of clever, colorful sweaters
that will give a dash of excitement to your sports and
campus wardrobe. Come to Spencer's, for we have gathered
the smartest sweaters of the season. See our Twin Sets in
novelty weaves, in colors that sparkle in the £ "> ns
Autumn sunshine: varsity gold, coral, sun »P -4.V5
yellow, green, brown, and navy. Sizes to 20 *^
—Spencer's Sports/rear, Fashion  Floor
CRAMS SHOES
Here's the new "Tongue Tie" — it's
going to be the season's hit! Styled
in tine calf and simulated alligator,
this shoe carries novel little touches,
good sturdy soles and comfortable
heels — just the shoe to wear with
your sport tweeds or knit dresses.
Colors: All-over Alligator, Brown,
Green. Vintage, Black.
Sizes .'? to 9.   Per pair
$5.50
■Sh
pcncers Men's Shop, Main   Pluor
DAVID SPENCER
LIMITED

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