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The Ubyssey Nov 10, 1959

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 THE UBYSSEY
THE
MUSTANGS
VOL. LXVII
VANCOUVER, B. C, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 1959
No. 23
NAIDA CHERNENKOFF, 1959-60 HOMECOMING QUEEN.
Representing the Engineering Faculty, Naida was crowned
before some 750 students at the Friday night dance. John Goodwin's hand sets her crown on straight.—Photo by Roger McAfee
''Soprons Unfortunate
Frothings"—Morgan
By FARIDA SEWELL, (Ubyssey Staff Reporter)
"Hungarians want to return to Hungary rather than face
unemployment in Canada."
Canada's Comnfunist Leader, Nigel Morgan, made this
statement Friday to a restless and heckling crowd of students.
"The Soprons are    merely  a
are
group of unfortunate frothings
left over from the Hungarian
Revolution," Morgan said.
Morgan denied that 150 Hungarians are in jail waiting to be
executed on their eighteenth
birthdays.
He had written to leaders in
Hungary who had denied this,
Morgan said.
"If you don't believe me go to
Hungary and see for yourself.
Just try going back," Morgan
said.
The crowd which had packed
the  Buchanan  lecture  hall  re-
RCMP Helps
Hitch-Hikers
A check with the RCMP revealed that Ubyssey's Friday
editorial bore fruit.
The police pointed out that
they have nothing against a car
stopping for riders anywhere
but right inside the gates.
They suggested that if hitchhikers would seek a lift from the
parking lane on West Tenth they
would cause no congestion or
hazard for traffic at the gates.
RCMP said they will enforce
the no stopping sign at that
point.
We're thankful for a reasonable police force.
Pilling an empty car for that
mile-and-a-half run is one of the
oldest and best of UBC traditions, probably dating from the
return from the "Great Trek"
of 1922, and of immeasurable
benefit to "the budgets and punctuality of many thousand of
students.
plied, "Yes, just try!"
Morgan's main message was
an appeal for peace.
In developing this topic, he
said that "even capitalism can
no longer live in a limited part
of the world, set off by cold
war."
The Communist leader also
stated that "Influential circles
who have vast financial interests
in war provisions and colonial
exploitation and plunder, and so
do not desire peace, can go dig
their own bombshelters and
graves."
"More and more businessmen
are realizing that peaceful co-existence is vital to our economy,"
he said.
Morgan stated that money
spent for nuclear protection is
pure waste and that "bomb shelters are merely do-it-yourself
kits."
His solution to the fallout problem was peace.
Morgan emphasized that gross
expenditures for war materials
—100 million dollars a day over
the world—could be put to much
better use.
Forum Decides That
Fraternities Good
Mardi Gras Chorus Line
In Need OlEuger Males
Mardi Gras tryouts start today.
Sorority pledges must try
out, and many more high-
kickers are needed.
Brock Hall's Music Room
is the place.
Time: today at 1:30 for the
girls; 3:30 for the boys. More
auditions will be held Thursday, 12:30 to 5:30 at the same
place..
SPECIAL
NOV. 11th
CEREMONY
Tomorrow is the 14th anniversary of the ending of the second
world war.
It is Remembrance Day.
The annual UBC Remember-
ance Day Programme, jointly
sponsored by the 196th Battalion
Association and the University
Reserve military cadet units,
will be held in the War Memorial
Gymnasium beginning at 10:45
a.m.
The two speakers on the programme are UBC President Dr.
Norman MjaeKenzie and 196th
Battalion representative J. H.
Bird.
The Battalion Padre, Reverend
Dr. William Deans, and Major
Brian Cowan will officiate at
the ceremonies.
Cowan is a second year Theology student attending the Anglican Theological College on campus, and a former British Army
officer who retired after 17
years of service.
He came to Canada in 1956.
The University Cadet Units
will form up at the Armories
and march to the Gymnasium
where one sentry selected from
each unit will be on ceremonial
guard with arms reversed.
Accompanying the marchers
will be two pipers from the
army band, and a naval cadet
bugler.
The entire parade will be
composed of and commanded
by student cadets, with the regular army officers attending
separately.
Two hymns will be sung in
the ceremony, and "The Last
Post," a one minute silence, and
"Reville" wil commemorate the
deaths of servicemen in the two
Great Wars and Korea.
Ten wreaths will be laid beneath the memorial plaque in
the gymnasium-foyer.
Refreshments will be served
at the conclusion of the ceremony.
UBC Enrollment Up
Over Last Year
UBC has 10,570 students this
year.
This is an increase of 6.5 percent from the 9,918 students of
last year, said Registrar Jack
Parnall.
Engineering has dropped from
1,416 to 1,351, but no other faculties have shown significant
drops.
Arts and Science has 5,172 registrants, an increase of 267,
making it the largest faculty on
campus, but Education has the
greatest increase, showing 377
more members than last year's
1,442.
There are 7,553 men on campus, compared to only 3,017
women.
A majority of four agreed yesterday at the Student Forum
debate with the resolution that fraternities and sororities are
a good thing.
This close decision, 104 pros
and 100 cons, is a change from
previous years when the
Greeks have got an overwhelming majority in such issues.
Arts student Laurie Moss
spoke for the affirmative and
Lorenne Gordon, Arts IV argued
for the negative.
Lorenne stated that the
Greek letter societies are defin-
ately a bad thing.
Miss Gordon said she does not
believe the framework under
which they operate contributes
to the aims of the University.
"Our aims," said Lorenne,
"should be to develop knowledg-
able citizens to whom the
people can look to for guidance."
"We Should aim at progress,
to wipe out harmful activities,"
she continued.
The Greek societies discriminate on the social economic and
racial level. We should prefer
organizations which benefit the
majority, said Lorenne.
Sororities and fraternities
tend to create an artificial division in the student body.
They are the means to maintain rigid class lines, argued
Lorenne.
The fact that there are racial
clauses in some fraternity constitutions indicates what kind of
people are in the organizations,
and what their standards and
ideals are.
"The Greek societies are attempting to preserve a select
little group of the right kind,
not to benefit the University
or society," Lorenne continued.
"Students from the low
economic bracket are prohibited from the onset," she
stated.
"It also fosters a notion of
white supremacy," she said.
Laurie Moss, speaking for the
affirmative stated that the Greek
letter societies satisfy a basic
need for social companionship.
Their phenomenal growth can
be explained by the expansion
of colleges into big incorherent
masses. Fraternities are the unifying centre, he stated.
They play a part in furthering the education of the membership by spreading intellectual
development.
They do this by such constructive activity as lectures debates
and counselling.
"We are expected to gain
social poise at colege," said
Lauries, "doing this is one important function of the societies."
"Fraternities and sororities
contribute to the University and
society by several means said
Laurie.
They provide scholarships and
bursaries, and participate in
philanthropic activities he
argued.
"The fraternities houses give
the University grounds dignity.
They are also a useful addition
to the student housing problem,"
stated Laurie.
An active discussion from the
floor followed the two presentations.
Sigma Chi was mentioned as a
fraternity with disqtiminitory
clauses. In reference to the immorality of joining such an organization it was stated that it
is better to stay a member and
try to improve the society from
within.
It was also mentioned that
Greek letter societies are a
North American invention. None
exist in the European Universities.
Most of the students realized
the need to improve certain aspects of the societies organization but some were very strong
in their acceptance of discrimination even on the racial level.
NEW DEAL FOR
UBYSSEY STAFF
All those who consider
themselves Pubsters as well
as any who would like to become Pubsters are advised that
they must, repeat must, attend
an important meeting to be
held Friday. November 13,
at 12:30 p.m. in the music
room. Brock Hall.
The meeting will include
discussions on a new staff
training program, a pub party
Which has finally been arranged, and an important
talk by the newly appointed
Managing Editor. He will outline a program whereby all
pubsters will be well looked
after.
Those attending the meeting will also be given ample
opportunity to air any gripes
they may have or any suggestions they may wish to
bring up.
I 'tween classes   I
Shell Oil P.R.O.
Speaks At Noon
AD AND SALES CLUB
Mr. Pat Belcher, P.R.O. Shell
Oil Ltd., will speak on the Duty
of the Public Relations Man at -
Bu 212 noon today. Everybody
welcome.
•X* V 3£
ALPHA OMEGA SOCIETY
Ukrainian dancing instruction
will be held in the basement of
the Education building—-Room 2
at 12:30 every Tuesday. All students who are still interested in
taking lessons please attend.
* *      *
NFCUS
Mrs. Daisy Hurley addresses
the student body on the subject
of Indian Affairs in B.C., today
at 12:30 in Bu. 100.
* *      *
CONSERVATIVE  CLUB
Ernest Broome will speak today at noon in Bu 202. He will
speak on the "Federal Record"
—all are welcome.
*    *    *
FROSH UNDERGRADUATE
SOCIETY
j   A   very   improtant  meeting
(Continued on page 8) RAGE TWO
THE      U B Y SSEY
Tuesday, November 10, 1959
Authorized as second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Published three times a week throughout the University year in Vancouver
by the Publieations Board of the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C.
Editorial opinions expressed are those of the Editorial Board of The Ubyssey
and not necessarily those of the Alma Mater Society or the University of B.C.
Telephones: Editorial offices, AL. 4404; Locals 12, 13 and 14;
Business offices, AL. 4404; Local 15.
Editor-in-Chief: R. Kerry White
Associate Editor .. Elaine Bissett
^ News Editor Bob Hendrickson
C.U.P. Editor Irene Frazer
*        Club's Editor Wendy Barr
Features Editor Sandra Scott
Head Photographer Colin Landie
T"" Photography Editor Roger McAfee
| Senior Editor:  Allan Chernov
Reporters and Desk:
■ * Steve Ringwood, Diane Greenall, George Railton,
Farida Sewell, Lynn McDonald, Bob Sterling
Our Empty Minds
What has happened to the thinking, idealistic student?
He is a vanishing breed.
Let us assume that Canadian Universities are the only
spawning ground of the old-fashioned and fast-vanishing
^educated" man. Then let us 'take Dalhousie as a typical
"university and multiply it by fifty, to arrive at the number
"of college men currently churned put in Canada.
Is this the best our system—orabilities—can produce?
By far the greatest amount of graduates become engineers,
scientists, or businessmen; we may.call them technicians.
Inn e|pse second place are the professional people—doctors and lawyers—whose purpose and training aims at
giving them a secure income in a somewhat bewildering
worH ...
In Canada, educators and thinkers, good writers and
statesmen, are sadly lacking.
There are all kinds of explanations to this problem, but
hardly a single justification. Many feel that today's college
man in Canada, a product of the postwar generation, has
grown up in a world stressing reconstruction, research, and
the development of a "new" way of life; call it materialism.
It is a scientific age, and Canada has become a scientific people.
Small wonder, then, that philosophy is only a word
encountered by a very tiny percentage of university students. Yet it was not long ago that phlisophy was considered the most important offering of higher learning.
Nobody  wants io go into today's  world armed with
mere idealism. Yet everyone seems to be leaving college
with no views at all on ethereal things, fewer opinions,
ainjd relatively closed minds.
If tomorrow does come, it may be valueless.
Oct. 21, 1959. —PETER OUTHIT, Editor-in-Chief,
Dalhousie Gazette.
LETTERS TO
THE EDITOR
The Editor,
Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:
As two members of the student body of the University,
we feel that the hour of music
titled "The Works of the Masters", broadcast on UBC Radio
should be definitely eliminated. This program, much to
our disgust, is heard from 11:00
to 12:00, just when most fans
of non-classical music are arriving in Brock from a morning
of classes. After these  classes
we feel that we do not want to
listen to classical music. It can
be heard anytime of the day
by tuning into a Canadian Radio Station. Popular music, or
even music of a livelier type,
is much more appreciated by
the majority of students as it
tends to awaken them. The
Brock is not intended for relaxation, and not for music appreciation. Why not let majority rule and abolish this program?
Signed,
—Two Hopeful Students.
NOV. 12—Famous English Architect Hugh Cussan
speaks on
".THE FUTURE OF THE PAST"
Bu 106   -   12:30
In co-operation with Dance Club & El Circulo
presents on
NOV. 13—SUZANA & JOSE'
Interna.tina.Uy Famous Spanish Dance Team
complete with orchestra
Auditorium   -   Noon
;       Tickets willbe on sale outside the A.M.S. Office
TddStJr and Thursday from 12:30-J 2:30. Price 25c.
NOV. 13--LAST MINUTE* CLUB
NATIONAL DANCE THEATRE OF FINLAND
Queen Elizabeth Theatre-
Sign,.up for tickets at the. A.M.S. Office
STATEMENT OF POLICY
The Ubyssey is at all times
glad to print provocative editorial material as long as it is
signed and typewritten. The
deadline for such material is
12:30 p.m. any day.
Opinions expressed in guest
editorials, letters to the editor and editorial columns are
not necessarily those of the
Ubyssey.
The Ubyssey will not publish letters to the editor unless they are signed and typewritten. Pseudonyms will be
used on occasion, but not unless the author's identity is
known to the Ubyssey.
—R. K. WHITE
The Editor,
Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:
The following notice has been
posted on the bulletin board of
the Musical Society:
Of Players' paltry challenge,
and the hubris
Of that puny club, whose odious scenes
Bring snores into the pit, and
of our vow
To quell the upstarts, till our
greater Heel
Restore us, and recrush their
palsied throats,
Take note, O Mussoc men that,
back of Brock
Or on the Field of Aggie, didst
destroy
Those windbags, whose abortive puerile plays
On either field or stage did
never yet
Rise out of Chaos; or if Georgia, glass
Delight thee now, or Cecil's
brook that flows
Fast by the Bridge of Granville
Street, we thence
Invoke thy aid to our avenging
team,
That with no light resolve intends to pul-
Verize  the   Thespian     hordes,
while it pulls off
Things    unattempted    yet    on
Stonehenge field.
See you Thursday, Players'
Club—and meanwhile, blanche
in your buskins!
Very truly yours,
Mussoc.
The Editor,
Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:
Theoritically University
training includes fair play, and
sportsmanship; particularly
when inter-student affairs are
involved. In actual practice,
however, attainment of these
ideals is limited.
One tends to doubt ones fellow students acclaimed ethics
when one finds that 4 posters
publicizing a beauty queen for
homecoming were indiscreetly removed. On Monday, each
of these posters was surrounded
by ones representing other
queens. On Wednesday, these
posters were missing while the
others were still publicising
their candidate.
This is grosely unfair—to
the respective queen to the
faculty represented, and the
makers of the posters. Such
competition does not belong
in university and the person(s)
who actually "stole," this publicity outlet should re-examine
the ethical standards. It is evident that they need an overhauling!
Publicity, Education*
WUSC CHAIRMAN
REPLIES
The editorial written in last Thursday's UBYSSEY regard-
in the local activities of World University Service was not only
a result of hasty and ill-founded judgment but it was also based
on distorted facts. I would have been pleased to answer any
questions and to explain the local committee position had I
been asked.
I join with Miss Sandra Scott
in saluting the Alberta Committee for a job well done,
however, as I served on that
committee for three years be-
,fore coming to UBC may I
draw her attention to a few
facts. The local committee there
does not operate on profits
from Treasure Van, as all such
profits go directly to the national organization for allocation as the General Assembly
sees fit. The exchange students
there are supported by the University Administration, not by
the students or the local committee. Because they do not
have the levy system a fund
raising campaign is carried out
each year for the International
Program of Mutual Assistance.
I assure Miss Scott they have
not always been so successful,
last year they collected just
over $800. I was pleased to dis-
The Editor,
Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:
In reply to Mr. Hexter's letter of November 6th, there are
several points which I feel
should be made clear re the
students in Hungary awaiting
trial.
This was not dogmatically
accepted by the A.M.S. It was
felt that there were sufficient
grounds to circulate a petition.
This opinion was supported by
Dean Roller, Dean of Sopron,
and President MacKenzie. A
wire was sent to Sir Leslie
Munro, Ambassador to the U.N.
from New Zealand, who is investigating the situation in
Hungary.
If there is even a remote possibility that these students are
being held, then we have a responsibility to attempt to have
them freed.
The Hungarian Premier, Janos
Kadar, has denounced these
charges as lies perpetrated by
the west. He also included the
thirty-one young people executed during the summer. The
International Commission of
Jurists in a report issued recently does not agree with Mr.
Kadar.
Our efforts may prove futile,
but at least we have the satisfaction of knowing that we at
least made an effort.
To bring up the political affiliation of the Hungarian
people during the war is irrelevant to the petition. These
people who we are attempting
to save were at the most four
years old and I am sure they
were not aware of the political
significance of the war.
Lastly NFCUS did not blindly accept this move. Many
member universities have but,
as yet, the national executive
has not accepted it per se.
They have been in touch with
Sir Leslie Munro as well. They
agree with our work but they
have not blindly or hysterically
accepted it.
As long as we are free and
can think for ourselves then,
all should not sit back and wait
until it is tod late for action.
Sincerely,
—Peter Meekison.
cover that the main reason the
UBC delegates to the Press Conference were so taken by the
Alberta activities was due to
the excellent coverage that the
campus newspaper gives to
WUS. I trust full note was
taken of this admirable interest by that campus newspaper.
To suggest that the activities
of the UBC Committee are not
in full keeping with the objectives of the National Committee is false. The exchange scholarship program is an integral
part of the WUS scheme and is
the largest of its kind at any
university in Canada. Here it is
a student program, both financially and administratively,
and UBC can be justly proud of
that fact. Miss Scott mentions
that UBC helps meet National
Office expenses, contributes
substantially to the International Program of Action, sponsors panels on international affairs, and carries out an active
orientation program for many
foreign students attending UBC.
These are all fully within the
objectives of the National Committee.
The criticism seems then to
fall on three areas:  fund raising, Treasure Van, and informing the campus. The students on
this campus are now making a
substantial contribution to the
International  Program   of  Action   and   an   additional   campaign  in   this   respect   is not
justified.  With  a  student levy
and thereby a sound financial
base, this Committee can work
most effectively in the field of
exchange scholarships; in contrast  universities   without   the
levy   can   appeal   more   effectively   through  a   share   campaign in the area of mutual assistance.  It  seems hardly  just
that we should be criticised for
carrying  out  a  program   best
suited for this campus. As for
Treasure   Van   the   committee
passed   a    resolution    over   a
month ago to bring it to UBC
next year. It has not been here
for the past few years because
of difficulties   in   its   own   administration   but    these    have
been   corrected   this  past   fall.
That the students are not sufficiently informed, is well taken
but the local  committee  fully
appreciates    this    continuous
problem. The WUS Committee
I might  add,   is  not  the  only
group to suffer from this problem at this  university.  An  attempt has been made this year
to correct this. A pamphlet was
distributed during Registration
and on  Club's  Day to  inform
the students of the current program. In addition the  foreign
exchange students here and the
UBC students abroad will  be
writing articles which we hope
will be published in the Ubyssey. The local Committee will
undertake any other valid project   which   will   further   the
worthwhile objectives of World
University Service. We would
be pleased to accept any constructive   suggestions   at   any
time from any one, but we have
no   intention of  accepting   an
unfounded   ultimatum   to   disband.
Respectfully submitted,
—Norman R.  Gish,
WUSC Chairman. > "SPuesday, November 10, 1959
T H E    UBYSSEY
PAGETHfiEE
Trocme To Speak On
Algerian Question
Magda Trocme, a recent worker among the Moslems and
Christians in Algiers, will speak
on the Algerian question Friday
noon in Bu. 102.
Magda, with her husband, is
Travelling Secretary of the International Fellowship of Reconciliation.
During the war, the Trocmes
helped Jewish and political ref u-
gies and founded the College
Cevenol in the French mining
Districts.
This social work was an attempt to make the district a
centre of non-violent resistance.
Since   the  war  the   Trocmes
have established the Maison de
Reconciliation in Versailles.
They have recently worked in
Algiers where the revolt has
been going on for several years.
In the past year the Trocmes
have travelled in the Soviet
Union.
Magde, Versailles France, is
a graduate of the New York
School of Social Work.
She has an Italian teaching
degree for literature, and two
French degrees.
Miss Trocme has completed
two speaking tours in America
and is considered a dramatic,
fluent, and effective speaker.
oooooooaoaooooooooaooaoaooaooaoooeepaoooaoagjpgeqceoogpaeeocaooaocoaao»oooe
Social Worker Notes
Alcoholic Problem
"There are many thousands of alcoholics in Vancouver."
Dr.  E.  D. McRae, executive  director  of the Alcoholism
Foundation of B.C., made this statement in a talk to the Pre-
Soeial Work Society yesterday.
He was speaking on the role
of the social worker, using examples from his experience
with the Alcoholism Foundation.
* The SPCA treats Stray dogs
better than the city treats a
destitute person the doctor said.
In answer to a question he
pointed out that most alcoholics
start with social drinking.
Okily 15 per cent of alcoholics
come from skid road. He also
pointed out that.
"This university has supplied
quite a number of patients to
our clinic."
■ He said, " don't think anyone
begins to drink because he wants
to become an alcoholic. There
is a calculated risk in social
drinking."
Afcheotogists
On Field Trip
"Ever hear of the Stselax village?
Members of the Archaeology
club have proposed a field trip
to the extinct village next
spring.
Dr. Borden mentioned the
project in ah informative talk to
16 members of the club on the
extinct cultures of the Fraser
delta.
The Stselax village (pronounced "sla") is located on the South
East corner of the U.B.C. Endowment Lands, on the North
Arm of the Fraser River.
In his talk, Dr. Borden spoke
of the ages of several cultures.
WESTERN TO
GET A BREAK
LONDON (CUP) — All students of the University of Western Ontario will be getting a
"toreak" at the beginning of
March.
At that time they will have a
week's recess from lectures and
laboratories.
"The break will give students
a chance to relax, study, and consult professors," said Dr. G. E.
Hall, President and Vice-Chan-
cellor of the university.
A committee of faculty members proposed the break which
received Senate approval last
May, and becomes effective this
year.
Dr. Hall said staff members
felt the second term too long for
professors and students in relation to the short first term.
With final examinations extending the second term from
January to the middle of May,
both the professors and students
have almost five months of work
with almost no break except on
Good Friday.
In addition, Dr. Hall stressed
the opportunity for students to
catch up on essays and studies,
and for professors to mark examinations and help students,.
University Registrar Helen M.
B. Allison said students are not
to regard this week break as a
holiday.
She stressed, "Its purpose is
to give students time to clear
up their courses and essays, and
to consult their professors about
term tests.
CANADA'S  BEST
FILTER  CIGARETTE
top taste
true mildness
best all 'round filter.
CLUB NOTES
by WENDY BARR
There will be an important
UCC general meeting Thursday noon in Bu 205.
UCC policy on the use of
club space, procedure in forming new club constitutions
will be discussed, and awards
for Clubs Day will be given
out.
Under UCC by-laws every
club is expected to send a
representative The repre-:
sentative must be on the club
executive or appointed by the
club executive, and their
names must be submitted to
UCC.
Only those whose names are
submitted will be allowed to
vote at any UCC general meeting.
•!•        *P        •*•
UNITED NATIONS MODEL
ASSEMBLY
The United Nations Club will
present a model United
Nations General Assembly
Thursday noon in Brock
Lounge.
Students will act as delegates from the various countries in the United Nations.
Some of those who will be
taking! part actually come
from the countries they are
going to represent
The USSR will put forward
a resolution to the effect that
people living in colonial territories have a right to self-
determination, and that the
question of self-determination
for these people falls within
the jurisdiction of the United
Nations.
fif,       ff,       •$•
CONSERVATIVE CLUB
At   noon  today   Stuart   A.
Fleming, Conservative Member of Parliament for Okan-
agan-Revelstoke,    will   speak
Stuart Fleming, M.P.
on "Canada's Seven Point program put forward at the
United Nations."
Stuart Fleming was elected
to Parliament in 1958, and
went to the United Nations as
a parliamentary observer with
the Canadian delegation He
will be speaking in Bu 102 at
noon today There will be a
question and discussion period
after his speech.
*r      T*      3p
BACTERIOLOGY SOCIETY
"Don't    be    an    antibody —
Come   to   the   Bug  Bounce,"  is
the    Society    of   Bacteriology's
invitation to all students.
The "Bug Bounce" is an informal dance to be held in the
Dance Club room in Brock
Extension, 8 pm. Friday.
The dance will be free for
members  and  their  partners,
and non-members will be admitted for twenty-five cents.
■r*     •?     •X"
NFCUS
Mrs. Daisy Hurley, an
honorary chieftain, of several
Indian tribes will address the
students on Indian Affairs in
BU  100.
Mjrs. Hurley has acted as a
spokesman for BC Indians f(tr
many   years.
NFCUS is sponsoring her
speech.
College Shop Reports On
Large Loss Of Revenue
The College Shop reported to
the AMS that it has lost money
so far this year.
College Shop manager, "Jock"
Munro, blamed Registrar's refusal of a booth in the regist
ration line up.
In the College Shop committee meeting the manager estimated that $500 in revenue was
lost.
Faculty pins and some good
publicity were the chief losses.
A mistake in communications
started the misunderstaridnTg.
Munro claimed he would have
set up at the back door of the
line up, but he did not find out
he could until too late.
The College Shop is now investigating the possibility of
selling books.
■
Oakridge
Down Town
Park Royal
New
Westminstei
SHAGGY  SWEATERS
The fashion flare for college wear and so soft and warm, too.
You'll be the envy of all the girls on the campus when you
show up for class in the new "ShaggLook" sweater. So easy to
care for when they can be hand washed. Come and choose
from Shetland, brushed Orion or bulky Shetlantex in one o4
these scrumptious smokey shades: grey, blue, brown, and
■ green.
• 36 to 40 7-'
• Medium and Large ..: 9.'.
• 36 to 40  13.' PAGE FOUR
THE     UBYSSFY
Tuesday, November 10, 1959
I.H. To Hold
Open House
UBC International House will
hold its first public Open House
Nov. 21, 8 to 12 p.m., in conjunction with their annual fair.
The lower lounge will be arranged in nightclub fashion,
complete with dancing, floor
shows, and a snack bar.
Side shows and the Cafe Continental, with its Bazaar of
Foreign Foods, will be found
on the  upper  floor.
Films will also be shown.
Tickets can be obtained from
International House members
or at the door.
West Point Printer
And Stationers
Brief   Cases   —   Slide   Rules
Drafting Instruments
4514 W. 10th AL 1245
Matz & Wozny
548 Howe St.       MU 3-4715
Custom Tailored Suits
for Ladies and Gentlemen
Gowns and Hoods
Uniforms
Double breasted suits
modernized in the new
single breasted styles.
Special Student Rates
...REMEMBER WHEN?
QUEEN and PRINCESSES reigned over Homecoming. From
left to right: Fern Owen (Frosh) Princess, Naida Chernenkoff
(Engineering) Homecoming Queen, Sheila Lees (Education)
Princess.
Need Parts for your
English Car
Call English Car Used Parts
1821 Main St. TR 9-4041
Radiators, Differentials, Tires,
Body Parts, etc.
We Don't Wreck,  We
Dismantle
6 YOBA HEADS NURSES
Miss Joyce Chyeko Gyoba of
Spuzzum has been elected head
of the 1959 graduating class of
the UBC School of Nursing.
She will receive her degree
at graduation Ceremonies Oct. 30.
Miss Gyoba, a Japanese-Canadian is now at the South Central
Health Unit in Kamloops.
K*
/
/*
\
X
QUEEN ANNS
Black Suede
Black Patent
Only g95
that "well-heeled"
■|*i
/^
Black Suecfo
for. work or play
SQUATTIE \
Black SuecJo
Brown Suede)
Grey Suede
Only J95
ALL styles IN AA AND 0 WIDTHS
« to to sees
of course they're . • *
CREATIVE
«    IW   IV  «MpEiV
'resk, young and so {
desirable for the platter crowd or working miss*—
SOLD    AT    ALL    SHOE    AND    DEPARTMENT    STORES
WHERE    FASHION    COUNTS
BY CREATIYI
To
Sorrow-stricken Students
Comes Senates' decree
of no more
Talking in the Library.
Thoughts now stalk
About, unuttered
And unsung and
Must wait
Their expression
In the
Freedom
Of the open air.
With cute
Little Cards
On which there is
Daintily printed
The decisive words,
All talking,
Whispering,
Muttering,
Singing,
Hissing,
And whistling
Have been relegated
Into the limbo of the past.
Silence reigns supreme,
Even over John and
Probably there will be
Inculcated at UBC
A course in
Sign languages.
For, since
Co-eds are now tongue-tied,
They will have to
Express themselves
In some handy manner.
Let us hope, that
In the future
Varsity
When Conversations
Will be carried on by
Mental telepathy
The
Chagrined Officials
THE SKI SEASON
IS HERE
Outfit yourself now while the
selection is at its best.
Call at
Arlberg Ski Hut
608 Robson at Seymour
MU 5-9411
Listen for Ski Report
Thursday, CKWX, 6:15 p.m.
Won't cancel
Brains,
Providing of course, that the
Students possess them.
—Ubyssey, Jan. 18, 1929.
(They should hear it now!)
COUNTLESS CARS CROWD
CAMPUS
Owing to the somewhat remote position of the new University buildings, a great number of students from outlying
districts, such as Burnaby and
New Westminster, and some
also from Vancouver, are travelling to and from the grounds,
daily, by auto. Consequently,
the view from the Arts building consists, chiefly, of a long
line of cars—big cars and little
cars, open cars and old cars.
Students have combined in parties to travel by one car, all
starting in the morning with the
earliest of their group, and all
leaving at night with the latest. So many travel in this manner that it has been found necessary to institute "traffic
cops" in the mornings, and
early comers find themselves
marshalled at the extreme end
of the long parking ground,
while the late comers are unfairly favored with a more convenient station.
Not only do the autos solve
the problem of transportation
for many, but these same students have also overcome the
inconvenience caused by the
present lack of chairs in the
buildings, and the cars are
turned into lunch rooms, lounging rooms and study rooms.
This custom can last, however,
no longer than the fine weather.
(—They had troubles?)
—Ubyssey, October 2nd, 1925.
DO-NUTS
made up for parties
We make fresh do-nuts
every day
DO-NUT DINER
4556 W. 10th AL 3580
UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE
HOURS:    -
SATURDAY:
9   a.m. to   5   p.m.
-    9  a.m.   to   Noon
LOOSE LEAF NOTE BOOKS
EXERCISE BOOKS AND SCRIBBLERS
GRAPHIC ENGINEERING PAPER, BIOLOGY PAPER,
LOOSE LEAF REFILLS, FOUNTAIN PENS and INK,
DRAWING PAPER
Owned and Operated by . . .
THE UNIVERSITY OF B.C.
WINNER GRAND PRIX
FOR BEST COMEDY-
CANNES FILM FESTIVAL
m
WIS IS HOT
SOITABLEFOf?
CHILPRBN
Second Tremedous
Week!
VARSITY
Afiur
ONLY
10th il TRIMBLE    AL 0H»
"A Movie of Tremendous Charm and Wit"
—Les Wedman, Province Tuesday, November 10, 1959
THE    UBYSSEY
PAGE FIVE
Mamooks Has New Policies
Brock Management Committee ratified the new policies for
the operation of Mamooks during the coming year.
Gaynor Smith, first year law
student was appointed manager.
Mamooks had been operating
as a club, charging only for materials used.
This year Mamooks is no
longer a club, but has the same
status as the Brock College
Shop.
STAFF COUNCIL
(continued from page 2)
dent of W.A.A. for illegal use
of hands. It was obvious to onlookers that Marg the only female member of the council
squad, was more familiar with
other indoor sports than soccer.
Eliot drove the ball past Haskins despite the fact that Pete
had been moving the goal posts
closer together in order to make
his task less arduous—a typical
political move.
GOODWIN SCORES
John Goodwin, chairman of
the Homecoming Committee,
put council back in the game
scoring on a pass from referee
Bill Woodson. (Another example
of political maneuvering?)
Dave Edgar, who had used his
head to good advantage throughout the game, switched tactics
and booted in council's second
goal seconds before the final
horn sounded.
Speaking of the 2-all tie in
the dressing room afterwards
John Goodwin said: "It was a
brilliantly played hard-fought
game." Mr. Eliot expressed
faculty sentiment in one word:
"Woosh."
They have a supply of all
materials to be sold at regular
retail prices.
When Mamooks facilities are
used material cost will include
use of paint, brushes, and other
facilities.
All campus organizations are
encouraged to supply their own
artists.
Mamooks has a small group of
artists who will do work, being
paid on a "piece-work" basis.
Mamooks* hours are: Monday and Fridays, 3 to 5 p.m.;
Thursdays,  12:3 to 2:30 p.m.
Other times may be arranged
including evenings and Saturdays at a cost of $1 per work
period.
Also passed at the meeting
was an allotment of $1,575 to
the Ubyssey.
The money is to be used for
renovation of office, purchasing of seven typewrites and an
addition of eight new desks.
Garrett Asks
To Be Charged
TORONTO (CUP) — An expelled Students' Councillor at
the University of Toronto is requesting that a specific charge
be laid against him.
Councillor Garrett, charged
with "conduct unbecoming a
councillor" claims he would be
able to disprove a specific
charge.
"The vague accusations which
have been laid against me have
no foundation in fact and only
(Continued from page 7)
the beginning. Led by the inspired play of speedy (!) John
Forsythe and the shooting of
Mike Fraser and Ed Wild, the
Grads grabbed a 32-31 half-time
lead.
They increased it to three
points, 49-46, at three-quarter
time. The final quarter was highlighted by some sharp shooting
as the teams battled neck-and-
neck. Long John Forsythe dumped in one of his patented baseball hooks from the corner, and
Neil Desaulniers swished a couple of set shots.
FORSYTHE FIXES BIRDS
Forsythe won it with 1:14 left
on a short jumper, and Mike Fraser added the insurance points
with 15 seconds to go.
For the Birds, Bill Berardino
(8 points) and Dennis Moorhead
(13 points), stood out. But the
Birds beat Forsythe on Saturday, so apparently experience
can't win them ALL!
SUMMARY
BIRDS (58)—Dumont 6, Osborne 4, Brousson 4, Fairholts 4,
Moorhead 13, McCallum, 2, Martin 8, Gushue 2, Berardino 8,
Way 1, Lusk 8, McKay 4.
GRADS (62) — Mitchell 2,
Southcott 6, Forsythe 7, Munro
4, McLeod 4, Fraser 14, Wild 9,
Carter 3, Gimple, Upson 6, De
Saulniers 8.
cloud the issue," he said. "If the
SAC has got a case they should
state some specific charge and
then prove it. As it is I am being pointlessly libelled."
Garrett was summarily expelled from the SAC last week
when President Walter McLean
laid the general accusation of
incompetence and conduct unbecoming.
WUSC ELECTS
NEW OFFICERS
Montreal, (CUP)—WUSC annual election took place this
week at the Canadian Assembly,
McGill University.
Governor - General Georges
Vanier was elected Honorary
President of the National Assembly and Dr. Andrew Stewart, chairm|an of the CBC Board
of Governors, was reinstated as
national president.
VICE-PRESIDENTS
Vice-presidents elected were:
Dr. C. T. Bissell, president of
the University of Toronto; Rev.
Father Clement Cormier, rector
of, St. Joseph's University; Dr.
Walter A. Johns, president of
University of Alberta; Dr. Watson Kirkconnell, president of
Acadia University; Msgr. Irenee
Lussier, rector of University of
Montreal; Msgr. Parent, rector
of Laval University; Dean F.
H. Soward, assistant dean of
graduate studies at UBC; Very
Rev. H. F. Legere, rector of the
University of Ottawa.
Dean J. A. Gibson, of Arts
and Science at Carleton College, was re-elected national
chairman and Don Johnston, a
McGill Arts student, was named
vice-president.
CHAIRMAN
William J. Bouris was elected as chairman of the Business
and Finance Committee, and
Bruce Lockwood, barrister and
solicitor, was named treasurer.
Faculty members elected to
the National Committee were:
Prof. Weaver, University of Saskatchewan; Father Malone, Loyola College; Dean MacDonald,
University of Toronto; Prof.
John Weaver, University of Saskatchewan; Father Malone, Loyola College; Dean MacDonald,
University of Toronto; Prof.
Morin, University of Montreal;
Prof. Coleman, Western; Prof.
Woodfine, St. Xavier; Dr. W. O.
Fennell, representative of NC
CUC.
Accommodation from 25 to 4,000
-fr   SMORGASBORD
•fr   HOT MEALS
■fr   COLD BUFFET
■&   LIGHT REFRESHMENTS
Prices ranging from $1.25 to $3.00 per person including all
l+-ri   I   I   m   n   t-   k
CaU**>U oj ^bUtmcUm JUd.
5802 Fraser Street
FAirfax 5-7411 TRinity 6-5143
U. B.C.  PLAYERS  CLUB
43rd   Annual   Fall   Production
Romanoff and Juliet
By PETER USTINOV
DIRECTED BY IAN THORNE
FIRST SOLDIER  ,  MR. FRANK ABEL
SECOND SOLDIER  ,....  MR. CECIL PLOTNIKOFF
GENERAL ,.... MR. JOHN SPARKES
HOOPER MOULSWORTH  ,  MR. LES WAGAR
VADIM ROMANOFF  ., MR. WALTER SHYNKARYK
ROMANOFF  MR. BARNEY BAKER
ARCHBISHOP	
JULIET ,  MISS PENNY GASTON
SPY ,  MR. MARTIN BARTLETT
BEULAH MOULSWORTH  MISS LLOY COUTTS
EVDOKIA ROMANOFF  MISS ELIZABETH KAISER
CAPT. MARTA ZLOTOCHIEVKO .... MISS MAXINE GADD
FREDDY VANDESTUYT MR. MICHAEL MATTHEWS
MR. KEN KRAMER
November 12th, 13th and 14th   -   8:30 p.m.
U.B.C   AUDITORIUM
Tickets $1.25 - Students 50c
At Modern Music or A.M.S. I.PAGESIX
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November ID, 1959
GET YOUR NAME ON
BIRD TELEGRAM NOW
UBC's   football   team   has
won   the   right.' to   represent'
the west in the Churchill Cup
-game at   Varsity   Stadium  in
Toronto Saturday.
The Thund|erbird Booster
Club is organizing a list of
names of fans Which is to be
telegrammed to Toronto.
You-can have your name on
the telegram if you will come
to the Thunderbird Booster
Club Room in Brock Extension and give us your name
and a dime You must have
your name in by Thursdav.
SPORTS
MENU
Rugby 'Birds
TUESDAY
. BASKETBALL
Girls'   Rules   Basketball  vs
York House
at Women's Gym—4:30
WEDNESDAY
RUGBY—MCKenzie Cup
Birds vs North Shore Reps.
Brocton Oval—2:30
THURSDAY
WOMEN'S" BASKETBALL
Senior "B" Women vs Hastings
at King  Ed Gym—7:30
WOMENS'S HOCKEY
League match at 12:30
behind Brock Hall
FRIDAY
BASKETBALL
Braves vs Lord Byng
at U.B.C—7:30
Birds vs Dietrich Collins
at   U.B.C—8:00
SATURDAY
RUGBY
U.B.C. Birds vs Trojans
at U.B.C. Stadium—2:30
Braves vs Maralomas
at Cannought Park
Phys. Ed. vs Rowing Club
at Douglas Park
Tomahawks vs Ex-Brits
at U.B.C. Aggie Field.
CROSS COUNTRY
* f Pacific- Northwest   Meet
' at U.B.C. Stadium—11:00
WRESTLING
; Apparatus Gym—2:00
In Miller Cup play this weekend 'Birds were held to an
8-8 tie by Rowing Club at Brockton Oval.
U.B.C. now has a precarious one point lead over-Kats
who downed the U.B.C. Braves 24-3;
Captain Gerry McGavin scored a convert and booted a penalty
goal with less than two minutes left to preserve 'Birds unbeaten
record. Mike Chambers scored the try.
INJURIES HURT
'Birds were undoubtedly hurt by injuries. High scorer Neal
Henderson, who suffered a concussion last week and Paddy Sloan
who was injured earlier were both missed.
Henderson is out until January and Sloah will not return for
two weeks.
GILMORE SCORES
The lone point getter for the Braves was Benny Gilmore, who
kicked a penalty goal.
In the Bell-Irving Cup series U.B.C won a pair. The P.E. squad
knocked over Barbarians 11-3 in the "A" division.
• In the "B" division Frosh rapped West Van 14-5.
Tomahawks were held to a three-all tie by C.Y.O.
It is reported that ragged play in the second half killed 'Birds
chances for a fifth straight victory. They now have four wins and
a tie to second place Kats' four victories and a loss.
THIS WEEKEND
Next weekend the 'Birds take oil the Trojans at UBC stadium.
They must win to insure their hold on first place.
The second place Kats meet Barbarians at Balaclava.
The Braves tangle with Meralomas at Connaught Park.
In Bell-IrVing Cup action Rowing Club meets the P.E. team
at Douglas East and Tomahawks ptey Ex-Brits at UBC Aggies' field.
COLLEGE SHOP
Open Daily in the Brock Extension
11:30 A.M. TO 2:30 P.M.
Now That November's Here,
Keep Warm With a
- UBC  SCARF -
Special This Week at $3.00
ALSO FEATURING:
—UBC AND FACULTY SWEATERS
—CRESTS, LETTERS, NUMBERS
—PINS FOR ALL FACULTIES
—SCHOOL SUPPLIES AND STATIONERY
—UBC CRESTED JEWELLERY
LOST AND FOUND
OWNED AND OPERATED BY THE A.M.S.
SPORTS
SHORTS
SYNCHRONIZED SWIMMING
Women's Synchronized Swimming practice at Canadian Memorial Pool on Thursday noon.
Girls meet outside the Women's
Gym at 12:30 sharp.
MEN'S BOWLING
The Intramural Association is
planning to start a university
bowling club with the idea of
eventually sponsoring a varsity
team.
An organizational meeting
will be held Friday, November
.13 in the bowling alley.
The club plans to enter a
number of teams in various
tournaments    after Christmas.
Further  information  may  be
obtained from Stan Curry, the
alley manager at  Al.  4531  until 7:30 each night.
BRAVE   BASKETBALL
Braves moved into second
place in the Junior league by
virtue of a 42-31 win over Rollins.
The team was behind until
the fourth quarter. Behind the
shooting of Pete Hewlett and
strong defensive play of Pete
McCollough the Braves moved
ahead late in the fourth quarter
to citich the game.
Ken/ Barry Star
As'Birds Win Two
By MIKE HUNTER (Ubyssey Sports Reporter)
Thursday: UBC 77, Cloverleafs 70.
Saturday: UBC 71, Eilers 56.
Jack Pomfret's Thunderbirds showed last weekend that
they will be a threat for first place.
The hustling Birds whipped Cloverleafs 77-70 Thursday at
Churchill gym, and drubbed Eilers 71-56 Saturday, at home.
On Thursday, a small crowd of about 300 saw a spotty, foul-
filled contest. Cloverleafs were called for 24 fouls, UBC for 21.
Leafs were whistled down time and again as the Birds worked
their block-and-screen offence.
LEAFS LOSE
Leafs couldn't mount a sustained drive until the last quarter,
as the Birds sprung a tight zone on them. Leafs finally started to
roll in the final quarter, and closed the gap to 4 points, but were
unable to get any closer.
Big Norris Martin led the scorers with 19 points, while Leafs
were headed by Herb Olafson's 18 points. Dave Way, in his first
year with the Birds, and playing only his third year of Basketball,
impressed again. Dave added 11 points to the 15 he got against
Alberni a week ago Saturday. Ken Winslade was a demon on defence, as well as on offence, canning 12 points.
The Leafs kept up to the Birds until the third quarter, when
they dropped 10 points behind.
SAT. GAME FAST
Saturday's game was a faster-moving contest, although it was
a runaway for most of the first half. The Birds missed six opening
shots, but they controlled the boards, and didn't allow the Gem's
a shot. Then they began to "hit. Barry Drummond, Dave Way and
Ken Winslade hit four jump shots before Eilers got a point. The
Birds ran wild, building up a 20-3 lead with a minute left in the
quarter. Ray Goodwin got the Jeweller's first field goal with 50
seconds left, and the quarter ended 24-5.
Ed Pederson stole the ball several times, and tied up the
opposing forwards on other occasions. Barry Drummond and Dave
Way got nearly all the rebounds at both ends, as Varsity stretched
their lead to 30-9. But Eilers couldn't be that bad, and the Birds
couldn't keep controlling the play. Led by Don .Steen and John
Gower, Eilers cut the margin to 32-24 at the half.
BIRDS DOMINATE
The Birds dominated the rest of the game, even though John
Forsythe's boys were much improved. Norris Martin and Ed Pederson dropped in a couple of nice hooks, and Drummond _and Winslade continued to score from the top of the key.
Winslade and Drummond both had a great night, Kenny getting 22 points and Barry 15.
Birds were called for the 30-second rule once, believed to be
the first time it has been called this year. Birds led by 13, 51-38,
entering the final quarter, but the Eilers were on the move. Logan
Tait and Co. narrowed it to 4 points with nine minutes left. Then
Winslade went to work at the foul line as the Jewellers became
desperate. He dropped five foul shots and ten during the course
of the game. Eilers started to take back-court fouls in an effort
to get the ball, but Birds held on and won it by 15 points.
WEEKEND GAMES "^
Birds have a tough weekend coming up, the toughest so far.
They take on unbeaten Dietrich-Collins here on Friday, and play
the Athletics Saturday night in Alberni. Should they beat the
Collins' team, they will be in first place.
SUMMARIES — Thursday—UBC (77)—Osborne, Lusk 3, Drunv
mond 8, Way 11, Hartley 6, Berardino 2, Gushue 8, Pederson 6,
Potkonjak 2, Winslade 12, Martin 19.
Cloverleafs (70)—Jennings 2, Terris 8, Heathcote, Lorenz 2,
Sankey, Dean 15, Gimple 6, Braithwaite 1, Barnes 10, Holyoak 4,
Lesisin 4, Olafson 18. '■
Saturday—UBC (71)—Osborne, Lusk 3, Drummond 8, Way 9,
Hartley, Berardino, Gushue 4, Peterson 9, Martin 9, Winslade 22,
Potkonjak. *"l
Eilers (56)—Tait 4, Oddy 2, McLean, Gower 9, Nicol 13, Brown
6, Elkington 3, Goodwin 8.
Soccer Advances
To Second Round
The Varsity soccer squad advanced into the Second Round
of Imperial Cup play with a
2-0 victory over North Shore at
Mclnnes Field on Sunday afternoon. These two Second Division teams battled to a 0-0 draw
for 45 minutes.
However in the last half Varsity outside right Bill Wedley
stole the show as he tallied
twice to give the winners their
margin of victory. Bill's opening goal came from a kick directly in front after a pass from Pat
Glenn. Wedley's final effort was
a beautiful header.
FAST FIELD
This important win was
achieved on a hard, dry and
fast field which was complemented by a sunny sky.
Watching the game from the
sidelines, one was struck by the
fact that the whole young light
Varsity team put forth a superior
performance to stop the older,
heavier North Shore crew. The
rugged close checking North
Shore eleven found a stone wall
Varsity defence, particularly in
the person of versatile Frank
Sealy who was at his colorful
dashing best in the fullback position. In addition Don Celle, borrowed from Wallaces, was outstanding in the Varsity goal.
WEDNESDAY GAMES
The Varsity team manager,
Sid Brail, reports that the
Second Round of the Imperial
Cup will be played on Wednesday, November 11. Varsity will
travel to Sunset Park to take on
Hillcrest at 11 a.m. in one holiday encounter. Tuesday, November 10, 1959
THE      UBYSSEY
PAGE SEVEN
Birds Bash lief pi
By FRED FLETCHER (Uhyssey Sports Reporter)
U.B.C Thunderbirds rolled past University of Saskatchewan Huskies 39-7 here Saturday to end their first WCIAU
football season undefeated in league play.
'Birds controlled play throughout the game moving almost
at will against the inexperienced Huskies.
U.B.C. marched for a touchdown on their first series. Olafson capped the drive scooting
four yards around left end for
the major. Dave Barker converted.
UBC MOVES
On the very next U.B.C.
series 'Birds again moved into
paydirt. Tonis Tutti drove nine
yards for the touchdown. Barker
again converted.
On U.B.C.'s third offensive
series early in the second quarter Bianco crashed eight yards
over center for a third touchdown. ■    ■ !**HF!
The next march was sparked
by  the passing of  Quarterback
Grads Beat
New Birds
Old-Old Timers 6, New New
Birds 4
Grade 62, Birds 58
Friday evening turned out to
be a harrowing but humorous
night for Jack Pomfret's Thunderbirds.
Up she goes!
The UBC team, minus five regular Birds, dropped both ends of
the doubleheader with their
alumni.
In the abbreviated first game
(five minutes) the old-old timers
clowned their way to a 6-4 win.
They won by virtue of a pre-
game meeting .of the "basketball
commission," who decided to allow the oldsters three points for
each basket.
BIRDS; USE FIRST YEAR
PLAYfRg
The eld-old timers even scored
first, Jjim (crazy legs) McLean
canning a beautiful hook; Dave
Osborne and Earle Fairholts got
the Birds back in the lead, but
H^rry Franklin won it with a
cojurt-length (well, not quite) one
hahder, with a minute left.
In the more serious game,
C»ach Bob Osborne's not-so-old
timers controlled the Birds from
(continued on page 5)
Stan Knight and the brilliant
running of Jayvee star Bill
Riedl. Another Jayvee star, Ron
Kincade, rambled over for the
major from the 16-yard line.
Barker's convert attempt was
again blocked.
HALF ENDS
The half ended without Huskies making a serious threat and
with U.B.C. leading 26-0.
The 3300 fans had hardly had
any time to get their minds off
the Homecoming Queen, Miss
Engineering, her court, and the
dancing cheerleaders, when the
'Birds were at it again.
This time linebacker Doug
Mitchell started the drive pouncing on a fumble by Saskatr
chewian's all-everything, ken
Tidsbury. Two short passes from
Henwood to Bill Crawford, on
the tackle-eligitole play made
the score 32^0. Barker converted."
On the fourth Saskatchewan
play after the TD U.B.C. halfback Dave Lee intercepted a
pass and ran it back 30 yards.
Jim Olafson carried over for the
score.
SASK SCORES
Saskatchewan finally hit the
scoreboard in the fourth quarter.
Tailback-Quarterback Ken Tidsbury tossed a 17-yard pass to
fullback Nick Baiton on a sleeper play. Baiton had stood near
the sidelines totally unnoticed
by the 'Birds and had trotted
into the end zone and waited
all alone for Tidsbury's pass.
Gerry Lee converted.
The game ended without further scoring. Bruce McCallum
knocked down a Soskatchewan
pass in the end-zone late in the
game to keep the score at 39-7.
JIM OUTSTANDING
The outstanding player for
U.B.C. was Jim Olafson Who
picked up over 100 yards in
13 carries.
'Tonis Tutti, Bill Riedl, Dave
Lee, and Roy Bianco also picked
up considerable yardage for the
'Birds.
Jackie Henwood played an
excellent game for the 'Birds at
quarterback. He ran for over
"40 yards and threw for 105. According to unofficial statistics
he completed 10 passes in 10
attempts.        ' '■    ' ~
Barker was his ace receiver
gobbling 3 for 65 yards.
The visitors were paced by
Ken Tidsbury who operated
equally well as a halfback from
the "T" as he did from the tailback spot when the Huskies
switched to a single-wing. He
picked up 74 yards rushing and
passed for 57 more.
DEFENSIVE SASK.
Defensively the Saskatchewan
squad was led by fullback Pat
Marshall, tackle Ian Sisetki, end
Milt Wakefield, and guard John
Mjuzika. Wakefield and Sisetki
both rushed well. In addition
Sisetki recovered the lone U.B.C.
fumble.
Defensive stars for the 'Birds
were Gary Bruce, Bruce McCallum, George Hoar, Mike Williams, and Doug Mitchell.
Hoar ranged all over the
field, leading the team with
nine tackles.
v.o-c.
Jown Owen Jr. talks in Bio-
Science 200 at noon today. He
will show slides and give a talk
on his climb of Mt. Raleigh.
* .*    ^JgtiSk**
M'?» \* .s '        ■   -,:y >,      «.
% 1 ^\
Bird End John Barberie goes through the Saskatchewan line
Co-Editors Ann Pickard, Ernie Harder
Staff Alan Dafoe, Fred Fletcher, Mike Hunter
Dave Way Checks Eilers' Player
Staff-Council Tie
In Halftime Soccer
Athletic techniques went out
the window Friday night in
Memorial Gym when students'
council took on faculty in a six-
man soccer game.
This constituted the half-time
entertainment (?) at the Homecoming basketball game.
The council squad was the first
to make an appearance as they
trotted out onto the floor festooned in bright orange, jerseys
and led by the renowned athlete,
Ian Stewart, President of MAA,
wearing his stylish ivy league
cap.
The contest was fast, furious
and fantastic. Faculty drew first
bloody- when   Mr".   Eliot,    the
esteemed Latin instructor, wearing his   famous   coonskm   cap,
drove a blazing shot past council netminder Pete Haskins.
HASKINS HELPS
Haskins, no doubt to distinguish himself as goaltender from
the other members of the squad,
was wearing a tweed coat and
vest, knickers, long wollen socks
and a tweed cap. The fact that
he was smoking his pipe may
have limited his effectiveness in.
goal but he is rarely seen without it.
Eliot scored again for faculty
When    a    penalty   was    called
against Marg  McLachlan presi-
See STAFF COUNCIL
(Continued on Page 5)
Still Tops
In A Division men's grass
hockey action on Saturday, Varsity consolidated their hold on
first place in the league with a
6-1 triumph over Redbirds, the
UBC faculty team, at the Chris
Spencer Field. Varsity, now in
possession of a 4-0 w on-lost record, was ahead 2-0 at halftime.
After the 'Birds had scored
a penalty bully to make the
count 2-1 early in the second
half, the eventual losers pressed
hard to get the equalizer. However, Varsity recovered quickly
and rammed home four goals.
WARREN SCORES
The marksmen for Varsity
were Victor Warren, Arthur
Temple, Gordon Forward, Nelson
' Forward, Dave Simpson and centre half John Young. In a post-
game interview, Young -stated
that the 1958-59 league champion
Redbirds forward line was
strong, but added that they suffered from a weak defence.
University Coach Dr. Malcolm
IVtcGregor emphasized that this
was a hard-fought game which
was much closer than the spore
indicates.
At the same time on UBC No.
2 Field, the UBC Blues bowed
2-0 to a good Vancouver eleven.
In summary, this was an evenly
played contest in which Blues
were unable to score on the Vancouver goalkeeper who turned
aside many Blues' scoring threats
GOLDS LOSE
Playing away from home, the
UBC Golds lost 2-1 to a tough
Grasshoppers A team at Hillcrest
West Park. Despite holding down
a 'Hopper scoring machine, the
hard-working Golds squad could
not capitalize on their opportunities.
In an earlier hockey contest
on UBC No. 2 Field, the Crusaders dropped an ever-trying
UBC Pedagogue team by a 3-1
count in a B Division encounter.
The Peds attack, sparked by Don
Carter's lone goal, picked up considerably in the second half.
GRASSHOCKEY
Varsity vs India "A"
at Memorial—2:00
Blues vs N. Shore
at U.B.C—2:00
Golds vs Redbirds
at U.B.C.—3:00
Peds vs Blackbirds
at U.B.C. No. 3—2:00 PAGE EIGHT
Tuesday, November 10, 1959
CLASSIFIED
WANTED—Girl, for company,
to share apartment. Kerrisdale
Phone c-o YUkon 8-0060.
APPLICATIONS are being received for manager of the Fort
Camp Canteen. Candidates must
be married and have accounting
experience in double entry. Contact Cec Plotnikoff, AL 1270-L.
STOLEN or picked up by mistake on Nov. 5 in Buchanan 106,
in between 8:30-9:30, a light
brown, full-length leather coat.
Please return, since it is valuable.   Marge, BR 7-7844.
FOR SALE—Hohner accordion.
Excellent condition. Cheap. RE
3-6211.
FOR SALE— One 220-spring
Hollywood bed. Near new. Very
reasonable. Phone Ron, RE
3-8367.
LOST—K & E slide rule in Hg
9 or Biological Science 2000.
Identification, Frederick Block,
HA 6397-L, inside flap. Phone
Fred, RE 8-5944.   Reward.
TYPING
I   ESSAYS, THESES, NOTES
MIMEOGRAPHING
MRS. F. M. GOW
4456 W.  10th Ave.
AL 3682
MEN
TWO BARBER SHOPS
TO SERVE YOU
inside   the gates
• Brock Hall Extension
• S734 University Boulevard
(Continued from page 1)
will be held this Friday in Bu
320 at noon. All class reps or a
substitute  must attend.
•T*        •!•        •!•
NFCUS PHOTOGRAPHY
CONTEST
Enter the Canadian Universities Photography Contest.
Rules and entry forms available
in NFCUS Office, Room 165,
Brock   Extension.
2p       Sf,       .j*
JAZZ  SOCIETY
Jay Atherton speaking on
"The Great Arrangers of Jazz
History." Tuesday noon, Bu 106.
GAMMA DELTA
There will be a meeting on
Tues. Nov. 10, at 12:30 in Bu.
227. Rev. F. Gabert will speak
on "I believe The Nature and
Significance of Faith.
•*• •** •**
UBYSSEY
There will be an important
Ubyssey staff meeting at noon
Fri. 13 Nov. in the Music Room
above the Mildred Brock Room
in Brock Hall—All staff must
attend.
•n     •**     **■
BOOSTER CLUB
Pep Band. Practice in H.L. 6,
Thurs., noon. Important.
•J*       •*•       *r
N.V.C.
General Meeting Thurs., Nov.
12 at 12:30, Bu 205. Members
please attend.
•p    •*•    •*•
V.O.C,
Hear John Owen in Biq-
science 2000 Today at noon.
Slides and talk on Mt. Raleigh
trip.
•*•        v        •*•
NEWMAN CLUB
Nov. 10, 12 and 13 in St.
Mark's College there will be a
JiiftOcc PreAekiU
ALEC JACK
MESS-HAWKINS
st his vsrsstlls best..*     In his greatest of rots*.4
as ths Prisoner as ths Interrogator
the Prisoner
[W nw * amoerr boland •»«. »..««•. svdncv bo*!
"——• «» VIVIAN A, COX • Sl~»« l« PETER OLINVILUI
THUSDAY - NOVEMBER 12 - 12:30
Iva Soreback
(Phys-Ed. 5U) says
I keep my finances in good
shape with a growing
Savings Account at..
nfiii
Bank of Montreal
Your Campus Branch in the Administration Bldg.
MERLE C. KIRBY, Manager
a big step on the road to success is an early banking connection
"Mission on Campus." Each
noon hour there will be a lecture
by a Redemptorist priest from
Edmonton.
BRIDGE AND CHESS CLUB
No   meeting   on   Wed.    Duplicate bridge on Thurs., at 7:30
in   the     Music   Room.
Brock) All welcome.
*
*
EL  CIRCULO
Today at noon in Bu 204, Prof.
Koobervig will be showing
slides of Spain.
(North , INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Tonight    at    8:30    Professor
Alec  Wainman  will  speak  and
show   slides   on   the   Canadian
Rockies. Everyone welcome.
SAILING CLUB
Lecture  today   at   12:30,   Bu
22t), Theory of Sailing.
U.B.C. RADIO - STARTING MONDAY, NOV. 16
Time
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Eye Opener
Thursday
Eye Opener
Friday
9:00
Eye Opener
Eye Opener
Eye Opener
9:30
Eye Opener
Eye Opener
Eye Opener
Eye Opener
Eye Opener
10:00
Sounds of
the City
Roy Jacques
Roy Jacques
Roy Jacques
Roy Jacques
10:30
Sounds of
the City
Coffee Break
Coffee Break
Coffee Break
Coffee Break
11:00
Works of
Masters
Works of
Masters
Works of
Masters
Works of
Masters
Works of
Masters
12:00
Scope
Scope
Scope
Scope
Scope
12:30
Open House
Open House
Open House
Open House
Open House
1:00
Searchlight
Music Room
Searchlight
Music Room
Searchlight
Music Room
Searchlight
Music Room
Searchlight
Music Room
1:30
Music Room
UBC Digest
Music Room
Music Room
Woman's
World
World in
Print
2:00
Musical
Showcase
Musical
Showcase
Music Makers
Compass
Music Room
2:30
Musical
Showcase
Musical
Showcase
Music Makers
Musical
Showcase
International
Bouseparty
3:00
Musical
Showcase
Musical
Showcase
Musical
Showcase
Musical
Showcase
Musical
Showcase
3:30
Jazz
Unlimited
Jazz
Unlimited
Jazz
Unlimited
Jazz
Unlimited
Jazz
Unlimited
4:00
Mostly Music
Mostly Music
Mostly Music
Mostly Music
Mostly Music
4:30
Mostly Music
Mostly Music
Mostly Music
Mostly Music
Mostly Music
JFriday Only - 5:30-6:30—Dial UBC; 6:30-8:00—House Party; 8:30-12:00—Dancing Party
TRAIN FOR THE BEST
OF TWO WORLDS
Develop your leadership ability, acquire new technical skills,
benefit financially and continue your university courses by enrolling
in the tri-service Regular Officer Training Plan (ROTP).
It provides for:
• university tuition fees paid by the     • allowances for board and room,
Department of National Defence books and instruments
• a monthly salary • free medical and dental cars
• and a career in the Canadian Army
Then, on graduating, you will have not only your chosen
professional training, but also the Queen's Commission
as a career officer in the Canadian Army with the prestige
and many personal advantages it brings.
A LIMITED NUMBER OF CANADIAN ARMY VACANCIES IN THESE
ROTP "UNIVERSITY QUOTAS" ARE STILL AVAILABLE.
?
If yon want tie best of both worlds, find out what tW» plan can offer yon today*
For further particulars, contact yonr Unrressity 8o$poxt Officer (Ann;}*
MAJ. REYNOLDS
Armoury. UBC
Tel. No.: ALma 1922
Married Accommodation
in Acadia available for undergraduate students, all years.
Call, at Housing Office
Rm. 205-A, Physics Building
A. R. BAIRD
Housing Administrator.
Authorized as second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa.

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