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The Ubyssey Mar 26, 1957

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 THE UBYSSEY
Vol. XL
VANCOUVER, B.C. TUESDAY, MARCH 26, 1957
No. 61
Prairie   League   Possible
Fee Increase Would
Speed WIAU Entry
Sport Heads Opine
EARLYBIRD UBYSSEY
OUT FOR REFERENDUM
For ill last regular edition
of the year, The Ubyssey today
goei "earlybird."
Copies of today's edition arc
delivered, before breakfast to
Fort and Acadia dining rooms,
i io Blanca bus loop, all early
mornino eateries, and the Bus
stop.
If students vote "yes" to a
one dollar f*o increase for
Publications Wednesday, early
morning delivery next year
will be assurod.
Other benefits: a tentative
fourth edition on Monday
mornings, Canadian Press wire
service, expended news coverage through increased available space.
Final edition, the infamous
end traditional "goon" edition,
will appear Friday.
'tween dosses
(Ssa on Page 8)
Degrees In
Sciences
Herein 58
Bachelor of Science degree
will be given by the university
starting next fall according to
Walter Gage, Dean of Administrative and Inter-Faculty Affairs.
Long awaited power to grant
the degree will be given to the
departments of Chemistry, Physics, Zoology, Giology, Bacterilo-
gy, Physiology and Biochemistry. Under special conditions Ma-
thematic students will be able
to qualify for the B. Sc.
Most important change in the
program for Arts students is
that English 200 will not be required for a psrson taking a
E. Sc. degree. Instead second
yenr 13. Sc. students will have
u> take one Humanities course,
c. which English 200 wil! be only
one   of   the   options.
Other Humanities courses will
include the Social Sciences, Phi-
loa-.phy. History and subjects
cf thai nature, which don't include laboratory or statistical
work.
Students and staff have been
grossing the administration for
this move since the end of World
War II. Recently formed Arts
end Sciences Undergraduate Society played a part in the movement to arrange for the degree.
First year will be essentially the >ame as for thc Bachelor
o!' Arts degree; second year students will have to take three
science courses (of which Mathematics can he one) and one Humanities course. Fifth course
ea.a be either another Science or
Hunmanities course. Languages
will not be specifically required '
in the- second year although they !
can be (hosen as a fifth or sixth
course i
EMERGING SYLPH-LIKE from the waves, capricious Don
Jabour taunts a noon hour crowd.Jabour, as well as Bryan
Williams, and Sandy Ross were thrown into the pool by
Spring-fed Engineers Monday. "These juvenile gangsters,"
said Jabour referring to the Engineers, "are a disgrace to
the University."
—Photo by Mar K Underhill
Ottawa To Subsidize
Hungarian Foresters
Federal Government has agreed to pay three dollars a
day for every Hungarian refugee attached to the Sopron
Forestry Faculty, now in Powell River.
Mews of the government pro-i	
gram   came   from   the   Powell
River Company Monday.
Grant will continue until the
refugees are able to support
themselves through jobs, probably provided by the Powell
River Company.
University officials confirmed
the plan but were unable to give
any indication of who w ar- going
to pay the cost of establishing
the school  at  UBC  next  fall.
Assistant to the President Professor Geoffrey Davies said that
"we regard this as the responsibility of the Federal Government."
Salaries for the Sopron staff,
accommodation for the school,
and place for the staff and students to live are the problems
facing   the  administration
Youth Training Centre at Acadia Camp has been suggested
as a possible home for the new j
school. UBC under present fin- j
ancial conditions is unable to as- I
sume the burden of the added j
cost for the school according
to  Professor  Davies.
World fimous Antmopolo-
gist Margaret Mead will be on
campus next wet k, 1 \u rday,
April 2, sponsored by Special
Events Committee
She will speak in the Auditorium al noon, on "The
Changing Ideas oi Marriage."
and in tho evening on "Ethics
In An Atomic Age."
Long-awaited formation of a Prairie Athletic League may
become a reality in 1958 if students vote Vyes" in Wednesday's
I referendum, athletic officials said Monday.
Hopeful prediction came from Athletic Director R. J. Phillips
Monday, after he received news that Universities of Alberta
and Saskatchewan are willing and able to enter the .proposed
League.
'The cost will be considerable," Mr. Phillips said, but th«
increase would bring a Prairie League much closer.
Outgoing AMS President Don Jabour etimated that membership in the Prairie Leagvie would cost "about $12,000" more
than UBC now pays to participate in the Evergreen Conference.
The fee increase, if approved, would provide Athletics with an
extra $£,000 next year.
For years, Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba have balked at WIAU entry. Last fall, Manitoba students voted against
a fee increase that would have permitted them to enter the
proposed League.
Mr. Phillips said Saskatchewan and Alber'a Athletics Departments, always anxious for WIAU entry, have finally decided  it  is financially  feasible.
"The Administration would probably b'j more inclined to
give financial aid to extra-curricular athletics if it meant competition with Canadian, instead of American teams," Jabour
said.
| WIAU entry would mean football and .basketball competi-
' tion with green Prairie teams, plus tournament competition
, for nine minor sports. Gaps in the yearly schedules would be
I filled by exhibition matches with American teams, Mr. Phillips
: said.
!        UBC could not enter WIAU next year because one year's
notice must be given for withdrawal from the Evergreen Con-
I ference.
i
\ Students will vote Wednesday on a referendum that pro-
j poses an extra dollar each for Athletics and Publications. Stu-
! dents can accept or reject either or both proposals.
|        The extra dollar for athletics would permit only slight ex-
| pansion in UBC's athletic program, since sports are now fighting to maintain the present program despite rising costs.
The extra dollar for Publications would mean four Ubyssey
editions weekly, early morning delivery and expanded news
coverage.
Fee Increase Referendum Tomorrow
$1 To Sports and - or $1 To Pub
This i.s the referendum students will be asked to vote upon
tomorrow. Fee increase will total  two dollars if two-thirds of
the students voting answer "yes" to both questions. Two-thirds
.majority is required for each of the increases if each i.s to pass.
Please vote Yes or No on both questions.
1.  Resolved that a $1 fee increase be given to Athletics. Yes . No	
2. Resolved that a $1 fee increase be given to Publications. Yes . No	 PAGE TWO
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 26, 1957
THE UBYSSEY   letters to the editor
Authorized as second class mall.   Post Office Department.,
Ottawa.
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Student subscription* $1.20 per year (Included In AMS fees). Mall
subscriptions $2.00 per year. Single copies five cents. Published
In Vancouver throughout the University year by the Student
Publications Board of the ALma Mater Society, University ol
British Columbia. Editorial opinions expressed herein are tboee
of the editorial staff of the Ubyssey, and not necessarily those of
the Alma Matdr Society or the University. Letters to the Editor
•hould not be more than 150 words. The Ubyssey reserves the right
to cut letters, and cannot guarantee publication of all letters
received
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF   SANDY ROSS
ASSOCIATE EDITOR       PAT  RUSSELL
Managing Ed. Dav* Robertson      City Edilor Jerry Brown
Business Manager   Harry YuiU    Asst. City Editor. Art Jackson
Photo Editor, Mark Underhill       File Editor  Fred Bobski
CUP Editor Marilyn Smith
Reporters and Deskmen: — Barrie Hale (he lent us his car to
go get typewriters and masking tape); Hank Hawthorn (Thank
God this is the last regular issue for this year).
Muscle Pipeline
What is generally "regarded as campus culture was marked
by experimentation this year, in what seemed to be an effort
to render it campus entertainment as well,
The first noble experiment was a revival of the Varsity
Revue tradition. This was met vvith student apathy as it should
have been: It was a clumsy, unappealing display of a paucity of talent, ineffectively staged.
The second of the cardinal efforts was a dramatized reading of Shakespeare's "Richard II," which drew a similar grunt
of student disinterest. A prolix play to begin with, it gained
little from an absence of movement and business.
The third member of this year's cultural blitzkrieg was
Player's Club's presentation of Shakespeare's "Twelfth
Night," and this, surprisingly enough, was a critical, as well as
a popular, success.
Perhaps there is an inference to be drawn from all this
—the Varsity Revue might have been more successful had it
been written by someone a.s witty as Shakespeare, or acted
by someone as accomplished as the Player's Club; "Richard
II" might have been more successful had it been staged by
someone as resourceful as Ian Thorne.
There is, however, another, more encouraging inference
to be drawn—that UBC audiences will not be attracted by the
second-rate.
BARRIE HALE
Quality' Culture?
News that formation of a Prairie Athletic League is now
probably feasible should provide a powerful incentive for
voting "yess" on Wednesday's fee increase referendum. No-
one has said that an extra dollar per head for athletics will
guarantee a Western Intercollegiate Athletic Union, but indications are powerful that it will. The advantages of such an
alliance are many.
Two Prairie schools, Alberta and Saskatchewan, finally
decided yesterday they can afford trans-mountain competition. Manitoba cannot afford to enter on a full-fledged basis,
but Athletic Director Bus Phillips says they are keen to compete in Basketball. The question now is: can UBC afford to
complete the threesome, and make Prairie ball a reality?
The indications are that we can, and the fact i.s that we
should. Thc extra dollar would be well-invested. To begin
with, Prairie competition would mean greater spectator interest, and increased gate receipts. Not many students care
whether the Multnomah County Curd-Churning and Basket-
Weaving Institute wins or loses against UBC; but we've a
suspicion that interest would quicken perceptibly at the
prospect of Alberta or Saskatchewan versus UBC—even if
the quality of competition might not in some cases he as high.
And to take a wide view of it, more interest in the Land Beyond tho Rockies can do nothing but strengthen, in a small
way, the unity of the Canadian Nation.
If wo vote "yes" to Athletics Wednesday, we'll be going
a lonk way toward- tho formation of the long-awaited Prairie
League; thai is an eminently desirable objective. But even it'
the extra dollar won't do the trick. ''yes" i> Mill be-t. The
money   is   badly   needed
And Publication^ could use an extra dollar too, but that's
Some Writers Object
To New Fee Increases
FLATLY AT VARIANCE
Editor, The Ubyssey:
If tiie aim of education in
a democracy comprehends the
idea that enlightened, responsible individuals should be the
outcome of the educational process, then the views of certain
members of the student body
are flatly at variance with this
aim.
It has been proposed that,
updn the majority approval of
a referendum, all students of
this university will be required to pay one or two dollars
more next year when registering. Underlying the proposal is
a curious perversion of the concept of democracy. Democracy* here is being thought the
right of the majority to dictate
to the minority. If this idea
is to be justified at all, it can
only be on the ground that the
demands of the minority conflict with the rights of the
larger group. This is palpably
not the case with regard to
athletics and the Ubyssey.
Leaving aside the question of
whether either of these is
"necessary" to the purpose of
a university, there is no justification for certain intellectually impoverished individuals to
ask for anything more than
voluntary contributions. Participation in such extra curricu-
lar activities ought to be financed by those interested in
them. Any others, who Blight
be under the impression that
the purpose of attending university is to study, are not violating the right of those engaged in athletics by refusing
to contribute to its support.
To advocate compulsory support, even though blessed (or
cursed) by majority approval,
is to argue an insiduously disguised authoritarianism.
I would cheerfully make a
voluntary  contribution   to  the
Ubyssey, but I resent the smug
attitude that I have to.
LANCE IRVINE, Arts 2
FOUND ADDRESS
Wroclaw,
16th February, 1957
Our Dear Friends:
In our student's paper 'Viives'
we have found your address,
and we decided to write to you.
We are two Polish physics
students of the University of
Wroclaw, and we beg you to
aid us to bind the correspondence with students in your
country.
For many years we had been
cut off, from the whole world,
and it wasn't safe for us to try
to enter into connection with
you. Now it is possible and we
should longed to learn something about your life and your
country. *
We beg you to make easy to
us, if you can do it, of course
the binding of connection with
Canadian students, which
would wish to correspond with
us. Wc are interested in all
matters of your life and we can
give you some impressions of
our life and work We can
also exchange postcards, photos,
magazines, books, etc. We
should be very thankfully to
you, for going to help us in this
matter.
All good wishes.
Yours sincerely,
Yerzy Urbanik
Audrey Miecznikowski,
the same calibre as before.
2. When do you arise from
your bed, Mr. Editor? I believe that most of us have already heard an adequate presentation of the morning's new3
over six radio stations long before getting a chance to read
Ubyssey's inadequate accounts
even if the Ubyssey hit the
news-stands at 8.30 a.m.
3. The only other pasture
left for you to browse in lies in
news of other Canadian universities. Unfortunately you have
missed the boat here for we
now have the University Post.
In summary, then, I would
urge you to cut the rot out of
the apple before selling it to
somebody who might object
after realizing that "all that
glitters is not gold."
TONY RICHMOND.
"The Irate Forester"
3rd Forestry.
FOUR EDITIONS WEEKLY?
Editor, The Ubyssey:
1. Four editions weekly, eh?
2. Delivered before breakfast,
eh? 3. World and National
news from the wires of Canadian Press, eh? These benefits
with our money, eh?
I suggest that you are endeavouring to wrap a rotten
apple in gold foil.
1.    Results in more litter of
NO RIGHT TO ACT
Mr. Reynold and Associates:
You and your friends had no
right to act as spokesmen for
the Musicians Union at the
AMS meeting last Thursday.
The reason is obvious, You and
your friends are totally ignorant of the Musicians Union's
stand on such an issue.
You should know that the
Union will not interfere with
any AMS function that does not
involve the public. In other
words, you and your friends
can donate your very valuable
services to any function, strictly
AMS, free of charge, and without any fear of the Union boycotting the campus.
If you were not ignorant of
this, then perhaps you were deliberately lying to the student
body in order to protect your
infamous income.
If you feel any injustice at
these comments, I would like
to hear of them. However, before you say anything I suggest
that you write a formal letter to
the Musicians Union and get a
few valid facts instead of a few
misinterpreted ideas.
DICK McMANUS,
Eo. II.
Career In Retailing
MODISTE LIMITED, RETAILERS IN LADIES'READY TO WEAR
HASAN OPENING FOR A YOUNG MAN INTERESTED IN RE-
TAILING AS A CAREER.
The applicant must have and recognize the following:
1. AN EVEN TEMPERAMENT WITH PLEASANT PERSONALITY: BE ABLE TO
MEET THE PUBLIC AND HANDLE PERSONELL COMPRISED MOSTLY OF
WOMEN.
2. INITIATIVE, IMAGINATION AND ABILITY TO COPE WITH MULTITUDE OF
CIRCUMSTANCES QUICKLY AND EFFICIENTLY, SINCE RETAIL LADIES'
WEAR IS VERY COMPETITIVE AND DEMANDING BUSINESS.
ok BE BONDABLE.
4. BETWEEN THE AGES OF IS AND 24.
5. MUST REALIZE THAT TIIE PERIOD OR APPRENTICESHIP IS LONG AND DI-
FICULT, TO QUALIFY FOR AN EXECUTIVE POSITION. HOWEVER THE REWARDS ARE WORTH TIIE EFFORT.
Send handwritten application phis your p'ersotial history together with a picture of
yourself to:
MR. J. SUZUKI.
MODISTE LTD.
■131) GRANVILLE ST.
VANCOUVER.  B.C.
Your applieution .should spite why \mi wi-h to make a enrem1 on! ol rela'diivj. pkm
your   ediu\.li"n.d   background,   ho'iimm   spirts.
EncloM' letter-, or letters nt reiereuce nagem ma \m;h a ietf-v i ro::. yo; rdoeammml'. 1 y-
in.g 'mod health. Tuesday, March 26, 1957
THE    UBYSSEY
PAGE THREE
Athletic Director
Tell Money Need
By JACQUES STRAPPE
If UBC students agree Wednesday to pay an extra dollar
to support Athletics, where will the money go? Athletic Director
J. R. Phillips gave the answer Monday in a statement to the
Ubyssey.
The fee increase, if approved,!
would provide S8.000 above the|Permit ^   !°    JLancific Coast
,    . A A, ,   .    s meets.   Needed $3,000.
$40,000 yearly income Athletics -,„twwT»i/-        *   *    ,,
„, .„. (2)    SWIMMING needs funds
now receives.    Mr. Phillips est- tQ rent an indoor poo,     skiing
imates an extra $23,000 is needed has thfe men and mountains, but
to  provide  an   adequate  sports
programme.
Athletics needs    an    absolute
no   money   to   compete   outside
Vancouver.    Hockey  must  host
Prairie teams in the Hamber Cup
series next. "year.      Badminton,
minimum of  $10,000  extra  "to Fencing, Golf,    Grass    Hockey,
stand still." | Tennis, Volleyball, Weightlifting
iand Gymnastics all have strong
INSECURE j teams, but no funds to compete
.,.,,., , elsewhere.    Needs here total up
Another dark cloud envisioned x    ..„ B„_
to $3,600.
by  Mr.  Phillips:  $5,000  of the!     .„,    -.-,«-,»»» t ^
H I     (3)    FOOTBALL  needs  more
present $40,000 is insecure. The | and better equipment — includ-
"risky" 85,000 revenue comes, ing training facilities for inju-
from T-V royalties, Harlem' ries — and helmets. Publicity
Globetrotter percentages, and |atld travelling budgets are also
„ . .  ,        T,j pared   below   the  minimum.  —
Homecoming   gate  receipts.    "; N-tdtd: |3<m
these failed to materialize next
year, the picture would be black
indeed.
KRRP
These are the things we have
no space to mention, but must
get in to save our reputation:
1. Football Queen nominations are due before April 1st in
the Council Office.
2. Open House'wants administrators to apply to the AMS
office. Open House will be a
major undertaking next year.
3. WUS - WAA banquet on
Thursday in the Brock. Tickets
50 cents. Speaker Mrs. Lorraine Johnston, lawyer, Judge in
Juvenile Court. WUS Activity
Awards to be presented.
Bachelor: A man who has no
children  to speak  of.
Father's Day: Nine months before labor day.
Horse Show: A lot of horses
showing their asses to a lot of
asses  showing  their  horses.
Second 1957 edition of
Raven, the campus literary
magazine, goes on sale Wednesday,
New Editor, Ted Necholson,
Monday, promised "less rape"
for UBC literateurs in Raven's
pristine pages. Last edition
ran three rape stories, provoking a campus outcry.
Price is 25c. Sales booths
will be set up in Brock Hall
and points West,
*
*
This Wednesday, at 8 p.m. in
the auditorium, the new sixty
voice Choral Society will present
its first public concert. After
this concert the choir will go on
its first tour to Vancouver
Island.
Highlighting the concert will
be selections from the Broadway
hit   "Wizard   of   Oz",   and   Mr.
Repel's     arrangement    of     the!
"Alma Mater" song. j
Tickets, 50c for students and
75c for the public, may be
bought at the door,
k
(4) OTHER NEEDS include:
an increased travelling budget
for   basketball   teams;   expenses
In rough, here  are  Mr.  Phil- for  hostin*    Golf'    Te"nis and'
Track tournaments next year.
lips' estimates of Athletic needs
over and above present incomem
(1) ROWING: — Operates   almost entirely as an affiliate of
the Vancouver Rowing Club, and
has little equipment of its own.j
Present  budget  is too  small  to!
Tuxedo Rentals
WHITE COATS — TAILS
MORNING COATS
DIRECTORS COATS
SHIRTS- •   ACCESSORIES
EA    I BE   MAr. 2457
. A. LEC623 Howe St.
Don't- miss these remaining Special Events
Presented by Special Events and Fine Arts Committee
TUESDAY, MARCH 26, NOON—AUDITORIUM
ROBERT LOWELL
Distinguished American poet.
THURSDAY, MARCH 28, NOON—PHYSICS 200
Prof. RICHARD POPKIN
Noted philosopher will speak on Existentialism
TUESDAY, APRIL 2, NOON—AUDITORIUM
MARGARET MEAD
Leading Americananthropologist.
Letcure topic: "Changing Ideas of Marriage"
TUESDAY, APRIL 2, 8:0 p.m.—AUDITORIUM
Lecture topic: "Ethics For An Atomic Age."
(For above lecture tickets are 75c at Modern Music or
AMS Office).
Keep It Safe!
Your AMS Card is your student passport. Protect
yours by having it sealed in plastic hy experts.
The cost is low, but the value is terrific. One
day service.
Waterproof
Tamperproof
Long Wearing
ONLY
AT
THE
COLLEGE SHOP
South Brock —  Opposite  Coffee Shop
Open Monday to Friday — 11::»1 to 1:'I0
U.B.C.'s NEW SIXTY VOICE
CHORAL SOCIETY SINGS
Wednesday, March 27, 8 p.m.
*
Audit. 75c (public) 50c (students)
Tickets at the door.
In bottles only
AS TELEPHONE OPERATORS
• You can begin in April.
• No previous experience needed.
• Pay is good.
• Time off—8 days every 4 weeks and 4 of
these are consecutive.
Telephone Operating is the ideal summer job for university girls.
The time-off arrangements are especially attractive, giving you
the opportunity for trips to nearby resorts, shopping excursions,
or whatever you like to do most.
Most of the operators are needed in Vancouver but there will
likely be openings elsewhere.
For more information, and to apply, come in to our Employment
Office, 768 Seymour Street, at Robson.
BRITISH   COLUMBIA
TELEPHONE  COMPANY
"A Good Place to Work" PAOETOUR
TKt    UBYSSEY
r
UBCs Year:
ENGINEERS obviously posed no problem at all to the
above frosh during orientation week. After all they only
lost their clothes; few freshmen were this lucky as engineers
proved conclusively once again that anyone with the economic means can attend UBC.
^0'f^ **•
«ss«*
SYMBOLIZING the University's year-long drive for money,
President N. A. M. MacKenzie posed early in the fall for
this picture before leaving on a money-hunt. UBC now can
expect a total of 25 million dollars within the next ten
yoars if Victoria, Ottawa and UBC's fund drive committee come through.
UBC EIGHTS finished second to Yale in the '56 Melbourne Olympics,
and further supported the contention that UBC can be a sports power.
Pictured above are cox Carl Ogawa, Bill McKerlich, Phil Kueber, Doug
•^imma* nvtr I'm* #r
LEADERSHIP Conference this fall saw the
annual gathering of campus extra-curricular pundits meeting in the same policy making, partying, Ubyssey-baiting mood. Caught
in   an    unguarded   moment, the   delgates
above  seem  to be  seriously  considering   •
something or other. < ■■■N
m
i ,   i a* i »,;■   i- :■  l.i ii   ,-,,   i   ■.'   ai;  r
THE    UBY.88EV
-1»Afl«
Cabinet
elaxed at-
ands than
ulty com-
BC at this
academic
life, held at Island Hall Lodge, on Vancouver Island. Symposium was judged by all
present to be an impressive success, and, at
this writing, next year's was impatiently
awaited.
ROWING PROWESS of UBC athletes was
demonstrated strikingly when UBC fours
took first and second place and the Gold
Medal in 1956 Olympics^ to the astonishment
of all but campus experts.  Pictured
Walter d'Hondt, Archie McKinnon, Lome
Loomer, and Den Arnold, the four victorious
gentlemen responsible for UBC's newest
claim to fame.
are
Churning, boiling
Effervescent,
Surging, Student
Life. A fantasy
of UBC in pictures.
Always pressing,
never finding,
always trying,
Sometimes guessing.
Worthwhile?
.Wilson, Wayne Pretty, Dick McLure, and Dave Helli-
. * ? m.§ nmw
HONEYBUN made it in '56 to the immense disgust of
everyone with an outboard motor. Ubyssey's Carol Gregory
in a courageous attempt to boost the campus paper's circulation over that of Flash is being examined, or perhaps
just fondled, by Rex Ledgerwood, M.D., immediately prior
to her epic lilvpond plunge.
DUNCILLORS Al Thackray, Ben Tre-
no, Don Jabour and friend study brief of
BC's epic Second Great Trek. Trek re-
lests were frozen out in budget speech;
accorded somewhat the following Monday
with a five million dollar matching grant.
Gloom, followed by glee, folowed by guessing.
PATTI D'ARCY reacts with unrestrained glee to being
selected this year's Frosh Queen. Or maybe the loving cup
is cold. Anyway, she wa.s voted frosh queen, by the trosh,
of the frosh, and for the frosh, a situation to which her
opponents responded with a glee that was somewhat more
than restrained. PAGE SIX
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 26, 1957
Internationals Selected To
Meet B.C. s All-Star XV
Twenty of the finest rugby
players in Britain, all of them
internationals, will play in Vancouver May 4th and 11th as the
famed Barbarians. They will
play three games against the
B.C. All-Stars, two in Vancouver, and one in Victoria.
The Barbarians are composed
of Internationals representing
England, Ireland, Scotland and
Wales. Here is part of their
line-up as know so far:'
MULLIGAN.   Andrew   A—
Scrum half, played for Ireland,
Cambridge University, and the
London Irish. He is 5' 9", 156
pounds, and is a student at Cam-
bridge University.
EVAN8. Eric—Hooker,. 32
years old. 5' 10", 179 pounds.
Eric has played no less than 100
WANTED
Your old double breasted suit
. . to be made into a smart
new   single   breasted   mode)
with the new trim notch lapel
UNITED  TAILORS
549 Granvillt PA. 4649
times for Lancashire and is the
captain of England.
WELLS. G. — A master at
Cheltenham. Wells is a centre
and as an interesting side-light,
holds the British record for the
hop, step and jump. This
might bear watching.
ROBBINS, Ptter —A wing
forwaid, Robbins was in Vancouver with the Oxford-Cambridge team last year. He is 6',
200 pounds.
GRIFFITHS. Gareth—Mem-
ber of the British Isles team to
South Africa. Griffiths is reputed to be a brilliant runner.
MORGAN. Cliff —Plays for
Cardiff, and is the captain of
the Wales International fifteen.
An outstanding player, Morgan
has participated in 23 international matches.
O'REILLY, Anthony—A wing
three-quarters, O'Reilly is also
an outstanding tennis, soccer
and cricket player. He wa.s a
standout on the British Isles'
team to South Africa.
DORWARD.    Arthur — Has
been captain of Scotland three
times and of Cambridge University in 1949. He is 5' 6",
152 pounds. Dorward is a
scrum half and has appeared in
international games 13 times.
MICHIE. Ernest—Serving in
the Royal Engineers, Michie
has also played in 13 international matches and is 6' 3", and
weighs 200 pounds.
Members of the Varsity team
who are being considered for a
position on the B.C. All-Stars
are Ted Hunt, Don Shore, Don
Sloan, Donn Spence, Dick Mc- ,
Intosh, Peter Tynan, Gerry McGavin and Derek Vallis.
CRICKET MEETING IN \
GYM WEDNESDAY
The   all   important   spring !
meeting of the Varsity Cricket |
Club will be held in the Men's j
Gym. room 212, at 7.45 p.m. j
Wednesday.   There will be the j
election   of  officers  for   1957 j
and all persons interested are j
asked to attend. I
SPORTS EDITORS; KEN WIEBE, BRUCE ALLARDYCE.
INCORPORATED 2"??   MAY  1670.
The 'Sissies" come out of hiding!
JOE MATOVIC displays the boxing skill that eliminated
him in the semi-finals of the intramural boxing tournament.
Ian Todd (Newman) made good use of an effective left
jab to earn a berth to the finals. Finals are tomorrow night
in the Memorial Gym at 8:00 p.m.
SHORT SLEEVES
Sizes  12-44  	
Ti SLEEVES
Sizes   12-20  ...
6.95
7.95
Out of hiding and into our
hear!-, dance the frilly, feminine 'Sissies" by Orignal.
Toia lonu »- and cotton — wash
in -(vent' . my in minutes, need
a minimum of ironing. P.S.—
we think mmi like the "Sissies." too, e-pccially in our pale,
pretty color.-; -a. hite, pink, blue,
niai/.i' 'and hei'.ie.
rn;c
-Third Floor
Phone PA. 6211
Open daily !) to 3:30. Fridays 9 'til 9
Gala Boxing, Wrestling
| Display Tomorrow Night
'        UBC Memorial Gymnasium will see one of its best shows
of the year tomorrow night.
Under the direction of Intra-'V "r~ : : r-
murals Director Bob Hindmarch S,St °f three two"minute rounds,
a 13-bout boxing and wrestling ! A d°ck WiU be set up s0 spec"
card has been drawn up The jtat0fS Can see when each point
bouts will feature 16 of UBC'H1S awarded to the wrestlers
best boxers in eight different j After the fights, Bob Osborne
weight divisions and the 10 best j wil1 Present each individual win-
wrestlers in intramural competi-' ner wi1h a troPhy an(b to tho
tion. Fighters have earned their ; best Performer of the evening,
berths by a series of elimination  1he   Varsity  Boy  trophy.
bouts that have been fought in
the last month.
A  jury  of  appeal  consisting
of Frank Gnup, Bob Hindmarch
Hindmarch has a terrific gala   and Art Bur£ess has been form-
evening planned, complete with Ied-   Honorary   referee   for   the
an announcer in a tuxedo. A portable uoxing ring has been se*
up at one end of the gymnasium's main floor and the wrestling, alternating with the boxing, will be held at the other
end. All boxing bouts will con-
PITMAN OPTICAL
LTD.
# Specialists in frame
styling
# Prescriptions  duplicated
# Safety lenses
# Contact lenses
# Repairs
Grotmd Floor
734 Granville St.
MA. 0928 MA. 2948
night will be Peter Mullins.
Honorary judges are Dr. Max
Howell and Albert Laithwaite.
Admission is 50c to students
and $1.00 to outsiders.
BOXING
Referees: Art Burgess, Al
King.
featherweight: Ray Paris
(Newman) vs. John Tomlinson
(DU). Light-welter: Jim Young
(Pre-Med) vs. Bill Martin (Forestry). Welterweight: Ed Lucas
vs. Al Schultz (Fiji). Light-
middle: Wayne Byron (Fiji) vs.
i George Hay (Fiji). Middleweight:
Dune Maclnnes (Newman) vs.
John Mitchell (Fiji). Lightheavy:
Ted Hunt (PE) vs | Ian Todd
'Newman).
Heavyweight: Don Shore (PE)
vs. Dave Milne (Alpha Delt).
WRESTLING
Referees: John McCormick,
Charile DeHeck,
Welterweight: Haskins (Forestry) vs. Haynes (Forestry).
Lightheavy: Gray (DU) vs. Ma-
tovic (DU). Heavyweight: Kar-
ras (PE) vs. Von Schilling (PE).
Light-welter: Burgess (PE) vs.
Popoff (DU).
Middleweight: Horton (Fiji
vs. Turnbull (Phi Delt). Tuesday, March 26, 1957
THE     UBYSSEY
PAGE SEVEN
Reps, Varsity To
Share McKechnie
Rain, Wind Spoil Final;
Teams Battle To Draw
Varsity were almost upset in their attempt to regain the
McKechnie Cup, but held on through a rathe? trying last few
minutes and emerged with a 3-3 draw.
What promised to be one of?	
the finest McKechnie Cup finals. The Reps muffed several grand
in years was spoiled by a driving; opportunities to score, and once,
down-pour which made the ball j minutes before half time, put
as  impossible  to  handle  as an Varsity fullback John Mulberry
THIS IS FRANK MATTAROCCI. He plays
for the University of California. The Cal
Bears meet Varsity in the last two games of
the World Cup April 4th and 6th. Frank
plays second row forward and it will be his
first appearance against UBC this year. He
was injured during the first two games.
Frank is a big wheel at Cal.
Last Two Games Of World Cup
Slated For April 4th and 6th
in the embarassing situation of
having to cover three men at
once. John Newton solved the
problem for him, by passing too
far ahead Of McEachern who
knocked on, ten yards from a
certain try.
The UBC forwards came out
after the half like they meant to
wipe the field with Vancouver,
and the play in the forwards in
the second half was on a more
equal basis.
After Gerry McGavin missed
a penalty goal by inches from
the thirty yard line, it began to
look as though Sinclair's drop
goal was to be the margin of victory. With seven minutes re-
The kick and follow up tactics1 maining, UBC was penalized for
proved dangerous to both sides, off side on their own thirty-yard
but Reps winger George Puil line, squarely in front of the
thwarted the Birds many times posts. Barry Stubbs made no
by anticipating the kick and cov- mistake for the Reps, knotting
ering beautifully. *    the score 3-3.
Last Minute Anxious One
oversized cake of soap.
A field goal by winger Gary
Sinclair in the first ten minutes
saved the Birds from defeat by
a Reps team which should have
won on their margin of play.
The Varsity forwards were
rather badly outplayed in the
first half, as the heavy and powerful Reps forwards won 80%
of the loose scrums and 70 % of
the set scrums. Dick Macintosh
was badly missed in the front
row,
The game was confined mostly
to the forwards, and both back-
lines were employing the short
kick and hoping for a mishandling by the opposing fullback.
There were plenty of them.
By FETE BRIEGER
University of B.C.'s Varsity Rugby XV meet the University of California Golden Bears
in the deciding games of this year's World Cup Series, April 4 and 5 at Varsity Stadium.
April 4's game will start at 12:30 with second game at 2 p.m. on the 6th.
'It should be one of the best
"tnals we have had in years,"
•ommented UBC's Head Coach.
Albert  Laithwaite.    "I  am sure
^%m^^m^  1TI%IB'^J AC can 'x'nl them, providing we
1/lOp    I nil Q play on a dry field.    If it is wet.
"uiything can happen as wc saw-
in Berkeley in the first two
games.    Tlic poor weather ham-
A last minute dribbling rush
by Vancouver carried to the Varsity goal line, and resulted in
some rather fierce and quite out-
of-hand scrimmaging on thc UBC
goal line.
Although the Reps surged over
the goal line en mass two times,
referee Bill Dunbar could not
award a try because it was impossible to tell who had grounded the ball in a pile-up of sixteen
players.
Norm Blake of Vancouver was
outstanding   at  scrum   half   for
Vancouver, handling the wet ball
very well.   Donn Spence of UBC
wa.s "much beset" all afternoon
by the Reps wing forwards who.
were breaking around the scrum j
very fast, their noses only inches:
behind the ball, with the result,
that   Spence   was   catching   two
forwards and the ball simultaneously.
UBC Braves lost the Bell-
Irving Cup to Rowing Club 9-6
at Brockton Point in as scrubby
a game as could be seen anywhere.
Rowing Club's entire strategy
consisted of throwing in short to
the line out and running around
the front of the lineout and out
of bounds. They also played
their backs absolutely flat for
the entire game.
The result was nauseating, and
thc game consisted of one line
out after another.
GIRLS HOCKEY SHUT
OUT EX-NORTH VAN
UBC girls' grass hockey team
easily defeated North Van 3-0 on
Saturday at Trafalgar Park.
Char Warren, Coleen Kelly
and Ruth Orton scored
Varsity XI
Third
By   IAN   TODD
Week-end soccer at UBC
along with Saturday's weather,
was pretty dismal.
Saturday the 'Birds lost 3-2
to lowly Richmond Legion at
rain-drenched Brighouse Park,
and Sunday thc Chiefs lost by
the   same  score   to   Norqunvs.
Thursday at noon tho 'Birds
make their last appearance of
the year in the Stadium when
they meet a team comprised of
Hungarian students from Sopron
Universitv.  This  uame   is   in  aid
UBC and a draw would result in
the winner being chosen on a
total point basis.
California will tout such international stars as Pat Vincent,
IP.")6* captain of the New Zealand
All-Blacks and John Harrison of
Australia, both stars of the first
pereel our backs all day and did  Uvo games.
not allow them to break loose.
Cal stuck mostly to a kicking
game."
In the final game, Cal defeated thc Birds 8-0, but UBC came
hack in tho second game and
both teams battled to a scoreless
tie.
If the Bears can win one came
According to UBC's Max Howell, Cat's fullback Jim Duff, also
an American footballer, was by
tar the most outstanding player
on thc Bear team in the first two
games.
Missing from action in Berkeley for the first part of the series
but appearing al UBC will be
her" it would assure them of ti' 4", 23.") pound lock. Frank Mat-
thcir third successive World Cup, tarocci. also centre on tho 1 !);">(>
by  merit  of total  games. football team.
However,    if   Birds   can    take       Left  winger Boh Brooks, a  re
Pot;', games inev would takeover   turning   veteran,   is   exnected   to
Varsity Field Hockey
Break Losing Streak
By LYNN CLARKE
Varsity defeated North Shore 2-1 in men's Field Hockey
action at Brockton Point  on Saturday, while on the Campus
the  UBC Golds defeated  UBC Blues  1-0.  Both games  were
played  on  rain  and  wind  whipped  fields.
Varsity comnletcly dominated*-
the play over North Shore as
they broke a two game losing
streak. "T'uhndit" Rai of Varsity opened the scoring but at
half time the score was tied.
High!   winger   Gordon   Forwaid
Action on the Campus saw
Doug Howie score the winning
goal for the Golds as thc final
whistle  went.
For    the    Golds,    goalie   Jim
scored   the   winner   with   eight ; Moore turned  in a steady game
a.s he was tested several times
b.v the Blues' forward line and
repulsed  Ihe  same each time a.s
minutes to go.
Varsity    is    now    two    points
|.ack    of    the    leargue    leading
oi'    the    Iliumarian     Drive,    a!'    po-messam of the Cup.    A win for   give the Birds lots of trouble. Wedbirds
proceeds   .g"ing   to   that   cause.
lie   gamed   his  sluitoi
Sopron vs. UBC Thursday 12:30 PAGE EIGHT
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 2«, 1997
TWEEttCtASSIS
Public Speaking
Competttlaiulwhy
JOURNAL OF COMMERCE
Public Speaking Competition
will be held today at 12.30 in
A»its 100. Thc erght finalists
Iron* £«nmerce public speaking
classes are competing for the
Journal of Commerce Trophy.
UNIVERSITY Social and Economic Research Institute is presenting the second and last public lecture by Professor W. Arthur Lewis on the economic impact of technical progress today
at 4 p.m. in Faculty Club
Lounge. Economics Society members are invited to meet Professor Lewis today at 3.30.
JAZZSOC presents Sharon
Landa and the Four- Sounds (nee
Squares) accompanied by John
Gittens today at noon in the
Brock Stage Room. This is Jazz-
soc's last concert this season.
AQUA - SOC - Test on Skin-
Diving Theory will be held today
at noon in Arts 102,
LUTHERAN STUDENT Association is holding its regular
meeting today at noon in HL-2.
Rev. Maigaard, guest speaker.
TOMORROW
PARLIAMENTARY COUNCIL
General Meeting of all members
of all political clubs will be held
in Arts 100 tomorrow at 12.30.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Organization will bold its regular
testimony meeting tomorrow at
12.30 in Physics 300.
DEUTSCHER KLUB will meet
tomorrow evening at 8 in Hut
A-3 (behind Brock Hall). Everyone is welcome.
V.O.C. members please bring
your raffle books to the meeting I
tomorrow at noon.
VARSITY   CRICKET   CLUB
wfll hold its Important election
meeting tomorrow at 7.4S p.m.
fh the Men's Gym, room 212. All!
interested persons are invited to
attend.
CRIMINOLOGY SOCIETY
elections will be held in Arts 102
at noon tomorrow.
MUSIC Appreciation Club
presents a recorded program featuring Zara Nchsava and Loudon
Philharmonic Orchestra playing
Bloch's "Scheloma" tomorrow at
noon ln Brock Music Room.        |
THURSDAY j
PEP BAND last practice will i
be held Thursday noon in Brock, j
All members are asked to attend.'
NEWMAN CLUB general |
meeting will be held in the club!
house, HL 5 on Thursday. i
DANCE CLUB - Election of
officers will take place at the
general meeting Thursday at
12.30 in Arts 100.
TENNIS TEAM - There will
be a meeting on Thursday at
12.30 in Arts 208 for those interested in playing on the men's
tennis team.
FRIDAY
CAMERA CLUB will hold a
general meeting Friday at 12.30
in Arts 204 to elect next year's
executive.
S.C.M. Annual Spring Banquet
will be held in Brock Hall, on
Friday at 6.30 p.m. Tickets are
available in SCM office, Room
312, Auditorium Building. [
BEN HILL-TOUT Photographic!
Salon — Will all entrants please)
pick up their pictures at the Arti
Gallery as soon as possible. j
When you pause...make it count...have a Coke
ledudlnt f*d»rml Text*
"C»fc>" It a r*aUt«r«4 tratU-marfc.
C33
Such  a [ot
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Full-fashioned, hand-finished, in
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Look for tho name J^mSM^
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mis MAN IS
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HE IS capable, quick-thinking, forward looking.
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