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The Ubyssey Oct 1, 1959

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 THE UBYSSEY
VOL. LXVII
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1959
No. fi
—photo courtesy Totem
Scenes like this from Clubs' Day last year will be familiar today
as thousands of students, jam the armouries to join up.
Club's Day — You
Name It, We Got It
By DIANE GREENALL
(Ubyssey staff reporter)
It's here! Club's Day 1959, U.B.C.'s best attended function.
Over 5,000   students   are  expected    to    crowd    into    the
Armouries   today   for   Club's Day,  a   two  hour   show1,   from
12:30 to 2:30, sponsored by over 60 campus organizations.
The   newly   formed     Squash
Club, in conjunction with their
plan of informing the public
about the gamte of Squash, has
set up a miniature Squash
Court.
FOR SAILORS
The Sailing Club, another new
organization, will have on display one of the 6 Penguin
Class Sailing Dinghies built by
club members during the summer.
DO YOU DRIVE?
The Sports Car Club, one of
the older clubs on campus, expects a 100 percent rise in membership* Their wares will be
advertised with racing machinery as the theme.
Besides having a 1954 "D"
type Jaguar and an "Acece Bristol on display, the Sports Car
Club will have intermittent
slide shows of "Team Ubyssey"
events during the past summer.
CALYPSO
Calypso, skits, poetry and
Jack Cullen, all wMl.be featur
ed on the Club's Day stage show.
JACK CULLEN
CKNW's Jack Cullen has
been imported by Radsoc to MC
the show. He will also tape the
show and use it on his'own radio spot.
POLITICS
The CCF. Club has some
more imported material. They
are featuring Spencer Mohart,
an Elvis Presley type folk singer, who will make several appearances on the stage, singing
American type folk songs and
old labour songs.
FOLK  SINGING
Some local talent, a trio, including    Kerry    Feltham    and
Dave Sproule, will also do some
folk singing  arrangements.
POETS  AND   JAZZ
The Undergrad Writers will
feature a commentary, Poetry
to Jazz.
The Carribean students will
have their steel band on stage
writh some lively music,
Students' Council Decides
To Reorganize  Mamooks'
Investigation By Student    Council Reveals Need
For Complete Re-vamping And Re-organization
By ALAN GRAVES
(Ubyssey Staff Reporter) i
The results of an investigation, into Mamooks whs submitted to the A.M.S. Council <MT
Monday.
Mamooks will no longer be a member of the University Clubs' Committee. As a service
organization, it will be placed under the jurisdiction of the A.M.S. where it properly belongs.
It will be organized on a commercial self sufficient; basis, and will receive no grants, eith©»
from UCC or the AMS.
 <$    Mamooks will only be respon-<S> ———
Pritchett
TalksPeace
"We're living in a new era
of peace throughout the world,"
stated L.P.P. Organizer Harold
Pritchett.
Speaking to more than 200
students on campus, Tuesday,
Mr. Pritchett admitted that the
"Krushchev Peace Plan" was
nohing new, but that, if implemented, it would forever eliminate all possibilities of war.
Mr. Pritchett, recently returned from a visit to the Soviet
Union, went on to describe the
progress and development going on in the USSR which "cannot be denied."
RUSSIANS  PROUD
"The Russians are proud they
are building a society far superior to anything the world
has ever seen," he commented.
Th LPP leader, who was in
Moscow during U.S. Vice-President Nixon's visit there, stated
that Nixon was given complete
freedom! of operation—to move
about wherever and whenever
he wanted.
In a lively question period
which followed Mr. Pritchett's
talk, the speaker admitted that
capitalists in the Soviet Union
have either been "liquidated
or changed."
He also reported that in the
rural areas of the USSR, prob-
Continued on page 4
IMPORTANT NOTICE
FOR ALL PUBSTERS
There will be an important
general meeting of all the
| Ubyssey staff Tuesday. October 6, at 12:30 p.m.
Everyone who has worked
for the Ubyssey this year, and
who' would like to work for
the Ubyssey must attend.
sible to the Brock Management
Committee. The society will no
longer be club-like in its functioning. Card playing, bull sessions, and other social activities,
which were prevalent in the last
year or two will be stopped almost entirely.
All purchases of materials by
organizations wishing to use
Mamooks facilities must be made
through their A.M.S. accounts,
or if they have none, by receipted
payment to the A.M.S. cashier.
These measures are intended to
halt the recurrence of any theft
or misappropriation of funds,
which has allegedly occurred in
the last few years.   ,
MANAGER NEEDED
A manager is urgently heeded
to supervise the re-organization.
He mus£ have a thorough
knowledge of commercial artistry since he will be responsible
for setting up and maintaining
an inventory of art supplies. He
will also have to establish a
group of students under him,
who will be paid on a piecework system. He will supervise
amateur artists from the various
organizations who wish to buy
supplies and do their own work.
Mamooks must open immediately, and all applications for
the position of manager, which
will pay a flat salary, the amount
of which is still to be set, must
be in to Russ Brink in the Brock
Management Committee offices
my 12:30 this Friday. All applicants will be heard there by
the B.M.C.
EXPERIMENTAL SET-UP
The proposed set-up is experimental at present, to facilitate
quick establishment. If, after two
weeks, the structure is found
satisfactory, minor details such
as representatives from each
organization using Mamooks,
price-structure renovation, -definite operating hours, etc., will
be filled in. If after two weeks
no relief to the present situation
is in sight, another investigation
Continued on page 3
'tween classes
ROWERS MEET
THURSDAY
U.B.C. ROWING TEAM
A meeting will be held 12:38
in Physics 200 today for anyohd
interested in taking part in
UBC's championship team.
H-      *      * >
TOUR SLIDES
Dr. Brearley invites all he*
former students to see her European Tour slides noon. Tuesday
in Buchanan 100.
T* *X» »f" \
LIBERAL CLUB <
General meeting on Friday in
Buchanan 104, at 12:30. AH
members and those interested
are asked to attend.
* *      * |   I.
S.C.M.
Fall Camp at Ocean Park Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Apply at Hut L-5 for registration.
v      ^p      •*•
RAMBLER ATHLETIC CLUB
General meeting in Buchanatt
204 at 12:30 Friday.
* *       * i   \)
VARSITY CHRISTIAN          '\
FELLOWSHIP
All members and interested
people are invited to the Frosh
reception tonight at 7:30 at 6062
Newton Wynd (one block from
Law Faculty.)
* *      * {  i
U.B.C.  FENCING  CLUB
Special general mteeting on
Thursday   at   12:30,   Buchanan
V •*• ■*•
TOTEM
Sign  up for  Totem Staff on
Thursday   at   Club's   Day
Friday,   at  noon  in Brock
tension 168.
No experience necessary, -ia
variety of interesting jobs avait
able.
FOOTBALL DANCE
Saturday, 9-12. $1.50 per couple, 1.00 single. John Fredeiv
ickson's Orchestra.
Continued on page 4      3■■ f AGE TW©
THE.UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 1, 1959
Authorized as second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Telephones: Editorial offices, AL. 4404; Locals 12, 13 and 14;
Business offices, AL. 4404; Local 15.
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF - - - KERRY WHITE
SENIOR EDITOR MICHAEL SONE
Reporters and Desk: Diane Greenall, Irene Fraser, Elaine Bissett,
Brad   Crawford,   Ann   Sturdy,   Elizabeth  Robson,   Sandra   Scott,
Alan Graves, Bob Hendrickson, Wendy Barr, Gail Merilees,
Colin Landie, Linda Webster.
To Park Or Not To Park
Last year the  board  of directors  of  this university
- deemed it necessary to raise student tuition fees by $100.
And there is a rumour that, possibly next year, or the
I   year after, they will be raised again.
Last  summer  many   students  found   it   extremely  diffi-
i   cult, if not impossible, to obtain work.    Those who were
fortunate enough to find jobs .could not earn much more
!   than $1000.    Some students could only obtain part-time
work, and hence earned much less.
.''$-'     It'can therefore, be. safely assumed that after paying
tuition fees, room and board, miscellaneous fees and costs,
and buying books at exorbitant prices^ there are not many
students on this campus with much more than small change
.; ,-JMt
' And yet the university's administration has, through
. its ingenious parking plan, placed a claim on this pocket
l " money.
* * *
After a tedious day at his lectures, the destitute student tramps from one corner of the campus to the other
and across a cow-pasture to where he left his car that
Haprning.
« Here he finds, to hi$ utter amazement, that his car
has been towed away. He then wearily retraces his steps
to the COMPOUND where he tries to explain to the
; CUSTODIAN that he was forced to park where he did
because every slot in "A" PLOT had been filled by the
time he arrived—8 a.m.
- THE CUSTODIAN, not moved by our student's story,
, . forces him to leave his watch in trust until he can beg
! v«nough money to pay the designated fine.
j * Having done this,  our student,  with  a half-hearted
!   attempt at optimism, remarks that at least his money is
• helping the university in some small way.
j ' Little does our student know that his $5 will be paid
to BUSTER'S.
Unfortunately,   the   solution to  the parking  problem
at U.B.C. is in the students' hands for the present at least.
A quick survey of the parking lots at high tide will
reveal to anyone the fact that students are, as usual, parking their Volkswagens in Cadillac spaces. If every student
used a fair amount of space, the parking problem would
disappear.
Then the only problem left would be the bottlenecks at
the various entrances to the campus and parking lots. It
is the duty of the Buildings and Grounds Department to
jrectify this situation at once.
j In the near future, however, the present parking lots
Will be the sites of new buildings, and the problem will
be truly desperate.
The Buildings and Grounds Department could and
Should do something about this anticipated problem immediately.
A series of paved, marked, and permanent parking
lots could be built on the perimeter of the campus and
a shuttle transit service provided to take the students
to the campus.
May we also suggest that something be done about
the towing service. Why couldn't the university buy a
tenck or two so Hhat fines would not go to an outside
LETTERS  TO  THE   EDITOR
The End-All
Editor,
The Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:—
I was sorry to read about the
athletic attitude that Mr. Madden advocated in his "ideal of
excellence".
I was, at the moment, under
the pleasant impression that
Canadians, unlike our neighbours to the South, do nottiaye
to indulge in sports just to win.
Mr. Madden says, "For any
athlete worthy of the title there
is no second place. He either
wins . . ." To me, Mr. Mad-
den's athlete is unworthy of his
title.
The only athlete worthy of
his title is he who loves his
sport for its own sake. That is,
he will take a third, second,
or, if lucky, a first place with
a gracious "It was a pleasure
to compete".
I agree with Mr. Madden
that the day Canadians adopt
this: attitude, more gold medals
will glow.
However, many of us forget
that gold is not everything.
Yours truly,
"LE COMPTE"
EDITORIAL BOARD
WANTED URGENTLY;
Applications are wanted for
the position of City Editor,
News Editor, Sports Editor,
Clubs Editor, and Senior Editors.
Would those interested
please apply in writing to the
Editor of the Ubyssey not
later than  Friday  noon.
All That Glitters
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:—
A non-emoting reply is, I
believe, 'due Mr. Madden's outcry in the September 25 Ubyssey. One should examine critically (in the sense of analytically) Mr. Madden's article,
because the writer represents
a vested interest as far as governmental support of rowing
is corfcerned.
First of all, is a university,
city, province or nation really
any better place to live because
an handful of its youth wins
an international athletic event?
If so, does this community become worse if it fails to win
the event next time? Too many
people delight in saying, "The
world champion of such-and-
such lives next door to me".
Are these people any better because they happen to reside
next door to a champion? False
pride, most injurious of traits!
Secondly, is being handed a
bit of gold-covered metal the
end-all of a- competition? I am
reminded of the maxim, "What
matters is not whether one wins
or loses, but how one plays the
game" (or words to that effect).
Certainly it is unsportsmanlike
for anyone not to endeavour to
do his best, not to want and try
to, win. But if his best is, however, insufficient, how can one
reasonably blame him?
One should note that there
is no official national team
scoring system for the Olympic
games. But that the wisdom of
the ancient Greek culture could
pervade today's money- and
prestige-mad society. How unfortunate that it does not start
to penetrate the minds of at
least our educated fellow men.
Yours truly,
J. F. OGILVIE
EDITORIAL:
Salesmen
&V Phonies
Today brings on the annual
madness on campus called
Club's Day.
Thousands and thousands of
students, many of them unsuspecting frosh, will shove, elbow and fight their way into
the armouries, only to be met
by a bewildering display of
gaudy booths and high pressure salesmen.
To those who have a sincere
desire to take part in club activities in which they are interested, the money spent" on
membership fees will be well
spent.
Notwithstanding these salesmen, these individuals would
probably join, because they
know what they want.   .
But this message is directed
to those students who have no
intentions of attending the
meeings of the club they join,
nor, for the most part, have
any interest in their activities.
These are phonies who pay
to get a membership card
which they can show to friends
to impress them.
Must we have both high-
pressure selling jobs and clubs
full of phonies?
'     M.S.
Mob Hysteria
Editor, ;
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
I would like to suggest that
the annual occurrence known
as "Screech Day" be eliminated forever from this campus.
Never in my life have I witnessed such juvenile, school-
girlish, senseless, and in every
way,  ridiculous  behavior!
It is little wonder that the
idea of a woman pursuing "a
higher education is the subject
of constant mockery, when
women to whom this privilege
is allotted mistreat it as did the
girls on Tuesday.
Really, girls, don't you think
it's time we started upholding
our dignity as serious and intelligent students?
In addition, you might also
consider yourselves. Many
people will agree that the spectacle was most ungracious.
Surely there must be a more
sane manner for informing
someone that she belongs to a
sorority. Judging j by the
screaming, one would almost
say that they aren't pleased.   >
Let's do away with the. mob
hysteria once and for all! ,
Yours truly,
DISGUSTED FRESHETTE
WATCH FOR
IT
Bird Calls
RIDE WANTED
From West 16th and Camosun
(4 blocks west of Dunbar)
Monday to Sat., to Wesbrook
Bldg., for 8:30 a.m. and return
at 4:30 p.m.
Phone AL 0268-M,  5-7 p.m.
Class
enchantress!
I V     I00PFD M0HAI
934M
Kitten   creates   a   looped   mohair   cardigan   in
heavy-knit texture . . . light as milkweed down,
daring in its dramatic simplicity ... in colours
dipt from the rainbow . . . truly a 'long-term
investment' for your college wardrobe . . .
so lovely to wear, so easy to care for.
Sizes  36   to   42,   price   $17.95—
Pullover: price $15.95 ... in
colours exciting and
ultra smart!
Look for the name f@tt$n. Thursday, October 1, 1959
THE     U BY S S E Y
PAGE THRES
Ears Ringing? It's
Screechdayitis
WESBROOK ADDITION FOR FACULTY OF PHARMACY WILL
COST $536,000. COMPLETION DATE- SEPTEMBER 1960
NFCUS Exchange Student
Reviews Past School Year
By MARILYN BERNARD
(NFCUS  Exchange  Scholar)
N.F.CU.S. Interregional Exchange Scholarships were instituted with the aim of fostering understanding and unity
among Canadian students.
RESPONSIBILITIES
When a student goes to another university on exchange,
the benefits, both tangible and
intangible, are many. However,
the responsibility felt by the
exchange student is constantly
in mind, because at no time can
he or she forget that they are
representing U.B.C.
But the pressure of this responsibility is far outweighed
by the many opportunities afforded the exchange student to
Bnake new friendships, to cultivate varied interests, and to
travel.
FIRST STAGE DIFFICULT
Initially, the adjustment is
difficult. It is somewhat of a
shock to leave U.B.C. and one's
friends to go to a new university where one knows virtually
no-one. This feeling is shortlived, however, and new friendships are quickly made.
In many ways I feel that
people are first attracted to the
exchange student as something
of an oddity, a person from a
university about which the
majority of students at the exchange university know very
little. Whether this is desirable
or not, it certainly leads to the
establishment of the initial
friendships which are so important if one is to becon > an
integral part of any group Before long, the student is accepted for what he is, a" member of the university community.
This can only come, however,  if  the exchange  student
is willing to participate in the
varied activities which are so
much a part of our Canadian
university system. For this
reason, exchange students are
selected on the basis of interest
in campus affairs as well as a
reasonably high scholastic
average. One of the principal
aims of the Exchange programme is that the student will
enter into activities and contribute something which he
has absorbed through campus
participation at the parent university. He may be able to
proffer constructive criticisms
and suggestions which will improve various aspects of the
campus life at his adopted university.
In most cases, the student
will leave the exchange university with a genuine feeling that
he has helped, though perhaps
in a very minor way, to further the programme. Similarly, he can feel that much of
what he has learned may be
implemented by U.B.C.
OTHER ADVANTAGES
Another advantage available
to the exchange student is the
opportunity to take .courses
which are not. offered at the
parent university. In addition,
an exchange provides an excellent opportunity to make contacts which might otherwise
be impossible to make with
authorities in the student's field
of study. A fresh outlook is
always desirable and the opportunity to achieve it is available to the student through the
exchange programme.
When seen in the light of
the advantage, the disadvantages of a year are minor. In
retrospect, that year passes all
too   quickly,   and   the   oppor
tunity afforded to broaden
one's intellectual and cultural
outlook canno t be over-estk
mated.
EUROPEJ960
Wise travellers book air sr.d ship  accommodation
early through Travel Headquarters.
Phone ALma 4511 for information, fares and brochures.
Your Headquarters for Travel Anywhere.
Travel Headquarters
» Mm- WHMth--A-rcmte
ALttra 45B
Parents To
Tour UBC
Saturday, October 17, is University Day.
University Day will give parents of freshmen students a
chance to see university life.
More than 2400 parents will
be invited to UBC to hear President N. A. M. Mackenzie, Dean
Walter Gage and John F. McLean discuss university conditions and services in the UBC
Auditorium at 9:30 a.m.
At 11:30 a.m. parents will
tour the campus with student
leaders. Luncheon will be
served in Brock Hall at 12:30
p.ml.
The afternoon football game
will be free for the guests.
Aubrey Roberts, director of
the UBC Development Fund,
said the purpose is to acquaint
parents with the conditions under which their children live at
UBC and the services which are
available to them.
Do-Nut Diner
FRESH DONUTS Every Day
±suy Them by the Dozen
DeLuxe Burgers and Chips
Turkey Burgers
4556 West 10 th A vs.
That's right, Josephine, they
screeched, squealed and even
sobbed.
To 121 coeds, Screech Day in
the Cafe meant the end of an
exhausting session of ice-water
tours, coke parties, teas and
closed parties. Rushing was
over; they had received their
bids.
Here's the way they went:
ALPHA GAMMA DELTA
Gay Blossom, Fran Charkow,
Doreen Davidson, Lynn, Gal-
braith, Shannon Gammer, Pauline Grauer, Mary Hudson, Jea-
nette James, Sheila Lees, Gail
Leitner, Kathy Noble, Lois Rob-
bins; Ellamae Sharpe, Heather
Watson, Judy Worthington.
ALPHA DELTA PI
Leatha Boulton, Lynn Bride,
Barbara Buckland, Trudie
Clarke, Kathy -Dahlstrbm, Heather Erb, Rhonda Hooper, Judy
Jack, Phyllis Kearney, Margaret Leroux, Lynn McDonald,
Penny Ramsey, Judy Sewell,
Marilyn Smith, Susan Smith,
Nancy Vikic.
ALPHA OMICRON PI
Diane   Gagnon,   Pauline   McMillan, Carol Reynolds, Donna
Smart, Tineke Templeman.
ALPHA PHI
Sue Allan, Wendy Bennett,
Angeli Budnick, Barbara Drew,
Anne Gillespie, Claire Haramia,
Margaret Hoby, Barbara
Hughes, Carol Johnson, Marilyn
Leslie, Bonnie Morrison, Sharon Russell, Sandra Scott, Pamela Thomas.
GAMMA PHI BETA
Allison Andrew, Dall Cameron, Marguerite Fox, Judy Francis, Gail Harvey, Joanne Hill,
Barbara Jagger, Carol Kirkham,
Carol McGregor, Barbara Mitchell, Margaret Johnston, Cornel Therrien, Judi Thompson,
Kathy Wardle.
DELTA GAMMA
Joanne 'Baikie, Kay Baker,
Judy    Bailey,     Susan    Foster,
European Barbers
INDIVIDUALLY STYLED
HAIRCUTS
UPPER TENTH BARBER
AND TOILETTRIES
4574 Wesl 10th Ave.
MALE STUDENT
to share apartment with
Iwo others
Gas, elec, telephone included
$27.50 per Month
Phone Dave or Herman
RE 1-4337
HURT BOOK SALE!
EXTRAORDINARY
Price Cuts up to 50%
Wide sekcticn of slightly shopworn books at remarkable
savings. Many titles distributed exclusively by us and not
available from any other source.
for Your Library or for Gifts, take advantage of
this rare opportunity sale.
Starts Friday, Oct. 2 - Ends Sat., Oct. 10
Store open 9:G\) a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Friday 9:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Peoples Co-op Book Store
307 W. Pender St., Vancouver 3, B.C.
MU 5-5836
mmmmmmmmmmimmKm
Michael Gilley, Marjorie McFarlane, Suzy McMahon, Karen-
Moore, Judy Outerbridge, Janet'
Robertson, Carole Sloan, Sheila
Watson.
DELTA PHI EPSILON
Sherry Carman, Mimi Cristall/
Shirley Dayson, Cecille Grober-
man, Elaine Hayward, Marcia.
Kahn, Valerie McDonald, Bonnie
Pullan, Harlene Roadburg, Margaret Segal, Janice Smith, Judy
Toban, Carol Wiesenthal, Marilyn Zack.
KAPPA ALPHA THETA
Barbara Bowles, Denise De-
Laval, Sandra Gailus, Jean Gordon, Judy Grey, Barbara Holmes,
Vera Johnson, Carol Jones, Sher-
rill Nixon, Arlie Purser, Connie
Robinson, Elaine Spring, Ina
Stirle, Janet Tynam, Pat West-
man, Faith Wilson.
KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA
Sandra Browning, Brenda,
Cherrington, Diana Douglas,
Judy Frain, Doreen Griffin, Jane;
Hardie, Sherry Hurley, Maureeri
Hyland, Valerie Johnston, Tan-
nis McBeth, Joan McCrimmpn,
Joanne McLean,. Gail. Morrison,'
Libby Shekury, Allene Spills-
bury.
Student's Council   i
Continued from page 1       '
may be launched.
Since 1939, when it was established as a member of the University Clubs' Committee, Ma-<
mooks has steadily ^decline in
spirit. Efforts which have been
made in the past two years to
regain efficiency have failed,
and a complete, reorganization
is now necessary.
TODAY - JOIN A
Dynamic
CLUB - THEUBCCCF
TWO BARBER SHOPS
on Campus
• Brock Hall Extension
• 5734 University Boulevard
ridge
theatre
16th at Arbutus
Crf 8311'
Oct.  1-2-3 - T.F.S.
ENDS  SATURDAY!
"Orders to Kill"
Paul Massie - Eddie Albert
' Lillian Gish
The  Perfect  Picture!
(Les.Wedman)
PLUS
"Law and Disorder"
A Fun-Fest with
Robert Morley, M. Redgrave
Cartoon
Oct. 5-6-7 - M.T.W.
John Wayne - Eiko Ando
"The Barbarian and
the Geisha"
PLUS
"Touch of Evil"
Orson Wells - Janet Leigh
News
mfmmmmmmmmmmsifTT^r PAGE FOUR
THE    13 B YSSEY
Thursday, October I, ^19^
Day In — fray Out,
Well Hear Musk
Did you hear those voices swinging over the ether? Did
music suddenly wake you up, when you were dozing over
your nine o'clock coffee4 That was.Radsoc, which began broadcasting today.
<S>    The University Radio Society
started   their   new   year   at   9
'Tween Classes
327 or 326,   Those interested in
joining please come.
NO ABSENTEES.
NEWMAN CLUB
Communion Breakfast, Sunday, Oct. 4, 9:00, St. Mark's
College. All new members cordially invited.
LUTHERAN STUDENTS*
ASSOCIATION
, First weekly Topical Study in
Buchanan 216, Monday at 12:30.
Pastor Becker will speak on
"Necessity of Faith." Everyone welcome.
•P •!• ^f»
"frOTEM
•inSign up for Totem Staff on
Thursday at Club's Day and
Jo^iday, at noon in Brock Extension 168.
'■■■■ Nb' experience necessary, a
variety of interesting jobs available.
|l rp v •*•
ttADMINTON CLUB
badminton Club opens Tuesday, 8:30 p.m., in Memorial
Gym. General meeting Thursday, October 8.
•I* •*" •X'
ECONOMICS  CLUB
Dr. C. H. Fay will lecture on
Thursday, 12:30 p.m., in Buchanan 100.
His talk is entitled "Pacific.
Discovery."
•J* V •!•
CONSERVATIVE CLUB
AH . old and new members
please attend general meeting,
Friday-noon, Ted Rogers will
speak pin "The Role of the Conservative Student Federation."
PHRATERES
All-Phi meeting will be held
12:30 p.mi, Friday in Buchanan
106. All actives and pledges
are asked to attend.
o'clock this morning when they
began pouring news, music and
commentary into their more than
35 campus outlets.  '
As in previous years the
Radio Society will broadcast
from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. from Monday through Thursday and from
9 a.m. until 11 p.m. on Friday.
Radsoc, which has a record
library of over 30,000 selections,
has outlets in Brock Lounge,
Brock Club, Rooms, the ■ Armories, War Memorial Gym, Campus Cupboard, and the Auditorium.
The club intentions this year
are for good standard music
selections, with a few "Rock 'n
Roll" pieces.
THIRD YEAR OF SERVICE
For the third year Radsoc will
be served by 3 news services,
Canadian Press, Associated Press
and Reuters News Agency.
News commentators are
wanted for Radsoc's hourly news
broadcasts which include world,
national, B.C., and campus affairs.
Club announcements will be
broadcast if they are properly
written up, and handed in a
day in advance.
New Era
Continued from page 1
lems of sanitation do exist and
are a serious problem.
"In the development of the
system     which     the     Soviet
Union  is  carrying out,  there
are   bound     to   be   shortcomings,"  he   added.
Answering a question in regard to dictatorship, Mr. Pritchett stated that dictatorship of
the working class is necessary
under a -socialist type government.
Answering, a question about
social Satellites, he stated there
were none.
MOSCOW UNIVERSITY
VISITED
Mr. Pritchett, who visited the
Moscow University and spoke
with students there, said the
university was so large — he
had been told that if he spent
only a minute in each room it
would take 33 years to go
through it.
We Goofed!
In yesterday's paper
we said that the rowing team would meet
in room 216, Memorial
Gym.
This was wrong!
The team will meet
in Physics 2G0, Thursday, at 12:30 p.m.
AMS Elects
Female Pro
The AMS has a new PRO.
Marilyn   Bernard,   fourth-year
Arts student, was chosen from'
four  other  applicants for'PRO
by Students' Council, Monday.
As a non-voting member of the
Council, it wall be Miss Bernard's job to represent Council and the Alma Mater Society
generally, to the press.
"I think that there is a great
deal yet to be done in the way
of letting the public know what
is happening on the campus,"
she said. "This is particularly
important now that some tangible results of the Building
Fund are beginning to be seen."
Miss Bernard also said that
she wanted to increase the publicity given the campus in the
press, in the hopes of encouraging more prospective students
to attend.
NEW LOCATION FOR
TEXTBOOK SALES
All textbooks are now on sale in the FIELD HOUSE,
immediately south of Brock Hall.
This FAST SERVICE Center closes October 3rd
/ :        ... avoid the rush, get your books today!
Operated by the
UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE
Prism - may now be obtained at the Book Store
Blitz Objective:
More Money
Commerce students will invade U.B.C. classrooms Wed*
nesday, October 7, in a "blitz" campaign to raise money for
the Community Chest.
WANTED $1300
Dick Richards, president of
the Commerce Undergraduate
Society, said that the objective
Pharmacists To Be
In Hospital Wing
The faculty of Pharmacy will
soon be housed in a new $536,-
000 wing to be added to the
Westbrook Building.
The four-storey addition will
be constructed at the south end
of the present building. The
wing will contain classrooms,
laboratories and offices for faculty.
Professor W. H. Matthews,
dean ;of the faculty of Pharmacy,
said the wing had been designed with a view to closer co-operation with the student health
service and the University hospital.
Both are located in the West-
brook building.
NEW LABORATORY
The wing will also contain a
specially - designed laboratory
for teaching dispensing to students.
"Sor far as possible we will
simulate the conditions of the
prescription department of a
modern pharmacy," Dean Matthews said.
The graduate program in
pharmacy, started this year and
at present housed in the Biological Sciences building, will
also be moved into the new
wing.
of   the   one-hour   campaign   ifl
$1300.
Last year the "blitz" netted
$1177, and it is hoped that the
increase in student enrollment
will help in meeting this year**
objective.
BUT ONCE A YEAR
"This is the only annual ap»
peal sponsored by the University," Dick Richards pointed out,
"and we hope students wiH
shoulder their responsibilities
and increase the number of uni»
versity donors.
Last year, from all sources^
the University contributed $13,-
593,24 to the Community Chest.
This year the Chest's total abjective is $3,121,542, an increase
of 7:5 over the 1959 figure:     ■■-
Why I Came Bad
To Christianity
"Is there a satisfying religion for _
the modern educated man?" Lin
Yutang, famous Chinese philosopher who once wrote "Why I
Am A Pagan" recently startled
his millions of followers by returning to Christianity. In
October Reader's Digest he
explains why he has "come-,
home again", back to the.only
religion which establishes a
personal relationship with God.'
Get Reader's Digest today: 35
wticles of lasting interest.
THE NEW
LOOK IN
Bird Calls
ARTS
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Golden Jets let you play longer without tiring because cushion
action of ripple® Soles absorbs shock, reduces foot fatigue.
You'll want these other Golden Jet features too:
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sports or shoe store.
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