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The Ubyssey Mar 18, 1938

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 Published Twice Weekly by the Publications Board of the University of British Columbia
Vol. XX
VANCOUVER, B. C, FRIDAY, MARCH 18, 1938
No. 39
INTELLIGENCE
TESTING IS
PROTESTED
Kingston School
Board Objects
By  Canadian   Unlveralty  Preea
KINGSTON, March 18. —
Kingston's municipal board of
education registered a protest
this week against Queen's
psychology students using local primary school children
for intelligence tests in Child
Psychology courses.
The "Kingston Standard,"
commenting editorially, deplored the practice and suggested that if permission is to
be granted, such should be
given -yearly.
CONSENT OP  PARENTS
The local dally claimed, however,
tha tlf Klngaton children are to
be subjected to auch tests by "inexperienced students," their parents' consent should be obtained
flrst.
Leading Queen's psychology student* believe the protests ot the
board and the newspaper to be unnecessary and "rather stupid," as
one senior remarked.
Test employed is the Stanford
revision of the Binet-Simon test by
Terman, and it is cllamed that the
tests can be Invaluable aid* to
teachers in diagnosing a child's
real ability.
NO  TROUBLE   HERE
U.B.C. psychology students, in
discussing the above dispatch, stated Thursday that there has never
been any difficulty ln this city with
students testing children.
Blnet-Slmon    teata    are    given
Vancouver   publio   aehool    children by atudente at U.B.C. taking
Payoh. 6, It la declared.    Permla-
alen   of   aohool   prlnolpala   la   reoeived, but there haa never been
any trouble with either the aehool
board or the chtldren'e parenta.
Tests are often found to be valuable, psychology students state. At
any   rate,   as   the   children   never
know   their   ratings,   no   harm   is
done.
SPEAKS TODAY: Harrison Forman, photographer for March of
Time, whose pictures on the
Orient aflame will be shown here
today, under the Pass System.
Auditorium, noon.
Prof. Gibson to Take
Place of Bengough
At Institute Saturday
Saturday evening Prof. J. A. Gibson, of the Economics Department,
will lecture in Arts 100 on "The
Notable Contribution to the National Life ot Canada by our Least
Known  Governor-General,"
Mr. Gibson takes the place of
Percy Bengough, Secretary of the
Vancouver Labor organization, who
is unable to make his scheduled address.
The lecture, which ls open to the
public, supplements that given last
week by Dr. J. W. Dafoe. President John Ridington of the Vancouver Institute, will take the chair
at 8.15.
FORMAN TO
TALK TODAY
An eye-witness account ot China
today will be given by Harrison
Forman, famous Asiatic explorer,
who is speaking Friday noon ln the
auditorium on "China — the Far
East Aflame."
Forman, who has had eight yeara
travel ln the Far Bast, will answer
many of the questions being asked
about it today, among them, "What
does Japan want?"
Admission will be free to pass-
holders.
This lecture will be Illustrated
with exclusive films, some ot which
have been released through "The
March of Time." Forman la recognized aa an authority on Asia as
indicated by the fact that he served
as technical director of the film,
"Lost Horizon."
Education Out Of
Date In Europe
—Frank Morley
"England and Europe are today
facing an important educational
problem, said Mr. Frank Morley,
prominent English publisher, ln an
address to students and faculty last
Wednesday noon.
NOT  CULTURAL
Education ln England, he pointed
out, ls still running on the rails
laid down by Newman, Arnold, and
Ruskin. The young Englishman ls
being trained for executive positions, and hardly enough thought
ls being given to hts cultural development.
In tracing briefly the history of
Eureopean education, Mr. Morley
stressed the constant struggle between Christian and Socratlc ideals
of learning.
BUSINESS TRAINING
"The present ideal of business
training," said the speaker, "is
causing unrest and disgust. A time
of transition is due. Something
new in education will emerge —
probably on the lines of European
tradition—but  it will  be  new."
Mr. Morley is a brother of Sir
Christopher Morley. He was born
ln the United States, and educated
in England, and is President Roosevelt's personal publisher and friend.
Fewer Athletic Awards
Are Given This Year
Male athletes of the campus
came Into their own on Wednesday
when the annual Big Block and the
new Prosh awards were made.
There were only ten of the former,
which Is quite a decrease from last
year, six Freshmen, also, received
sweaters hearing their graduate
year across the front. This lotter
award Is a new innovation and
makes it Impossible for a flrst year
to  win  a B1g  Block.   '
Canadian Football carried off the
major share oe honors, having five
new winners and six previous winners, who will receive the traditional numbers on their arms. Rugby
and Soccer had four new and eight
previous winners.
Although sporting a Canadian
championship team the basketballers received only one new award
which went to Byron Straight.
There have been no awards meted   out   in   Track  as  yet.     Awards
will be made after the C.P.S. meet,
which is the big event of tho year
for   the  track  men.
A complete list of the winners,
both new and previous, are as follows:
CANADIAN FOOTBALL
New Winners: J. Pearson, W.
Martin, J. McGulre, O. Orr, and L.
Straight. Rewinners: C. Campbell,
R. Henderson, R. Keillor, H. Stradlottl,  and  T.  Williams.
ENGLISH RUGBY
New Winners: R. Robertson and
L. Vine. Rewinners: L. Andrews,
J. Bird, D. Carey. W. Leggatt, H.
McPhee and R.  Upward.
SOCCER
New Winners: L. Mizuhara and
■R. Fiorillo. Rewinners: A. Croll,
D. Quayle.
BASKETBALL
New Winners: B. Straight. Rewinners: A. Lucas, R. Matthison,
G.  Pringle and K. Wright.
"PLAYBOY" IS
STAGED WITH
DIFFICULTY
Parts Over-
Acted
By JAMES BEVERIDGE
Irish comedy added yet a
little more variety to the roster of Players' Club Spring
performances with the staging of J. M. Synge's "Playboy
of the Western World," which
opened Tuesday night on the
campus.
Well-done and effective as
far as it is possible for the
youth of one country to stage
the national drama of another, the play left student audiences with mixed emotions.
Pauline Scott and Archie
Bain both seemed to capture
the spirit of their roles. Both
realized the swiftness of emotion, confusion of logic, and
flash of wit that characterizes
the traditional Irish temperament. Both seemed fully at
home and happy in their characterizations.
SUPPORT  ADEQUATE
Supporting characters were generally adequate, although there
was a marked tendency to burlesque character rather than represent lt actually. As satire, "The
Playboy" perhaps veered too much
towards a musical comedy type of
atmosphere.
There was a good deal of overacting and over-posturing, every
colleen tossing her head and flaunting her elbows as if she would
break into "Molly on the Shore" at
any moment. Apart from the posturing, movement and voices among
the crowd were good.
SAGER   HEARTY
Arthur   Sager,    Beth    Gillanders,
and   Norman   Beattie   were   better
than the others.    Sager's sketch of
the portly toper was heartily comic,   Miss   Gillanders   was   effective
as the domineering widow woman,
and Beattie, the battered and much-
murdered father, also convincing.
Setting and eoatume* were un-
obtrualve but good.    Slnoe there
wa* no aoenery ohange, a awlfter
paoe than uaual wa* maintained.
Once    again,    dialect    lifted    its
ugly head and to tone extent came
between   spectators   and   the   play.
Greater success with "The Brontes"
last Spring indicates the advantage
of keeping to English plays and undiluted diction.
PLAYERS ENJOY LINES
The players obviously appreciated to the full comedy value their
lines, Archie Bain particularly getting full measure from his.
The cost: Archie Bain, Norman
Beattie, Pat Fowler, Pauline Scott,
Dacre Barett-Lennard, Beth Gillanders, George Kldd, Arthur Sager, Mary McLeod, Anne Carter,
Esme Cayrlzlea, Beth Blakely, Lester Sugarman, David Morrow, Robert McDougall, Jack Mercer.
Production was under Dorothy
Somerset. Dr. D. C. B. Duff was
Art  director.
TOTEM WILL
REVIEW YEAR
PICTORIALLY
Authorities May Take
Action Against Petty
Thievery on Campus
Petty thieving on the campus
the past month has reached considerable proportions, according
to reports reaching the Ubyssey
Thursday. Several measures are
being taken by student authorities in an attempt to stop the
losses being incurred by students.
All students suffering from
thefts are asked to report them
to members of the Students*
Council. Also, In view of the
prevalence of thieving, it is suggested that no valuables be left
where they may be taken away.
If the thefts do not cease, it is
believed that some stringent action will be taken to curb them.
As a climax to the work of the
Publications Board, the laboring
staff of the university year book
has reached the home-stretch with
their vast and astonishing volume
known as the "Totem."
Dave Crawley, blonde cyclonic
editor, announced Thursday that
his ink and paper child will appear
e're the close of this blustering
month.
No afforta have been apared to
make thle year'a book an out-
atandlng publication, particularly
with raapeet to Ite teohnleal aa-
pacta. The Totem will be bound
In a delloiou* green-grey oover,
with a blue oellophane "over-all"
to oover everything.
The heavy, eoated paper le of
the beat quality, and la eepeclally
adapted to the peculiar type of
printing.
"There are millions and millions
of photographs," chanted Crawley,
"and every one of them ls bigger
and better than ever. The snaps,
the montages, the title pages, —
everything ls absolutely lovely!
The Totem will be the best advertisement that the university can
get."
Every conceivable phase of university life has been recorded in
pictures or In type. Not a club, society, fraternity, sorority, or athletic team has been omitted from
the Totem's glistening pages.
The achievements of all the campus satellites have been tabulated
dutifully, while vivid feature stories
tell of campus "landmarks," campus
life, and campus problems.
ARTISTS WILL  REVEL
Artists will revel ln the striking
photographs of apparently ordinary
objects, remlniscents in the memorable portraits of their old friends,
humorists in the awfully candid
camera shots, the stranger ln the
liberal helpings of nourishing information. The Totem is the university Itself ln still life.
''You   can't   get   along   without
It," declared aardonlo Carter Han-
bury,   aee   photographer  for  the
book.    "Every  one  should order
a copy right away at thla very In-
•tantanaou*  moment."
All students can obtain copies at
a   cost   of   $2.BO.     Orders   may   be
placed   either   at   the   Alma   Mater
Offices, Room 303 in the Auditorium
Building,   or   in   the   Publications
Board Offlce.
VINE WILL PRESENT NEW
ATHLETIC PROGRAM MONDAY
Large Attendance
Desired
Revolutionary changes in U.B.C. men's athletic administration will be presented to a special meeting of the M.A.A.
Monday noon in Ap. Sc. 100, when Lyall Vine will present his
scheme for a Men's Athletic Council.
Expected to be the grounds for considerable discussion
are the terms of the new setup, prepared by Vine after
lengthy investigation into athletics on this campus.
INSURANCE
HAS NEW PLANS: Lyall Vine,
men's athletic rep., who Monday
noon in Ap. Sc. ICO will present
the M.A.A. with his proposals
in connection with a Men's
Athletic Council and a new system of athletic insurance.
Air Force Positions
Open to Graduates
A number of positions in the R.
C.A.F. are open to university graduates wishing to enter this service.
Commissions are available, and
those wishing to enquire into the
matter are asked to contact Dave
Carey or Squadron Leader McLeod
at once.
Good pay and opportunities for
advancement are to be had in the
Air Force service, and it is hoped
that U.B.C, graduates will apply
for some of the positions available.
Was Your Waver Signed?
If Not—Call At Council
More than 100 students, in filling
out aution Money waivers for the
publicity campaign, ngelected to
sign the waivers properly.
Students listed below are asked
to call  at the  Students* Council
offlce as soon as possible, in order
to fill in their waivers.  All waivers must be signed—not printed,
as many were.
At  the   same   time,   it   is  hoped
that   many   students   who   did   not
subscribe to the campaign will sign
waivers,    in    order   that   sufficient
funds may be available for carrying  on  the  work   of  the  publicity
committee.
NAMES BELOW
Names of those who did not fill
out the waivers properly are listed
below. They are asked to attend to
this matter as soon as possible.
Eunice Bennett Alexander, Margaret Alexander, Margaret Beattie,
Anne Margaret Bedner, Roy Gordon Bell, Margaret Aileen Beveridge, John Moor Bezer, Arthur John
Bingham, Kathleen Bladen, Marion
Blair, Mary G. Bradshaw, Barbara
Agnes Breeton, Reginald Harry
Brown, Constance Isabella Busy,
Ethel Jean Campbell, Ewr.n Campbell, James Alexander Campbell,
Mary Lois Campbell, Margaret
Murray  Campbell.
James Kennedy Cavers, Dorothy
L. Chamberlain, Arthur Ernest
Chapman, James Charters, Audrey
May Chowne, Teresa J. Coady,
Maisie B. Cowan, Guy R. L. Cur-
wen, Alastalr Davie, Doreen Davie,
Gordon D. Ellison, Aili Enegren,
Bernard    Franklin    Ennals,    Jean
Alexandra Ferguson, Winifred
Christine Field, Blanche Fry, Wesley M, Fujiwara, Jcane E. Gall,
Raymond Forrest Gaul, Walter M.
Goodwin, William H. Grand, Helen
W. Gray.
Joan Fernau Hall, Ernest Harvey, R. E. Haskins, C. J. Henniker,
Jean M. Hill, Mary Webber Holdom,
Cicely E. F. Holmes, Joy Jameson,
William James Johnston, George
Herbert R. Jones, James Charles
Keller, E. W. Kier, D. Knox, Dorothy May Ladner, John Lamb, Alison Melville Law, Ruth Leung, Hin
Lew, Arthur St. Claire Lewis, Lyon
Lightstone, Dorothy McCammon,
Daniel J. McCartney, Mary Stuart
S. Maclnnes.
Margaret E. McKeen, James D.
MacLeod, Margot J. Martin, Carol
Menchions, Jack%S. Michell, Elmer
Mikkelson, Armando Peter Minichi-
ello, Arthur Morris, John Alexander
Murray, Don Nazzer, Barbara Nes
bitt, Eileen Newby, Eric Holt Nor
ton, Tarn Tsutomu Ozaki, John Reginald Paddon, Dorene Marian Perry,
John Norman Pinder-Moss, Norma
Mathison Pollock, Daphne E. Preston, Lillian M. Randall, Ursular M.
S. Rhodes, O. Robertson.
H. Basil Robinson, Ruth Scott,
George Shimo-Takahara, Lloyd L.
Smith, Anne T, Speirs, Josephine
Margaret Staniforth, Luke V. Ta
nabe, Mary Elizabeth Thomas,
Gladys Marjorie Thompson, T. B.
Touhey, Dick Tracy, Isabella Trace
Underhiil, Kathleen E. Webster,
John Clark Whitelaw, George C.
Wilson, Lloyd Allen Woodside,
Stewart Wylle.
Also scheduled to come before the Monday meeting is
the new athletic insurance
proposal—also a Vine brainchild.
Both    matters,    together
with other items on the agenda, will add up to muking the
meeting   the   liveliest   men's
athletics has seen recently.
The Athletlo Counoil aoheme I*
d**ign*d   to   take   men'*   apart*
out  from   under  the  Jurisdiction
of   Studenta'   Counoil,   th*   new
body having supreme eontrol ever
■ II matter* In It* field.
Studenta, faculty, and administration  representatives  would   sit  on
the   council,   which   would   administer funds previously set aalde for
men's athletics by Studenta' Council.
OOOD TURNOUT
Vine  has  a  complete  outline  of
his  proposal,  and is asking for a
good  turnout  Monday noon  in  order to have the matter thrashed out
and dealt with as soon aa poaalble.
How  much  of the work In connection  with  the  formation of the
Athletic Council Vine will leave to
the  incoming   Students'   Council  is
unknown, although the latter body
will have to work with the new organization should it be set up.
Athletic    Inauranea,   alwaya   a
oauae  of coneern  at  U.B.C, will
alao   be  dieeuaaed   Monday,  with
new Ideaa In thla direction being
put forward by Vine.
1200 CHOOSE
COUNCIL
Tired election officials completed
counting ballots Tuesday at supper
time and looked baok on one ot the
hottest contests U.B.C. has known
in several years.
Choaen   by   aome   1200   voter*
Tueeday were  Jack   Davie,   M.U.
8.;   Jean   Stordy,   W.U.S.;   Rann
Matthlaon,   M.A.A.;   Struan   Robertaon, L.8.E.;   Bob Smith, treaaurer;     Evan    apRoberte,    Junior
member;   and   Peggy  Thompson,
aeorotary.
These,  together with  Peggy  McLeod,   elected   to   the   W.A.A.   post
by acclamation after Pamela Run-
kle   was  ruled  out  of  the  running
by   the   eligibility   committee,   will
make   up   a   Students'   Council   to
work  under  president-elect  Carson
McGuire in a critical year for the
A.M.S.
HEAVY SCIENCE VOTE
Features of the Tuesday election
Included: a heavy Science vote,
failure of a score of men to vote
for secretary, a close race for L.S.
E., and definite victories for Davis
in M.U.S. and Matthison in M.A.A.
—both of whom were given preelection odds by observers.
Council next year will have only
one "repeater," Bob Smith, who
will occupy the treasurer's post for
a  second  term.
First Joint meeting of the present council with the preaent
group will be Monday night—with
the Inoomlng administrators taking over following the annual
meeting,   March  30.
Pub. Board Tea to
Be Held Wednesday
Annual meeting and tea of the
Publications Board will be held
Wednesday at 3.45 in the caf faculty dining room. Promotions and
general business will be discussed.
All members of the staff are
asked to be present, as a number
of important announcements will
be made. Two
THE      UBYSSEY
THE   UBYSSEY
Issued twice weekly by the Students' Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society
of the University of British Columbia
Phona  Point Grey 206
Mail Subscriptions, $2.00
Office: 206 Auditorium  Building
Campus Subscriptions, $1.50
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
Kemp Edmonds
NEWS MANAGER
Dorwin Baird
SENIOR EDITORS
TUESDAY: Frank Perry FRIDAY; Dorothy Cummings
SPORTS EDITOR
Frank Turner
ASSOCIATE EDITORS
Monty Fotheringham Bill  Sibley Robert King
ASSOCIATE SPORTS EDITORS EXCHANGE EDITOR
Jack Mair Hugh Shirreff James Macfarlane
ASSISTANT EDITORS
Victor Freeman Rosemary Collins Irene Eedy Beverley McCorkell
Jack Mercer John Garrett
ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITORS
Van Perry Orme Dier Myrne Nevison
REPORTERS
Betty   Bolduc,   Joyce   Cooper,   Joan   Haslam,   Ann   Jeremy,   Ozzy   Durkin,   Barbara
McDougal, Ed McGougan, Virginia Galloway, Lester Pronger,
Doug Bastin, Helen Hann.
SPORTS REPORTERS
Norm Renwick, Basil Robinson, Frank Thornloe, Archie Byers, Bob Melville
♦ ■»"»—
Viewing
The News
With
The Exchange Editor
""•'"By" jr"D""M ACr^RLAViE*"*"'
Advertising Office
Pacific Publishers, Limited, 303-A Pender Street West, Vancouver, B. C.
Telephones: Trinity 1945
All advertising handled exclusively by Pacific Publishers, Limited
THE ANNUAL MEETING
The annual A.M.S. meeting will be held Wedneaday,
March SO, in the auditorium. At this time, students will
be given an outline of the work of Students' Council during
the past year.
There are several questions which must be discussed at
this meeting. Students should see to it that these matters
are brought up and clarified.
1. Status of the Pass System must be explained, and
students should be shown how much money was spent from
this fund for athletic attractions, how much for other affairs, and how many students attended functions this year as
compared with last.
2. Students should be told what progress has been made
by the publicity committee, and what plans are being laid
for the future. They should be told what hopes the committee has for success in the effort to avoid the fee raise and
registration limitation.
3. Definite word regarding the Union Building must
come from council, along with plans for the future.
4. The entire student body, not merely the men interested in athletics, should be made acquainted with the proposed
Athletic Council, and given an opportunity to discuss it before any move is made by council.
TIS TOTEM TIME
Once again — our annual message in support of the
Totem. This time, remembering that last year we did bring
forth a "bigger and better" year-book, we can again promise
the student body that the 1938 Totem ($2.50) will be a fine
thing.
It'll be a fine thing, graduates, for your ^grandchildren.
A fine thing, too, for you freshman, for your pictures are
in there, too—and you can show 'em to yourselves four years
from now in order to bolster your ego and prove that you've
grown up in the interim.
It'll be a fine thing for the rest of us too, for the 1938
Totem ($2.50) positively abounds in photos that record in
pictorial fashion a campus year. It'll be a fine thing for the
Totem staff if all of us go right up to the A.M.S. offlce today
and order our year-books. After all, 82.50 for a Totem is a
fine way to spend your money—and it 11 save you borrowing
your fraternity brother's copy.
All in all, these Totems  ($2.50) are fine things.
THE GIFT OF 38
Last year the graduating classes set a precedent by establishing a scholarship fund, which they hoped to have
added to by succeeding classes. However, before the class
of '38 decided upon its graduation gift, they should survey
the situation at the university with respect to scholarships
and bursaries—remembering that under the new scale of
fees, an added $10,000 yearly will go to such awards.
There are many ways in which the graduating classes
could assist those who will follow them. They should consider Union Building equipment, a contribution to the publicity campaign, additional books for the library, University
Theatre equipment—in fact, there are many possible avenues
of endeavor where the graduates can be of assistance.
Considerable thought must be given this year to the
graduation gift. Remembering the tradition of U.B.C. students in their long program of adding to the visible, capital
assets of the university; and that it is the tfhsiness of the
university to look after the scholastic side of student life,
grads of '38 should make a wise choice this year when it
comes to determining their gift.
"WE ARE YOUR DELIVERY SERVICE
B. C. DISTRICT TEL. and DELIVERY CO. LTD.
REAR:    SIO   WMT   HAOTINOe  ST. SIVMOUR   0189
after • p.m., also sunday* ano holidays.  s«y.  0184 k
Head Office:  Marine Buu-oino
truck*.  motorcycle* ano bike missinsirs
available at all. time*
"Bringing to you the news
of Universities coast to coast."
This is what you may here in
the not too distant future over
the C.B.C. hook-up if plans of
the directors of Canadian
University Press develop.
Throughout the year by
wire and air-mail the news of
the moment is hurried 'A
Mari Ad Mare' so that readers of university papers
throughout Canada may read
of events within 24 hours of
their occurrence. The success
of this system in the last few
months is a testimony to the
important place which college
journalism occupies today in
Canada. For it is from these
papers, organized on a voluntary basis, of complete amateur standing but professional
technique, and non-academic,
that Canada's rising young
journalists are coming.
At U.B.C. the coverage of
Canadian University news
falls to the lot of the Exchange Editor, whose department next year will be augmented by three assistants to
cope with the newly enlarged
system of news dispatches.
Papers in the present hook-up
are located at Edmonton, Saskatoon, Winnipeg, Toronto,
London, Montreal, Halifax and
Frederickton. Feature news
is forwarded from all these
papers to a central bureau at
Toronto, and is re-issued in
bulletin form monthly by Canadian University Press
through the National Federation of Canadian University
Students offices.
THE DAILY  ROUND
In addition to all this, with
the daily round of the postman there comes to the desk
of the exchange editor some
thirty college newspapers and
other periodicals, including
the Weekly Report of the Dominion Bureau of Statistics.
AMERICANA
In the carefully assembled
files of this department the
United States is represented
by one daily and three others.
From Washington comes the
daily with a front page makeup which never fails to intrigue the boys of the Ubyssey. Within its four pages,
sometimes increased to six,
news is balanced by a wispy
column called "Le Premier
Whisper," offering little flakes
of campus gossip by light verbal snatches at a multitude of
fraternity and sorority affairs which must give Wash-
ingtonians a lot of interesting
reading . . . imagine a Mary
Ann column coming out daily
replete with names!
Other papers coming to us
are the U. of N. Sagebrush
from the divorce capital in
Nevada, a weekly; the Idaho
Argonaut from Moscow, Idaho; and the Puget Sound
Trail, a weekly, from Tacoma.
CANADA
Two dailies, a French paper
from Laval at Quebec, and
nine other publications running on a weekly and twice-
weekly basis, plus various
Vancouver high school papers
and the odd monthly college
magazine from here and
there, including the Prairies
and South Africa, make up
the Canadian quota.
McGiil Daily, of Padlock
Law and Tim Buck fame, ably
steered     into     adventurous
Friday, March 18, 1938
McGuire Will Be
Guest Speaker at
S.C.M. Annual Banquet
Annual banquet of the Student
Christian Movement will be held
at the Deutschland Cafe, 615 Seymour Street, on Friday, March 26,
starting at 7.15 p.m.
The program will be divided into two parts: dinner from 7.15 to
0.16 and dancing from 0.30 to
1.00 a.m.
Carson McQulre will be the
guest speaker, taking for his subject: "The Place of Religion ln
the  University."
Tickets will be 75c per person
and may be obtained from the S.
CM. Room, 312 Auditorium Bldg.,
or from the following committee
members: Stan Bailey, Jack
Ewen, Ruth Hind, Alfred Kitchen,
Phyllis McEwen, Winifred McLean, Charles Richmond, Jack
Ross.
"LET ME SERVE YOUR CAR, AND YOUR CAR WILL SERVE YOU"
"FBANK" STOKE
U.B.0. 8ERVI0E STATION
24-Hour Emergency Service — Complete Repair Facilities
SOUTH END OF McGILL ROAD PT. GREY 53
channels by John H. MacDonald, Editor-in-Chief, and President of C.U.P., combining
probing editorials with balanced news, and with flashing enterprise ih feature writing, takes the lead amongst its
British brethren. Toronto
Varsity, home of C.U.P. bulletins, and the only college
newspaper in Canada to use
its own presses, fills a tough
job trying to embrace several
collegess and gives a composite news presentation with a
goodly proportion of feature.
Ontario offers three papers
other than the Varsity, the
lead being filled by Queens
Journal, edited by our pal Bill
Neville, C.U.P. secretary, a
twice - weekly publication,
which goes in for various
things in its make-up which
usually, except in its magnificent "screwy issue," includes
a serious face. The U. of
Western Gazette goes in for a
balanced front page make-up,
rhyming or blank verse heads,
and faculty consultants, while
McMaster Silhouette, at Hamilton, offers us a paper with a
flare for two and three-inch
high streamer heads and a
boundless local patriotism.
The inaritimes gives us the
Brunswickan, politely called
the "Weekly News and Literary Journal," while from
Halifax comes the Dalhousie
Gazette, declared to be the
oldest college paper in America, being founded in 1869. We
have always wondered! A
companion piece called the Argosy, weekly, comes from
Sackville,  N.B.
Of the prairies we have
heard much through the W.I.
P.U. news dispatches which
are now working in conjunction with C.U.P. Here Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba furnish us with plenty of
copy, a really splendid assort-
"I'm not taking a» big a riik as you think ..."
"Yes you are, if you're the one who swiped the boss's Sweet Caps I'
SWEET CAPORAL CIGARETTES
"The purest form in which tobacco can be smoked."
f
TRANSLATIONS
W« oo* turpi? *nr «-slLh Tr.a.Utl*-
r-fclUb*-—to*. ALL LANGUAOBS
Ordrr  er  writ*  far prl.M  m  jr»ur  bm4«
The Book Exchange Rtg'd
Specialists  In Saw and Und To******.
30O Bloom w.   Toronto. Ont.
FTYPING
THESES, ESSAYS, AT FIVE CENTS
FER   PAGE.    ESTHER  SISSON, 9
A.M.-6   P.M.     SEY.  972.    AFTER
6 P.M.  PAIR. 4S55-R.
There Is none Better than the "Besstt"
"©tttfi'tt       >ijr
and   *i
Oranvlllef.
{point grey flower shop!
Flowers for Every Occasion
Coriai.i, Bouqu.ta, ou., mod* «• ard«r
44J» W. TINTH Ay..   Pi. Or.- 680
ment. All three are published twice weekly along the
same lines as the Ubyssey,
with the Gateway at Edmonton and the Sheaf at Saskatoon vieing for honors in the
field of wide-awake make-up,
while the Manltoban, formerly
of dignified tradition, is doing
more than vieing by using the
screwiest heads we have ever
seen.
All in all, the year has provided lots of fun. We have
had mail from Austria and
Poland asking for exchanges,
and the Honi Soit from New
Zealand . . . and altogether
everything    has     been    just
ducky. Now we lay down our
typewriter gently till next
year, with our best wishes to
all.
NOTICE
Rowing Club Meeting Friday ln
Applied Science 102 at 18.16. Important business to take place and
election of next year's officers.
THE HOTEL VANCOUVER
featuring
Mart Kennev's Music
AND  HIS  TWELVE  WESTERN
GENTLEMEN
STUDY f   . a,
FRENCHW
THIS SUMMER
LIVE IN FRENCH FOR 6 WEEKS
IN FRENCH CANADA
Elementary, Intermediate, Advanced
couraes, Coeducational. Certificate*
and college credit. Residence la
newly opened Douglaa Hall; 30th
Jun* — loth August. Inclualv* fee
$180. Write for booklet to aeeretary.
RMIDINTIAL  Frame* SUMMIR SCHOOL
"Fraternity Jewellery a Specialty"
FIRBANK & LANGE
Seymour at
Dunsmuir
SEY.  2088
PERSONAL JEWELLERS TO EVERY MEMBER OF THE FAMILY
ORDER NOW:
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with the Publications Office at
once  $2.50
We're Just
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that when you—or you—or even you—have
your measurements taken, your garment is
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whether you're a bag of bones, or just plain
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199 Hastings St. West  - -  637 Granville Street Friday, March 18, 1938
THE      UBYSSEY
Three
The Sounding
of Brass
One of the traditions of the
Players' Club has always been
a policy of
THE THESPIANS   'No stars.'
GO BRAGH But they
tend to
nullify this policy in practice.
And this year's Spring play
exemplifies the fact with a
nicety which could not be bettered. Three actors had to
carry much of the remainder
of the cast along with them,
and half the effect gained by
the leads went to offsetting
the gaucheries of the minor
roles.
Pegeen, Christy and the
Widow Quinn were credible,
lifelike, real. But the minor
male roles presented Ireland
as a land of swaggering shout-
ers, who are never still for a
second, who have almost no
sense of balance (that is the
only thing that could account
for the alarming and quite
impossible angles taken up by
them) and who are simply
not believable.
This question of the believable is the heart of good acting. It is not sufficient to present a picture of people as
they are; with this must be
combined a knowledge of what
the audience generally believes the people are, and the
second requisite is the more
important. Out of any seven
people, at least six will not be
vaudeville comedians. And at
least five will stand upright at
any given time.
The innkeeper, who showed
a tendency to this sort of
thing at Christmas, spent
most of his time on the stage
leaning backward at an angle
of forty-five degrees. He
smirked incessantly; he
"caught flies." When he tried
to make a speech emphatic,
he merely ranted, waving his
arms wildly the while. The
other males seemed to feel it
incumbent upon them to
cquat as if they were attempting to catch a greased pig
which regrettably was not
there. It would have livened
things up and made better entertainment.
Sean Keogh, if he can sing,
has a great future with the
Minsky brothers. Sean can
be a pitiful, tragic figure—a
craven, timid individual, but
intent and serious. We saw
him as a swaggering, slobbering lout. And the girls reminded one of a chorus. The
temptation is always present
to use a number of very similar minor characters in "Formation" plays. And while it
did not entirely win, evidences
of it were present.
But what a difference when
the incredible people were off
the stage! The play lived,
moved—until it was destroyed
by their return. Arthur Sager
and George Kidd, with Norman Beattie, were real. But
they were unfortunately accompanied by the others. Good
acting does not place a strain
on the audience. And the leads
did not. But the remainder
of the cast mixed their Greek,
and substituted bathos for
pathos. And if some irate
Irishmen are seen stalking out
of the University Theatre
with malice aforethought,
heading for the backstage
areas, the cause is to be found
in overacting and burlesque.
And, just in passing, we
might note that the acting of
the minor males differed imperceptibly, if at all, whether
they were supposed to be
drunk or sober.
GRAD MEET
CANCELLED
The meeting of the graduating
class originally scheduled for today has been indefinitely postponed. Seniors are asked to watch
notice boards for announcements
of the meeting, which is likely to
take place a week from today.
Cooperation Of
U.S. And Canada
To Avoid War
—Symposium Result
Suggestion of Local
Girls Adopted By
Seattle Group
SEATTLE, March 18 (CUP)—A
policy of collective security was decided on as the most plausible
means for the United States and
Canada to avoid war.
This solution was offered by Margaret Flndlay of U.B.C, who visited University of Washington with
Kay Armstrong to take part in a
symposium debate Tuesday.
ECONOMIC  DIVISION
The basis of thla policy is an economic division of raw materials,
as opposed to the terltorial division plan used by the League of
Nations.
Further details Include the abolition ot all trade barriers and the
meeting of a world conference to
draw up a policy of how much each
nation needs in products, where
they can get lt, and to what extent
they will co-operate with other nations ln this matter.
TOPIC  ANALYZED
Kay Armstrong apoke flrat, giving an anlysis of the topic.
The fourth apeaker analysed the
solutions from the point of thetr
giving a satisfactory answer .to the
question: Is it practical? Can it
be used in the present situation?
and: Doe* it get at and remove the
fundamental causes of war?
CASH  AND CARRY
The third speaker presented as
a possible solution a polloy of Isolation. It consisted of a "cash and
carry" system of international trade
and lnaistance on foreign countries
collecting goods here so a* to avoid
our sending ships into other waters.
The debate took place before the
debating society ot the Broadway
High  School.
Credit* fer debating at the Unlveralty of Washington have been
raiaad thla year frem 3 te 6 unit*
All debating I* under the au*
plea* ef th* Department ef D*
bating.
Dozen U.B.C. Delegates
Attend Phraterean
Conference at Corvallis
The North West Phrateres* Conference for 1938 Is to be held at
the Oregon State Agricultural College at Corvallis, Washington, on
Saturday and Sunday, March 10
and  20.
Theta Chapter ot U.B.C. is to be
represented by eleven undergraduate delegates chosen from the subchapters and three graduate delegates.
Those making the trip are: Clare
Brown, Mary McQeer, Phyllis Mason, Jessie McRae, Doris Johnson,
Betty Thomas, Adrlenne Collins,
Nancy Carr, Pat Chutter, Katherlne
Hewitt, Doris Pepper, Sheilab Hutchinson, Ruth Hutchinson and Biddy McNeill, who is the official Theta representative, and who will present the report of U.B.C.'s actlvitiea
at the Conference.
W.U.S.
The annual meeting of the Women'a Undergraduate Society will
be held in Arts 100 on Monday,
March 21st at 12.30.
Election of officers for the positions of vice-president, secretary
and treasurer for the 1398-39 session will constitute the main business of the occasion.
STILL   LOST
A polyphase duplex slide rule, In
a leather case, John Brynelsen
written on the back. Please return
to   the   Council   Office.
If YOU
plan on getting a
copy of the
1938 TOTEM
you'd better get your
order
in
at once . . .
order at the
Ubyssey office . . .
$2.50
"I wonder li Mlmm Elinor will mind? Tho tmmlly borrow***
my FORD V-«"
$30 Monthly Buys
A New Ford V-8
You'll Do Better At
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VANCOUVER
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The Ford Corner
901 SEYMOUR SEY. 7700
What brunette freshette has given the one who has been her faithful
escort for the past year the well known air. Perhaps it's because there are
no more parties coming up.
* ■¥        ■*
You can still make reservations for dinner at the Dolphin before the
spring plays. Why not make a completely sophisticated evening and dine at
the Dolphin? It's ideal if you are going to stay out on the campus and very
lovely for a pre-arranged party.
Even if you don't dine there you won't want to miss Vienna coffee at
fhe Dolphin after the plays. All the campus intellectuals will be there
discussing drama an dart.  By candlelight the atmosphere is quite continental.
* *        *
Then there is the man who ran all the way from the fourth floor of the
Science building to the Council office at five to four on voting day
because he had  just met one of the secretary candidates.
■**        M        ■¥
For something different when dining downtown drop in at the Village Inn,
on Howe St., between Dunsmuir and Pender. With a new cook just engaged
the Village Inn is serving wonderful food; and the thrilling Bohemian atmosphere combines to make a meal there an interesting event. Phone Sey. 2876 L
for   reservations.
•*        -*        •*
There are four Psi U's who seem to think that bridge every afternoon
is the way  to get  through their exams.
* -* -*
Are you looking for a light wool suit to wear under your spring coaA
Tlie combination is the smartest thing for spring and Del Raine is the
smartest place for wool suits If you want to be smartly dressed in the
individual co-ed style shop at Del Raine, |ust west of Granville on Robson
Street
* * *
A Zele and an Alpha Delt bave found a new use for their passes
They  spent all  yesterday morning  playing cribbage with   the basketball   tickets
■*■*■*
Stop worrying if your German courses aren't getting along as well as
their might. Don't stop thinking about them altogether, but Just phone
Baron H. E. von Wittgenstein, Bay. I182X, and make an appointment for
coaching .You'll be sure to make the exams with flying colors if you are
coached by Baron von Wittgenstein.
It doesn't seem to matter whether they are going to the Spring Play,
or a dance, or just a plain, ordinary movie—she always says, "I'm sleepy."
Maybe she works too hard.
*      *      -at
In the spring a young man's fancy turns to the pretty girls on the campus.
If you would like to be a pretty girl, too, phone for an appointment with
one of the Russian Duchess' experts. First of all the Russian Duchess permanents are beautifully soft and natural and so very inexpensive. They are done
with a special French oil and leave your hair as soft as if you had natural
curls.
Not only are the permanents beautifully done, but one of Russian Duchess'
experts will advise you on all your complexion problems, and give you a
make-up analysis which will bring out your best personality points.
For new spring blouses and fresh slips and stockings stop at the Lingerie
Shop at Twelfth and Granville. The Lingerie Shop caters especially to the
needs of co-eds and sells all those little pleasing silk blouses and scarves
that make so many of the co-eds look just that little bit smarter than their
sister students.
-K        *        *
We think she was embarassed, the Gamma Phi, when the professor
friend whom she had taken to the Phraterers party wowed the girls with
his  trucking.
*        ■¥■        ■¥■
It happened guite a while ago, but the story is still going around about
the A O Pi's who were ejected from their apartment because of the noisy
parties  they had.
-* + M
f-lave you noticed the beautiful new shoes in Rae-Sons' window^ Well,
if you haven't you haven't seen the newest styles for this spring. But there's
more good news for you kae Sons Budget Shop on
Rae-Sons regular store ha-, these, smart styles at ,-
afford.
Rae-Sons Budget Shop has long been . h.s.,01
Varsity's smart co-eds. For bea jhful shoe-, that la ,t
you ye ever worn,  shop at  Rje-Son ,
■* * *
the
prk
rne;:ranme   floor  of
e   any   co-ed   could
tlie    of fie i
longer   thai
nl
ier    of
others SOCCER GAME
VARSITY vs.  MACCABBEES
SATURDAY at McBRIDE PARK
OR-T,
GRASS HOCKEY
VICTORIA "LADIES" v.. VARSITY
TOMORROW at 2:30
Four
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March 18,. 1938
WESTERNS DOWN VARSITY TO TIE SERIES
STUDENTS FAIL TO CLICK
AS MILTONMEN WIN 37-23
By JACK  MAIR
Smashing Varsity's famed zone defense wide open,
an Inspired Western quintet powered their way to a 37-
23 victory at the V.A.C. gym last night. The win ties
up the Intercity playoffs at two games apiece.
Passing over, under and around the demoralized students, the Sports Centre boys piled up an eight-point margin
by half time, and then, when the wise ones predicted a stall
in the second frame, the Westerners ran wild to blast the
Thunderbird defense and romp away with the tilt.
VARSITY LEADS AT QUARTER ,.».«.
Por the flrst quarter it seemed as though it would be the
old story again with Varsity holding a small but comfortable
lead.
Then, early In the eeeond quarter, *om*thlng happened. Western* want eraay. Lad by Jo*
Re**, th* apart* contra aquad began banging them In from all
angle*. Flrat Roaa tied the oount
at Sail; then Willoughby and
Mayer* looped In a eouple of
ong ahota followed by two elttera
by Roaa to boom Weaterna Into
• 16-8 lead at th* half.
28-11 AT THREE-QUARTERS
After the breather, Maury Van
Vllet tried the lineup around ln a
vain effort to catch the flying Mil-
tonmen. But the Sporta Centre
quintet swept all before them,
holding the dazed collegians to
three points while they added 12
more markers to their total to lead
28-11 at tbe three-quarter mark.
In the flna period Westerns coasted, sending ln second string men
for Wllloughby, Ross and Bardsley,
and enabling the Thunderbirds to
pull up to within 14 points of the
centreltes.
Joe Ross and Jimmy Bardsley led
the scoring for Westerns with 9
points, while "Hooker" Wright,
with 6, seemed to be the only
Thunderbird to know where the
basket was.
The deciding game of the serlee
will ba played Saturday night at
Varaity gym.
Madame L. Wellington
DRESSMAKIR
Spring Llnea Are Smart and Clever
2666 Alms Road       Bay. 7227
Campus\Golfers
Hold Tourney
Student followers ot the Royal
and Ancient pastime swung into action for the flrst bit of divot digging of the current season last Friday ln the University Club's Handicap Event. A howling wind and
minor flooding boosted the scores
of most of the faithful who turned
out.
Pete Vlekera oapturad th* low
net with a groaa of 81 le** 10
handicap for a total of 71, In aplta
of him trouble around th* tricky
green* of the Unlveralty Courae.
floy Leeklo blaatad out a aub-par
34 on the aaoond nine to flnlah
In aecond place with a groaa of
80 and a net ef 72.
TOURNEY TODAY
A second tourney of the same nature ls on today over where the
grass ls green and some high-class
pill pasting ls expected from the
many smart llnksters on the campus. A few spring breezes will
work the winter kinks out of such
men as Wilf Balderston, Maury
Wright and Des Barett, and Old
Man Far ls scheduled to take a
severe beating before this day is
out.
H. Jessie How, B.A. I
PUBLIC STENOGRAPHER 2
Popular Library $
%   4451 W. 10th AVINUI $
COLIEGIATI barn dance
Friday, March 25th, 9 till 1.   Ad. 50c
CASH PRIZES POR COSTUMES
ADDED  ATTRACTION
4 HOT SHOTS
World's Greatest Dane* Entertainers, now on
thalr way to Bollywood, to be featured In
Riidy Vallee'8 new picture, "Oold Diggers of
Paris," recently featured ln "Vogues of 1838."
Student Birdmen
Schedule Tourney
The U.B.C. Badminton tournament scheduled to start last Mon
day will definitely commence Mon
day, March 21, at 7.30 sharp if sufficient contestants turn out, according to Prexy Peggy McLeod. Otherwise the silver posts will be
placed in safekeeping and will see
the light of day one year hence.
The loeal birdmen have ahown
a great lack of enthualaam In the
tournament and unloaa more le
ahown tha eontoet will be cancelled.
NOTICE!
FIRST YEAR STUDENTS
USE SHURPASS NOTES
"Shurpau Students Excel"
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ST A_C Y'S LrD
1762 GRANVVILLE
Opp. Lyric Theatre
528 WEST HASTINGS
Opp. Spencer's
VARSITY CRICKETERS
TO ENTER LOCAL LOOP
MURAL CUP
RETAKEN BY
SCIENCE MEN
SCIENCE *40 WINS
With the possibility of their
being caught almost an impossibility, Science '40 seem* to have
the Governor's trophy tucked
away in some obscure lab for
another year. Arts '40 or '41 have
an outside chance of overtaking
them In the final event*, but
their chances are slim.
Fallowing is the standing of
the teama up to date:
Art* '41, 342 points; Science
'41, 190 points) Art* '40, S80
points; Science '40, 388 points;
Arts 'SB, 277 point*; Science '89,
141 pointa; Arts '98, 131 point*;
Science '38, 283 points; Aggie,
22; and last and least, Education,
43.
With only  Ave events left to be
run off, the Intramural program Is
about ready for the moth balls after one ot the most successful seasons in the history of the University.    This    program    which    has
brought out more class spirit this
semester than any previous policy
is   the   direct   result   of   Director
Maury   Van   Vllet  and   hla   'Mural
council, and lt is hoped that under
their tutelage the aport will grow
to even greater heights next year.
CHANCE POR TRACKSTERS
The   final   four   eventa   of   the
traok meet whloh had to be can-
called,    will    be    held    tomorrow
noon,  weather and  aueh   permitting.    All  olaaa  repa.  are aaked,
In faot they are ordered, by  Mr.
Van Vllet to be out at the track
tomorrow   to   dlaeuaa   aome   Important bualnaaa. Alao Pole Vault,
High   Hurdle  and   Dlatanoa  men,
are   requeatad   by   the  aforementioned   Mr.   Van   Vllet  to   get   In
touoh with  him or managar Bud
Burden with reapeot to the coming C.P.S. track meet.    Aa there
le  no  one  at  all  entered  In  the
flrat two of thoae, there la a real
opening for any aaplrlng athleteo.
CO-ED
SPORTS
By  MYRNE  NEVISON
In a hectic last period rally, the
Sophomores   came   from   behind   a
10-5   deficit   to   cop   the   lnter-class
basketbal  cup  17-10 from  the  Juniors.    Led by the stellar playing of
Hortense Warne who accounted for
8   points  in  the  second half  push,
the Sophs had lt all over the losers.
This   viotory   gave .the   Sopha
enough polnte to win the cup for
Intramural    aupremaey    for    the
whole year. The Freahettee came
aecond.     In   all,  the   Sopha   have
won the cupa for volleyball, baaketball   and   archery,   while   the
Freahettea  won   the   badminton.
The   Senior   B   hoopettes   proved
themselves   "above   Normal"   when
they defeated the teachers 21-17 in
their own gym, last week.
The Victoria Ladies will travel
over to the U.B.C. campus tomorrow to engage in a return game
with   tho  co-ed  hockeyists.
The collegians are anxious to
avenge their defeat at Victoria on
the Invasion, hut utiles a great
change comes over the coachless
coleglans, tho score will be about
7-1—not in their favor. In their
last few games the co-eds have
been displaying a very poor brand
of ball with everyone blaming each
other (instead of themselves) for
the  result.
The  game is  at 2.30 on  the University field out by the Aggie barns.
Basketballers, attention. Turn  in
strip at once.
NOTICE
A basketball meeting for all melon tossers of all calibres will be
held on Friday, March 25, at 12.15
noon in Arts 104. All interested
please  turn out.
Strong posalblllty that dreama
of a Varaity Cricket Team to
funotion thla eummer will oome
true, waa aeon following an enthu-
alaatlo meting held Tueeday noon
for the purpoae of organisation.
Although no definite decision has
yet been reached as to whether a
Blue and Oold entry will be seen
on local cricket fields thlB summer,
the cricketers lost no time In electing an executive to go ahead with
the work ot organization. Basil
Robinson, elected -President; Jack
Rush, Treasurer, and versatile
Frank Turner, Publicity Agent, are
all well known in sport circles and
played with top-flight clubs last season. Other officer* chosen by the
meeting were Eld Barton, who will
take the minutes, and Dr, Harry
Warren, Faculty Advisor,
WEONESOAY LEAGUE MOOTED
lt is thought, judging by the enthusiasm evinced by downtown cricket officials at the possibility ot a
University Club entry into a local
league, that little opposition will
be encountered provided the Campus cricketers can guarantee to
field a full team for every fixture
throughout the summer months.
No decision has yet been reached
on what league will be approached
tor entry, but both Wednesday and
Saturday officials have expressed
thetr willingness to co-operate with
any move towards the Inclusion ot
a  Blue  and  Oold  aggregation.
MEETING TUESDAY
The executive wishes to make lt
perfectly clear that it ls only
through the co-operation and aid
of every cricket enthusiast on the
campus that a team can be put ln
the field, and that lt ls up to each
of them to publicize the new plan.
This Is positively the last chance
that there ls to register as a member of the cricket club. You can
do it by getting in touch with Basil Robinson or Dr. Harry Warren,
or preferably by attending a meeting next Tuesday noon ln Arts 108.
choice of
the
majority
=s£.-    v» i * " _._....,<«tt*_U\VV__AVL-U-U-UH*ia*^'n
ot*
cot*"1*
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Varsity   Rowers
Saturday at 3 p.m. will see Varsity Seconds rowers whip over the
Coal Harbour course against Vancouver Rowing Club's aggregation.
Vowing to duplicate the senior's
victory   ln   Oregon,   U.B.C.   second
oars have been groomed for the
past two weeks under the watchful
coaching of Professor Frank Wilson.
NOTICE
Another Important Cricket meeting  wll   be  held   next   Tuesday  in
Arts 108 at 12.18 noon.    Crloket enthusiasts must be there en maaae.
U.B.C. Sport Stars
IN ACTION In the new
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CHECK SOME OF THESE AS  IS  BARGAINS!
'31 NASH 890 Sedan $350
'30 AUBURN 6 S.dan $250
'29 ESSEX Ssdan $195
'28 BUICK 6 Ssdan $125
MANY MORE LIKE THESE
4 NEW TIRES
NEW   BATTERY
ON EVERY
CERTIFIED CAR
BEGGS
THE      HOME      OF
CERTIFIED     CARS
1056 WEST GEORGIA
Sey. 3161 Open Evenings. Nite Phone: Sey. 3166 K
A    SAFE    PLACE    TO    BUY    USED    CARS
DISTRIBUTOR'S USED CAR BRANCH
Owned and operated by
Consolidated Motor Co. Ltd. Dan McLean Motor Co. Ltd.
ALMOST  NEW USED CARS
'37    Dodge    Custom    Sedan,
Radio, Heater $1035
'36 Dodge  D.L. Sedan, 8000
Miles $1035
'37 Ford Vict. Coupe, a beautiful car    $885
'37 Flying Standard De Luxe
Sedan      $885
'37 Graham Coupe, 5000
miles    $975
'36 Lincoln Zephyr, 18000
miles   $1075
'30 Ford Roadster  . .
'31  Durant Sedan   . .
'29 Buick Sedan	
'29 Chevrolet Sedan.
'29 Essex Sedan	
'29 Whippet Sad. (6)
'29 Nash Cab	
'27 Buick Sedan	
'27 Hup   Sedan	
Was
$245
$395
$265
$285
$235
$245
$295
$135
$195
WHY WALK?
Now
$195
$345
$185
$235
$165
$150
$235
$ 80
$125
'29 Nash Sedan     . .
'28 Velie Sedan   . . .
'29 Pontiae  Coach.
'31 Studebaker   . . .
*30 Nash	
'28   Hudson   	
'26 Willys-Knight  .
'29 Durant Sedan   .
'29 Franklin Sedan.
Was
$295
$195
$285
$485
$395
$225
$135
$335
$250
Now
$245
$145
$235
$425
$325
$145
$ 75
$265
$175
All Cars Have  1938 Licenses
OPEN EVENINGS
1015    GEORGIA    WEST
SEYMOUR 9085

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