UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Jan 9, 1919

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0124513.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0124513.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0124513-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0124513-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0124513-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0124513-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0124513-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0124513-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0124513-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0124513.ris

Full Text

 llbjjaafg
Issued Weekly by the Publications Board of the University of British Columbia
Volume I.
VANCOUVER,  B.C., JANUARY 9, 1919
Number  6
VARSITY  versus   VICTORIA
Rugby Ends In A Draw;  Victoria Wins Both Basketball Games
University Student
Passes Away
WELL-KNOWN   MEMBER   OF   SCIENCE   IS   VICTIM    OF
INFLUENZA
Among the first
victims of the' recent epidemic of influenza was Horace
Stedman of Science
'19, who, with his
mother and younger
brother, was taken
to hospital the week
before Christmas.
Circumstances had prevented young
Stedman from entering as he would
have liked into the social life of the
University. After a childhood which
had known nothing but plenty, he was
left in his early teens without resources
and with the responsibility of supporting a mother and two younger brothers.
Leaving England the little group started
to make a livelihood in the Okanagan
Valley, but soon found an opening in a
business firm of this city. His ability
was soon discovered by friends, and
Horace was led to resume his studies.
In the University his thorough work
won for him the high regard of all the
instructors.
Circumstances imposed on him severest limitations, but these were accepted
cheerfully. With rare highmindednes,s
he accepted what would have broken the
spirit of many a young fellow. His
modesty and self-forgetfulness concealed from all save a few intimate
friends the pain of his life. And even
his friends never knew him to complain
or    to    reveal   any   bitterness   over   the
(Continued on page 2)
STUDENTS    ENJOYABLY    ENTERTAINED IN THE CAPITAL
The invading rugby and basketball
players of the University drew one and
lost two of the three games played with
the Victoria teams on Saturday, December 21st. The Island aggregations were
victorious in both basketball games,
while the rugby match in the afternoon
resulted  in  a  scoreless  draw.
The U.B.C. party, numbering nearly
one hundred students and their friends,
arrived in Victoria on Saturday morning. The majority returned on the
afternoon boat on Sunday, while others
did not leave the capital until Monday
or Tuesday.
The rugby game was one of the hardest and cleanest played in Victoria this
year. Neither team was able to score,
though twenty minutes overtime was
played. Victoria pressed strongly during the first few minutes, but Varsity
defended well with good kicking. The
superiority of the Varsity scrum was
evident early in the game, when they
heeled the ball out almost every time.
But the defensive work of the Victoria
halves and the poor passing of the Varsity backs spoiled this advantage.
In the second half the play was almost
all in Victoria territory, but good tackling and kicking prevented any score.
The Victoria backs managed two or
three individual runs in this half, but
Kingham was there with the tackle at
the riarht moment. The game ended
with Vars:ty only a few yards from the
Victoria line. Don Morrison had bad
luck in the second period, when he was
brought down on the line. The Varsity
was short a man for a few minutes, when
Hugh Ross was carried off with cramps.
The fine work of Gwvther, the captain,
deserves  snecial  mention.
The University lined ut> as follows:
Forwards,    Gross,    de    Pencier,    Weld,
(Continued on Page 2)
The Second Debate:
Seniors Victorious
"Resolved that the Allied forces
should withdraw from Russia and
Siberia," was the subject of the debate
between the men of Arts '19 and '20 on
December  17th.
Mr. Hosang, the first speaker for the
affirmative, pointed out that fears were
awakened by rumors of a German-
Russian alliance, but now" that the Germans have been defeated that cannot
be given as an excuse for intervention
in Russia. Public opinion and Labor
interests are against the expedition. In.
closing, he stated that intervention, is
against self-determination and democ-!
racy, and now that peace has come is1
no longer justified. ,•
Mr. Adams, for the negative, con*-'
tended that the Allies can not withdravyi
without violating their promise to renU1
der military and economic aid. Withfj
drawal now would vindicate Bolshevistrjj
Under the present chaotic conditions i'lj
would be impossible for Russia to enfj
ter the proposed League of Nations, and
representative Russians have asked the
help of the Allies in reorganizing the;
country. ;j
Mr. Mahrer held that for the Allies tcj
interfere in Russia is against interna*
tional law and Wilson's principle of th
self-determination of nations. Allie
victory there does not necessarily en'*
sure improved economic conditions. Itt
conclusion, he repeated that public opinion is hostile to the expedition. •
Next, Mr. MacKinnon stated that the;
economic state of Russia requires Allied
assistance. There is no attempt to en-r
force law and order, while millions are
facing starvation.    We must help in the
(Continued, on.Page ,8)...,_:.-_. UBYSSEY
January   9,   1919
Great Demand for Efficient
Stenographers
START NOW
Take a Course at the Oldest and
Best Business College
Results count—all graduates
placed in good positions
The
PITMAN
Business College
Established 1898
422   RICHARDS   STREET
Phone, Seymour 9135
«
99
THE NIKKO
Japanese Silk Store
Headquarters for
Christmas and New Year Gifts
848 GRANVILLE STREET
Phone, Sey. 3507
Jfafiljtnn-(Kraft
FASHION-CRAFT
CLOTHES
are made not only to fill the needs
of mature men, but also special
care is taken to provide for the
young man, or youth, developing
into manhood
Prices   Moderate—Values  Positive
©boa* Jfaafrr $c (&n.
timttfu
514 GRANVILLE STREET
VANCOUVER, B.C.
VARSITY VS. VICTORIA
(Continued from Page 1)
Allardyce, Gunning, Swanson and Meeki-
son; halfbacks, Russell and Gwyther;
three quarters, Morrison, Broadfoot,
Ternan, Darts and Ross; full back,
Kingham.
The first basketball game was between
the University ladies' team and an all-
star Victoria quintette, the home players
winning twelve points to six. Play was
close in the first period, the score at
half time being four to nothing. The
Victoria ladies showed a better knowledge of the game than their opponents,
who lacked practice. The University
was represented by Misses D. Kerr, G.
Pedlow, M. Kilpatrick, B. Clement, E.
Eveleigh and K. Stewart.
In the second game the U.B.C. men
went down to defeat before the senior
team of the Victoria Y.M.C.A., the score
being 39 to 11. The Varsity players
only held one practice before the game,
and consequently were very weak in
team work. The baskets which were
scored were due more to individual effort than to combination. Fisher, with
six points, and Gross, with five, were the
University scorers. Art Lord refereed
both contests. The U.B.C. players
were: Guards, Andrews and Taylor;
centre, Gross; forwards, Fisher and S.
Anderson   (captain).
After the basketball games the visitors were entertained at an informal
dance in the ballroom of the Empress
Hotel, given in their honor by the Victoria and Island Athletic Association.
Blue and gold ribbon could be seen in
all parts of Victoria on the day of the
games, and the many who made the
trip  had  a very enjoyable  time.
UNIVERSITY STUDENT
PASSES AWAY
(Continued from page 1)
great disappointment which had come to
him. The loss of all early prospects did,
for a time indeed, make him scornful of
those formulas that may be regarded as
cheap, but patience and sympathy led
him to reaffirm the deepest convictions
about life.
Weakened by asthma he sank at once
under influenza, and two days before
Christmas he died. After the festival
representatives of the student body,
headed by the Deans of Faculty and
many members of the staff, united to
pay the last tribute to the memory of
one who had lived among us a brave,
simple life, determined to know what
was true and to do what was kind.
Phone, Seymour 1391
H. F. Storry & Co.
Tailors
650 Granville Street
Up Stairs
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Success Business
College
Limited
E.   SCOTT   BATON,
Principal
B.A.,
Corner Main Street and Tenth Avenue
VANCOUVER,   B.C.
Phone, Fairmont
2075
GIBSON STUDIO
Photographers
214-18   Blrks   Building
Phone, Sey. 3430 Vancouver,  B.C.
HARRISON   &  CO.
R. H.  SEABROOK, Prop.
Drawing    Instruments    and    Materials
Architects', Engineers' and Surveyors'
Supplies—Nautical   Instruments
and Charts
Telephone,  Seymour 5826
582 RICHARDS STREET
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Delicious Homemade Cakes
Served at
YE LITTLE BROWN INN
745  DUNSMUIR  STREET
(Around  the  corner  from  Drysdale's)
Luncheon, Afternoon Tea, Supper
License  No.   10-2636
YAMAT0
Direct  Importers  of
Japanese Silk and Fancy Goods
460 GRANVILLE STREET
VANCOUVER,  B.C.
Phone, Seymour 2288 January 9, 1919
UBYSSEY
Economy in Value
THE LATEST STYLES
THE BEST FABRICS
THE MOST REASONABLE  PRICES
are three distinct features of our
clothes
High-class  Furnishings  for Men
and  Young  Men
The  swellest  Ties  in  B.C.
The  JONAH PRAT  CO.
401    HASTINGS   ST.,   WEST
Wellington and Comox
COAL
The Best for Kitchen and
Furnace  Use
Macdonald, Marpole Co. Ltd.
Sole Agents
1001 MAIN  STREET
Phone, Seymour 210
A   SHOE   VALUE   NO
MAN SHOULD MISS
$5.95
Latest Styles.    Regular Values $8,
$10, $12
Including New York custom
grades, Regal, Slater and many
other well-known makes. Compare them with others. ' Remember, they are not seconds. You
can get all sizes in the lot. They
come in brown, mahogany, gun-
metal calf and vici kid leathers;
straight lace, button or blucher
style; English recede, medium and
full-fitting lasts, with military and
low heels. Sizes syi to 11; values
$8, $10 and $12. January sale
price  $5.95
DAVID SPENCER,
Limited
THE GREAT DISCOVERY
The following page from a notebook
was found in the hall of the Physics
building. Owner may receive same by
applying at editorial room. As two
editors have already left, suffering from
temporary insanity as a result of attempting to understand it, we publish
it, without revision, for the benefit of
the faculty and staff. The students are
asked not to read it, as it might do
them harm:
Shop Notes
Name — John Goethals Stevenson
Westinghouse   Edison   Morse   Smith.
Material—One   Ford  engine.
Tools—One steam hammer (pulverizer),  test-tube,  filter  paper.
Description—Adjust the engine on
the anvil so the spark-plug is over a
point whose co-ordinates are 3.4—the
carburetor. Turn the valve "V" through
(?) radians, permitting steam to pass
into the cylinder and expand idiomatically and causing the piston to describe simple harmonic compound motion around a common center. If the
solubility product of the undissociated
molecules is low, three or four strokes
of the differential will be sufficient to
reduce the magneto to a fine powder.
Collect the unconsumed residue and
treat as instructed on page 34562, Ball's
Chemical Reaction. Divide the quotient
by the square of the compression cubed
and the test will detect the gay youth
who stole the bus and went joy-riding.
Confirmatory test: Dissolve tonneau in
sulphuric acid and test for nitrate of
hairpins.
CPL. COFFIN, BEWARE!
Who is that man  with haughty mien,
With  ample  chest and  peanut  bean
And  movement  like  a   Ford  machine?
Why,  sonny,  that's  the  Sergeant.
Who's busy as a  bumblebee
To get you up at reveille,
And  shouts your name  in strident key?
Why,   bless  you,   that's   the   Sergeant.
Who   yells   "Right   dress!"   and   "Right
by  fours!"
And gets as mad as all  outdoors
And sends you out to do the chores?
You're   right,   that   is   the   Sergeant.
Who carries all the world's  disgrace,
Written  in furrows  on his  face,
And  looks  for trouble  every place?
Why,  that must be  the  Sergeant.
—From the New York Times.
Leckie Shoes
are   made   for   the   man   who   is
particular
Remember:   "The Quality goes in
before the Name goes on"
"That's a Leckie"
University Students
Who have time to spare
could make no better use of their
time than in the
Study of
SHORTHAND
It will be of untold advantage
to you in taking lecture notes.
Most great speakers and many
great writers are good shorthand
writers.
What about YOU?
Don't you think it would be
valuable to you also?
Enter any time—Day and Evening Sessions.
R. J. SPROTT, B.A.,
Manager.
Phone, Seymour 1911
"MIKADO"
Our Specialties:
Silks,  Kimonas, Ladles'  Wear
Made to Order
Opposite the Orpheum Theatre
766 Gran villi St. Vancouver, B.C.
Don't Forget to
Buy a Song Book! UBYSSEY
January  9,  1919
29th ANNIVERSARY
SALE
Clubb & Stewart
Limited
309 td 315  Hastings  Street, West
are   offering   some   great   bargains
in Men's and Young Men's  Suits
and  Overcoats.
They   are   great   values   as   prices
go  today.
BOYS'    DEPARTMENT
Great bargains are being offered in
Boys'  Coats,  Overcoats and Suits.
Phone, Sey. 8380
The
Northern Life Assurance
Company of Canada
is a good  Company to Insure with
Granville Stationery Co.,
Limited
540  GRANVILLE  STREET
Books,   Stationery,   Toys,   Photo
Supplies
Developing,   Finishing   and   Enlarging
The Canadian Bank of
Commerce
Capital   -   -   -   $15,000,000
Reserve  -    -    -    $13,500,000
THRIFT AND  SECURITY
Open a  Savings  Account  with The
Canadian Bank of Commerce.   If more
convenient,   accounts   may   be   opened
and deposits made by mail.
Ten Branches in Vancouver District,
including the  following,  which are in
the vicinity of the University:
Falrvlew—Corner   Sixth   Avenue   and
Granville
Kltsllano—Corner Fourth Avenue and
r     Yew Street
Mount   Pleasant—Corner   Eighth   Ave.
and Main Street
UBYSSEY
Issued    every    Thursday    by    the    Publications
Board  of the   University  of  British   Columbia.
Extra  mural   subscriptions,   $2.00   per   session.
For   advertising   rates,   apply   Advertising   Manager.
EDITORIAL STAFF:
{Miss  M.  Browne
Miss  P.  Smith
R.   Adams
Editor-in-Chief I.   A.   Shaw
Senior    Editor A.    Rive
Chief   Reporter R.   Cribb
Military   Editor C.    P.    Leckie
Exchange   Editor Miss   A.   Urc
BUSINESS STAFF:
Business   Manager W.   J.   AUardyce
Advertising   Manager J.   Wells
Circulation   Manager J.   G.   Fraser
Editor for  Week Miss   P.   Smith
THE SPRING PLAY
We note with more disgust than surprise that the Players' Club has chosen
for the spring play "The Importance of
Being Earnest," by Oscar Wilde. It
does seem extraordinary that from the
vast army of playwrights, ancient and
modern, Oscar Wilde should be the one
favored by the executive of this club;
but it is the play itself more than its
writer  that  meets  with  our  disapproval.
It would seem fitting indeed that
an organization of University students,
enjoying the broadening process of
"higher education," should endeavor to
stand for the moral as well as the
merely intellectual qualities in the
plays with which the University name
must be associated by the general
public.
That "The Importance of Being
Earnest" is of excellent literary merit
and that many of its lines are, in their
paradoxical form, brilliantly clever, few
will deny; but still fewer dare affirm
that this play is more than a mere bauble
to tickle the fancy of "Society," and to
provoke laughter among those who
would otherwise be really enjoying
themselves at a cabaret. The better
element of the Players' Club audiences
is present entirely because of the college name and associations.
The tone of the play is piffling and
cynical, as the mind of its author, and
out of harmony with fundamental truth.
Its author saw only the tawdry veneer of
civilization, and he has described characters whose manner of living is unworthy of attention and beneath contempt.
This farce may possibly prove amusing, but so may the efforts of sensational
"artists"  on  the   Pantages   circuit.
The same remarks may be applied
with a fair amount of accuracy to the
plays  previously produced  by  the  club.
There was no value in "Fanny and the
Servant Problem." "Merely Mary Ann"
was rather pretty with a touch of pathos,
but the situations and atmosphere of
"Alice-Sit-by-thc-Fire" rendered it absolutely unsuitable for a college play.
We do not wish to be put on record
as believing that amateurs should confine themselves to rather painful renderings of the works of the Bard of Avon
or resurrections of ancient Greek
dramas, although such would be preferable to the trash that is being presented
at present. With all the plays of all the
ages before us, is it impossible to choose
one within the capabilities of college
students which possesses literary and
artistic qualities and which at the same
time embodies within itself a healthy
moral tone?
Let us hope then that the next dramatic effort of the students of this University will be of such a stamp that the
audience may leave the theatre with a
fair measure of satisfaction and at least
one thought as a reward for their
evening's patience.
I. A. S.
CORRESPONDENCE
(The  Editors accept no responsibility for statements made in this column.)
Vancouver,   Jan.   6,   1919.
Editor   UBYSSEY,
Dear Sir: The results of the games at Victoria show clearly that this University will never
stand in the front ranks of athletics in this province unless something is done to make the different branches of sport more easily available to
the students. Under present conditions it is almost impossible to produce a team of any kind
which would do the University credit. We have
the material for the teams, but we have not the
means for developing that material. How many
more years are we going to carry on without a
gymnasium? There are over 500 students in this
University now; and next year we can count on
having well over 600, a good many of whom
will be returned men. Are we going to tell
these men that the only form of exercise under
the University name is forming fours with the
O.T.C.?
And that brings me to another question. Now
that the war is over, why should the O.T.C. need
to carry on its activities? It was very necessary during the war, but why should it continue to be compulsory when it is objectionable
to so many students and, as a consequence, does
so little good? If this University continues under its present policy, it is working contrary to
the fundamental principles of a democratic institution. A true education develops individual
tanking and does not compel conformity to
activities with which we are not in sympathy.
All this being true it is of vital importance
that steps be taken as soon as possible to ensure
greater freedom in individual endeavour. And
one step toward this would be to abolish compulsory drill and make provision in the time
table  for  athletics.    Yours,   etc.,
Penner.
(Continued on Page 5) January 9, 1919
UBYSSEY
The Art of Speaking
Debates, Speeches,  Play-parts,
Recitations  Coached
Special   rate   on   single   lessons   to
U.B.C.  Students
HELEN BADGLEY
Suite 23, 709  Dunsmuir Street
Phone,  Sey.  6535Y
Mrs. A. L. Richardson,
L. R. A. M.
Pupil of Tobias Matthay
Formerly    Professor    of    Piano    and
Lecturer at  McGill  University,  Montreal,  and   Midland  Institute,   Birmingham,  England.
Studio,   709   Georgia   Street,   West
Phone, Seymour 8519L
VIOLONCELLO
MISS MAUDE SCRUBY
A.R.C.M.,  L.R.A.M.
Receives Pupils, Ensemble Classes,
Concerts, Recitals. Visits Vancouver weekly  (Tuesdays).
Stud'o:  709 Georgia Street
Telephone, Bay. 189
CUSICK
SERVES   GOOD   EATS
692 BROADWAY,  WEST
VANCOUVER,  B.C.
Photography        Kodaks
Developing and  Printing
Pictures and  Frames
CAMERA   AND   ARTS
610  GRANVILLE  STREET
R.   P.   DUNNE,   Mgr.
LUXENBERG
Importer
Ladies'  Exclusive Garments
Our   Prices  are   Moderate  for
Quality Shown
Phone, Seymour 1593
629 Granville St., Vancouver, B.C.
We Specialize in
GLOVES
DENTS       FOWNES
PERRINS
Ladies' and Men's
E. CHAPMAN
545 Granville Street
CORRESPONDENCE
(Continued from P.age 4)
Editor   UBYSSEY:
It was with great pleasure that I learned, some
few days ago, that women were to be excluded
from the meetings of the Men's Lit. I now understand that this only applies to debates. Why,
oh why, can't women be excluded from all the
activities about the college that are primarily for
men? It seems, in this western country, we
have to put up with co-education, but why
should we allow so many of our societies to be
diluted with the weaker sex. I have no objection to women in "higher education," though it
is just possible that they are playing with fire;
but now having lowered the academic standard
for their benefit, certain students would prevent
us   raising   the   Men's   Lit.   above   the   feminine
level. T ,„
L Homme   Indigue.
Dear   Editor:
Just    one    question.       Why    not    abolish
O.T.C.  in favor of compulsory athletics?
Abou   Turren.
the
THE OLD GRIEVANCE
At the risk of offending our readers'
sensibilities by continual repetition, we
would like to mention yet again the
need for increased athletic facilities for
the University. The results of the
basketball games played against Victoria
show that a proper gymnasium is one
of the first requisites for successful practice. The limitations imposed upon
shooting and passing by the size of the
King Edward gymnasium were greatly
to blame for the victory of the Victoria
teams, which have had excellent opportunities for practice in large halls. We
are all proud of the pluck and skill the
Varsity players showed in the games,
and we hope that by next year the handicap imposed by the lack of a good
gymnasium  will  have  been  removed.
ARTS MEN'S DANCE
The annual dance given by the Arts
men will be held on Friday of this week
in the University Auditorium. An enjoyable evening for everyone is assured.
There is no better music in town than
that which will be supplied by the five-
piece orchestra in attendance. The
necessary stimulus to spontaneous and
harmonious action will unquestionably
be of the highest order. Light refreshments will be served during a brief re-
snite. The charge for college students
is Pity cents: for outside couples, $1.50.
Every loyal student should support
this annual function with a rare and unusual enthusiasm. It is always considered one of the outstanding student
affairs ef the college session. Let this
one be no excention. Enter into the
student life of 1019 whole heartedlv by
attending the dance Friday evening.
You will enioy it. There can be no alternative—be there.
FOR CLASSY SWEETS
AND   DAINTY   EATS
Give
THE ARBOR
the  "Once  Over"
779 GRANVILLE STREET
T^EEP   the   happy   memories   of
College days for all time.
Bridgman s Studio
will   help   you    with    pictures    of
established reputation
At  the  same address:
413 GRANVILLE STREET
The
Clarke & Stuart Co.
Limited
Commercial  Stationers   and   Printers
Students'  Loose-Leaf  Binders
Educational Stationery
School  Equipment
Drawing   Instruments   and   Materials
320  SEYMOUR  STREET
(Opposite  C.P.R.   Depot)
Vancouver, B.C.
Fresh  Cut  Flowers
Funeral   Work  a   Specialty
Brown Bros. & Co. Ltd.
Florists, Nurserymen
and Seedsmen
TWO STORES
Head   Office:
48   HASTINGS   STREET,   EAST
VANCOUVER,  B.C.
Phone, Sey. 988 and 672
728   GRANVILLE   STREET
Phone,  Sey. 9513 UBYSSEY
January  9,   1919
WISE     YOUNG     MEN   AND     WOMEN
Secure Life Assurance  Protection  Early in  Life
Apply for Yours in  Canada's Largest Life Company
Talk with  Macfadyen!
SUN LIFE ASSURANCE CO.
Rogers Building, Vancouver, B.C.
Next  Time
TRY THE BUNGALOW
For   Light   Refreshments,
Ice   Cream   and   Candies
at
774 Granville  Street
E. C. KILBY
The Hosiery Specialist
628 Granville Street
VANCOUVER, B.C.
EXCLUSIVE
COSTUMIERES
For  Women,  Misses  and  Children
LIMITED
575 GRANVILLE STREET
R.£.Purdy,Dd.
Famous Chocolates
and
Home-Made Candies
Afternoon Teas and Light Lunches
Ice Cream and Drinks of all kinds
675   GRANVILLE   STREET
DRAMA NOTES
Faust is by far the most popular of
the operas which are to be produced
here at the end of the month by the
San Carlo Opera Company. The libretto is a dramatization of Goethe's work,
but the real charm of the opera lies in
the music. The principal numbers are
the Students' Chorus and the famous
Faust waltz of Act 2, the Flower Song,
Faust's aria, "All Hail Thou Dwelling
Pure and Lowly," the Jewel Song, and
the final duet between Faust and Mar-
gherita of Act 3, the Soldiers' Chorus
of Act 4, and the Prison Scene of Act 5.
The only opera of Mascagni's which
has achieved any fame is "Cavaliera
Rusticana," and the same is true of
Leoncavallo's "Pagliacci." It has become customary to produce these two
operas together, but it is probable that
the San Carlo Company will produce
"The Secret of Suzanne" in place of
"Cavaliera   Rusticana."
"The Secret of Suzanne" is an intermezzo in one act by Wolf-Ferrari. The
story centers around a young wife who
attempts to conceal from her husband
the fact that she smokes cigarettes.
Many complications result, but everything ends  happily.
In contrast to this light opera we have
the tragedy of Pagliacci, in which two
deaths take place. The chief features of
this opera are the expositary prologue
and the play within a play. The story
deals with the actions of a faithless wife
and a jealous husband, but, like the
great majority of grand operas, Pagliacci has survived solely on account of
its music.
It is impossible for the San Carlo, or
any other company, to be an entirely
all-star organization, but it is as good
a company as the public will support.
A few years ago an attempt was made
to give the people opera on a really
first-class scale, but even Vancouver, in
the height of its prosperity, helped to
bring about' the failure of the Quinlan
Opera Company. If we want opera,
then we must pay for it; and the surest
way to ensure future operatic productions here or anywhere else is to give
the San Carlo Company our hearty and
generous   support.
THE VICTOR
There came to a seaside town in Southern France
A man of plain attire,  disguised in rank;
And in the cool shade, when the daylight sank,
A   boy,   who   had   been   playing   with   sword   and
lance,
Came and sat by him, knowing not that here
Was   France's  greatest  marshal—commander when
The  German hordes,  plunging in mad career,
Were  swept  to  defeat  by  Honour's  fearless men.
The boy talked, and found the stranger wise
In lore of war and tales that thrill young ears.
Then suddenly he spread a portrait wide.
And,   fixing the  marshal with  his  knowing eyes.
Cried:    "The  victor  in  disguise!    The  victor   in
disguise!"
But   the   marshal   said:    "Not  victor,   only  guide."
R.   F. A.
MUSICAL NOTES
A College Without a  College  Song
Did it ever occur to you that the
University of British Columbia has no
distinctive   college   song?
We have a yell that has been heard
over the continent and in Europe—but
no song which we can call our own.
In most universities each year has its
own class song, while we have not even
one for the whole college! Surely it is
about time we were waking up.
One does not necessarily have to be
a poet to write words for a college
song. "It is up to you" to sustain the
honor  of  the   U.B.C.
If anyone is inspired to write the
words, the Musical, Society will promise that suitable music will be written
for them.
Act I. Victoria, 9 a.m., Saturday.
Cafe—
Allardyce:  "Coffee,  please."
Murphy: "I don't drink tea or coffee.
I'll have a glass of milk, please."
Act   II.    Ditto.    1   p.m.    Cafe—
Allardyce: "Coffee, please. And bring
this   guy   his   bottle."
Van Wilby: "Peardon!  Oh,  Peardon!"
Peardon:  "What  d'  you  want?"
Van   Wilby:   "There's   a   girl   in   the
hall  wants  to  speak  to  you."
Peardon:    "What's    the    matter    with
her?"
You   can  always  tell  a  Senior,
For   he's   sedately   gowned;
You   can  always  tell  a  Junior,
By  the  way  he  struts  around;
You can always tell a Freshie,
By his verdant looks and  such;
You can always tell a Sophomore,
But  you  can't  tell  him much. January 9, 1919
UBYSSEY
SHIRTS
FOR EVERY PURPOSE
FOR EVERY PERSONALITY
FOR EVERY PURSE
New weaves
And colors
$1.50 to $12
Potts vS Small
'LIMITED
#or. Granville and Pender
SEY. 1643
Branch Stores:
57 Hastings Street, West
Phone,  Sey. 2313
932 Granville Street
Phone, Sey. 8723
Victoria Branch:
1232 Government Street
Phone 4742
U.Morimoto&Co.
Direct Importers of
Japanese Fancy Goods
Ladies' Wear Made Special to
Order
Hemstitching by Measure
Manufacturers of
"Bamboo  Knitting  Needles"
Main Store:
673 GRANVILLE STREET
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Phone, Seymour 6410
Y.M.C.A.
The last meeting of the Y.M.C.A. was
held on December 19, when the Rev.
Mr. Agabob took for his subject "Tuum
Est." The great need of the present
day, said the speaker, was for men of
firm purpose and strong character. The
meeting was  well  attended.
ORATORICAL CONTEST
The annual Oratorical Contest will be
held on January 17. Entries may be
made to any member of the Men's Lit.
Executive and should be in before the
end of this we.ek. Last year's contest
was a success in every way. How about
this  year?    "Tuum  est."
CLASS- NOTES
The Women's Executive of Arts '22
spent a most enjoyable afternoon during
the holidays at the home of Mrs. B. S.
Clarke, who is honorary president of
the   Freshettes.
WOMEN'S LITERARY
SOCIETY
A meeting of the Women's Literary
Society was held on Wednesday, December 18th, when a most interesting-
address was delivered on the Holy Land
by Mr. Munnings, who has worked
amongst  the  natives  of  Palestine.
Lantern slides of historic scenes
added greatly to the enjoyment of a
subject which has always possessed a
peculiar fascination for the minds of
Christian  nations.
The speaker told of the special attraction that Palestine now offers for British
subjects since the country has come under British protection and the tyrannic
rule of the Turk has been at last suppressed.
Pictures were shown of the beautiful
and historic city of Damascus, of Bethlehem, Baalbek xand the Mohammedan
city of Beyrout.
ARTS '22
At a meeting of the women of Arts
'22, on Monday, 16th, Miss Nora Willis
was elected vice-president, in place of
Miss Clara Le Mcssurier, whose health
was impaired during the recent epidemic.
Owing to  printers'  strike,  publication
of "Ubyssey" has been delayed.
Exclusive Styles
in
for
Young men and
Young oiotnen
nplIE  NEW STYLES IN  FALL
AND WINTER FOOTWEAR
are  certainly  handsome.
For the young woman, the new
military heel boot, with cloth or
buck tops, in colors of brown,
grey, or black.
For the young man, the new
shades of tan, with leather or
Neolin soles; also smart styles in
black.
We have an Expert Fitting
Service.
Ingledew
Shoe Co,
666 Granville Street
"Vancouver's   Smartest   Shoe
Store" UBYSSEY
January  9,   1919
OVERCOATS
The largest, the best, the
most complete stock in
Western Canada.
Smart  and  snappy  models.
Best quality mate-'als.
Overcoat   values   that   can't   be
equalled  elsewhere.
$25 to $45
Our guarantee—-Your Money's
Worth or Your Money Back—on
every sale.
WILLIAM DICK
Limited
33 - 49 Hastings, East
Vancouver, B. C.
UNIVERSITY
STUDENTS
—should be Interested in "The Store
of the Christmas Spirit" at this holiday season, where the treasures of the
world, specially selected for Christmas
Gifts, are on display—
DIAMONDS, JEWELRY, WATCHES,
LEATHER GOODS, FRENCH IVORY,
CUT GLASS, TOILET ACCESSORIES, SILVER-PLATED WARES, etc.
Delighted to see you at any time.
O. B. ALLAN
"The  House of  Diamonds"
480-486    GRANVILLE    STREET
(Corner Pender)
DRIVE AWAY
THE CHILLS
with a portable Electric Radiator
—ready for instant use in bath or
bedroom, wherever there is a light
socket.
A few minutes' use will send away the
chill of morning or evening and ward
off colds or influenza. You cannot
afford to be without one.
B.C. Electric
Carrall and Hastings
1138 Granville
SCIENCE
The resumption of hostilities after an
agreeable armistice of two weeks did
not seem to agree with the inhabitants
of the Science Building. However, the
spark of gaiety and life has not been
totally extinguished, and really, truly
we are going to begin something in the
near future. As soon as the time table
is rearranged a little every man in
Science—old and young alike, the lame,
the halt and the blind, the tall and the
short, the weak-kneed, the four-eyed,
the boneheads and the geniuses—will
turn out on the field for soccer or other
athletics. Dominoes, chess and the like
will be banished forever; and nothing
but vigorous, manly sports will be indulged in. This will be compulsory,
too.    Hurrah  for  the  open  air!
THE SECOND DEBATE
(Continued from  Page 1)
establishment of a stable, popular government to replace the present tyranny
of a minority.
The verdict of the judges was in favor
of  the affirmative.
MCDONALD'S
CHOCOLATES
For   Birthday  Gifts
Granville  Street Near Robson
A  FOREGONE  CONCLUSION
Professor: "If a farmer sold 1,479
bushels of wheat for $2.10 a bushel, what
would he get?"
Student: "An automobile."—"The
Varsity."
MEET   ME   AT
The Chocolate Shop
When you go down town shopping,
don't forget to get Hot Chocolate, Hot
Lunches, Afternoon Tea and Homemade Chocolates at The Chocolate
Shop.
When men are friends, there is no
need of justice; but when they are
just,  they still need friendship.
435 Granville Street
Phone, Seymour 3345
ORATORICAL CONTEST
JANUARY 17th
The Great-West Life
Assurance Co.
HEAD    OFFICE:    WINNIPEG,    MAN.
Assets,  December 31st,  1917,
Over 24 Millions
As soon as possible every young
man should create an estate by purchasing a life insurance policy.
Investigate the merits of The Great-
West Life, and it will not be necessary to seek  information elsewhere.
Inquire at
640 HASTINGS STREET, WEST
Branch Office for B.C.
Remodelling; Skins Tanned
FURS
A  SEALSKIN   COAT   or   a   fur
piece made up by us is a thing
of beauty.
H.  E.  TAYLOR
Repairs
508   DUNSMUIR   STREET
Phone, Sey. 4891
WELL-PRINTED
STATIONERY
Means Everything
to Your
Business Success
Get   Your   Next   Supply
from the Pioneer
Printing House
EVANS & HASTINGS
PRINTING   COMPANY
578 SEYMOUR STREET
Phone, Sey. 189     Vancouver, B.C.
None  but  Union   Mechanic*   Employed

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0124513/manifest

Comment

Related Items