UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey May 14, 1956

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0124499.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0124499.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0124499-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0124499-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0124499-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0124499-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0124499-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0124499-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0124499-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0124499.ris

Full Text

 TO PACE ENROLMENT
v.
Buildings, Courses, Mushroom
To keep pace with mushrooming enrollment, UBC
Administration officials have
announced many extensions of
facilities and course changes
in recent months.
Here is a review of Administration plans designed to
handle the influx of new
students over the next decade:
Buildings are the most pressing need, and last year's
$10,000,000 Provincial grant
has already resulted in a flurry
of campus building.
A new Arts building, to be
erected West of the Women's
Gymnasium, will provide a
long-needed home for Artsmen
of all stripes. Construction
will start this year.
OLD PROBLEM
Another old problem, student
housing, will be alleviated
next year with the construction
of badly-needed dormitories*
near the Fraser River Model
on the West Mall. The living
units will be clustered around
a central dining-and-recreatlon
hall, to permit future expansion.
Already under construction
is the new Education Building
on the site of the main student
parking lot. The rough-and-
ready structure will be ready
for an influx of teachers-to-be
next Fall.
BUS STOP
Housing a cafeteria, post
office and bookstore is the
already-completed Bus Stop
Building on the Main Mall. The
building provides valuable
lebensraum for an expanding
University, but an important
feature has been neglected;
there are no restrooms.
Nearing completion at the
site of Vancouver General Hospital is UBC's new Clinical
Sciences Building, which will
house laboratories and other
medical research facilities.
OFF HOURS
For students' off-hours activities,   next   year   will   see    a
$300,000 extension to Brock
Hall, to house club rooms and
recreational facilities. The project will be financed by
students themselves, who voted
to transfer the $5 per-capita
they now pay on the War
Memorial, Gymnasium debt to
the Brock addition.
Home for UBC's budding
Medical School will be the
huge Medical Sciences Building, to be erected next year—
maybe—on University Boulevard, near the Biological
Sciences Building.
The University's academic
program is being extended
yearly, to meet expanding
needs. This year, main change
was the formation of the
College of Education on the
campus. The College will provide a complete training-ground
for future teachers.
SPLIT-UP
Splitting-up of the Social
Sciences Department into two
separate   departments,   under
Dr. Harry B. Hawthorn and
John James Deutsch, constitute a significant organizational
change, indicating the increasing emphasis being placed
on Anthropology, Political
Science, Sociology, Criminology and Economics.
Institution of a Department
of Romance Studies which will
teach French, Spanish and
Italian is another link in the
University's expanding highway program.
Reflecting the growing importance of Asia in the world
today is the formation of a
Department of Asia Studies at
UBC, under Professor F. H.
Soward. The Department will
study the culture, history and
international relations of the
Asian countries.
DENTISTRY
Still under study is a Faculty of Dentistry at UBC. A
report by dental school expert
John J. MacDonald has been
filed with the University
Senate, blueprinting in detail
the formation of a Dental
Faculty here. The project is
high on the Administration's
priority list.
Subject to strong pressure by
outside cultural groups, UBC
Administration officials are
studying the formation of a
School of Music at UBC. Spurred on by the Community Arts
Council and various individuals, sources say the School
should become a reality within
at least two years.
THEOLOGICAL HOPES
A Roman Catholic religious
College, St. Marks, will be
built near Anglican Theological
College next year to offer
Catholic religious instruction.
Under Father J. L. Carr, the
College will supplement the
University's religious instruction program.
Still campaigning for building funds, however, is the
Presbyterian Synod, which
hopes to "colonize" at UBC
as soon as funds become available.
THE  UBYSSEY
VANCOUVER, B. C, MONDAY, MAY 14, 1956
Number 67
KEITH YATES
Governor   General   Medal
Goes   to   Pharmacist
A twenty-seven-year-old pharmacist has won the Governor General's Gold Medal for the 1956 UBC graduating
class.
Keith Yates, of 2684 Burlington Avenue, Burnaby, was not
aware that he had won the
award until a downtown newspaper phoned to get a story on
him.
He is now doing research
in tho UBC lab. i m.ler a gra;>i
given him by tho !'• ..-search Council o^ Canada. Ha hopes to complete the work for his Masters
degree in September, and than
work towards a Ph.D.. either at
UBC   or   an   Eastern   Canadian
(Continued  on Page  13)
See  GOV.   GENERAL   MEDAi. *
938 Grads Receive
Degrees, Diplomas
Degrees and diplomas will be conferred
ish Columbia during the two-day  1956 Spring
The colorful ceremonies opening Monday
awards made by eleven faculties, the school of
GRAD CLASS
1956 EXECUTIVE
Honorary President: Dean
Henry F. Angus.
Honorary Vice - President:
Dean Myron M. Weav<:.
President:   Bruce  Williams.
Vice-President: K n r. e t h
Fawcus.
Secretary:   Joa:   Mclvor.
Treasurer:   Ke :neih Smith.
Social Convener: Lilian
Marshall.
They Get
Honorary
Degrees
Five noted British Columbians
and the principal of McGill University are receiving honorary
degrees here today and tomorrow.
Today, honorary Doctor of
Laws degrees go to: Dr. Cyril
James, principal and vice-chancellor of McGill University;
Dean Henry F. Angus: and Miss
Jessie L. McLenaghen. Degrees
in Arts, Social Work, Home
Economics and Pharmacy will
be conferred today.
TUESDAY'S DEGREES
Dr. H. J. MacLeod, former
UBC engineering Dean, and two
local engineers, Col. W. G. Swan
and Mr. Thomas Ingledow, will
be granted honorary Doctor of
Science degrees here tomorrow.
Dean Angus wil deliver the
Convocation Address in the
Armouries here this afternoon,
and Dr. MacLeod will deliver
tho address to stjdents gradual iim tomorrow.
TINTH DEGREE
'i.-day's honorary LL.D is Dr.
Cyril James' tenth.   He is noted
for his work in economics, banking,  shin-building and shipping.
Miss McLenaghen has pioneer-
(Continued   on   Page   12)
See HONORARY DEGREES
DEAN   HENRY   F.   ANGUS.
retiring Dean of Graduates
Studies gives the graduating
address Monday, May 14 it.
the Armouries. He receives
the honorary degree of Doctor of Laws.
DR. H. J. MacLEOD. former
UBC Dean of Applied Science,
will address graduates yn
Tuesday Dr. MacLeod will
receive the honorary degree
of Doctor of Science,
upon 938 graduates of the University of Brit-
Convocation in the University Armouries,
and   continuing   through   Tuesday,   include
education (teacher-training), and the faculty
'-"of graduate studies.
Among the undergraduate fa
culties offering degrees are Agri
culture, Applied Science, Arts.
Architectural, Law, Medicine
Pharmacy, Physical Education
Home Economics, Comerce, anc
Education.
Doctorates will be awardei
in Philosophy to tweleve gradu
ates, and masters' decrees to 2(
arts scholars, 11 sciencemen, If
applied sciencemen, 5 agricul
turists, one forestry student, anc,
one   business   administrator.
HONORARY DEGREES
Today, the first day of the con
vocation, honorary doctor o
Laws degrees were granted Dr
Cyril James, principal and vie
chancellor of McGill University
retiring Dean F. Angus, an;
Home Economics pioneer Mi^
Jessie  I.   McLenaghen.
Dea:     Angus    delivered    th-
Congr  .atior  Address while d
grecs in Art-  social Work, Horn:
Economics   ,    I  Pharmacy wer>
conferred.
Three   f a*her   honorary   d ■
grees  will  be  granted  Tuesday
to former UBC Dean of Appli-
Science Dr.  MacLeod;  and twi
distinguished    local    engineer-
Col. W. G. Swan and Mr. Thorn
Ingledow. These degrees will !.•.
in the form of Doctorates of Si-
encc.  Br.  MacLeod will deliv ■
the address lo students gradua'
ing   May   15.
(Continued  on Page 9)
See AWARD WINNERS THE UBYSSEY
Monday, May 14, 1956
THE UBYSSEY
Authorized ai second class mall, Post Office Department,
Ottawa.
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Student subscriptions $1.20 per year (Included ln AMS fees). Mall
subscriptions $2.00 per year. Single copies five cents. Published
In Vancouver throughout the University year by the Student
Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society, University of
British Columbia. Editorial opinions expressed herein are those
of the editorial staff of the Ubyssey, and not necessarily those of
the Alma Mater Society or the University. Letters to the Editor
should; not be more than 150 words. The Ubyssey reserves the right
to cut letters, and cannot guarantee publication of all letters
received. — i
Editor-in-Chief Sandy Ross
Managing Editor   Pat Russell
Business Manager  Harry Yuill
Reporters and Desk   Marilyn Smith. Dave Terry
4FOTHERINGHAM RETURNS
Responsibility
When we leave university, it's hard not to be nostalgic;
for graduation is a time when mothers sniffle, dads beam, and
the mortar-bored graduates crane their necks and look at each
other's faces, and think back on the past four years and wonder
what's going to happen next. It's a time when even the most
cynical among us have to steel ourselves to hide the lumps
in our throats.
We all know what the university has meant to us in the
past four years; but we won't bother to enumerate all the
happy memories, rosy though they may be. We hope we've
all emerged as relatively competent, decent people, because
that's what the university was really trying to teach us.
We're on our own now, and whatever we did or didn't
do is all behind us. Our formal education is completed, and
now we begin to learn and work and live in earnest.
But although our undergraduate days are behind us, the
university itself still goes on. For the rest of our lives, this
institution will affect us, in ways more devious and far-reaching than we may ever know. And it might be pertinent for us
all to think a little about this university of ours, and about
our responsibility to it in the years to come.
U.B.C. IDEAL?
Ideally, the university is what one educator has described
as the "institutional embodiment of man's desire for knowledge". It should serve society at large by acting as a semi-
public corporation that creates and disseminates society's
most vital commodity, ideas.
Happily, UBC hues pretty closely to this ideal, thanks
mainly to an enlightened administration that takes a very real
and personal interest in preserving the tradition of academic
freedom. In an age when many university administrations find
it difficult to see any further than next year's government
grant, we graduates should make it our business to guard
against encroachments on that freedom.
In addition to the university's core, its liberal arts program^ there is its trade-school aspect to consider. Many
observers fear that the increasing emphasis on Engineering,
Commerce, Law, and the other "practical" disciplines is subverting the university's true function. In our opinion, there
is a greater danger of their being neglected; we are now
engaged in a cold war where technicians are the soldiers. And
although the technicians and specialists will never inherit the
earth, they must be allowed to continue their efforts. And it
is the university's responsibility to see that they do. Of course
the "impractical" disciplines must be preserved and extended
in the same way at the same rate too, unless we wish to inherit
a world where gadgets, not ideas, provide its justification.
WORLD NEEDS EDUCATION
All this can be stated very simply: The world needs more
education, and the university must be enabled to provide it.
Thurs, as graduates who have suddenly become citizens, we
have inherited a responsibility to the university which we
should shoulder for the rest of our lives; we must make it
our business to see that our university is kept free and flourishing and productive.
As people with votes and influence and moral force, we
must use whatever power we have to see that the university
is not hamstrung by the politicians, or starved by a lack of
funds. We must look to its welfare, as the university looks to
ours.
And that, even more than the backslapping at homecoming or the paying of Alumni dues, is our real responsibility to
the university which we are rather sadly leaving today.
Old Grad Tells How
Grads Really Are
(Editor's Not*: Now in the
Autumn of his years, misty-
eyed Alumni and former
Ubyssey Editor Alan Fother-
Ingham tells how it feels to
graduate. He very coyly uses
the name Newton J. McSlurp
in his little piece.)
Newton J. McSlurp uneasily
shifted from one foot to the
other, tried to brush the beer
stain from the lapel of his blue
serge suit and glanced up the
to the stage where Dr. MacKenzie was already handing
out the sheepskins.
"Just a few more minutes,"
thought Newt, "ten more minutes and I'll be educated."
It was really amazing when
you think of it, that a student
of McSlurp's mental abilities
had earned his degree in such
a short time. Newt thought
back to 1946 when he had enrolled as a freshman. And here
it was only 1954 and he was
receiving his B.A. already.
Wonderful how they can speed
up education these days, he
thought, scuffing his shoes
against the armouries' beautiful dancing floor to give himself that required scruffy destitute look which any truly educated person should have.
McSlurp, his bloodshot eyes
half closed, thought back to
his years on the campus—the
departure of the last of the
vets, the building of the gym,
the promise of the bowling alleys, the terrible Fort Camp
food, the bodies in the library,
the typographical errors in The
Ubyssey, the Ostrom Plan, the
terrible Fort Camp food, the
decise of the Jokers Club, the
coming and going of football
coaches, the Les Armour-Council duels, the terrible Fort
Camp food, Bellingham invasions, Homecoming parades,
the fraternity discrimination
fights, nights under the table
at the Georgia, nights on top
of the table at the Commodore,
the gradual thickening of engineers' skulls, the terrible Fort
Camp food, St. Paul's nurses,
St. Paul's night watchman, the
swimming pool, the effigy-burning, the dirty old Newman
Club and VCF, the terrible Fort
Camp food. . . .
*f* *f* *f>
He thought of the things he
had enjoyed while at the home
of the Thunderbird—Her Sci-
enceman Lover, throwing engineers into the lily pond, six
years of free-loading at rushing functions, sitting in the
library and looking, just looking, Ascent on F6, Professor
Soward's lectures, cheering at
football games, Varsity Review,
reading Reginald Seaforth's let-
ters-to-the-editor, listening to
Eleanor sing at pep meets, watching 'Birds trounce Alberta
Golden Bears, afternoons down
on the beach, Ton Franck's column, the first day back every
September, the last World Cup
game in 1953, sitting in the
bleachers one fall afternoon
after 'Birds had beaten Eastern
Oregon and it was getting dark
and everyone was waiting for
the Royal Couple and when
they got there everyone yelling
"We Want Phil," Mack's cartoons in the Slipstick, the noon-
hour talks, debates, side-shows,
the time he borrowed someone else's essay, changed the
'"howevers" and "therefores"
and got 27 more marks than the
original received, the day he
went to the reserve room and
actually got the book he wanted, the way that little rgirl
threw herself into his arms
when the ceiling fell in that
day in Arts 100, about 4:00
during exam-time afternoons
when you came out of the
stacks, squinty-eyed and ready
to chuck it all, and you walked
out on the library steps and
the sun was shining and the
girls were laying on the grass
and suddenly it didn't seem so
bad after all, the Booze Cruise
Someone behind him poked
him with an old cheating paper
and Newt shuffed forward in
the line-up. Still reminiscing,
he thought of the things he
hadn't enjoyed . . . the caf,
first year lawyers at AMS
meetings, Brock Hall politicians, the library's revolving
doors, the extreme heat or extreme cold in the huts (the
HUTS, for that matter), the
couples holding hands around
campus, Brock Hill snack bar
service, essays, the anti-climax
after you leave your last exam,
getting asked to leave the Leopold, girls with nylons and saddle shoes, Ubyssey editorials,
the morning after the Booze
Cruise, the sports section of
the Totem, the professors who
wanted details parroted back
to them on examsr the people
who wear logging boots in the
stacks, COTC . . .
Newt gazed down at the
scars on his hands and fondly
chuckled as he remembered
the scalding water in the library jawn. He winced as he
felt his ribs, still crushed and
mishapen from those line-ups
in the bookstore each September. He winced again as he
felt his wallet, still crushed
and tender from those bookstore prices.
Just before he had entered
the armouries, Newt had sadly
and tearfully thrown into the
lily pond his last pair of earplugs. He smiled as he remem
bered the name on the box . . .
Exclusively for Fort Camp ancf*
Acadia Students, Guaranteed
to Work Even on Mardi Gras
Nights. ~"
T T T
Newt laughed aloud as he
remembered how he had ro«v
cruited 80 artsmen and commerce types to raid the Engineer's Smoker that night at the
White Rose; how his boys had
started the riot and how the
engineers had got blamed the
next day in downtown paper's
headlines usually reserved for
the expose of a call girl racket'
among city taxicabs. McSlurp's
uncontrolled mirth quickly sub\.
sided with the stares of his
more serious-minded grads.
By now he had reached the
stage. As the names were called
out, Newt's mind slipped into
neutral, where it usually restedT
he thought for an instant he
might faint — names, objects,
dates, memories rushed through^
thq tepid mass of sloggish grey
matter which kept Newt's ears
apart . . . botanical gardens . ..
caf coffee . . . whispering in the
library . . . Philosophy 100 ....
do I exist, if I do, why the
hell do I exist . .. Shakespeare
lectures ... the tpyes on campus . . . players club . . . the*
recluse in the huts behind the
brock ... the tweed jacket
and the grey flannel types in
law . . . brock bridge, players
. . . pubsters . . . engineers . .V
the   pseudo-intellectuals   .  .  .
those buried in research . . .
the athletes ... the athlete?
haters .. .
McKenzie . . . McMahon . . .
McRhinegold . . . McSLURP
... as his name rung out
through the armourie's rotted
timbers, flounced against the
armed barricade of the COTC
quarters, saucily danced out*
the windows and actually tempted the employment office, resounded corageously over to the
den of the frats, rolled across
the campus and thumbed its
nose at the engineering building, then returned to bow graciously in the direction of the
president's office, McSlurp
stepped forward, nonchalantly
waved at the chancellor, confidently winked at Dr. MacKenzie as the Passport to Society was pressed into his hand
and whipped through a quick
Charleston step as he~teou#ded»
from the stage.
Then with the roar of the
assembled guests at his back,
Newton J. McSlurp, B.A., flug
open the armouries' door and
rushed out into the cold, cruel
world. -I
\
CONGRATULATIONS
to the
GRADUATING CLASS
GEORGE HAYES
MEN'S and BOYS' WEAR
4548 West 10th Avenue ALma 3564 THE UBYSSEY
Monday, May 14, 1956
President's Message . . .
Perhaps because spring and
Graduation c o m e. together
they seem to have much in
common, for botli are happy
yet nostalgic times, full of
youth and eagerness and the
promise of romance and adventure and satisfying experience
just ahead.
I hope very much that
"spring" for those of you who
graduate will, in a sense, last
throughout your lives; that
* you will continue to live in a
world that promises interest
and satisfaction and the joy of
worthwhile work, well done
and well rewarded in terms of
the results achieved.
For a variety of reasons you
are an unusual generation; perhaps never before have young
people with training and ability
and the willingness to work
been so much in demand, or
have had so many attractive
openings available to them.
You are living too, in the beginning of great, exciting and
new developments in nearly
every realm of life and achievement.   But it is, at the same
time, a difficult and a dangerous world that confronts you.
For you and those of us who
are older live under the shadow
of the atom bomb and the
hydrogen bomb and in a world
that is divided by deep and
bitter differences and by fear
and hatred. It is also a world
demanding conformity and
making its appeal or issuing its
comamnds to the mass rather
than to the man.
If the years you have spent
at this University have been
"successful"    in    the    proper
meaning of that term, you at
least, should be among those
who can preserve a sense of
your own individuality and separate identity, as thinking and
discriminating human beings.
If you can, you will contribute
much to your society and to
your fellow men. You go with
the best wishes of all of us
who have been your teachers
and with the hope that you
achieve some, at least, of your
hearts' desires.
N . A. M. MacKENZIE
N. A. M. MacKENZIE
Message from E. W. H. Brown
(President of Alumni Association) for Graduate Issue of
Ubyssey.
On the occasion of your
graduation we extend our
greetings and congratulations.
Your major preparations for
your chosen career are now
behind you. You have completed your academic courses
satisfactorily. More important
perhaps you have learned to
organize your capacity to think
and how to go about acquiring
the further knowledge necessary for your chosen vocation.
As you pass this memorable
mile-post of your life, you may
appreciate a few observations
from those who have gone before on what lies ahead.
Your period of learning is
not over. In a very real sense
it has just   begun.   You   will
Alumni Message . . .
E. W. H. BROWN
President of Alumni Association
have to increase and sharpen
your knowledge in your special
field and keep it up to date.
This wil be a continuing prerequisite for progress.
You must develop the capacity to make fruitful use of
your knowledge and talent.
The ability to express yourself
with clarity is a most useful
skill, one not sufficiently
taught or emphasized in University life.
You mus* develop your personal public relations department to ensure an atmosphere
conducive to an objective reception of your ideas and proposals. Many a bright idea or
brilliant plan has been stillborn because its parent did not
realize that how he is regarded
by his fellows has an impressive influence on how they will
judge his offering.
You will have to restrain
your impatience. This is an
almost universal characteristic
of new graduates. In University, given acceptable performance, progress is predictable
and continuous. In business
and profession it is not. Here
the rate of progress varies
greatly by business and by professions. Initially, by the extent of the need to temper
knowledge with experience;
later by the relative growth
rates of business and professions and other factors beyond
your individual influence. So
put apropriate curbs on impatience. Be satisfied to know
that over a period, progress
will be certain, though the
pace of it will not.
In an over all sense, you are
entering a world that places
full value on your degree. Can
ada, whose century this one
surely is, urgently needs many
more with your training.
Opportunities abound on every
hand. We are confident that
you will be worthy of them.
We suggest to you that along
with opportunities go obligations. To be a good and useful
citizen of your community and
your country is certainly one.
We hope that you may have a
sense of gratitude and obligation to your University as well
and that you will give tangible
expression to it in order that
your Alma Mater may more
effectively offer the advantages you have had to the
larger numbers of those who
will follow you.
Good luck!
E. W. H. BROWN,
President,
UBC Alumni Association.
We Bequeath
"4.
In five or ten years if you
pick up a Ubyssey you*ll likely-
see headlines saying: "Arts
Undergraduates Society to Re-
Form," "Engineers Riot," or
"Ubyssey Editor Charges
'Graft'," and to this you'll
sadly remark, "Things haven't
changed a bit!"
Furthermore, with your five
or ten years maturity derived
from struggle with the outndc
world, you'll probably laugh a
little at UBC students for the
serious way they attack their
"earth-shaking" problems. You
might remember that you yourself once assailed the Students'
Council for inequalities existing in the USC constitution,
but in 1966 you'll recall that
you were full of youthful
enthusiasm at the time and it
was really such a silly thing
to do. After all, what's the difference if ASUS lives or dies,
or if NFCUS even exists. For
all the yelling and screaming
done in one year at UBC, will
Canada find herself in a depression, or at war with Manitoba in the next?
A.s a matter of fact, even
without five or ten years
maturity tucked under your
belt, or even while you are an
undergraduate, you may still
view the AMS's struggles and
torments grunting, "So what'.'"
or "Who cares0"
To answer the question
li o n e s 11 y and objectively
would probably be very em-
barassing for most campus
politicians. The main benefit
derived from most campus
crusades seems to be only a
little vocal exercise and campus publicity for the crusader.
Oi course some crusades have
very noble aims and plan to
benefit   millions,   but   life   at
UBC would very likely still
be bearable without them. This
is the reason it is so easy to
chuckle at campus "problems."
But one wouldn't get much
enjoyment out of UBC if he
viewed all activities objectively, or took himself too seriously. True, the fate of nations
is not decided on the campus,
but fond memories arc; and
students who have shouted and
petitioned and rioted have
taken more of what this university offers than those who
"haven't got time to fool
around like that."
It's part and parcel of an
undergraduate, in the traditional connotation of the word,
to be loudly concerned in campus problems, notwithstanding
the ridicule of dispassionate
observers. Every counsellor
and advisor will tell you extracurricular   activity   helps   you
DON  JABOUR
to meet people, to talk on your
feet, to learn to organize, and
to make new friends, and even
though such phrases come from
the "Counsellor's Handbook,"
they are nevertheless true.
In five and ten years, students will still be crusading
and rioting. You might think
that with thc changing of the
times, ideas, problems, and personality types would change
and students would have a
more mature approach or at
least new problems would
arise. But campus politicians
are campus politicians because
that is their field of enjoyable
activity, just like an athlete
chooses. sports, and because
they believe (objectively or
subjectively) that they have an
important crusade to carry out.
"Things haven't changed a
bit!" you'll say.
And you'll be right. THE UBYSSEY
Monday, May 14, 1956
Compliments
to the
GRADS OF '56
VARSITY JEWELERS
4479 West 10th Avenue
ALma 3104
Best Wishes to U.B.C.
from
J. R. WILLIAMS & SON
Assaying and Ore Testing
METALLURGICAL WORK EXCLUSIVELY
580 Nelson Street
MArinc 5821
CONGRATULATIONS . . .
CUSS OF '56
tfatnhc  Terrace
"Chinese Cuisine at Its Best"
Internationally  known and acclaimed  tops  in
Chinese cuisine, hospitable service and exotic
Oriental decor    .    .    .    truly a
restaurant of distinction.
Reservations: MArine 1935
155 E. Pender Street
Dean N. V. Scharfe will head
the new School of Education
now being "built at UBC.
Are Bank Poets
Really Necessary?
Someone has said it's significant that two of today's best
poets, Walter de la Mare and
T. S. Eliot, once worked in
banks. The significance escapes
us, and when an English bank
investigated, they weren't able
to find out what these versifiers thought of banking. However, they did squeeze a confession out of a poet on the
staff. Said he: "As a poem takes
its time and that time is unpredictable, I feel that for poetry,
banking is as good a career as
any." The poet laureate, John
Masefield, started life as a banker too, but changed his mind.
As far as the Royal Bank is
concerned, we confine our verse
to efforts like "Make earning
time saving time" which isn't
much comfort to the average
student who usually has a tough
time making ends meet, let
alone saving anything, but we
want you to think kindly of the
'Royal." Even if you've just
a pittance, we'll gladly keep it
safe for you in a Savings Account. There are any number
of Royal Bank branches in Vancouver and its environs, all keen
to add more U.B.C. names to
the  books.  Drop  in,  any   lime
The Royal Bank of Canada
Valedictory
It is time for us, the class of 1956, to make our valedictory.
t The temptation i.s to be nostalgic. We have pursued a difficult
t], course, and we have succeeded, and the elation of the day
might betray us into hyperbole.   Let us instead, pause, and
i for the last time as undergraduates analyse our thoughts.
There  is a saying that
people   with   the   least   faith
have the largest funerals.  For
that reason we who are grateful to have been here do not
wish to make a loud wailing
as we go.   We have faith ifl
what this university has done
for  us.   Our  knowledge  will
stand  the test  of  time  if we
apply   it   as   we   have   been
taught.   This is the first thing
for which we are profoundly
grateful,   the   opportunity   to
have acquired a knowledge of
facts and rules and how they
should be used. These will be
the materials of our lives to
come, and if we find success, to this university will be owed
the debt. After constant use our knowledge will be so familiar
to us that we may seem always to have had it and forget from
whence  it came.   Let  us  now  record that  most  of  it,  and
especially that part which tells us how to discover more for
ourselves, was found here.
JOHN SPENCER
Save time and trouble-
BANK BY MAIL!
When you bank by mail, our nearest branch is as close to
you as your nearest post-box. No parking problems! Ask
for special deposit forms at our nearest branch—we
have more than 700 branches to serve you.
NW.US
For a second thing we are also thankful. Whatever troubles
may have been upon us, these have been happy years. Never
again will we be so much the masters of our time, nor will we
find so much tolerance. Students are by reputation ten years
more liberal than their elders. We are gradually becoming
older, wiser people, but the price we pay is that our live3
become more serious. This is an opportune moment to" pause
and acknowledge our happiness here, to be thankful for the
immeasurable luxury of time to think. Our critics have taxed
us with idleness at times, but our answer is, "we were not
wasting time, we were growing up."
Finally, we are thankful for this, and t is the reason why
ours is an unostentatious farewell. We are thankful for the
glimpse of a way of life that is contained in two words,
"TUUM EST". The most valuable gift we have received was
the opportunity to do things for ourselves. It was expressed
in our studying where we sought the answers alone and
learned that we must make up our minds. More especially it
was expressed in our clubs and societies, our sports and our
student government, Whether we did it well or ill we did it
for ourselves. We learned initiative, and it is upon this that
we and our world must depend. We have a motto which we
hope will haunt us, so that whenever we see a problem,
whether as experts in our own sciences, or in the whole art of
civilization in which we have been qualified amateurs, we
shall know that both the opportunity and the responsibility are
ours. It is to remind us that what we have is not merely a
gift but a trust for others. Whether we obey this trust will be
the true measure of our education. As our parting words of
thankfulness we proclaim this as our ideal, that the feeling of
responsibility to those who have enabled us to learn may
remain with us. Thus we will always retain the most important part of our university, and so we need not take a
loud and long farewell.
"TUUM EST"
-John Spencer.
THE CANADIAN BANK OF COM MERCE
More than 30 Brandies in Vancouver and Distrki
BRANCHES IN THE UNIVERSITY DISTRICT
10th and Sasamat Univ. Blvd.
Met.: Mr. R. E. McKinnon Mgr.: Mr. G. C. Hull
Congratulations
to the
Graduating Class of 1956
from the
WESTERN READING LABORATORY
We hope we have been able to help some of you
Individual reading training
839 Hornby Street TAtlow 11720 New Education
Course Offered
A summer course emphasizing the administration, principles and methods of adult education programmes will be
offered for the first time in Western Canada by the University
of British Columbia from July 3 to 20.
t-
FOR TEACHERS
J. Roby Kidd, Director of the! The course is Planned for
Canadan Assocation for Adult school teachers, principals and
Education at Ontario College . superintendents who have a par-
of Education, will direct the ticular interest in the education
course. j of adults, and for others who are
! concerned with adult education
in correctional and rehabilitation institutions, libraries and
social agencies, trade unions or
business associations, voluntary
organizations and other adult
education agencies.
27,469 CHADS
SINCE CAIRN
Since UBC's incorporation
1918, twenty-seven thousand
four hundred and sixty nine
graduates have passed through
the various courses offered by
the university and have obtained degrees.
Men Win
Nearly All
Top Awards
COURSES
Units on development, organ-
At the final count of scholar-1 ization and administration, phil
osophy, methods and techniques,
adult education will be included
in the course.
s'r.ips awarded for the 1956-57
session, men winners outnumbered women 142 to 32.
The  only  faculty  topped   by      Field trips, discussions, demon-
women, was Home Economics—  strations,    films   and    recorded
traditionally a woman's course,   case  material  will be  used.
Five women won awards in this
field. ,     Registration is open to gradu-
„. .     . . . ' ate  students  and  to  others  by
Six   women   and   eight   men .   . J
,   , , . permission,
win   scholarships,   bursaries   or
general awards for heading the j     Applications     and     inquiries
graduating class.   Peter Pearse. i should be made to the Extension
Arts   IV,  scored   twivc   in   this   Department.
division. |         	
John Sandys-Wunch, Arts IV.
w n the Rhodes Scholarship,
giving him next year at Oxford.
Ten men and throe- women
won awards for excelcntv in
general Undergraduate work.      i
Engineering,    of    course,    re-!
trained strictly a masculine divi-j
sicn.     Fifteen   Redshirts    were
given awards. • I
l
Males were almost edged out i
in the typically masculine field
of Law, but managed to capture j
three awards for men and just!
two for women.
One woman won a scholarship j
in Medicine, and six men were
given similar awards. I
Scholarships for graduate
studies   to   be   conducted   next l
session were awarded to forty-
seven men and seven women.    |
Gwendolyn  Leong  and  Peter j
Janiewick won two awards each I
ir. pharmacy, and Ken McDonald \
won the alumni book prize for
the; best potential pharmacist.     J
Awards made by miscellaneous institutions were given to
forty-five men and two women.
World University Service
gave scholarships for studies in
Europe next year to lour men.
George Forbes will go to Bonn,
Robert Jackson to Hamburg,
Jtmes Webster to Nigeria and
Peter Burns to Malaya.
THE UBYSSEY
Monday, May 14, 1956
Best Wishes
For a Successful Future
CANADIAN
FOREST PRODUCTS
LIMITED
999 West Pender Street Vancouver, B. C.
MArine 7341
Congratulations
CLASS OF 1956
Pride of the West Knitting Mills Ltd.
Manufacturers of
Custom-made Club and Sports Sweaters and Scarves
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Patronize
the
advertisers
in this
Graduation
Edition
of
The Ubyssey'
Congratulations    .    .
WEST POINT PRINTERS
& STATIONERS
4550 W. 10th       ALma 254C
ir
CRANE
LIMITED
PLUMBING  and   HEATING   SUPPLIES
FABRICATED PIPING
PIPE, VALVES and  FITTINGS
l\-r
Success to Graduates
of 1956
7-r
540 Beatty Street — 1300 Marine Dr.. North Vancouver
Grandview and Boundary Road
BEST WISHES
to the
UNIVERSITY STUDENTS
CROSSMAN MACHINERY
CO. LTD.
806 Beach Avenue
Vancouver
WHEREVER YOU GO
WHATEVER YOU DO
WE WISH YOU WELL
Parsons Brown
Limited
INSURANCE OF ALL KINDS
535 Homer Street
T At low 0311 G
•  •   »
HUMOR ICE CREAM
DISTRIBUTORSHIPS
AVAILABLE
America's favorite ice cream brings you
a gold mine on wheels
.:«<**•        ..** V-*-'
MAKE YOUR DREAMS COME TRUE
The sky's the limit on your income when
you own a Good Humor franchise
What do you consider a good income?
Nome the figure — you can moke it
wh^n you own your own protected
Good Humor franchise. This moneymaker can be yours. You operate under
minimum expense. You have no rent
to pay, no real estate taxes. You have
no credit accounts. All sales are quick
and strictly cash.
Quick turnover means quick profits.
You can work as long as you wish and
where you wish. You are not tied down
to any one location. Submit details of
your past and present employment. For
further information write to 20th Century Merchandising Company, 43 5
Querbes Street, Montreal, Quebec. WALTER  MOttJ-OHU
ELEANOR JOW
PETER  PEARSE
m
MARY HOSSt£
Top Award Winners
(Contiuued from Page 3)
OOVERNOR GENERAL'S
MEDAL
The coveted Governor General's Gold Medal for head of the
Graduating Class In Arts was
copped by Burnaby student
Keith Yates (see story page 3).
Highest marks in the field of
Agriculture were recorded by
John Gordon Shaw of White
Rock. Mr. Shaw will be awarded the Wilfrid Sadler Memorial
Gold Medal for heading the
graduating class for the degree
of B.S.A.
The 22 year-old graduate intends to continue his studies at
Wisconsin where he hopes to receive his Ph.d. in Agriculture.
After that? "I don't know" he
shrugs, "research, I hope."
While he modestly remarks
that he wonders how he managed
to win the medal, John admits
that he has won "two or three"
scholarships previous to this honour . . . but he forgets when
and how. He won "a few" in his
White Rock high-school days,
and took the Hogarth scholarship last year.
COMMON OCCURENCE
Winning awards is a common
occurence with John. He topped his class in engineering with
monotonous regularity as well
as proving to be one of B.C.'s
ace fencers. He holds nearly
all the B.C. fencing records and
plays for thc UBC team.
After graduation the applied
science scholar intends to move
south for a Business Administration course and then to follow
a career in Engineering Administration.
WOMAN LEADS LAW
In a field held almost exclusively by men, a 5' 4" blond
lawyer-ess produced the highest
marks to win the Law Society
Gold Medal and Prize.
The 25 year-old miss who tops
her class for the second year
in a row feels "quite well" about
her most recent award. However she is no stranger to academic renoun, having won the
Maitland Memorial Award in
1955 and the Morgan Scholarship in 1954.
Miss Hossie attended York
House School in Vancouver before attending Toronto University Trinity College to receive
her Bachelor of Arts degree.
She intends to article at Davis,
Hossie, Marshall, and McLorg
law firm in the coming year.
This award includes the Law
call and admission fee.
FUTURE  WALL   STREET
Future Wall Street Wizard
Geoff Robert Conway of Victoria
headed the Commerce Graduating Class to take the Kiwanis
Club Gold Medal and $50 prize.
Geoff, popular Treasurer of the
1956 Students''Council, gained
instant fame this year with his
"super budget."
Conway, a 22 year-old married student, is a Victoria College
product, where he won the top-
all-round student award both his
first and second years. He also
took the Birk's Watch award,
the Standard Furniture Economics award, the Katherine Agnew
History prize, and the Hudsons
Bay Commerce award, all this
while acting Treasurer of .the
College Council. Incidentally, he
came away from his home town
with the honorary activity
award.
In his three years at UBC,
Geoff has been executive editor
of the Ubyssey, president of the
Badminton club, treasurer of the
1954 open-house, on the executive of the Commerce Undergraduate Society, member of
Beta Theta Pi, and honorary
member of Sigma Tau Chi Fraternities, as well as Students'
Council Treasurer.
For the past two years, his
way through school has been
largely paid by Gait Brothers
scholarships of $300. Both last
year and this, Conway led his
Commerce class to win the Kiwanis Club Prizes. The versatile
graduate intends to spend the
next two years practicing cliar-
, tered accountanscy with Parkson
Gordon & Co.
Two Alberta students, now
j living in Vancouver, led their
classes in Medicine and Architecture. Alexander (Sandy) Rankin McKay Cairns and Charles
H. Easton, were born at the
same time in the same hospital
in Isley, Alberta 22 years ago.
Both students received their
early education in Alberta, Sandy continuing his high school
in Edmonton, and Charles attending John Oliver High School
in Vancouver. This is the second
time the boys have won honours
together, both having been
awarded scholarships two years
ago in their1 respective fields.
Mr. Cairns was awarded the
Hamber Gold Medal and Prize
of $250 for heading the third
medical graduating class from
UBC. Red-headed Easton won
the Architectural Institute of
British Columbia Prize, books to
the value of $66 for being outstanding in architectural design
and head of the architecture
graduating class.
Sharing honours in the physical education courses were Waller   Morford   and   Joyce   Run-
nails, who will receive the Canadian Association for Health,
Physical Education, and Recreation Special Prize for heading the
graduatiing class.
Morford, a married ex-serviceman, was captain of the Rugger
Team this year at UBC. 21-year-
old Miss Runnalls, a StevestOn
student, also topped her class
in 1953. She was water-front
director at Camp Fircum last
summer, and after another summer at the camp, intends to
teach at Richmond high school.
Top honours in home economics went to a Vancouver girl
who claims she wants to be "just
a housewife" from here on. 21
year-old Mary Diane Alsbury
intends to be married in June
to UBC chemical engineering
graduate Walter Wlesner.
Miss Alsbury won the British
Columbia Parent-Teacher Federation Prize of $100 for heading
the Graduating Class in Home
Economics. This marks her second scholarship in this field.
Leading pharmacist for the
Horner Gold Medal was Gwendolyn Faye Quen Leong of Van-
I couver.
Gwendolyn Leong, who captured the Cunningham prize,
said she "didn't expect to win
anything."
Two-time winner Peter Hector Pearse of Kamloops won
both the Canadian Institute of
j Forestry Medal for the best all-
i round record in Forestry or For-
i est Engineering, and the H. R.
MacMillan Pize in Forestry of
j $100 for heading the graduating
class for the B.S.F. degree.
Heading the graduating class
taking the degree of Bachelor
of Social Work was Mrs. Ellen
Isobelle Esau of Creston. Mrs.
Esau will be awarded a special
Prize of $25.
Top student among teacher
training graduates is a mother
of  four children.
The Dr. Maxwell A. Cameron
Memorial Medal and $50 Prize
was awarded Mrs. Elizabeth Al-
don Frith of Hope. B.C. Mrs.
Frith led the Teacher Training
Course.
Top honours in the Arts and
Science classes for heading the
non-science group of the Graduating Class were won by Michael
Geoffrey Peers of Vancouver.
Peers will receive the University
Medal for Arts and Science.
Michael Peers, 21, who won
the University medal, intends to
study Theology at Toronto's
Trinity College next year. He
spent last year as an exchange
student at he University of
Heidelburg.
JOYCE RUNNALLS
urlARL£S EASTON
JOHN  SHAW
GEOFF CONWAY
«
<**?.»**%
>omi   LobWtii
GWENDOLYN   LEONG
DIANE ALSBURY
MICHAEL  PEERS
ALEXANDER FINLAYSON
THE  UBYSSEY
Monday, May 14, 1956 THE UBYSSEY
Monday, May 14, 1956
10
Awards
Note:   This  list  contains  awards  won  by   graduates  and
members of the graduating classes only. Undergraduate and additional graduate awards will be announced in later lists.
The Governor General's Gold Medal (Head of the Graduating
Class for the degree of B.A.):
KEITH YATES (Burnaby)
The Wilfrid Sadler Memorial Gold Medal (Head of the Graduating
Class tor the degree of B.S.A.):
JOHN GORDON SHAW (White Rock)
The Association of Professional Engineers Gold Medal (Head of
the Graduating Class for the degree of B.A.Sc):
JOHN JOSEPH FALKLAND LOEWEN (Vancouver)
The University Medal for Arts and Science (Head of the non-
science group in the Graduating Class for the degree of B.A.):
MICHAEL GEOFFREY PEERS (Vancouver)
The Klwanit Club Geld Medal and Prise ($50) (Head of the Graduating Class for the degree of B.Com.):
GEOFFREY ROBERT CONWAY (Victoria)
The Law Society Gold Medal Prise (Call and Admission Fee)
(Hhead of the Graduating Class for the degree of LL.B.):
MARY RENDINA KATHLEEN HOSSIE (West Vancouver)
The Hamber Gold Medal and Prise ($250) (Hhead of the Graduating Class for the degree of M.D.):
ALEXANDER RANKIN McKAY CAIRNS (Vancouver)
The Horner Gold Medal for Pharmacy (Head of the Graduating
Clats for the degree of B.S.P.):
GWENDOLYN FAYE QUEN LEONG (Vancouver)
The  British   Columbia  Parent-Teacher  Federation   Prise  ($100)
(Head of the Graduating Class for the degree of B.H.E.):
MARY DIANE ALSBURY (Vancouver)
The Canadian Association for Health,  Physical Education, and
Recreation Special Prise (Head of the Graduating Class for the
degree of B.P.E.)—awarded jointly to
'    JOYCE ELLENA RUNNALS (Steveston)
and
WALTER ROBERT MORFORD (Vancouver
The Canadian Institute of Forestry Medal (Best all-round record
in Forestry or Forest Engineering):
PETER HECTOR PEARSE (Kamloops)
The H. R. MacMillan Prise in Forestry ($100) (Head of the Graduating Class for the degree of B.S.F.):
PETER HECTOR PEARSE (Kamloops)
The Architectural Institute of British Columbia Prize, books to
the value of $66 (Outstanding in architectural design and Head
of the Graduating Class for the degree of B.Arch.):
CHARLES H. EASTON (Vancouver)
The Dr. Maxwell A. Cameron Memorial Medal and Prise ($50)
(Leading student in the Teacher Twining Course):
(Mrs.) ELIZABETH ALDON PRITH (Vancouver)
Special Prise. 985 (Head of the Graduating Class for the degree
of B.S.W.):
(Mrs.) ELLEN ISOBELLE ESAU (Creston)
i THE RHODES SCHOLARSHIP
i JOHN WILLIAM KERVYN SANDYS-WUNSCH
) (Duncan)
Fellowships, Scholarships, and Prizes for
Graduate Study and Research
The Anne Wesbrook Scholarship. $200 (for graduate study and
Research):
DOROTHEA MARY ROSS (Vancouver)
The Britannia Mining and Smelting Company Limited Scholarship.
S250 (for research  in Mineralography—awarded  in  December.
1958):
JOHN ALEXANDER HANSULD (Vancouver)
Tho British Columbia Electric Company Limited Fellowship in
Agriculture, $800 (for graduate study and research):
ANTHONY MULLENS MacQUILLAN (Vancouver)
The British Columbia Electric Company Graduate Scholarships.
9280 each (for graduate study and research):
NANCY ANNE MAHONEY (Illinois)—Zoology
SHEILA ANNE ROSS (Vancouver—Psychology
CLEVELAND PENDLETON HICKMAN (Vancouver)—
Fisheries
GEORGE ALFRED STRASDINE (Alberta)—Bacteriology
The British Columbia Sugar Refining Company Limited Scholarships (for graduate study and research):
ROBERT JOHN   BOSE (Surrey  Centre),   $200—in   Animal
Science
KURT E. EBNER (Pitt Meadows), $300—in Animal Science
RICHARD GARM (Vancouver), $200—in Botany and Plant
Science
.        ALAN    CHISHOLM    HARKNESS    (Vancouver),    $300—in
Chemistry
MARY    CHALMERS    ROBERTSON    (Penticton),    $300—in
i Animal Science
WALTER   ALVIN    SHEPPE    (Virginia,    U.S.A.),   $250—in
Zoology
EMKE   ERNEST   SWIERSTRA    (Pitt   Meadows),    $300—in
Animal Science
RALPH CLIFFORD TUCKEY (Aleza Lake), $400—in Poultry
Science
GEORGE MILTON WEISS (Kelovvna), $250—in Plant Science
The British Columbia Telephone Company Scholarships in Engineering and physics, $600 each (for graduate study and research):
ALFRED STANLEY BARKER (Vancouver)—Physics
(Continued on Page 11)
J See AWARDS
Sincere Best Wishes to the
Graduating Class of 7956
from the Following Professional' and
Businessmen and Firms
# & toaclHillan, CSC
Percif & /SeHfPua k C£.C
J, IH- Buchanan
J. % ycuhftnan
W. (j. Ifluwfh
hat (jtauet
tHh an J iHtit. J. fanaM (jrahatn
& & Saket
J, £ Ccktnah
Cajtt Alfred MuUatd
CfneM W. H. &nm
?. J, &Hf
till-. JuMice J. #f. CWy
(jwdch Jamil
Xech J. Xatfher
THE WH6t?
FAMIL*
On the fishing grounds, in our canneries
in our offices .  .  .
the men and women of
      NELSON
evjoysiT      Bros. Fisheries Ltd
Share your pride in your graduation Sincere Best Wishes to the
Graduating Class of J956
From the Following Professional and
Businessmen and Firms
Chanceltw Ske/wcd Xett
fan Crew
Hen. C. tit. Hayifot
Ju4$e J. £. Clearihue
Hattii Ranatt — Architect
fate and Her — CuAtw* Snkete
(jartin ffce W Juel Ce. XU
Tctonleif and tflatheMH
The WchU Chemical Cc. XU
Saba 6nA. XU
&. C ktitrict Jet. £r bet. Cc.XU
C # C. William* Cc. XU
1   t
WebcH XauhtfererJ & Jbty Cleaner*
Canadian XxplwathnA
W.H.GaikeA
Alaska Pine and CeltuhM
Canadian CxjtlerathnA
WITH BEST WISHES
TO THE
GRADS OF 1936.
MAY WE CONTINUE
TO SERVE YOU?
PRINTING for Every Purpose
ANDERSON PRINTING CO. LTD.
CEdar 3111
2100 West 12th Avenue Vancouver. B.C.
THE UBYSSEY
Monday, May 14, 1956
11
AWARDS
(Continued from Page 10)
HAROLD H. K. WESEMEYER (Vancouver)—Physics
The   Burroughs   Wellcome   Fellowship   in   Anaetheiiology   and
Applied Pharmacology, $1000 (for post-graduate research))
DR. DAVID ALLAN (North Vancouver)
The California Standard Company Graduate Scholarship, $750
(for graduate study and research in Geology):
ROBERT GEORGE GREGGS (Ontario)
The Canadian Industries Limited Fellowship, $1700 (for graduate
study and research in Chemistry):
STEPHEN ALAN RYCE (Vancouver)
The Canadian Pulp  and  Paper  Association,  Western  Division,
Fellowships, $500 each (for graduate study and research in the
field of Forestry):
ROBERT WILLIAM KENNEDY (Vancouver)
WILLIAM FORBES MURISON (Vancouver)
The  Cariboo  Gold  Quarts  Mining  Company  Scholarship,  $100
(for research in Mineraloggraphy—awarded in December, 19&5)t
JOHN ALEXANDER HANSULD (Vancouver)
The CKNW Scholarship in Television, $500 (for special summer
course 'at Northwestern University)—awarded in March,  1058):
WALLEY PEARSON LIGHTBODY (West Vancouver)
The Cominco Fellowship, $1000 (for graduate study and research
in Chemistry)*
RONALD VAN DER LINDEN (Vancouver)
The Dr. F. J. Nicholson Scholarship, $500 (for graduate study and
research in Chemistry):
KENNETH HUNT (Vancouver)
The  Edith  Ashton  Memorial Scholarship,   $250  (research   and
graduate study in Botany):
HERBERT Spencer Pepin (Rossland)
The Graduate Scholarships In Slavonic Studios, given by Mr.
Walter C. Koerner in honor oi Dr. William Rose—$300 each (for
graduate study and research at this University in Slavonics):
GEORGE ALEXANDER MacKENZIE (Vancouver)
MICHAEL GEOFFREY PEERS (Vancouver)
The John and Annie Southcott Memorial Scholarship, $100 (for
research in the field of British Columbia History):
JOHN SPENCER CHURCH (Victoria)
The Lefevre Gold Medal and Scholarship, $150 (highest standing
in Chemistry and Chemical Engineering in the final two undergraduate years):
KEITH YATES (Vancouver)
The  Leon J.  Koerner  Graduate Fellowship  in  Forest  History,
$1000 (for research ia the history of the lores! industry in British
Columbia):
JOSEPH C. LAWRENCE (Vancouver)
The Leon oKerner Graduate Scholarships, $250 each (for graduate
study and research in problems of forest ecology):
DIETER MUELLER-DOMBOIS (Vancouver)
To be announced later.
The Mr. and Mrs. P. A. Woodward's Foundation Fellowship ia
Cancer Research, $5000 (announced in March. 1056):
ALAN ROBB PHILLIPS PATTERSON (Vancouver)
The Macmillan Company of Canada Prise in Creative Writing
(short story), $50:
MARYLYN ELAINE SICK (Vancouver)
The Native Daughters of British Columbia Scholarship, $100 (for
research in the early history of British Columbia):
JOHN NEIL SUTHERLAND (Vancouver)
The Northern Electric Fellowship, $1200 (for graduate study ia
Electrical Engineering):
FRED CHARLES HOLLAND (Vancouver)
The Poulenc Fellowship in Applied Physiology, $500 (for postgraduate work in Physiology):
DR. DAVID ALLAN (North Vancouver)
The  Powell  River  Company   Limited   Scholarship.   $7700  (for
graduate study and research in wood chemistry):
ALEXANDER JAMES FINLAYSON (Vancouver)
The Richard  Claxton  Palmer  Memorial  Scholarship.  $250   (for
graduate study and research in horticulture and related fields):
GEORGE MILTON WEISS (Kelowna)
The R. J. Pop Scholarship in Wildlife Biology. $150 (for graduate
study and research):
GERRARD FREDERICK VAN TETS (Vancouver)
Scholarships  for  French  Canada  Studies,   $500 each   (graduate
study and research):
PHILIP A. J. OLDHAM (Kamloops)—French
JOHN ALEXANDER BOVEY (Vancouver)—History
Shell Oil Fellowship for Research, $1200 (for graduate study and
research in Physics):
ERNIE ANDREW GUSTAV LARSON (Revelstoke)
The Standard Oil Company of British Columbia Limited Fellow*
ship, $950 (graduate study and research in Chemical Engineering
in field of petroleum):
DONALD JAMES WHITTLE (Burnaby)
The United Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union Scholarship in
Fisheries, $200 (for graduate study and research):
GLEN HOWARD GEEN (Kelowna)
The University Graduate Scholarship. $200 (for further study ar
research):
PETER HECTOR PEARSE (Kamloops)
University Special Award. $250 (for graduate study):
• JACK KENNETH STATHERS (Vancouver)
The Vancouver B'nai B'rith Eillel Foundation Scholarships, $125
each (for graduate study and research):
JOHN GORDON SHAW (White Rock)—Agriculture
DOROTHEA MARY ROSS (Vancouver)—Arts and Science
(Continued on Page 12)
See AWARDS •*
jo million     %
times a day
at home, at work
or on the way
r
There's nothing like a
*Cot»" it • leetsleterftreeVwoH:.        C3«
COCA-COLA LTD.
GREETINGS
to All
GRADUATES
We Offer
Highest Quality Equipment
in
DRAWING MATERIALS — MICRSCOPES
SURVEYING INSTRUMENTS — SCINTILLOMETERS
DRAFTING MACHINES — ARTISTS' SUPPLIES
The
HUGHES-OWENS
COMPANY LIMITED
Vancouver,  Edmonton,  Winnipeg,   Hamilton, Toronto,
Ottawa, Montreal, Halifax
MARSHALL-WELLS
B. C. LTD.
Wish the Graduates of 1956
every success
in their chosen field of endeavor.
Honorary Degrees
(Continued from Page 3)
ed in the development of home
economics in British Columbia
and in Canada. She was the
first president of the Canadian
Home Economics Association
and has been for twenty years
Director of Home Economics in
the Department of Education.
RETIRED  DEAN
Dr. MacLeod, who retired in
1953, has had a noted academic
career in Alberta rind British
Columbia. He joined the faculty
here in 1936, as Head of the Department of Electrical and Mechanical Engineering. In 1950 he
was appointed Dean of the
Faculty of Applied Science.
Dean Angus is retiring thi.'
year as Dean of Graduate
Studies.
Colonel Swan and Mr. Ingle
dow have made great contributions to engineering and education in British Columbia.
549 • 573 Carroll Street Vancouver, B. C.
PAcific 8211
Blind  UBC
Student
Wins   $1500
A 26 year-old University of
B.C. student who is totally blind
has been awarded scholarships
and fellowships totalling more
than $1,500. UBC Scholarship
chairman W. H. Gage announced.
The winner is James Nyman
of 1625 West 13th Avenue, and
formerly of Nakusp. He will be
awarded his Bachelor of Arts
degrees for first class honours
in political science at the UBC
convocation.
Nyman. an enthusiastic participant in campus political club
circles, represented the University in the McGoun Cup debates
last February.
He will pursue graduate studies at the University of California, Berkely Campus, working towards a Master of Arts
degree in political science.
Nyman has been awarded a
$1000 scholarship from the recently established Donald C.
Buckland Memorial Bursary
Fund, donated to the University
of B.C. by the Canadian National Institute for the Blind. He
has also been awarded the Heller fellowship from the University of California valued at $500
and tuition fees.
He received offers of gradute
fellowships from Queens University, University of Toronto,
and Washington University in St.
Louis, but turned these down in
favour of attendance at1 the University of California.
The Donald C. Buckland Memorial Fund was set up in memory
of former associate professor of
forest pathology at UBC who
was almost totally blind and
who died this vear.
Patronize
the
advertisers
in this
Graduation
Edition
of
The Ubyssey"
THE UBYSSEY
Monday, May 14, 1956
12
AWARDS
(Continued from Page 11)
AWARDS IN SOCIAL WORK
The British Columbia Electric Company Graduate Scholarship,
$250 (for further study in Social Work, proceeding to M.S.W.
degree):
, LESLIE WARD LAIDMAN (Saskatchewan).
The Canadian Association of Social Workers (British Columbia
Mainland  Branch), prise,  books $25 (for  all-round proficiency
and promise in M.S.W. course):
THOMAS DONALD BINGHAM (Mission City).
The Chetkow Memorial Prise, $100 (for general proficiency in
studies in the M.S.W. course):
JOHN WILLIAM BRAITHWAITE (Vancouver).
The Junior League of Vancouver Scholarship <n Social Work. $500
(for further study in Social Work):
BRIAN WORTH HESELTINE WHARF (Victoria).
The Laura Holland Scholarship, $262.50 (proficiency, proceeding
to M.S.W. course):
PATRICIA LOUISE SHARP (Saskatchewan).
The Social Work Alumni Prize, $25 (best thesis for M.S.W. degree):
BUDD CUMMING MacKenzie (Nova Scotia).
Special Prise, $25 (all-round proficiency and promise in M.S.W.
course):
DONALD GARTH HOMER (Saskatchewan).
GENERAL  UNDERGGRADUATES  AWARDS
The Gilbert Tucker Memorial Prise, $25 (leading student in His*
tory 404):
JAMES BERTIN WEBSTER (Vancouver).
The United Empire Loyalists' Association Medal and Prise ($35)
(best essay on United Empire Loyalists):
IAIN HAMILTON BROWN (Vancouver).
The United Nations Prize,  $50 (significant  contribution to the
United Nations activity on Campus):
JOHN DAVID BOSSONS (West Vancouver).
AWARDS  IN AGRICULTURE
The A. Max  Charkow Bursary, $100 (for work in the field of
poultry science or nutrition):
ALBERT  RAYMOND SJERDAL (Alberta).
AWARDS IN ARCHITECTURE
The British Columbia Lumber Manufacturers Association Prize in
Architecture, $100 (best solution of design problem in which use
of wood predominates):
IVAN GEORGE MIRKO (Vancouver).
The Powell River Company  Limited  Prise, $25  (excellence in
some aspect of Planning):
BEVERLEY JAMES WENSLEY (Alberta)
AWARDS IN ARTS AND SCIENCE
The Ahepa Prise, $100 (proficiency in Final Year in Greek Stud-
ies):
CHANDRADAYE BEEBAKHEE (British West Indies).
The Armstead Prise in Biology and Botany, $50 (scholastic achievement and promise in research):
GERTRUDE D. PENTLAND (Vancouver).
The David olocan Memorial Prize, $25 (outstanding student in
Philosophy and Psychology):
SHEILA ANNE ROSS (Vancouver).
The Francis Midforth Painter Memorial Prize. $10 (outstanding
in History Seminar):
JOHN ALEXANDER BOVEY (Vancouver).
German Government Book Prise (proficiency in German):
GEORGE HECTOR FORBES (Lac la Hache).
The Morris Belkin Prise. $100 (best essay on Freudian psychology)}
DOROTHEA MARY ROSS (Vancouver).
The Slovanic Studies Graduation Prise, $100 (given by Mr. Walter
C. Koerner in honour of Dr. William J. Rose—highest standing in
Slavonic Studies):
MICHAEL GEORGE PEERS (Vancouver).
University Essay Prise, $25 (best undergraduate essay in Department of English, Final Year):
ROBERT STUART KIDD (Ioca).
AWARDS IN ENGINEERING
The American Institute of Chemical Engineers Award, Membership and Certificate (Final Year Chemical  Engineering student
with high scholastic rating in first two years):
RONALD ALFRED STERNE (Vancouver)
The Canadian Forest Products Limited Prize, $100 (high standing
in Forest Engineering):
RONALD KURT SAWATSKY (Vancouver)
The Machine Design Prize. $25 (for best design in course M.E. 463):
KENNETH LINCOLN SMITH (Victoria)
Engineering   Institute   oi   Canada   (Vancouver   Branch)   Walter
Moberly Memorial Prize, books, $25 (best engineering thesis :
RALPH GEORGE SULTAN  (Vancouver)
The Heavy Construction Association of British Columbia Graduation Prize, $50 (highest standing in course in highway engineering):
THOMAS WILLIAM LAURIENTE (Trail)
The H. R. MacMillan Prize in Forest Engineering, $100 (highest
standing in Forest Engineering ior B.A.Sc. degree):
JAMES ROBERT MARTIN BROCK (Harrogate)
The Ingledow Prize, $50 (general proficiency):
JOHN JOSEPH FALKLAND LOEWEN (Vancouver)
The Northern Electric Company Limited Prize, $100 (best scholastic record in final two years of Electrical Engineering):
BASIL DALL MATTERSON (Ladner)
The Timber Preserver's Limited Prizes (best nlans and specifications of structure oi treated timber in course CE 476):
First Prize, $65—
(Continued on Page 18)
See AWARDS Class
Will
We the Graduating Class of 1956, of the University of
British Columbia, being as sound of mind as stress and strain
of examinations and Bacchanalian revelry permit, hereby
revoke all former wills and testamentary dispositions and
declare this to be our class will and testament.
Know all men this will is made in contemplation of
graduation which has been arranged shortly hereafter to be
solemnized between ourselves and the university aforesaid.
We hereby appoint Donald E. Jabour and the undergraduate serfs to be executors and trustees of this our will, to faithfully administer the assets and adhere to the provisions hereinafter contained.
We hereby devise and bequeath the following:
1. To the Publication's Board: One vile rag.
2. To Students' Council to carry motions: The N.F.C.U.S.
Railroad.
3. To John Bossons: Salome, the only living Hammus Ala-
bamus pig.
4. To the Board of Governors: Bowling balls.
5. To Mike Ames: Life membership in the Players' Club.
6. To Buildings and Grounds: One large pot hole.
7. To Alade Akesode: A voodoo doll of Ron Bray to stick
pins into.
8. To the Engineers: A Latin motto: Blotz Est Mort.
9. To Professor MacPhee: One red engineer's sweater.
10. To Lynda Gates: A new set of bar bells.
Graduates
Win Two
Fellowships
Two graduate students at the
University of British Columbia,
James Edward Hardy of Vancouver and Ian Morley Duck of
North Kamloops, have been
awarded Imperial Oil fellowships for advanced studies in
physics.
Each fellowship is worth up
to $2,000 a year and may be
held for three years.
Both students will use the
award1 to help them study for
the degree of Ph.D. in physics
Mr. Hardy at P*rinceton and Mr.
Duck at the University of British Columbia.
Mr. Hardy received hU B.A.
in chemistry, mathematics and
physics from UBC in 195S and
is now working towards his
M.Sc. degree at UBC.
Mr. Duck, holder of several
undergraduate scholarships, obtained his B.Sc. degree in physics from Queens in 1955. He is
now working on his M.Sc. degree at UBC.
THE UBYSSEY
Monday, May 14, 1956
13
GOV. GENERAL MEDAL
(Continued from Page 3)
11. To John McLeod and Eddy Wilde: Frank Read and his
crew to keep them company on their way to Melbourne,
Australia.
12. To each member of the Administration: A parking ticket.
13. To the Provincial Government: The return of one acre of
U.B.C. pasture to graze the Socred cow.
14. To Dr. McKenzie: The moon, confident that should it ever
be required for the betterment of U.B.C, he will, as he
has always done in the past, devise some means of getting
it here.
15. To Dean Angus, whose presence, we suspect, will be missed
at the university even more than our own, we wish good
health and happiness and the hope that the traditions of'
scholarship and academic freedom that he has built on the
campus will forever be a part of U.B.C.
Signed, published and declared in the presence of the
Graduation Class of 1956, University aforesaid, as and for its
class will and testament. May, Nineteen Hundred and Fifty-six.
U.B.C. Graduation Class, 1956,
Robert B. Hutchison,
Class Solicitor.
Wanted to Train as Manager
Young man with two to four years' university, in Commerce or Arts. This is a splendid opportunity for a young
man wishing to enter the business field. He will receive
a very comprehensive training over an 18 months' period,
and eventually take charge of a small modern establishment, employing about 15 people, in Greater Vancouver.
Adequate salary, with automatic increases, will be paid
during training period, and merit increases may be earned.
This position requires a stable, personable individual with
leadership potential which can be developed during the
planned training period. Selected applicants will receive
aptitude testing at the expense of the hiring company to
assist in determining the likelihood of their success and
happiness in this job.
Please apply fully in writing:
c-o CONRAD M. LAMOND, Director
EMPLOYEE APPRAISAL & DEVELOPMENT
SERVICES
939 Hornby Street Vancouver 1, B. C.
university.
Mr. Yates completed his high
school in England, and then entered the Canadian navy for two
years. He worked for a construction company for another
four years, and "decided to
come to university."
His formula for success: "I
work 12 hours a day, on labs
and lectures, and at home, during the year, and eight hours a
day during exams."
During his three years at UBC
he has won five scholarships and
two prizes. They were: The
UBC Scholarship, for the highest standing in second year Arts;
the Dr. Isabelle McKinnis Prize,
for the highest standing in first
year German; the Papoor Singh
scholarship for pharmacy; the
Alaska Pine Scholarship for research; the Chemical Institute's
scholarship; and the Jonathan
Rodger Memorial scholarship
for pharmaceutical research.
Mr. Yates is still working hard
in the lab. "I am not going to
start celebrating until the night
of the Convocation Ball," he
said.
PARAPALEGIC BOM' HERE
AGAIN THIS SEPTEMBER
The University of Western Ontario "Mustangs" will
return to the UBC campus in the fall for another annual
Paraplegic Charity Bowl football game.
This series was initiated in 1952 when the UBC
travelled to .Montreal to be defeated 6-7 by the Magill
University team.
Since then, one game has been played in the west.
The game will take place Saturday, September 22,
probably in the afternoon. The "Sir Winston Churchill"
Trophy will be presented to the winning team.
Proceeds from the game will go to aid the Paraplegic
Fund of Canada. \
CONGRATULATIONS . . . GRADS
flu*****-
4538 West 10th Avenue
Photographer
and
Camera Sales
ALma 2404
WANTED
by Northwest Territories Gold Mine
Engineering Graduate for position of surveyor and
junior engineer.
Salary: $350.00 per month plus board
Apply to   .   .   .
Discovery Yellowknife Mines Limited
*    Yellowknife, N.W.T.
J
CONGRATULATIONS
to the
CLASS OF '56
from
Your UBC Alumni Association
UBC is interested in you after graduation-
We hope you will continue your interest in UBC
DON'T BECOME A "LOST SOUL"
When you marry, have children,
get a new job, change your address
DrcV a note to 201, Brock Hall, UBC
Vancouver, B. C. Conference, Conway, Commodore
Shaw Centennial, Share Stage
With Akesode, Asus, and Ames
THE UBYSSEY
Monday, May 14, 1956
14
COMPLIMENTS   .   .   .
MRS. F. M. GOW
Stenographer
4526 West 10th Avenue
ALma 3606-1866
Every Success   ...
SCIENTIFIC SUPPLIES
CO. LTD.
LABORATORY APPARATUS
Industrial, Assay, Clinical,
University and School Laboratories
650 Industrial TAtlow 2271
GROWING
DAIRY INDUSTRY
FURTHERS B. C.'s
PROSPERITY
Thirty-eight years ago, two employees—today over 800.
This is just one example of how Fraser Valley Milk Producers' Association, through its members, is helping to
further B. C.'s prosperity.
In economic value, these 38 years represent more than
200 million dollars—money returned to farmer members
for the purchase of milk, paid to employees in wages and
salaries, to allied industries for supplies, for the hauling
of milk and for many other important services.'
They represent, too, the confidence of this community in
the following quality products:
• Dairy land Milk Foods
• Pacific and Delta Evaporated Milk
*> Fraser Valley Butter
• Fraser Valley Cottage Cheese
• Fraser Valley Instant Sweetmilk Powder
• Arctic Ice Cream
FRASER VALLEY MILK
PRODUCERS' ASSOCIATION
Vane over, B.C.
It is now eight months since the students of the class of
1956 at the University of British Columbia returned from their
summer jobs to the campus. They came in truculent mood.
It rained, registration'was a nuisance, life was trying, and all
of them were snarling.
The first good tfting to happen was that a Leadership Conference called all the big wheels amongst them to Camp Elph-
ingstone, leaving the rest of the campus in comparative peace.
Observers at the camp were wondering whether, with nobody
present except leaders, there would be anyone available to
wash dishes, but the actual event presented no problems and
the rally was instructive and enjoyable for all. In its good
effect on subsequent campus activities, it is to be compared
with the noon-hour talk by Stephen Potter.
At this time the class began to be impressed by the super-
budget devised by A.M.S. Treasurer "Croesus" Conway, whose
simple but original idea was to give more money to everyone
except the LPP at no extra cost. Moreover he explained his
novel idea to the students in terms of quantity of refreshments,
a unit which was readily understood.
The universal snarls temporarily faded when the Thunderbird Football Team beat Western Washington to gain their first
Evergreen Conference victory in years, and again when tlie
rowing crew that had won international fame at Henley last
summer was introduced at the Fall General Meeting. What the
resolutions at that General Meeting were about is quite forgotten, but the way they were discussed is remembered. Large
numbers of well-organized engineers made the necessary decisions for the University, and Alade Akesode contributed by
rying to show that General Meetings are a comedy and that
the Arts Undergraduates Society is active.
One controversial gathering was followed by another, and
the next disturbance occurred during a speech by the LPP
chief, Tim Buck, who told his audience that there are no concentration camps in Russia. As a result one hungry student
was quite unable to eat the tasty apple from his lunch, and
others wondered where exactly to draw the line between intolerance and dumb inactivity.
At the Homecoming football game, undergrads and alumni
together packed the Stadium with traditional celebration as
they have in years past and wil lin many years to come. A
panel of judges endorsed the good taste of engineers by selecting Lily Dong as the girl most worth coming home to.
In mid November a spell of memorably cold weather soon
influenced campus fashions, and blue-and-yellow scarves 7Va
feet long became standard wear. Girls appeared in woolly
knee socks and ignored the protests of men who seemed to
prefer legs visible, even if frostbitten, to legs warm and covered w;th wool.
While the ground was still hard frozen, the campus was
invaded by three hundred girls from fifteen colorful teams,
come to play in the Pacific Northwest Grasshockey Championships. They found themselves welcome, and Union College
now boasts a fne collection of college beanies.
One of the last events before Christmas in which all faculties too kpart was the Arts Undergraduate Society Meeting.
It was considered a success, but the lawyers and engineers
who attended had to leave before the end of the meeting in
order to study for their Christmas exams.
The start of the spring term found fraternity men trying
to fit their heads into younger brothers' space helmets in
preparation for the Mardi Gras in Outer Space, while the
sophisticated A.M.S. President sang a touching duet with
Lorrane McAllister in support of the Muscular Dystrophy
Fund. Then came John Maynard's busy week, the Shaw Cen-
(Continued on Page 24)
See HISTORY
111 mTTrrTTvvvvvMtoM^LJ
Every Success, '56 Grads
Photographer for Faculties of
Av ■  and Applied Science
STUDIO
PHOTOCRAPHfR*
581    GRANVILLE
MA3625
TA 7937.
Social Science
Split To Form
Two Schools
The school of Social Science
will be split in September to
form two new schools.
A new department, Criminology, will be added to the departments of Anthropology and
Sociology to form the first of
the new schools. The other will
be the school of Economics and
Political Science.
Dean Henry Angus, head of
the former School of Social
Sciences, retires this year.
Dr. H. B. Hawthorne will
move up from head of the present Anthropology department to
lead the new Schol of Anthropology, Sociology, and Criminology.
John B. Deutch wil resign as
head of the Treasury Board in
Ottawa, to become Dean of the
new School of Economics and
Political Science.
Please patronize
our advertisers.
NOW OPEN
The Fabulous New
tt/landarin
(jatdenA
VANCOUVER'S
GAYEST
NITE CLUB
Dining
Dancing
Floor Shows
Music   by   Ray   Norland His Orchestra
$2.00 Includes Tax,
Dinner,  Dancing,
Floor Shows
Mandarin
195 East Pender Street
Open 9 p.m. to 4 a.m.
MUtual 3-3738 THE UBYSSEY
Monday, May 14, 1956
15
CONGRATULATIONS . . . GRADS
HEWER HARDWARE LTD.
4459 West 10th Avenue ALirn 1552
BEST WISHES GRADUATES
CONGRATULATIONS
STANDARD SHOE SERVICE
4437 West 10th Avenue ALma 0608
For the Finest of Its Kind
Engineering Equipment and Supplies
Artists' Materials
J. G. FRASER LTD.
621 West Pender Street
TAtlow 8484
r
*-»
ALL GOOD WISHES
TO THE GRADS
Varsity Automotive Service
Ltd.
J. J. SMITH — J. C. REID
IMPERIAL DEALER
10th Avenue West at Blanca
(University Gates)
ALma 1201
B. C. TEACHER'S
FEDERATION
Wishes the Graduating Class of 1956
every success in their
future endeavors.
1642 West Broadway
B Ay view 3197
CONGRATULATIONS GRADUATES
OF '56
UNIVERSITY PHARMACY LIMITED
1 x!z Blocks East of the" Empire Pool
ALma 0339
CONGRATULATIONS AND BEST WISHES
irom
DEAN'S
FINE FOODS
V; Dean's Chocolates and Pecan Opera Rolls
4489 West 10th Avenue
ALma 2596
Potronize
the
advertisers
in this
Graduation
Edition
Congratulations
EVERY SUCCESS TO THE
GRADUATING CLASS OF '56
THOMPSON, BERWICK & PRATT
ARCHITECTS^ WE UNIVERSITY
TO THE GRADUATES OF 1956
A one-year course in Librarianship leading to the degree
of Bachelor of Library Science is offered, for university
graduates, at the
LIBRARY SCHOOL
. UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO
The school provides a placement service and there are
good openings in various types of libraries including:
Public libraries for adults or children; university and
college libraries; government, business, scientific and
technical libraries.
All inquiries should be addressed to the Director, University of Toronto Library School, Ontario College of
Education, 371 Bloor Street West, Toronto 5.
Congratulations
1956 Graduates
WE WISH YOU
Many   line   accomplishments   in   the   years   ahead
I   .    .    .    touched with the warm glow of friendships
you enjoyed at U.B.C.
Stuart  Keate
Publisher
Bruce Hutchison
Editor
VICTORIA DAILY TIMES
VICTORIA, B. C.
EATON'S
Congratulations
and £eM WtiheA /<>/- the
future tc the
19B6 Cjraduatina ClaJJ
T EATON C
la      CANADA       ^^
o
uMiTce "I Remember The Time .
n
Activities Were Never Dull During
The Last Four University Sessions
17-jewel movements
made in Switzerland exclusively for Birks;
Noted for accuracy and long service.    ^
1
Ladies' 14kt. yellow
in white gold case,   50.00
Ladies' bracelet model with yellow top, stainless steel back, 26. ">0
Men's strap watch, yellow top, stainless steel
back, ' 12.50
Mail Orders
filled promptly
B 1 R K S
JEWELLERS
Serviced in Ttiri;* stores from const to coa<t
>      __
\\
ft
A GOOD PLACE TO WORK
1. A variety of interesting, jobs
for young men and women.
2. Good   starting   salary   and
regular scheduled increases.
3. Excellent promotional
opportunities.
4. Liberal pension, sickness and
death benefit plan.
5. Congenial surroundings.
6. Holidays and vacation with
pay.
7. Recreational activities.
Apply to:
B.C. TELEPHONE COMPANY
At least four years at UBC.
What do you remember? What
did you do?  What happened?
More than lectures. The last
four years have been a series of
noon hour meetings, sports,
Ubyssey-Council squabbles, Engineer's pranks, parties, the
Georgia, blunders, successes and
fun.
A general meeting turned into
a near riot. Frosh got dunked.
A student produced his own
paper to show his religious convictions. Political clubs fought
bitter arguments. Buildings were
opened.
Read the news stories which
tell of the UBC outside of the
lecture room for the last four
years.
October 9. 1952: Teacher
Training Student Milla Andrews
won a -$50.00 first prize and all
expense paid trip to Montreal
on the CBC radio program
"Singing Stars of Tomorrow."
October 21, 1952: AMS President Raghbir Basi was elected
president of the National Federation of Canadian University
Students, representing 40,000
students.
October 24, 1952: More than
30 "redblooded" engineers failed in an attempt to kidnap WUS
President Marion Brown from
a WUS pajama party in Brock
THE UBYSSEY
Monday, May 14, 1956
16
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE
GRADUATING CLASS
OF 1956
Qcooidu
LADIES' READY-TO-WEAR
4469 West 10th Avenue
ALma 3075
.    .   The welding industries are also making
a  significant contribution  to  the   industrial
progress of' British Columbia
ix
Scott-Foster Ltd.
"Your Welding Supply House"
1215 Clark Drive. Vancouver
HAstings 9340
CONGRATULATIONS and BEST WISHES
FOR FUTURE SUCCESS
from
NICK'S "NEW" GRILL
5778 University Boulevard
ALma 1679
Hall.
They were turned back by
Brock Proctor Bill Bradshaw's
threats of expulsion.
October 30, 1952: Ubyssey columnist AHan Fotheringham was
kidnapped by engineers and
chained to Birk's clock.
November 28, 1952: An emergency general meeting of tho
AMS voted to (1) condemn the
Senate Freshman ruling on Athletics, (2) investigate entrance'
into the Canadian Inter-Provincial Football League, and (3)
reject the institution of football
scholarships at UBC.
Seholarehlips were proposed
by Darrel Tepoorten, and CIPEL
participation was proposed by
Allan Goldsmith.
Anti-Semitic
January   6,    1953:   "We   are
against international finance and
most international Financiers are
Jews," said William Thompson,
a member of a five-man exec title who announced the formation of a Social Credit Club on
the campus after five years' absence.
Other members of the now
club (Roy Trimble, Vince Ven-
ables, John Redekop and John
Murdoch) denied sharing Thompson's views.
January 9, 1953: Social Credit
Club members relieved William
Thompson of his position as secretary of the club.
Meanwhile', Thompson accused
The Ubyssey of misquoting him,
and branded the Ubyssey's story
on formation, of the club 'yellow journalism."
The club's statement to The
Ubyssey said Thompson was ousted   because   he   "was   alleged
! to have made anti-semetic state-
I ments."   It   added   that   Social
; Credit "is diametrically opposed
to discrimination."
January 15, 1953: UBC foot-
; ball coach Jelly Andersen an-
! nounced his resignation. "I can-
j not harbor any enthusiastic per-
j spectives that will alter the cal:-
j bre of football of which, you,
| ihe student body and the alumni
! expect," he said.
February 10, 1953: AMS Pres:-
| dent Raghbir Basi announced he
' would   present   a   brief   to   the
B.  C. Electric demanding a  re-
j duction in student fares.
More Politics
February 13, 1953: Engineering student Campbell Robinso'.i
\ and Co-ed Janie Wright presented protests which left the AMS
election committee in a tangle.
Robinson demanded to be allowed to run for Junior Member, but the Election Committee ruled that Robinson's entrance into third year engineering would make him a senior
and ineligible.
Janie Wright defeated by Nan
Adamson in the race for President of WUS, demanded she be
acclaimed Junior Member. She
claimed that the extension of
time which allowed the other
candidates to post nominations
was unfair, since a defeated candidate has two days to file nominations for another position after   being   defeated.   This,   she
(Continued on Page 17)
See ACTIVITIES , ACTIVITIES WERE NEVER DULL
(Continued from Page 19)
claimed allowed her an exclusive 24-hour period in which to
file a nomination for Junior
Member. Miss Wright finally
withdrew her nomination.
February 24, 1953: UBC's
campus blood donor clinic closed
down because, said Red Cross
officials, students were not supporting it.
February 29, 1953: UBC claimed the Canadian Inter-Collegiate
Blod Drive's "Corpuscle Cup,"
as a result of students "responding" to the appeal for donations
the day the clinic closed.
March 5, 1953: Ex - football
coach Jelly Andersen, bitterly
denounced the admilnistration
for tis atttude toward athletics.
He blamed the poor showing of
UBC's football team on "the administration."
March 12, 1953: President N.
A. M. MacKenzie opened talks
with Dr. William Miller, president of the College of Dental
Surgeons of B.C., on the possibility of establishing a dental
school at UBC.
No Sole
March 13, 1953: B. C. Electric
President Dal Grauer told UBC
delegates Raghbir Basi, Vaughan
Lion, Johann Stoyva and Lorna
McDougall that his company
would grant no fare reductions
to UBC students.
March 17, 1953: Robert Osborne, head of UBC's Physical
Education Department and mem- j
ber of the British Empire Games !
facilities committee, announced
that UBC had been chosen as
the site for the swimming pool
to be used in the 1954 Games.
March 20. 1953: LSE Presi
denti   Johann   Styova   directed
, publishing of a one-page flyer
which denounced the War Memorial Gymnasium as a "Million
dollar glass palace." The flyer
was printed to bolster LSE's
fight for more money at a coming AMS meeting by cutting
MAD's budget.
March 20, 1953: General AMS
meeting voted to ask Faculty
Council to order UBC Greek
Letter societies to remove discriminatory clauses from their
charters "within one year."
March 24, 1953: The Inter-
Collegiate Blood Drive Trophy
was won by Mount Allison College of Nova Scotia.
September 25. 1953: EUS Vice-
President Monte McKay promised there would be "no retallia-
tion" on freshmen for their raid
on a regalia violation court established to prevent roughhouse
initiations.
Freshmen staged three raids
on the court, brandishing stirrup pumps and spraying engineers with water.
September 29, 1953s UBC
Thunderbirds defeated the scrub
team of the B.C. Lions 11-1 for
the football team's first victory
in almost two years.
October 14, 1953: The campus
blood clinic closed down because
of a rush of donors which left
nurses short of equipment.
October 16 1953: Arts student
Archie McGugan sought Student
Council permission to form a
Labor-Progressive Club on the
campus.
October 27 1953: Students ejected hecklers who threatened to
break up the first meeting of
the newly-formed LPP club,
wJiich featured as speaker foun-
CONGRATULATIONS
to the
GRADUATING CLASS
and many thanks for your patronage
this last year.
CAMPUS FLORISTS
4528 West 10th Avenue ALma 3351
Night phone: ALma 3173-R
der Archie MeGugnn.
November 17, 1953: UBC's
rowing team swamped Oregon
State by five lengths to win the
Egg Cup.
Students talked of UBC representation in the British Empire
Games rowing events.
December 4, 1953: A group
of UBC students burned Chicago
Tribune publisher Robert G. Mc-
Cormick in effigy as a protest
against his paper's support of
Wisconsins Senator Joseph McCarthy.
A long telegram was also sent
to MeCormick by the students
who were alter billed 14 for
the message. Payment was
made after the effigy-burners
took up a campus collection.
Deon Gage
January 22, 1954: Dean
Walter Gage humiliated RCMP
by breaking up a wild snowball
fight in front of the library
which the "'men in red' had
failed to end after half an hour
of demands and pleas.
February 4. 1954: The Ubyssey appeared with its page
three half-empty as a demonstration against low standards in
faculty ediitons. The page, de-
(Continued on Page 21)
See ACTIVITIES
THE UBYSSEY
Monday, May 14, 1956
17
CONGRATULATIONS
EVA LINE'S BEAUTY BARR
4554 West 10th Avenue ALma 081t
CONGRATULATIONS GRADUATES
Collins &> Collin*
CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS
*
:
470 Granville
MArine 0564
1
CONGRATULATIONS
to the
CLASS OF '56
UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORE
Owned and Operated by
The University of B. C.
E=mc2
The above equation, after going three fast
rounds with a printer, means something pretty
cosmic, such as output equals input less sales
tax or never draw to an inside straight. Therefore, we use it to symbolize the great lesson
of life which now faces all UBC Graduates,
which is that you get out of it what you put
into it, minus deductions for wear and tear.
And, in closing, we also wish to express our
sincerest good wishes to all graduates and our
hope that their future may be happy and
fruitful.
Writer*!
One reason why so
many people (the majority, in fact) prefer
to read The Vancouver
Sun is that, to coin a
phrase, The Sun Has
the Writers. For Canada's most thoughtful
and entertaining columnists read The Vancouver Sun!
®k Sunday %m
VANCOUVER'S HOME-OWNED NEWSPAPER THE UBYSSEY
Monday, May 14, 1956
18
B4:• PsS£t yt^Jn m mim *y *
t
1 >'-*m,
j^^^f'V > , > *         *"       ' » **t „•* ?:   !*■   f
f
railtfif^      «* • <        ?                         ►
i .
, /*       '
^PS^^jl  *S^si*Vjl>*^^*«^S>*%^#^i-»^   ■*   **   »«r     »     «^V     **»,*».   v^K   .,»   *  »
I.** I»
iM^i^ttt^    *
■* i b^l^l^f!
°* *     Alt
**;*
Si**'**
Mexlical Building for nursing students at Vancouver  Geneial  Hospital   is  shown  here,
Planned for expansion is UBC's proposed
Medical Science Building. The three-storey
unit to the left houses Biochemistry, the
unit in the right background the Anatomy
and Pharmacology Departments. The unit
in the center background houses Physiology, Pathology and Neurology. Each unit
can expand independently of the others.
I   5* "*J
This is a sketch of one of the three new
dormitories that are being built on campus.
Construction will begin this summer, and
should be completed by the fall of 1957.
There will be three dorms similar to the
one pictured above, and a large common
room designed for the relaxation and riotous living of the dormitory inhabitants. The
new dorms, when completed, will be situated off in the bush somewhere.
AWARDS
(Continued from Page 13)
JOHN JOSEPH FALKLAND LOEWEN (Vancouver)
Second Prize—
JOHN MacKECHNIE MacLEOD (Vancouver)
Third Prize—
GEORGE SWAINE PRINCE (Vancouver)
Merit Awards, $15 each—
RONALD PHILLIP DODGE (Barriere)
KENNETH RONALD SMITH (Nanaimo)
JOHN ALEXANDER WATSON (Vancouver)
AWARDS IN HOME ECONOMICS
The B.C. Electric Company Service Award in Home Economicj
(twelve-months course at Home Economics Service Centre of
Company, $12002):
LOIS MARGARET CARLSON (Vancouver)
The  Lillian  Mae  Westcot  Priae,   $30  (outstanding  in  f eld  oi
clothing and textiles):
MARGARET MAUREEN SNYDER (Langley)
The Lower Mainland Dietetic Association Scholarship in 'Home
Economics, $100 (high standing, proceeding to dietetic interneship):
MYFANWY ROSALIND PEGGY SLUGGETT (North Van.)
The Singer Sewing Machine Company Prix* (portable electric
sewing machine—high standing and skill m clothing and textiles,
and entering field of teaching):
VERNA JEAN GRAHAM (Victoria)
AWARDS IN LAW
The Canada Law Book Company Prite (books—for highest standing in ihe subject of Conflict of Laws:)
KENNETH STANLEY FAWCUS (Vancouver)
The Canada Permanent Mortgage Corporation Prite, $50 (highest
standing in the subject of Mortgages):
ROBERT BRUCE HUTCHISON (Vancouver)
The Carswell Company Limited Prise (books—highest standing):
MARY RENDINA KATHLEEN HOSSIE (West Vancouver)
The H. Carl Goldenberg Book Prite (high standing):   •
JESSIE FRANCES ELAINE EVANS (North Vancouver)
The Norgan Essay Prite, $50 (for contribution to "Legal Notes"):
RICHARD ROBERT RALPH JOSEPH HOLMES (Vancouver)
AWARDS IN MEDICINE
The Dean M. M. Weaver Medal (outstanding record and progress
in the four-year course):
JAMES ALAN HERD (Vancouver)
The Dr. Frank Porter Patterson Memorial Scholarship. $150 (high
standing, special interest in orthopaedic surgery and proceeding
to interneship):
JOHN GORDON WATT (Vancouver)
The Dr. Walter Stewart Baird Memorial Prise, $50 (best graduation
dissertation):
DWIGHT IRVING PERETZ (Vancouver)
The Health Officers' Prise in Preventive Medicine and Public
Health, $100 (greatest interest in and contribution to Public Health
and Preventive, Medicine):
GEORGE WILLIAM SLEATH (Vancouver)
The Horner Prite. $100 and Gold Medal (highest aggregate standing in the four-year course in the subject 'of Medicine):
JOHN VERNON GEORGE HALL (Vancouver)
Tho Ingram  It  Bell  Limited Prise  (special prize for  all-round
qualities and record):
JOHN DONALD HUTCHINS (Vancouver)
The  Samuel  and  Rebecca  Nemets  Memorial  Scholarship.  $100
(special aptitude for medical research):
ELEANR PAMELA JOW (Vancouver)
AWARDS IN PHARMACY
The Cunningham Prite in Pharmacy, $50 (most outstanding record
in all years of course):
GWENDOLYN FAYE QUEN LEONG (Vancouver)
The Dean E. L. Woods Memorial Prite (donated by the Pharmaceutical Association of the Province of British  Columbia),  $50
(most outstanding  record  in practical  and  theoretical  parts  of
pharmaceutical subjects): a
PETER JOSEPH JANIEWICK (Chilliwack)
The Marck Awards (books—highest standing in Pharmaceutical
Chemistry):
PETER JOSEPH JANIEWICK (Chilliwack)
GWENDOLYN FAYE QUEN LEONG (Vancouver)
The   Pharmacy   Alumni   Book   Prize   (best   all-round   potential
pharmacist):
AWARDS MADE BY OTHER INSTITUTIONS
The Athlone Scholarships  (travel,  tuition  and  maintenance   for
two years of study in United Kingdom in engineering fields):
THOMAS MICHAEL  HARRIS  (Abbotsi'ord)
PETER HARVEY (Prince Rupert)
KENNETH LINCOLN SMITH (Victoria)
JOHN PORTER SUTHERLAND (Rossland)
The Exhibition of 1851 Overseas Science Scholarship (£450 per
annum for two years):
CHARLES BASIL MANSFIELD BAILEY (Vancouver)
Imperial Oil Graduate Research Fellowships, (S1250 a year each
for a maximum of three years) (for graduate study and research
in Physics):
IAN MORLEY DUCK (Kamloops)
JAMES EDWARD HARDY (Vancouver)
The International Nickel Company of Canada. Limited, Graduate
Research  Fellowship,  $1500  (research   in  Physics,  pertaining   to
metals):
CLARENCE DONALD COX (Moncton. N.B.)
(Continued on Page 27)
See AWARDS THE UBYSSEY
Monday, May 14, 1956
19
ART STUDENTS, long noted for their disdain of the other disciplines, will have cause to admit the architects' and engineers' superiority
in the construction of the Faculty's new building. The erection of the
Arts "House" which will begin this fall, is expected to be finished by
the fall of 1958, according to the university architects, Thompson, Berwick, and Pratt. It will be situated next to the Women's Gymnasium
where the present tennis courts are seeing their final days.
?
%,
Y.XXHA ROOM for extra-curricular activities will be provided by the S:U)l),ll()l> extension to Brock Hall to be bu.'lt
this   war.    The   Extension   features  additional  club   room
space and recreational facilities such as billiard and pin
pany tables. For o Liftetime
CAREER OPPORTUNITY
See the
Empire life Insurance Co.
815 West Hastings Street, Vancouver PAcific 8377
Maurice E. Thomas, C.L.U., Manager
MD5T
HDU5EWIVE5
CHOOSE
K Ikiun
^fei^te
THE UBYSSEY
Monday, May 14, 1956
20
Asian Studies Program
To Begin In September
President MacKenzie has termed the university's new.
program of Asian Studies "one of the most important post war
developments".
Congratulations    .    .    .
Totem Shoes
Mesh Flatties by Savage
$7.95
4514 W. 10th      ALma 1245
Every Success   .   .   .   Graduates of 1956
GENERAL EQUIPMENT
LIMITED
1r
Power  Plant  Heating  and  Ventilating  Equipment
Ceilin« Air Diffusers
tJt
224 West 5th Avenue
EMerald 888)
CONGRATULATIONS   AND
BEST WISHES CLASS OF '56
J. AA. Dent and Sons
(CANADA) LTD.
Toronto
Vancouver
The new courses, which will
begin in September, will for the
first time enable Canadian stu*
dents to major in this field.
The Univeriity of Toronto is
the only other Canadian Univeri
sity offering a full course in
Asian Studies.
PROFESSOR NAMED
Dr. MacKenzie announced the
appointment of Ronald R. Dore
to the UBC faculty, to lecture
in Japanese language and institutions.
From 1944-47, Mr. Dore was
with the British Intelligence
corps as instructor in Jananese
at the school of African and Or-
, iental studies, University of London. He is now in Japan collecting material for a book he hopes
to  write. '
SOWARD   IN  CHARGE
Professor F. H. Soward, recently appointed associate Dean
of Graduate Studies, will be responsible for developing Asian
Studies in his position as director of International Studies,
Patronize
the
advertisers
in this
.    Graduation
Edition
of
"The Ubyssey"
CONGRATULATIONS
AND ALL BEST WISHES
TO UBC GRADUATES
No field of endeavor
offers more opportunity
to the men and women
of tomorrow
than the
PROVINCE OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT    OF    TRADE
AND    I N D USTRY
PARLIAMENT   BUILDINGS.   VICTORIA',   B.C.
T. L. Sturgess
Deputy Minister
Hon. Ralph Chetwynd
Minister
Congratulations!
DONUTS AM COFFEE
After Class . . . After the Dance
ANYTIME
DO-NUT  DINER
4556 West 10th Avenue   .   .   .   Just west of Sasaitwt
Phone ALma 3580
DO-NUTS FOR SOCIAL FUNCTIONS
CONGRATULATIONS
RADIO RENTAL & REPAIR
Westinghouse Home Appliances
4453 West 10th Avenue ALma 2244
Best Wishes to the   .   .   .
GRADUATES OF 1956
ELOISE STREET
TYPING
ESSAYS.   THESES.   MANUSCRIPTS,
MIMEOGRAPHING
ALma 0655-R Campus Rales
I ACTIVITIES
(Continued from Page 17)
voted to the Home Economics
Faculty, carried an Item which
branded the copy turned in by
Home Ec. as unfit for a university newspaper.
February 25, 19S4. EUS Vice-
President Monte McKay was
kidnaped by Publications Board
members on the eve of the Engineers' Ball, and taken to a
cabin at Cultus Lake. The
Ubyssey feigned puzzled ignorance.
February 26, 1954: Ubyssey
Editor-in-Chief Allan Fother-
Ingham, Executive Editor Jer
erne Angel and reporter Bruce
McWilliams were kidnaped by
pubsters in a wild brawl in
front of the Commodore Cabaret.
March 23, 1954: Canada was
horrified as UBC students voted
to retain a measure which
forced Student Council to suspend two religious clubs, the
Newman Club and the Varsity
Christian Fellowship, because of
"discriminatory clauses" in their
charters.
Selpember 29, 1954: Ubyssey
news editor Stanley Beck was
barred from a meeting of the
Men's tAhletic Committee
Committee chairman Dean A.
W. Matthews explained to Beck
that it was the feeling of the
MAC that they would not have
freedom of discussion if a Ubyssey reporter was in attendance.
Brock Burns
October 26, 1954: Fire consumed the entire centre roof of
Brock Hall in a blaze believed
to have been started from a cigarette. UBC and Vancouver
firemen, students and COTC
cadets joined the attempt to
cave the building, but experts
etsimated  the  loss   at  250,000.
Dick Underhill called an emergency meeting to confer with
University architects Sharp,
Thompson, eBrwick & Pratt, to
discuss and immediate start on
rebuilding.
Pool Roof
January 14, 1955: A 100-sig-
nature demanding that the swimming pool issue he put before
the students at a general meeting was presented to Students'
Council.
The action followed a Council
recommendation that students
scrap the idea of roofing Empire
pool and instead build a second
roofed pool.
February 9. 1955: The Men's
Athletic Association, representing all campus sports, went on
record as opposing formation of
a Western Interprovincial Football Union until other universities offered a "more round and
extensive program and better
competitive conditions."
March 5, 1955: Despite freezing temperatures, UBC played
host to over 50,000 people in
the third tri-annual Open House
display. The project was rated
a huge success and news of a
435-acre land grant (enough to
6atisfy all future needs of the
university) came as a pleasant
surprise to University officials
September 20. 1955: Thunderbird football hopes suffered
a serious blow when star quarterback Gordie Flemons suffered
a dislocated shoulder in an exhibition game against Vancouver Cubs which sidelined him
for the rest of the season.
UBC lost 9-7.
Engineers
September 22, 1955: Engineers met their Waterloo today I
when battered Freshmen turned on surprised and chagrined
Redshirts and dumped them in
(Continued on Page 22)
(See ACTIVITIES)
Every Success, '56 Gradsj
Photographer for Faculties of
Arts and Applied Science
fTUDIO   •
HOTOGRAPHtn*
SSI    GBflNVILLt     __
THE UBYSSEY
Monday, May 14, 1956
21
SOCCER
ABERDEEN F. C. vs. EVERTON F. C.
(Scotland) (England)
EMPIRE STADIUM
JUNE 9th - Kickoff 8 p.m.
Reserve Seat Tickets  (inc.  tax)  $3.00, $2.50,  $1.50
* NOW ON SALE AT:
Hicks Ticket Bureau, 610 Dunsmuir St.. Vancouver
Ivor Williams Sporting Goods, 2064 West 4lit Ave., Van.
White Spot Service Station, 9019 Granville St.. Vancouver
Holiday Style Shop, 1321 King«way, Vancouver
Ken's Men's Wear, 3920 East Hastings St.. North Burnaby
Royal Oak Drugs. 3370 Kingsway. South Burnaby
Fred Smith, 1319 Esplanade St., North Vancouver
Fred & Ron's Sporting Goods. 1576 Marine Dr., West Van.
Swanson's Sporting Goods, 430 Columbia St.. New Westr.
Attention Fraser Valley Patrons!
contact your local Pacific Stage Lines agent.
For special package tour rates to this event, please
Best Wishes to Grads of '56
Every Success in
Your Future Endeavours
"THE COLLEGE SHOP"
4409 West 10th Avenue
ALma 2306
Exclusive Imports from Germany
Wools, Needle Point, Petit Point
GIFT ARTICLES
Knitted Goods by Bleyle
Also Made to Measure Articles
HOMECRAFT IMPORTERS
2348 West 4th Avenue CHerry 2614
B. Comm. - CA:
Interested in Commerce?
In Chartered Accountancy?
Telephone or write now to the Secretary of
The Institute of Chartered Accountants of B.C.
or contact the Accounting Division of the
School of Commerce and ask for details of the
B.Comm.-CA. Plan.
602 STOCK EXCHANGE BUILDING
PAcific 3264 THE UBYSSEY
Monday, May 14, 1956
22
CONGRATULATIONS
UNICRAFT SHOE SERVICE
4607 West 10th Avenue
ALma 0029
CONGRATULATIONS
MOLL IE CARTER
4347 West 10th Avenue ALma 1140
YOUR CENTRE
for ART SUPPLIES
RAMON SHIVA — F. WEBER CO.
5760 University Boulevard
ALma 0090
Compliments . . . Grads
TRIMBLETON'S BAKERY
4425 West 10th Avenue ALma 0444
COMPLIMENTS OF
BOULTBEE, SWEET & CO. LMITED
Insurance and Real Estate
555 Howe Street
Vancouver 1, B. C.
Sueccess to Graduates of '56
JACK JANZEN
SHELL SERVICE
■ir
10th Avenue and Discovery
ALma 1707
Jw People on
The Waif up . . .
BEST WISHES GRADUATES!
." .    .   every success in your future endeavors
Campus J)nn
4423 West 10th Avenue ALma 2481
Between Trimble and Sasamat
-ZZZZIIZZZZSEl
Dueck looks forward to
filling your automobile
requirements for now
. . . and in your successful years to follow.
Canada's Largest Automobile Dealer
Congratulations to the
Graduating Class of '56
VARSITY CYCLE SHOP
THE '-LAWNMOWER SHOP"
4357 West 10th Avenue ALma 0023
* Cadillac
* Oldsmobilc
* Chevrolet
ON BROADWAY1
CEdar 4111
BEST WISHES AND EVERY SUCCESS
CAVE
& COMPANY
LIMITED
SCIENTIFIC INSTRUMENTS and
CHEMICALS
567 Hornby Street
Vancouver, B. C.
Congratulations and Success
in Your Future Endeavors .  .  .
Remember
for Refaxing and Entertainment  Needs
Visit
WARD'S MUSIC LTD.
Another firm musically confident  in B. C.'s growth
412 West Hastings TAtlow 6545
In Victoria: 1320 Broad Street
2-8146
The Home of "Pizza Pie'
Congratulates tho Graduates
of   19.51)
Angela's at Robson and Richards
T Allow 1812
For Dinner Parties,  Italian Style
Visit the
Contadino  Room
ACTIVITIES
(Continued from Page 21)
their own portable lilypond.
The crowds cheered as lone
sciencemen streaked across the
lawn with umbrella - brandishing Frosh in hot pursuit.
September 30, 1955: A seven-
foot-high rubber bottle stolen
after the Frosh reception turned up atop the ten-metre diving  tower  at Empire  Pool.
October 7. 1955: Seven discussion groups went on continually during the two day First
Annual Leadership Conference
held at Camp Elphinstone last
weekend. Topics ranged from
Student Faculty Relations to
t h e Role of Publications on
Campus.
Brock Extension
October 21, 1955: A motion
proposing 'a $250,000 extension
on Brock Hall was unanimously approved by students at the
fall   AMS   general   meeting.
Motions proposing a quorum
increase and honariums for
Ubyssey editors were soundly
defeated.
October 25, 1955: Student
Council Monday night ordered
the Investigating Committee under chairman Dave Hemphill to
look into the matter of students
conduct during the Bellengham
Invasion.
October 27. 1955: "We should
withdraw from NFCUS and let
the organization collapse," said
student council President Ron
Bray, reporting on a recent convention. Bray suggested that
UEC take the initiative in setting up an alternative organization similar to the more informal
PSPA conference.
November 3, 1955: Student Investigating Committee planned
to investigate the behavior of
students at an LPP meeting featuring party leader Tim Buck.
Students attempted to disrupt
the meeting by throwing fruit
and lunches at Buck.
The Committee also probed
the ection of students who were
involved in a tussle with LPP
party members when they attempted to remove a banner
from the stage at the end of the
meeting.
i Dry
November 4. 1955: Homecoming brawls became a thing of
' the past when faculty officials
i laid down the law regarding the
j consumption of alcohol at cam-
j pus functions.
| Plans called for the Armouries
| to be patrolled by Commission-
! aires.
| November 8. 1955: Two hun-
i dred university students left
I their studies to spend a wet
, and sleepless night aiding vic-
: tims beseiged by floods in North
I Vancouver.
November 17, 1955: First General Meeting of the Arts and
Science Undergraduates Society
fizzled when only 60 artsmeu
turned up.
Quorum was 100.
Council President Ron Bray
commented "I think this is indicative of the lack of interest
among artsmen."
Akesode was dismayed.
November 18. 1955: The Ubyssey became Vancouver's leading
football newspaper when Editor
Stan Beck announced the appointment of B. C. Lions star
Rae Ross as Ubyssey Football
Editor.
Vile Rag
January 5, 1956: The Ubyssey
made natio.i-wide headlines as
the "vilest rag you can imagine,"
following charges made by Rev.
(Continued on Page 25)
See ACTIVITIES Professor F. J. Soward, appointed dean of International
Studies in the recent split of
the Social Science Department, spoke at the UBC graduation reunion of the Convocation and Alumni Association
in April. His subject: Germany and Japan, ten years
after. The annual reunion,
previously held in the fall of
each year, will in future become a regular spring event
of the University Calendar.
John James Deutsch will
leave a government position
in Ottawa to take over the
School of Economics and Political Science from Dean Henry Angus who retires this
year.
Please patronize
our advertisers—
they help to
support us.
Congratulations
to the
Graduating Class
Whether  for home or
business
our office .stationery and
printing departments
will serve you
in many  ways
STATIONERY &
PRINTING  CO. LTD.
1035 Seymour Street
Congratulations to the Graduates
Pitman's Business College Lid.
1490 West Broadway CHerry 7848
THE UBYSSEY
Monday, May 14, 1956
23
EVERY SUCCESS
<&ad&L fiaajufy* SakwL
FOR COURTESY AND SERVICE
4447 West 10th Avenue
ALma 0616
Best Wishes
To U.B.C. Graduating Class of '56
Frank Tearoe Construction
Co. Ltd.
1424 Clyde, West Vancouver
West 1792
Congratulations to the Graduates
Thanks for your co-operation
A welcome to next year's grads
TRIMBLE SERVICE GARAGE
4494 West 10th Avenue Vancouver, B. C.
ALma 1531
f    you'd find MORE at a duck dinner!
'   i	
Take all the impurities from a pig of Tadanac lead and a slab of Tadanac zinc.
You wouldn't have enough foreign material to make live BB pellets.
You'd find more shot in a three-pound mallard!
A pig of Tadanac lead weighs 100 lbs; a Tadanac zinc slab, 56 lbs. Yet their combined 156 lb. wcijht
contains impurities totalling less than 1,10 of an ounce!
Metals in today's markets must meet exacting conditions. Exceptional purity is a common
requirement; the complete removal of certain minor metals or alternatively the
addition of others to meet specific conditions is often necessary.
The problem of matching the product to the market is constantly under study by
Cominco's Sales and Research divisions. Cominco engineers are glad to work with customers to
answer their needs—and, if necessary, '"tailor-make" a metal or an alloy for their use.
1906-1956
O U   ft        50TH        ANNtV.H.ARV
THE     CONSOLIDATED      MINING      AND     SMELTING     COMPANY      OF     CANADA      LIMITED
MONTREAL,     QUEBEC-TRAIL.      BR!   T  I   5 H     COLUMBIA THE UBYSSEY
Monday, May 14, 1956
24
Compliments of
UNIVERSITY TRANSFER
LIMITED
4217 West 13th Avenue
ALma 1005
CLASS HISTORY
BEST WISHES
'      CLASS OF '56
Ward and Son Ltd.
CONTRACTORS
709 Agnes New Westminster
LAkewood 2-6841
Patronize
advertisers
in this
Edition
WM. SCOTT & CO.
LTD.
1426 Cottrell Street
PAcific 9591
Oldest and largest
poultry and egg wholesale
in British Columbia
l^ttfcjttmy'ftag (EwttjMmg
INCORPORATED 2»»   MAY  IC70
To the Graduating Class
of '56 . . . our heartiest
Congratulations!
(Continued from Page 14)
tennial, culminating in a lengthy production of Back to
Methuselah, which was so good that it justified the numbness
obtained by sitting through it.
Meanwhile the Rugby boys were playing five good teams
at a time. The Soccer team led by Bud Frederickson was
achieving its record of only one loss in thirteen games. The
Basketballers, inspired by the fabulous John McLeod, had
started on the road that took them within a few points of the
B. C. Championship. And Bob McLean was busy coaching the
Women's Ski Team in vain hopes that the Administration
would accept him as chaperon for the team trip to the states.
The Engineers were decorating the university with bright
reminders of the forthcoming Engineers' Ball.
Students' Council charged the cost of cleaning up this
advertising to the engineers, and that fired the smouldering
disagreement between the Engineering Undergraduate Society
and the South Brock Crowd. A spectacular squabble broke
out which kept the student body entertained for days. There
were charges and counter-charges. Some said that Geoff Conway was going to withhold money from the engineers, others
that Ken Smith was keeping money due to the A.M.S. Before
it was finally discovered who was kidding who, the quarrel was
cleverly patched by electing two engineers to council, which
shows once again the ingenuity of voters.
This neat solution to the foremost campus problem brought
about an unprecedented era of constructive quiet. President
MacKenzie went on a holiday fishing trip. Mike Ames settled down to write about B. C. Indians, the rake John Bossons
advised fellow students about Geisha girls, Ralph Sultan
hired his fraternity brother Henning Brasso to carry soot
away from the Engineering Building, and Bob Morford got
his shorts mended ready for the final rugger games. Even the
Spring Blood Drive was relatively peaceful, as a multitude
of inducements such as door-prizes, kisses, medals, cookies,
cokes and coffee made additional fuss unnecessary.
Just as people were feeling guiltily that it was time to
start finding out what books were supposed to be read for
the final exams, the sun appeared and continued to shine so
merrily that attempts to stay indoors and study were hopeless.
The girls started camping in tents in front of the dorms, and
the physical education class took to birdwatching. But the
weather didn't worry John Palmer, as he was sure of placing
first in the class in Agricultural Engineering.
To their surprise and pleasure, the graduating class defeated those exams, which is why they are now gathered under
the leadership of their president, Bruce Williams, to complete
the story of the Class of 1956. —John Loewen.
IIIHH111    Every Success, '56 Grads
Photographer for Faculties of
Arts and Applied Science
rHOTOCRirHim
58!    GRANVILLE ^
MA-US
TtDio «TA7957>
Complete Laundry and Dry Cleaning
Services
IXL
Laundry and Dry Cleaners
Dickens 1155 AUSTIN A-50 CAMBRIAN
$1799
Details - Demonstration - Delivery
Call
GORDON BROS.
CEdar 8106
10th Avenue and Alma
BEST WISHES GRADUATES
BOB'S QUALITY MARKET
4491 West 10th Avenue
ALma 0100
Complimsinidu . . .
GRADS OF 1956
FROM MANAFER and STAFF
S AS AM AT 5 & 10
ALma 1013
Best Wishes and Success
to the Graduates of '56
Jhsi fonnoi&kuA &hopL
GIFTS and CHINA
4433 West 10th Avenue
ALma 1520-R
UBYSSEY
BEAUTY SALON
ANN GRAHAM
CONGRATULATES THE
GRADS OF '56
It has been our pleasure to serve many of the students
during the semester now closing. We extend our hearty
thanks for your patronage and hope to see you patronize
us in the future.
5726 University Boulevard
ALma 1909
ACTIVITIES
(Continued irom Page 22)
E. C. Pappert, at a Canadian University Press Conference in Toronto.
January    10.    1835: U. B. C.
Thunderbirds Basketball Team
started their 1956 season by winning the first two games. This
equalled the best that the Birds
had done in Evergreen Conference play.
Previous to this the team's
best year was 1955 when they
won two games during the whole
season.
January 17, 19S5: Arts and
Science Undergraduates Society
formed a committee under Tom
Wilson to investigate the "buffoonery of the Student's Council."
January 27, 19S8: UBC Engineers won their third contest of
the season by defeating the Aggies to claim the Bucking Bronco
Riding crown.
Earlier in the year the Redshirts had established themselves
as chariot racing and spitting
champions.
McLeod Stars
January 31, 1956: John Mc-
Leod's spectacular 41 point performance led UBC Thunderbird's
to 70-68 upset basketball victory over the Central Washington Wildcats.
In the second, game of the
series UBC defeated Central
59-55 io win their fifth contest
of the season.
Each win sev a new record
for UBC in Evergreen conference play.
(Continued on Page 27)
See ACTIVITIES
THE UBYSSEY
Monday, May 14, 1956
25
wmmimmmm^^mMmmm
mmmm®
full-fashioned
0Z%
blossoms forth this ^-.fiT K
blossoms forth this S^tfl^lKJ-tjet
in six incredibly beautiful new sweaters!
You'll never look sweeter, or tuattr.,. dainty collars
enchanting tcoop and v-necks... some extravagantly
jewelled, braided . . . all hand finisbtJ!
Twenty-two vibranrhigh-tashion colours
in Kitten-soft Ptttal Orltn. Easy to
care for. . . keeps its shape ... flattersyturs!\
Lambswool, too, at better stores everywhere.
16.95 to $8.95. Jewelled
and braided extra. ^-^a^BsW      >X
fir tit
nam
<%,
BEST WISHES
TO THE CLASS OF '56
U.B.C. SERVICE STATION
COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICING
Roy Hand, Proprietor  ,
2180 Allison Road ALma 0524
(Just off University Boulevard)
#>
"Ti
\
fl
mm
B IH
...onyour Future
Your  Campus Branch    .    .    .
in the Administration Building
MERLE C. K1RBY. Manager
o-2iei THE UBYSSEY
Monday, May 14, 1956
26
/„ ■  ■' .       *   J>
.   .   .   WHEN   IT  ALL  BEGAN   .   .   .
there wasn't much more than a lonely
shack, a pile of stones and a forest. This is
a view taken from a standpoint near the
present Chemistry building, of the Univer
sity of British Columbia campus May 13,
1924. At this time, the university architects were making far-reaching plans toward the erection of present buildings.
A GENERATION LATER with the building of the university bus stop, British Columbia had a strapping universty on its
hands.    Outgrowing  the  encircling forest,
this view from the Chemistry building
shows (from left) the Agriculture, Arts,
Administration (behind) forest and Geology buildings and the auditorium (far side).
t*t
;saH>-i
*■**<*• »*«-*
sg.j***T',i
'JMi*T .Jm
Prophecy
Several members of the class of '56 were studying hypnosij--
not trying to find out what had happened in their former lives,
but attempting to investigate their future life. Their experiments worked only once, but this was enough for the hypnotic
subject, who was projected into the year 1981, to investigate
some of the* activities of some of the members of his graduating class. The following is compiled from answers he made to
questions asked of him while he was under hypnosis.
"I see Alade Akesode who i.s stirring up riots in Nigeria.
^Ie is urging that the people unite against the rulers of the
country and institute a new type of parliamentary government. In Russia, a U.B.C. hockey team, coached by Mo Cunningham, has just won an invitational match against the top
Soviet team. The U.B.C. team, having recently won the Olympics, is judged to be the greatest amateur hockey team of all
ime.
Dr. Michael Harris, after having rowed for several internationally famed English crews, has recently been appointed to
he post of head of the Physics Department at Oxford. Another
member of the class of '56, Stuart Clyne, is now director of
Lloyds of London and commutes by plane between London
ind his yacht moored at Capri. Also in Europe, Jacques Bar-
beau, internationally known playboy, this year has won the
award for the best-dressed man in the world. It is rumoured
'hat his success is due to his connections with the Jantzen
sweater company. i
The famed brother and sister team, Ann and John Wil-
loughby, are now co-directors of the former Mayo Clinic. They
have performed many cures by simply recommending that
heir patients learn to ski. Another ex-nurse, Linda Reeves,
laving won the Mrs. America contest for three consecutive
vears, has now retired from public life and is attempting to
'ive quietly with her ten children in Atlantic City.
An important man in political circles is John Bossons.
vho i.s president of the former United Nations, now called
Divided Nations. He travels between Lake Success and Geneva in a rocket ship designed by that eminent physicist, David
Hemphill.
The legal advisor for the C.N.R. is Ron Bray, who was
:hosen for this position because of his railroading experiences
at U.B.C. His qlose friend, Geoffrey Conway, a financial
wizard, is reported to have made several millions on the stock
narket. ■ •* #•'
The B. C. Lions have fired their 15th coach and Flemons
and Hudson have taken over the coaching responsibilities.
Faint hopes are held for the year. Dr. Nestman and Dr.
Stewart are opening a clini? for the treatment of wounded and
ageing Lions' players.
There are several members of the class of '56 on the
faculty at U.B.C. June Dawson is head of the Department of
Nursing and is still teaching the nurses how to get more blood
oer person during a blood drive. Bob Morford is an ornithologist in the Zoology department and now gets paid for
bird watching. The Dean of Applied Science is Ralph Sultan
who is thoroughly enjoying being Big, Big Brother to the
engineers.
The general manager of Kitimat is Carol Abrahamson,
while a fellow Commerce graduate, John Maynard, is Chief
Administrator of V.G.H., which has now grown to a 10,000-
bed hospital. Mike Ames is a successful publisher after many
years of starving in a garret. He at last gave up the idea that
readers wanted culture and began to publish true love comics.
Monte McKay, after years of hard work and study, has at last
become famous for his contract bridge. After having played
nrofessional soccer in England. Jack Butterfield has again
turned to metallurgical engineering and is fast becoming a
multi-millionaire due to his new process for extracting gold
I'rom sea water. That famous jazz impresario, Wall\' Light-
body, is now owner of a huge night club which is the- centre
of jazz entertainment for the entire Pacific coast. Frequent
and popular performers at the night spot are Dr. Al llwd and
'lis  orchestra.
Two women have become outstanding i:1 "-'hat arc usually
cstricted to men.   Ann Cas-^dy  him bee nue
She savs  that  she
eonsiderec!  p.elds r
"irst woman prime minister ol Greece.
lie
#* ^*m,'j*;
to directing thc activities of the Greeks \v:u
MATURE BUT STILL growing, this picture shows the university as it stands today. Note the new bus-stop in the foreground, behind which is the Engineering
building. The buildings are not quite as
clean and new-looking as in the last pic
ture, yet with all the added facilities, the
university is currently looking forward to a
phenomenal expansion. Within a few years
there will be buildings for Arts, Education,
Medical Sciences, Dormitories, and the
Brock Extension.
became so useu
at  U.B.C.  that   she  couldn't   give  it   up.   The  first   woman  to
become Air Vice-Marshall of the R.C.A.F. is Audrey Dieno.
Distillery king. John Ridington, has recently joined his
574th organization and yet finds time to supervise production
and  do  all   his   own   advertising.    Calgary's   mayor,   Henning
i Brasso, is seeking re-election because he hates tt) give up leac-
! ing the Stampede parade.
i At this point, our hypnotic subject came out of his trance
All attempts to project his mind into the future again failed,
and so these few fragments are all we know of the future of
some of the members of the class of '56.       —Sally Robertson. Best Wishes to Grads
SASAMAT SHOE SERVICE
4463 West 10th Avenue
ALma 0138
During Your Vacation
Come in . . .
and listen to your favorite selections
in our
Modern Record Shop
THOMSON & PAGE LTD.
2914 Granville Street Park Royal
CHtrry 5144 West 2302
Best Wishes to the Grads of '56
MRS. MUNRO'S
CONFECTIONERY
4601 West 10th Avenue
ALma 0080
Il •
Every Success, '56 Grads
Photographer for Faculties of
Arts and Applied Science
,/ // •MA3625
t0eeC*™*to •TA7937.
locaoHiai
I    GRANVILLE
CONGRATULATIONS . .
GRADUATES OF '56
BRASSO'S
CAR SUPERMARKET
3220 Kingsway
Burnaby
■£e*t Wishes to the
(jraduatina Class
o(f 19S6
Commodore Cabaret
PAcific7838   -   PAcific0413
AWARDS
(Continued from Page 18)
National Research Council Studentships, $1200 eaeht
Percy John Bandy (Victoria).
William David Bowering (Vancouver). Eugene Butkov (Vancouver). James Nicoll Campbell (Vancouver. Kasturl Lai
Chopra (India). John W. F. Cos-
terton (Vernon). Harry William
Morley Duck (North Kamloops).
Dosso (Chilliwack). Reinhold
Elder Drews (Chilliwack). Ian
Morley Duck1 (North Kamloops).
Rowland F. Grant (Victoria).
James E. Hardy (Vancouver).
Arthur Hillier Houston (Ontario).
Edith Mary Kennedy (Ontario).
IVarcos Kleinerman (Peru). Marcel A. R. LeBlanc (Saskatchewan). Frank Alden Payne
(North Vancouver). Herbert
Spencer Pepin (Rossland). Dale
Welton Read (Chilliwack). Lyle
Purmal Robertson (Victoria).
j Lloyd B. Robertson (Saskatche-
I wan). Max Lynn Swanson (Vancouver).  Robert Barton Wecdenj
! (United States). |
! i
National Research Council Special Scholarship, $2000:
Job Kuijt (Vancouver).
National Research Council Ovet-
seas Fellowship, $2500:
Arthur Hubert Webster (Vancouver).
National Research Council Bursaries, $800 each:        #
A.   Huntley  Blair   (Vancouver), i
Ronald R. Burgess (Vancouver), j
Sandra M. Cardinall (Penticton). j
Donato   J.   Cianci   (Vancouver).
John   Wyllie   Coburn   (Vancouver).  Douglas James Henderson
(Vancouver).   Blyth A.  Hughes!
(Victoria). Raymond Sverre Lar-1
sen   (Salmo).    William   Charles /
Olsen (Vancouver). Gertrude D.,_
Pentland (Vancouver). Peter Ju-,
lian Riley (Celista). Kenneth G. |
Scrimgeour  (Vancouver).    Ron- j
aid Alfred Sterne (Vancouver), i
Donald George Watts (Creston).'.
Roy    Westwick    (Honeymoon i
Bay).   Keith aYtes (Burnaby).
World   University   Scholarships
(expenses for one year's study
abroad):
(a) Bonn Government Scholarship—George Hector Forbes
(Lac la Hache).
(b) Hamburg University Exchange—Robert David Jackson
(Vancouver).
(c) University of Ibadan, Nigeria, Exchange—James Bertin
Webster (Vancouver).
(d) University of Malaya Exchange—Peter Laurie Burns
(Vancouver).
THE UBYSSEY
Monday, May 14, 1956
27
Graduation
Poem ... '56
We>do not come here in a burst of song
To make a hollow joy in a world gone wrong;
Or try to walk in blinded sweet content
And cheat ourselves that all that's said is meant;
Or sugar the view of the world's distress
With blatant, blasted hope in man's progress.
We are to be sad champions for a cause nea'r lost, t|
To seek new order in a world war tossed;
To work without despair in a selfish land
In danger of destruction by man's own hand;
And seek to show true values in a nation
Gone mad with love of money and sensation;
To say that blaring press and beaming politician
Oft have no interest in man's true position;
To tell Success in its bloated face
That trade is not the glory of man's race,
That money leads to little things which we intend,
But man's best thoughts and feelings are the final end.     4
Such is the world today and such our place
Its dangers to brave and its evils to face—
We do not enter, then, a useless strife,
To fail is death, but to win is life.
—John Sandys-Wunsch.
ACTIVITIES
(Continued from Page 25)
February   3.   1958:   Inter-fraternity Council opened a week
long traffic safety week on cam-
j pus with the presentation of Van-
| couver  Police  Motorcyale  Drill
: Team.
Later in the week the program
included a mock accident on
campus and a demonstration of
the police drunkometer.
Elections
February  9,   1956:  Tiki  Graham,  household   pet  of Ronald
Graham collected 50H votes for
Undergraduate   Societies  Chair-
j man of the Alma Mater Society.
j     Tiki  managed  this  with sub-
i dued publicity, a run-of-the-mill
campaign, no campaign speeches,
and ten names on his seconder's
statement.
With the permission of his
owner and  the  backing  of  the
; "dirty fourteen," Tiki was placed first on the ballots for USC
! Chairman.
GRAPHIC INDUSTRIES LTD.
PHOTOGRAPHERS — ARTISTS
Manufacturers of "Scan-a-graver" Plastic
HALF-TONE CUTS
193 East Hastings
PAcific 4174
VANCOUVER, B.C.
COMPLIMENTS
CHARLES HYDE
Plumbing and Heating Ltd.
4456 West 10th Avenue ALma 3687
Congratulations Graduates of 1956
NATIONAL FURNITURE STORES
150 West Hastings 1076 Granville
350 Columbia, New Westminster
WHITE DOVE
CLEANERS
SAME-DAY SERVICE
.    .    .   No Extra Charge
COMPLETE DELUXE LAUNDRY SERVICE
4567 West 10th ALma1688 G
HUMOR ICE CREAM
N
«►
DISTRIBUTORSHIPS
AVAILABLE
America's favorite ice cream brings you
a gold mine on wheels
tonts
MAKE YOUR DREAMS COME TRUE
The sky's the limit on your income when
you own a Good Humor franchise
What do you consider a good income?
Name the figure — you can make it
when you own your own protected
Good Humor franchise. This moneymaker can be yours. You operate under
minimum expense. You have no rent
to pay, no real estate taxes. You have
no credit accounts. All sales are quick
and strictly cash.
Quick turnover means quick profits.
You can work as long as you wish and
where you wish. You are not tied down
t oany one location. Submit details of
your past and present employment. For
further information write to 20th Century Merchandising Company, 43 5
Querbes Street, Montreal, Quebec.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0124499/manifest

Comment

Related Items