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The Ubyssey Sep 24, 1940

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 FROSH FROLIC
FRIDAY NIGHT
AT BROCK, GYM
lltmBfltfg
PEP MEET
TODAY, NOON,
AUDITORIUM
PUBLISHED TWICE WEEKLY BY THE PUBLICATIONS BOARD OF THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
vol. xxm.
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 24, 1940
No. 1
Klinck Urges Students
Curtail   Frosh   Rites
President Advises Wartime Sacrifices:
Slice Club Budgets, Curtail Social
Functions, Cut Out "Childishness'
4-
*»»
President L. S. Kinck appealed to U.B.C. students last
Friday to discontinue many of their time-hallowed traditions
of introducing newcomers to University life.
Speaking to the incoming crop of freshmen assembled for
the first time in the University Auditorium, the president called
upon his students to make the sacrifices necessary to place the
University at the disposal of Canada's wartime government.
CHILDISH CEREMONIES ''
"No single action of the students
does more, la my considered opinion, to create an unfavorable Impression to the public mind than
the perpetuation of certain of these
childish introductory ceremonies,"
he aald.
"Certainly within recent yeara,
nothing has been more ineffective ln
dlaclplinlng the freshmen or more
damaging to the prestige of the sophomores and the upper yeara."
Curtailment of social functlona and
extra-curricular aotlvities was also
advocated by Dr. Klin ok.
"On our campua there Is an urgent
need to demonstrate that we appreciate our privileges, that we recognize
our responsibilities, and that we assume the obligations which these impose," he aald.
"Theae constitute a challenge which
calls not alone for official action, but
what ls even more Important, for self-
imposed disciplined effort aa well."
REDUCE BUDGETS
"Slnoe the rank and file of our
citizens perforce are reducing their
personal   expenditures.   Increasing
their  voluntary  contributions  towards      Innumerable      deserving
causes, and assuming a burden ot
taxation which a year ago would
have  appeared  fantastic,  atudenta
might  well  reduce  their  budgeta
for   aoclal   functlona   and   extracurricular activities a* the university has ruled they muat do In the
matter of Intercollegiate athletics,"
Tho  president reported  that  lt  wns
unwise to continue senior Intercollegiate competition this year for the following  reasons:  the  energy  and  time
of male students should now go into
military training; students must learn
to  make  sacrifices of  some  of  their
interests In order to have time to do
their duty to their country; and the
cancellation    of    senior    oompetlUon
would do something toward removing
the feeling among the taxpayers that
studenta are a privileged class.
Full text of Dr. Klnck'a addreaa appears on Page S.
Thirsty Freshmen
Guxxle Soda Pop
The 1940 crop of freshmen are
probably the most thirsty class
on record, Judging from the figures of soft-drink sales revealed Monday night by Frank
Underbill, proprietor of the Caf.
Over seventy cases of liquid
refreshment passed over the
counter during the first day of
lecturea. Thirty of theae were
sold at noon hour, when temperatures soared to raid-summer heights.
Reaaon for the unurfual rush
on pop consumption la accounted for by the fact that the
strain of lecturea has fatigued
upperclassmen almost as much
as froah.
'_•
Students Pledge Full Support
As Second V/ar Session Opens
Gratitude
To the Vancouver News-Herald
and the Vancouver Dally Province, two of the city's moat prominent newspapers, go the thanka
of the Ubyssey tor permission to
reproduce some of their photographs. To Bill Grande, Independent photographer, who gave
his services free, the Ubyaaey expresses heartfelt  appreciation.
CANADIAN  CAMPUS —1940  STYLE
'—Photo by Bill Grande.
TREVOR PAGE
AT PEP MEET
TODAY NOON
The old Auditorium will onoe again
resound to the oheers and jeers of the
frosh-soph  battle,  as  a monster pep
meet  opens the new  term and  prepares the uninitiated for the perils of
the Frosh reception, to be held ln the
Brock Hall and the Oym on Friday.
Trevor Paige and his Orchestra
will swing out "Hall, U.B.C." and
the other Varsity songs, which all
the Frosh  should know by now,
anyway.     The   Mamooks   are   In
charge,   under   the  presidency   of
Harry Warner, and will make sure
that all Freeh rally to the call of
2200 Already
U.B.C. Enrollment
Near New Peak
Says Registrar
The largest registration of undergraduate students in the history of
the University of British Columbia
was forecast Monday by hard-worked
officials in tho registrar's office after
more than 2200 students had been recorded   Saturday.
With hundreds more registrants
pouring into the office on the first
day of the session to fill out cards
and large numbers expected, it looks
as though the war has had little adverse effect on the 1940 enrolment.
Unofficial    estimate    places    the
number   of  Freshmen   enrolled   at
►.—►*<*,
Student Passes
Students in all except first
year are requested to call at
the Women's Meeting Room
(above A.M.S. office) in Brock
Hall to receive their 1940-41
paaaea.
Freshmen, and upperclassmen
who have not had their pictures taken for the Totem, must
make appointments aa soon aa
possible with the photographer
In the dark room downstairs at
the north end of Brock Hall, to
havo pictures taken for both
their  passes and  the Totem.
...*
200  in   excess  of  the
TOO —  some
1939  record.
Speaking to Freshmen on Friday,
Dr. L. S. Kllnck declared himself
gratified that the registration was the
largest in history despite the war.
Last year's registration was 2594
students.     Official figures on the 1940"
registration will be available Immedi- ** S!^fsnodsm>**
ately    foUowing   the    Board    of    Gov        ~-**sr*SI******S
ernora'  meeting next Monday.
Name the Kaf Kitten
UBYSSEYiSPONSORS MAMMOTH
CONTEST-ALL CAN ENTER
Tucked away beneath its mother in the office of Frank
Underhiil, jovial Caf manager, is a tiny little ball of fur without
a name.
Several people are perplexed about this state of affairs.
They are:
1. Its mother.
2. Frank Underhiil.
3. The Ubyssey.
Determined that the little fellow shall not grow up to
respond to the vague nomenclature of "Pussy", "Kitty" and
"$&8Z$?) (", Mr. Underhiil, in co-operation with the Ubyssey,
(ias offered a dozen bottles of Coca-Cola for the genius offering
what he considers to be the best name.
Judges will be Frank Underhiil, Janet Walker of the
Ubyssey, and the kitten itself. Address all entries to the Publications office. Contest closes Wednesday, October 2, 1940. Decision of the Judges must be considered final.
Change Made
Soprano
Mary gold Nash
Returns To Campus
TO TEM A CQUIRES GL A MOR;
BETTY QUICK NEW EDITOR
Comely Betty Quick — Betty Elizabeth Eleanor Quick, to
be explicit, one of the brighter spots in the offices of the Publications Board, has been chosen by Editor-in-Chief Jack Margeson, to head the efficient staff which turns out "The Totem"
300-page, photograph-crammed University Year-book,
SWEETHEART <$>
The appointment of Betty as Totem
Editor was ratified late last night by
tho   Students'   Council.
Betty is one of the few women to
ever be Totem editor, and la probably
the first student to achieve the position  in  one year.
Betty's brilliant work as associ
ate editor last year earned her the
1940 Job, which was vacated by
Hampton Gray, who went on active service during the summer.
"I'm going to work very hard" was
all Betty would say when Interviewed. She'll have more information
on the new year book later on.
Marygold Nash returns to the
University after a year's absence.
Two years ago, Marygold was the
star of "Serenade", Musical Society production, and she comeback after a year's experience In
teaching and radio work.
In the B. C. Musical Festival,
this year, Marygold won the Ladles' Open Singing Class. A few
weeks later, she pained the practical part of the L.R.3.M. examination for piano.
If a good show ia to be put on
by the Musical Society this year,
Marygold Intends to try out for
one of the leading parts.- Musical
groups on the campus are very
glad to have this fine musician
back again.
No Curtailment
Of Fall Sport
Necessary . . . Power.
There should be no curtailment of
competitive sports during the fall according to federal government official statements.
Hon. Charles G. Power, as acting-
minister of National Defence, ln a
letter to the president of the Canadian Rugby Union written during
the summer, has stated the official
attitude as follows.
"There should be no curtailment of
competitive sports, other than that
normally arising out of the drafting
into Industry or military service of
those who -would ordinarily take part
In such sports. There are many advantages which would far outweigh
any disadvantages resulting from the
eliminating of such activities."
U.B.C* To Roll Up Its Sleeves In Preparation
For Extensive Rudimentery Army Training}
Alma Mater Song Becomes Moving March
By PIERRE BERTON
The second war-time session has opened on the campus,
and the men of the University have discarded their blue and
«old football strip for the khaki uniform of a soldier in Hia
lajesty's Canadian Forces.
The shadow of war which fell across the green campus in
1939 has darkened, and the men of the University have quickened their step with the rest of the nation.
<?>MARCHING THEME
The glorious Alma Mater song
"Hall   U.B.C."   which   hss   sent
Varsity   Thunderbirds   down   ths
gridiron   to   victory   yesr   sftsr
year    hss    become    s    marching
theme   for   hundreds   of  student
soldiers,   snd   the   playing   fields
before the stadium have beoome
a parade ground for long khaki-
clsd columns ot drilling scholars.
Oraduates      and      undergraduates,
freshmen and seniors, the men of the
University    have    rolled    up    their
sleeves, and are ready.
Already 480 have signed up for
basic military training, while hundreds more have signified their desire to become leadera aa officers ln
the C.O.T.C.
The orderly room In.the basement
of the Arta Building has been' crowded with recruits during the past
week, and student offloers have been
taxed to the utmost.
SIX HOURS WEEKLY
Baale military training will take
alx houra weekly, while It is expected that Officers training will
take slightly more.  Training times
have  been  selected so thst tbey
Interfere as little as possible with
lecture time tables.
The rhythmic thud of hundreds of
marching   feet   will   resound   weekly
each Saturday afternoon on the campus   as   every   student,   officer   and
cadet, turns out for three hours training.
Balance of the training — lectures
and physical education — will be held
during the week, either In the evenings, at noon hour or in the afternoon.
PHYSICAL TRAINING
Maury Van Vllet, men's athletic director, who took a course ln military
physical education at Sarcee camp
during the summer will be in chargo
of the athletic end of the training
which will Include boxing, badminton and other specialised sports as
well as the regular P.T.
Flrat parade for the corpa will be
held Saturday afternoon at 8 p.m. All
studenta as well as aU former members of the CO.T.C. are required to
attend.
Colonel O. M. Shrum, head at the
University Extension Department snd
Physics Department will again command the corpa. Complete tlme-
tablea are not yet available, but are
expected to be ready by Friday
afternoon.
"Kitsilano,       Capllano,       Slwaah,
Squaw!"
A foretaste of the Frosh mob scene
on Friday night will be felt (literally) when the traditional Frosh-Soph
batUe begins with a smash after the
pep meet. They'll be waiting out-
aid, boya, behind the barn!
The Student's Council, under
the presidency of Harry Lumsden, has decided thst the Brock
Hall, Judging from the crowds at
previous Flushes, will not be big
enough, and the nearby Oym will
house the overflow. A Public
Address System will convey- the
strains ef Page's music to sll the
Aggie animals, besides those In the
Brock and the Gym.
Council Speaks
To New Members
Urging freshmen to carry on the
high tradition and achievement of
former U.B.C. students, members of
the students council addressed freshmen and freshettes Monday noon ln
the Auditorium.
New students were urged to participate In extra currlcular activities by
all members of the council, who spoke
in turn, introduced by President
Harry Lumsden.
Whole-hearted participation in war
work for all women, was stressed by
Dorothy Hlrd, W.U.S., and Ruth Wilson,  W.A.A.
->.---~x
There are a few more positions for cub reporters on the
Ubyssey open. Prospective reporters may apply at the offices
of the Publications Board,
Brock Hall basement. Here a
beautiful blonde, who looks Just
like Margie, will take' your
name and give you a trial assignment.
i «5"
LILLIES FLOAT PASSIVELY
AS FROSH, SOPHS COWER
The timidity of the 1940 freshman is only excelled by the
timidity of the 1940 sophomore.
Such was .the opinion of upperclassmen Monday as they
waited eagerly round the lily pond in front of the library to
view the annual massacre.
NO  MASSACRE <$.rom   tree  to  tree,  fearful lost  a  big
But the massacre failed to come
off on schedule, and the Utiles
still float passively on the clear
water. The lilies float passively,
and the freshmen, though wet
behind the ears, are otherwise
dry.
More than 24 hours of Varsity life
has passed by, and the traditional
enemies have abstained from tearing
at one another's throats. The sophomores, who fought so fiercely as
freshmen in 1939, have become fat
and lazy as a result of too many potato chips In the Caf, while the
freshmen, unaccustomed to their new
surroundings   may   be   seen   sulking
bad Soph should take the offensive.
The days of ruthless warfare In the
quad have vanished. No longer do
seniors have to be called upon to act
as policemen so that co-eds might
cross the campus without large portions of decomposed fruit soiling their
new fall outfits.
Tho days of strife are over, and the
freshmen and sophomores are as
Damon and Pythias.
Peace has been declared on the
campus, but a few optimists still hope
for bigger and better thlnga In the
way of lnter-class warfare during the
week. Page Two
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 24, 1940
C.O.T.C* ON PARADE
Khaki  Clad  Students
Bring  War  To  Campus
Autumn has come to the University of British Columbia—
autumn clad in khaki.
Dotted about the dewy lawns of the campus, mingling with
the seething undergraduate mass in the Cafeteria, interspersed
among the scholars in the hushed silence of the Library are the
uniformed figures of student members of the Canadian Officers
Training Corps.
They make a sober contrast with the brilliant green of the
traditional Frosh garb, these uniforms — a patchwork of war
across a campus that heretofore has known only the conflict of
Scienceman against Artsman, of Frosh against Soph.
100 JOIN UF
More than 100 studsnts won't
be back for the 1940-41 session, for
they have gone on active aervice
as members snd officers ln naval,
army and airfares units. Sams are
already overseas, others are stationed in Canada — many ss instructors In Non-Perman.nt Active Militia units.
A total of 78 studenta have obtained
commissions ln other regiments since
last year.
lnree U.B.C. professors have also
gone on active service as offloers.
They *xm Captain J. F. Bell, formerly
of the appUed science faoulty, and
now engaged ln research army work
In Ottawa) Professor Frererlek Brand,
formerly of the mathematics department flying officer st Trenton; snd
Dr. W. O. Blaok, former head of the
department of eduoatlon now engaged
as sn Instructor ln Vancouver area
under tlie compulsory mlUtary training scheme.
FACULTY  MEMBERS
Six members of the 1940 faculty will sdd the burden of army
training to prsssnt duties, acting ss
officers over student recruits. Or.
O. M. Shrum, Is colonel of the contingent, while Dr. J. Allen Harris
is adjutant. Others Include Dr.
Topping, Dr. A, W. Currle, Dr. 8.
Wood, and Professor Ihorielf Lar-
Heads Corps
What - No Adelphi?
COL. GORDON M. SHRUM
. . . commands ths C.O.T.C.
Army Training
Forces Bonner
To Drop Plan
Plans for a campus-wide male organization similar to Phrateres collapsed at the beginning of the term
with the inauguration of required
military training on the campus.
One of the planks ln the platform
of Bob Bonner, successful candidate
for the position of president ot th.
Literary and Scientific executive, the
plan for a non-fraternity organization
embracing all male students came as
soothing eyrup last term after a bitter
student battle concerning the merits
of the existing fraternity system on
the campus.
Bonner's scheme acted aa oil on
troubled waters for wrathful under,
graduates seething under the Insults
of anti-fraternity and pro-fraternity
comments.
ARMY TAKES TIME
Now with military training occupying alx to nine hours of the
men's time, the Adelphi haa reverted to little more than s rosy
dream tn the mind of Bonner, snd
other coundUers.
Bonner points out that In aome respects the C.O.T.C. and basic training
will take the place of the Adelphi for
It will bring all campus males together. At the same time it cannot
hope to fiU the purpose that the auggeated organisation would have done.
"Maybe after the war we'U have
one, maybe," Bonner aald doubtfully.
"It'U take a great deal more than s
yesr to get it organised anyway. Right
now students haven't got the time."
FROSH   LAUGH
AT  DEAN'S
WITTICISMS
When Dean Daniel Buchanan
ascends the platform of the
Auditorium there's sure to be
fun brewing, for the Dean Is a
witty speaker.
And when it's a bunch of
freshmen that are the objects of
his wit, there's more fun still.
Here are some choice morsels caught
by a Ubyssey operative during the
freshmen introduction ceremony on
Friday.
A mother and her weeping daughter (the Dean called her Matilda)
were ln the Dean's office one day
after the Xmas examinatlona for the
usual reason.
"WeU," said the Dean In self-defense, "I told you, both before the
mid terms and at Christmas, that you
would have to work harder."
"Why, Matilda," exclaimed the wide-
eyed mater, "you never told me that."
"Well,"  whined daughter, very upset, "you told tne to relax,  so I relaxed!"
BE CAREFUL, GOD I
Dr.  Buchanan   also quoted  the
prayer of s little child evacuee,
"Ood,  do  take  care  of yourself,
for  If anything  happens tp you,
we're sunk."
He   urged   the   Fresh   to   take
core of themselves for the
SOME CHANOE8
In closing, the Dean remarked thst
although lnoomlng Freshmen classes
were Invariably referred to as "Tha
poorest Frosh elass In the history of
the University," four years later they
were known ss "lite most distinguished group of graduates ever to
leave the University."
Outstanding former members of the
C.O.T.C. are Col. H. F. O. Letaon,
now military attache at Washington,
D.C., and Col. Sherwood Lett, former
member of the Board of Oovernora,
now attached at Ottawa.
A total ot 260 students took C.O.T.C.
work during the summer session.
Present strength of the corps ls 399, all
ranks. This does not include students
joining up this session.
C.O.T.C. training will be ln three
parts: 1—Common to all arms; 2—
Special, to Branch (Rifle, Artillery,
etc.);   3—Practical   work.
This necessitates three exams during the year.
Conductor:  "Change here for  Alma!
Change for Alma!    Change for Alma!"
Freshman: "All right, all right, I |
don't know the girl, but I'll chip in ■
a dime." I
SPECIAL
DISCOUNT
To Students
MEN'S SUITS
Made-to-Meaaure
$22.95 - $24.95 - $27.95
Also Ready-Made        .
A fine assortment of new English
cloths give you a variety of designs to choose from.
TUXEDO'S   -   $27.95
and
To Ihe Ladies
Tailored Suits
22.95 - 24*95
27.95
SPORT COATS
TOP COATS
SLACKS
RAINCOATS
SKI SLACKS
DUNNS Tailored Clothes
342 WEST HASTINGS STREET
I —News-Herald Photo.
"C'EST LA GUERRE" . . . and the freshettes like it ! Norman
Bushell and Jack Baldwin exude charm, and the green ones admire. All of which goes to prove that there IS something about
a soldier. This compulsory training may take time from lectures and functions, but if it brings about chummy little get-
togethers like this, isn't it worth the effort, fellahs? When a
uniform makes a man out of Joe College, it's a case of "All this,
and freshettes, too."
CALL SYSTEM
GETS QUICK
RESULTS
"Wilbur Warble is requested to return the money he borrowed from
Joe Olotz Immediately," This and
other such announcements will be
heard aU over the Campus now that
the new Public Address System has
been  Installed.
The headquarters for the system are
located in the Alma Mater Society
offices and loud speakers have been
set up ln three prominent parts of the
campus: the Caf., the Stadium and
Brock HaU.
The Mamooks have been placed In
charge of the System and by applying to them any student can have a
call sent out for a missing pal—so If
you hear your name suddenly coming
out of the loud speaker don't be too
surprised.
Emergencies, announcements and
other information will be heard over
the system during noon hours, between lectures and at any other times
decided upon. It ls expected that the
system will be In great use and wlU
be a definite asset to the University.
POME
They met when they were Freshies,
When he asked her for a kiss,
They were so awfully bashful,
They      sat      apart      like      this.
Alas, but they are Seniors now,
And after months of bliss
When  in the park they're seated
Theysitupclosellkethis.
*    .   *   *
"Now   you   know.   Mrs.   Vanderbllt,
that   wouldn't  have  happened  If  you
hadn't   walked   between   me   and   the
spltoon."
ALL LAST YEAR CLASS
REPRESENTATIVES
PLEASE SEE MAURY VAN
VLIET NOT LATER THAN
THIS WEEK CONCERNING
INTRA  MURAL, PROGRAM.
PAN NAZI IN THEIR OWN TONGUE
If you want to swear at Hitler in his own language, you
can still learn how.
Yes, the University Is still
offering 11 three unit courses In
German despite the war with
the Nazis. German Is stiU a
very necessary language In
science and literature, and will
be kept on the curriculum Intact, although many city schools
have dropped their German
courses.
Courses will be offered as
usual In mediaeval German,
19th century German and
modern German.
V.
Supersilk
Orient
HOSIERY
SPECIALISTS
79c - 81.00 - SlelS
2-3-4-5 THREAD CHIFFON
—    CREPE   —
622 - 628 Oranvllle
Phone SEy. 8351-2
Kayser
Holeproof
* SPECIAL for
CO-EDS
MANY
Coats in
Taylor's Alama
$25.00
Sizes 12 to 20 ln brisk
casuals at exactly pre-war
price. Patch pockets, fully
inter-lined with set-in
sleeves and large lapels
an outstanding value.
CAMEL HAIR &
WOOL COATS
Warm, light, casual coats
with plaid or satin linings;
some half-lined in satin —
the   town's   best   buy.
$29.50
Handwoven
Harris   Tweeds
& large variety of other tweeds.
$35.00
SMART  SCHOOL  DRESSES  AND  DINNER
GOWNS TO SUIT YOUR TASTE.
*T. B.  LEE *
405 WEST HASTINGS STREET
Properly Corrected Vision
usually brings clearer
thought   and   keener  action
Have your eyes examined by an
Optometrist as a precautionary
measure.
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA OPTOMETRIC ASSOCIATION
i
I    / THE      UBYSSEY
Page Three
r
GIANT PUSHBALL MARKS INITIATION WEEK
-4>
—News-Herald Photo.
A DOG'S LIFE — The grinning pooch ln the cantre is Varsity, the campus mascot. He's gained
a reputation for picking out the comellest of co-eds, as the shanks on either side indicate. It
didn't take the Uttle dog long to make friends with, these two tennis-playing freshettes during
the summer and he's going to hang on to hia new acquaintances during the winter. Freshmen would do well to study the terrier's technique during the winter months.
Varsity Is Back Again
Tousled - Haired   Terriers   Favors'Fair   Freshettes
• eeo e • e e * * * *
Canine Casanova Barks Greetings To 1940 Crop
For 2800 undergraduates, it's a se*)-.,,Maury Van VUet, across the desolate,* GALS IN GREEN
Friday Nite
Frolic  Ends
Frosh  Rites
A gay week of activities, including
smokers, teas, pep meets, and the
newest of games, pushball by name,
climaxed by the frosh reception, introduces freshmen and freshettes to
the campus this year. From the pep
meet Tuesday noon to the "Frosh"
Friday night, there is no let up of
events, but lt is expected that an occasional fight or two will add to the
program.
Tuesday noon, a pep meet will be
held in tile Auditorium to initiate the
frosh into the ways and means of pep
son of hard bralnwork, heavy library
tomes, and midnight oil. But for a
littlo tousled haired terrier, It's just
another year of fun.
Step up, students, and shake paws
with "Varsity," the campus mascot—
the dog with several thousand masters
and moro mistresses than Louis XIV.
could ever muster.
He's the canine Idol of 2300 students, and when Frank Underhiil Isn't looking, he lives on a
diet of potato chips in the Cafeteria. When he's not bcgg)ng for
Caf scraps you'll find him bouncing across the campus usually at
the heels of the brighter specimens of co-ed pulchritude.
LONELY  SUMMER
For more than a month now — ever
since Summer School locked up, Varsity has been having a pretty lonely
time of it,  following his legal master
lawns of the campus and through the
dark lonely halls of the faculty buildings.
But he's been wagging the place
whero his tall ought to be, and cocking his tousled head ln anticipation,
for he's known all along that sooner
or later, The Great Day would come.
-—pft*' l\    ~,*Ai*   When     the    fa-
'mlllar red buses
/inally did disgorge their human contents
early Monday
morning. Varsity
was on hand, his
posterior vibrating with eagerness as he lept
forward to greet
old friends and
look over the new
crop.
'VAKSiry
For the upperclassmen he had a
friendly bark, for the professors a
suspicious sniff, and for the Froah a
rousing woof. But lt was for the
freshettes that he reserved a special
gleam In his doggy eyes, and did the
gals in the green ribbons love lt!
Sophomores, when they're hunting
ior phone numbers, always follow the
trauied^ eye of the littl-- terrier, fer
they recognize him as a veteran ot
many years.
It was a long day for most freshmen Monday, getting used to their
now surroundings, but it was a longer
day for Varsity who personally inspected every structure on the campus, ay well as most of the students.
As far as Varsity is concerned, the
entire University has been put there
especially for his benefit, and he's
going to make the most of the opportunity.
meets. At 3:30 the same afternoon,
a tea for the freshettes wlU be held In
the Caf.
Pushball, as it is called until someone finds a better name, will keep
the freshmen snd the sophs occupied
Wednesday noon on the upper field.
A huge ball haa been constructed.
The various members of both teams
get out on the field and try to push
tho ball through their opponents' goal.
A supper In the Caf wlU entertain
freshettes at 5:30 the same day.
Thursday at 12:30 noon, aU women
undergraduates are requested to attend a meeting of th Women's Undergraduate Society, commonly known
as WUS. The froah smoker, with aU
the trimmings of ancient tradition
will be held in the Alma Academy,
8:30 t(iat evening. Rumour has it that
tho Academy will be fixed in cabaret
style.
A return game of pushball will
nllow the vanquished another chance
in the upper field at noon on Friday.
Well-known sports commentators
forecast that the sophs will lose the
series, but the sophs may have something to say about that.
Tho frosh reception, always the big-
ges_, craziest, most crowded function
of the year, will be held Friday evening, 9:30 to 1:00.
GREETS FRESHMEN—Professor Walter H. Oage, U.B.C.'s
most eligible bachelor, hss returned to his Alms Mater from
California and already la back st his old Job of welcoming th*
Frosh. He fa photographed hers in characteristic pose ss he
addressed new students lsst Friday.
Frosh Ten Commandments
No  Lipstick  For  Freshettes
No  Cigarettes  For  Freshmen
Taking the role of a modern Mo*es,<$>
council member Charlie Nash haa
Issued Ten Commandments to the
cowering Frosh, with stern Instructions that ahould they be disobeyed
dire penalties will result:
Frosh will hereby take notice that:
*1—Freshmen are not allowed to use
Junior or Senior wings in the Library.
Z—Freshmen must not smoke in any
of the buildings, except in the cafeteria  and common rooms.
*3—Freshettes must not wear any
make-up on the campus during the
initiation period.
*4—All Frosh must wear their Insignia at all times on the campus.
*5—All Frosh must be able to repeat
the chorus of Hail U.B.C, the English
Rugby Team's song, My Girl's a Hul-
laballoo, and Mr. Noah.
6—AU Frosh must attend aU meetings
held for them and must occupy the
front rows  in  the  Auditorium.
THEIR FIRST DAY AT VARSITY AND THEY'RE VERY BEWILDERED
EAST-WEST
DEBATE MAY
BE REVIVED
The great East-West University debate, -which waa cancelled last year
becauae of war conditions, may be revived again if plans now under way
.etween Arthur Fouks, head of the
U.B.C. Parliamentary Forum and
eastern debating officials reach successful completion.
The East-West debate is one of the
biggest events in debating circles in
the Dominion. Fouks announced that
ho would attempt to have the debate
held In Vancouver. Here, U.B.C. and
student debaters from other western
universities will compete with debaters  from  Eastern  Institutions.
The McOoun Cup debate, held
simultaneously ln the four western
universities wiU also continue, Fouka
hopes, despite extra strain of war activities.
Although debating subjects have
been considerably narrowed by censorship, the Parliamentary Forum
expects to sponsor a student debating series culminating In U.S.-Canada
parleys.
Fouks expects that aeveral debating teams from American unlveraties
in the Pacific North Weat will meet
U.B.C. speakers In Vancouver. Proceeds from many debates wiU be
turned over to the Canadian Red Croas
he added.
The East-West debate is  under the
sponsorship   of   the   National   Feder- FRESHMEN EXPLORE THE CAMPUS — Asking advice
atlon   of   Canadian   University   Stu-' seems to be the primary function of the freshettes that swarm
dents, j the campus now, but finding the answers is the ambition of
—  i the studious freshman on the right.    Common ambition of all
AU freshmen are invited to attend frosh, however, is to prove that they know all the answers al-
tho S.CM. Frosh party, held at the ready — just wait till they find out! Question and answer
beginning of each session. This year's booths dot the campus this week, and on the left, a curvacious
party will be held on Wednesday, freshette demonstrates the proper stance at the booths, while,
September 25. at 8 p.m. , incidentally  trying  to  decipher   the   calendar,   time  honoured
7—Froah must not wear any high-
school pins or sweaters, etc.
8—At meetings Froah must remain
seated until all Upperclassmen have
left the building.
9—Freshmen must keep off the
grass.
•10—No  mixed  Frosh  couple  may  be
seen wandering about the campus.
PENALTY—
1—Violation of these regulations will
make the offender Uable to shoeshine duty in the Quad.
2—Continual violation of the major
regulations (marked *) shall result ln
the application of Minute No. 5 passed
by tho Students' Council at the meeting of September 16, 1940, reading:
"THAT, upon the recommendation of
tho Sub-Committee of the Sophomore
Executive, the President of M.U.S. be
given power to cancel the free tickets
to the Frosh Reception of those
Freshmen who have not abided by
the Frosh Regulations."
puzzle which has greeted oncoming Frosh for years. Centre,
Bernice Williams goes to the right place for her big sister, and
Nancy Carr, president of Phrateres, smilingly registers her. On
the right, Freshman Tom Syme demonstrates the reason for last
year's much publicized waddle ... or is it a New Year's Resolution so early? Perhaps he's trying to impress his brother
sciencemen-to be, who are carefully looking over the crop of
next year's imbibers of "El Stuffo", and Caviar.
Outdoor Club Hikers
Expect To Thrive On
Homegrown Spuds
Luscious, mealy potatoes,
fresh from the vegetable garden tn front of thetr Qrouse
Mountain cabin, will be the
fare of Outdoors Club members
thla winter—unless an envious
neighbour haa stolen the precious morsels.
Last spring an Industrious
member spaded a two-by-four
plot and planted potatoes and
peas In soil where previously
only pines and mountain blueberries had grown. He even
added a scarecrow, an Ingenious arrangemnt of two sticks
and a Jam can, to frighten passing birds with hungry gleams In
their eyes.
The few students who were
up the mountain during the
summer carefully watered the
tender foliage. By the middle
of August the peas had given
up the ghost, but the potato
plants were thriving and gave
every Indication of a bumper
crop.
PUy   Competition
Closet  Sept.   30
Student playwrights have Uttle time
left In which to finish up their contributions for the Players' Club prize.
All playa must be in by September
30. The <best play, if the quaUty Is
high enough, nets |S0 for the -writer
and will be presented with the Christmas plays.
Players' Club officials ask that any
students Interested ln writing playa
should -work at a play or two this
winter and have them ready for next
j fall's competition. Students have little
time for writing ln the summer, and
as a rule, few plays are submitted. Page Four
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 24, 1940
Qlljtf Hbg0B?)j
(MEMBER C.U.P.)
Issued "twice weekly by the Students' Publication Board
of the Alma Mater Society of the University  of British
Columbia.
Office:  Brock  Memorial Building    —    Phone Alma 1624
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EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
Jack Margeson
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Tuesday
Pierre Berton
Friday
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ASSOCIATES
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THIS   ISSUE
As you will see, this special issue has been
chiefly devoted to the way the University will
be affected by the war. Far more than last
year, every student will be affected, the men
by actual military training, the women by voluntary service work and the like.-
This issue presents the training scheme as
it will function and the official background to
the military training. Also plans of the clubs
and other organizations for the coming year
are given, especially the plans that will aid in
the war effort.
There will be many changes on the campus this year. Major societies may have to
curtail their activities to some extent. Intercollegiate sports will disappear unless some
arrangement is made so that there may be
games between the militia units of the different
colleges.
All major sports with the exception of basketball will disappear insofar as organized
league games are concerned. There will, however be physical training for all men students
incorporated in the military training. Co-ed
sports will continue as before with some expansion perhaps.
Social activities will not be cut out, although some may be combined with others, and
all will probably be on a less lavish scale.
Thus we enter into a "war term." We may
have to make sacrifices, but our burden so far
is comparatively light and we have no right
to complain.
UNIVERSITIES AND THE FUTURE
Back in the Middle Ages came the first
small beginnings of the universities of today.
First monks and then scholars from all walks
of life began to study the records of past ages.
The fall of Constantinople brought many
Greek scholars to Western Europe and made
a great many more manuscripts available for
study. Gradually the movement swelled and
became the Renaissance.
Slowly the universities have advanced
through many difficult peViods, but always
gaining with the gains made by the people toward democracy. As freedom spread, the universities began to make more important contributions to the progress of civilization. The
sciences particularly made a great' spurt forward.
Many of the universities, however, made
one mistake. They failed to realize that when
freedom of thought and action goes, so go their
own opportunities for progress. In Germany
at the start of the Nazi regime, no voice was
raised in the great universities on behalf of
freedom. Today, many of the great universities in Germany have been closed and the
rest are limping along as Uttle more than technical schools. Their most clever men have fled
the country realizing that no creative mind
can function in a state where the mind as well
as the body is regimented.
In this country, as in the United States, the
universities must watch freedom jealously.
They must, of course, realize that there are
certain civil duties to perform and that military necessities impose a certain amount of
censorship. They must remember that the
war has to be won'or that freedom will disappear entirely.
But as the struggle becomes possibly more
desperate, the universities should guard
against any movement toward a complete
totalitarian state. In the tremendous period of
reconstruction that will be necessary after the
war, they must watch even more carefully to
preserve the rights they have gained, especially if there are revolutions and other violent
changes. The gains that have bsen made are
too precious to lose.
Now, when the universities of Canada are
making large contributions to the war effort,
they should also think of the eventful years to
come.    They are the guardians of the future.
The Mummery
By Jabez
Once upon a time, long, long ago, before
anyone had ever heard of Hitler, or Mussolini,
or Lifebuoy, there lived a very plump man [
named Emperor Concertinus the Colossal,
who commuted between Rome and Cleopatra
before she gave him the old barber shop brush
off in favour of one Marc Anthony, the answer
to a maiden's phone number. Now, this Con-
certinus was a dyspeptic grouch, owing to his
habit of taking the odd snort of olive oil without soda, and we do mean bicarbonate. He
was never really happy unless he was never
really happy unless he was burning a Christian
here and a Christian there, and sometimes all
over.
So one day we find him sitting in the
ping-pong room, morosely watching his
latest troup of dancing girls, the Carthaginian Follies, supposed to be the hottest outfit north of the Tiber, as the historian
Herodotus tells us, with his teeth in his
cheek. Connie, for 'twas thus that he was
called by the boys down at the Arena.
Connie turns to the giant Nubian slave
standing behind him in the capacity of
Vice-president in charge of Kill That
Thing Before It Lays Its Eggs.
BRING 'EM ON 2
"Where are the Christians I ordered from
Sears, Roebuck, Snowball?" barks the Emperor.
"They's heah, boss," the slave replies,
drawing a bead on a bluebottle.
"Then why the Helios don't they send
them up. with the matches?" screams Connie,
punching his pillows viciously.
"Well, boss," says the technicolour job, "I
done heard they was held up at de Customs
by de man lookin' to see if they done brought
in mo' than $100 worth o' goods."
"Bah," snarls the Emp., and unwraps a
package of Fleishman's Yeast.
He stares a moment at the dancers, who
are just going into a Macedonian version of the
Kansas City Cakewalk.
"Women ! " he growls.
"Yeah, man, boss ! " grins Snowball, sniping at a daddy longlegs.
"What are they but a lot of skin and bone
and hair, tossed together?"
"That fo' me, boss ! " yells Snowball, forgetting himself completely.
By the end of the week, everybody had
forgotten him.
"Ship these babes back to the Major," the
Emperor orders the new slave, "and tell him
he can send his next few units to the Imperial
sawdust bin. And send in a fresh clown. This
one seems to be dead."
FROSHUS
A few moments later, a strange, little man
enters, covered with green paint, waving a Calendar in one hand, and a Calendar in the other.
"What's your name, fool?" snarls Concertinus.
"Shall I tell you in Latin, or will you take
it straight?" laughs the joker, nervously.
"FROSHUS," he continues, wiping the
blood from his nose.    "Froshus is the name."
"O.K., Froshus," sighs the Emp., "make
like Bob Hope."
AS IT WAS IN BEGINNING
And, that children, was the start of
the freshman as we know hitn today, and
we try not to. For this squirrel, Froshus,
was later positively identified as a first
student at the Rome Tech, and Aggie,
where he had enjoyed that position for
more years than the Faculty cared to remember. And if this evidence appears
somewhat hungry to the naked eye, it is
definitely corroborated by the words of the
mighty Cicero when, standing before the
Senate in his custom-built toga, he solemnly declared:
"Hunc jam ipsit dipsit oof hanc valves
grindes, hujus?"
Or, in the free translation:
"The  Emperor has  been   writing  to   the
papers again about the last shipment of dates
not being fresh, men?"
The comma has been definitely debunked
by the best historians as a hyphen that has
gone Hollywood. But don't let me get on the
subject of dates and freshmen. This column is
supposed to be funny, but not that funny.
I think the tale is interesting, though, now
that the academic vernal equinox has once
more hit tthe campus. Once more the new sap
is circulating in the old tree. New limbs have
sprouted, and very nice, too. The same, old
bark may be heard in the lecture rooms. But
don't let me carry the figure too far, as the
Duchess said to the Count, when he suggested
a hike through the Adirondacs.
And so, as the dusk falls across the peak
of Mount Blanc, we say Goodby to old Hawaii, until next week, when we return for a
tramp through the jungles of Darkest Africa.
Be sure and bring your own flytox, children.
What Grads Are Doing Now
By JANET WALKER
Darrell Braldwood,  1st year's L.S.E.
president,   has   left  for  Osgoode  Hall,
Toronto, to continue his study of law.
Dick   Dowrey   and   Jack   Stark   are
now    attending    Harvard    University,
Boston, Mass.
Howie McPhee, British Empire
Game?)' sprinter, ls married and ls
teaching In Grand Forks.
Hortense Warne, Oertrude Snow,
and Aileen McKlnnon, Arts '40, are
among those attending Normal School.
Peggy Murphy, Arts '40, will be
married early In October to Fred
Hartley, Science '39, of Palo Verdes,
California.
Margaret Boll, Alison Mann, Elizabeth Stewart and Beverley McCorkell
have entered the Vancouver Oeneral
Hospital.
Mickey Pogue, ski champ, ls bossing a forestry camp of U.B.C. colleagues, including Ion Mahood, Archie
Byers, Davis Carey, Eric Bennett and
Paul Brun, near Webster's Corner,
B.C.
Renee Leblanc, Commerce '40, Is
working at the Hudson's Bay Company.
Alf Parker, Science '40, is married
and working for an electrical company ln Ontario, together with Marino
Fraresse, last year's president of the
A.I.E.E.
Marlon Clement, Arts '43, ls a nurse
in training at St.  Paul's Hospital.
Inn Grant, Science '42, Is a lieutenant In the D.C.O.R.'s.
Gloria Gusola Is working in her
father's store In Nanaimo, and is
planning on taking a business course.
BUI Grand, last year's Totem Photo
Editor,  ls working at Lance Li tho.
John Garrett, last year's Ubyssey
"God",  is ln the army now!
Wally Gillespie ls working for the
Vancouver Sun.
Of teachers, Education Class, Molly
Field is teaching at Creston, Ruth
Barss (Normal) at Meldrum Creek,
Doris Turnbull at Richmond High,
Gil Clark (Varsity orchestra leader)
at Mission.
Ozzy Durkin, last year's Totem Editor,  is back in Minnesota.
Joan Haslnm and Van Perry, ex-
pubster.-i were married recently. Van
i-i an. officer in the Irish Fusiliers.
Pauline Field, Arts '43, is taking a
business course, as is Kay Augustine.
Len Zink, former Aggie Undergrad
president, works for the B. C. Electric,   in   the   Agriculture   department.
The R.C.A.F. claims many famed
grads. including "Hunk" Henderson,
t. ne of our football heroes, nnd Lloyd
Dctwiller.
"Muff" Loughced, last year's president of the O. M. Dawson Club, is
married to Gwen Pym, another noted
grad,  and  is  working  in  Quebec.
Hnrry Cumpbcll, Ubyssey circulation manager, is at the University of
Toronto  studying   librarianship.
Ward DeBeck, champion runner, is
preaching  in  the Bahamas.
Wants Pen Pal
Young man, visited 21 countries, lived in five, technically
and university educated, fond
of travel, golf, tennis and mountaineering, wishes to correspond with students interested
ln the above subjects and in
the publishing, mechanical, administrative and editorial phases
of newspaper work, free-lance
journalism and foreign affairs.
WlU exchange clippings, newspapers, and magazines. Write
to Frank D. Price, care of New
Zealand House, Tne Strand,
London.
pips   tobaooo   «r
OAPORALFir -
_.   1  Tb.  of  Sw/eET
_...   .'INE CUT (wlthVogu.
paperslto Canadians serving lnO.A.S.F.
overseas only.
$2.50 sends 1,000
cigarette* to an individual or unit.
Address  "Sweet Caps," _
P.O. ■._ 6000, Mentr.-!, P.O.
'I can't think where Sherlock Holmes got lo."
"Perhapt he went out lo get Sweet Cap*."
SWEET CAPORAL CIGARETTES
"Th* purest form in which tobacco can b* smoked."
t
1
Frosh Are Here
(An Editorial)
The lowly freshmen are once more with
us, wandering sheepishly around the campus,
walking on the lawns, and altogether looking
rather lost. Once more there is the problem
of keeping them in check, for they seem to be
getting more insolent and less respectful toward their seniors every year.
Sophomores will have to learn how tp organize themselves and also how to keep the
freshmen disorganized. If initiation keeps
drifting the way it has been going, soon the
freshmen will be initiating the sophomores
every year.
Some year though, the sophs may organize, and then the frosh will be In for a surprise.
Then they will be put in their proper place as
the lowest of tho low (for the time being).
The violent forms of initiation have all
been eliminated to prevent accidents. The life
of a freshman is no longer a life of fear and
terror. But there should be a short period of
disciplinary training so that the frosh would
have the proper respect for their elders during
the rest of the term. They should not be allowed to think that they are the rulers of the
campus, even for only a week. Sciencemen
particularly should be annoyed with the
usurpers.
Not that we have any ill-will toward
freshmen. We hope that they will learn how
to find their way around, how to study, and
also how to have a good time. Soon they will
be sophomores themselves.
tt
June 17, 1940.
Harold D. Lumsden,  Esq.,
President of the Alma Mater Society,
The University of British Columbia.
Dear  Sir:
Will you please convey to the Students of the University of
British Columbia, the sincere thanks and appreciation of the Vancouver Branch, Canadian Red Cross Society, for their thoughtful and
generous contribution of Ten Hundred and Fifty-four Dollars
($1,054.00) received today.
We appreciate, very much, the fact that your Organization feels
that the work which we are endeavouring to accomplish Is worthy
of mention, and you may rest assured that the money donated will
be used in the most advantageous manner possible.
The Universities can always be counted upon, and the University
of British Columbia ls no exception to this rule. Canada should
rank highly in the esteem of all Nations for her effort and for the
generosity of her Citizens.
Wo  find  It  difficult  to  express,   other  than  a  simple,  yet  most
sincere "thank-you."
Sincerely,
KIRKE S. LOUCKS.
Executive Secretary,
Vancouver  Branch,
Canadian Red Cross Society.
*
British Columbia
Advisory Board
Hon. W. A. Macdonald, K.
Hon. Eric W. Hamber
R. P. Butchart
J. H. Roaf
W. H. Malkln
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ASSETS UNDER ADMINISTRATION:
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J    ' Tuesday, September 24, 1940
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Five
Full Text, Dn Klinck's
Address To Freshmen
THE WAR — OUR ATTITUDE TOWARDS IT AND
OUR PART IN IT
There are many topics on which I might speak this morning, but one — that of the war and our relation to it — overshadows all others. On the outcome of the battle now being
fought over London rests the fate of the world we have known.
As a result of recent experiences our easy-going attitude of a
year ago, yes, even of three months ago, has given place to that
of concern, of disquietude and even of alarm. At last we have
wakened out of our almost lethal complacency. No longer is
there a disposition to minimize the nature of the struggle upon
which we have entered. No longer does distance give us the
illusion of security.
We now realize that ln this struggle there is no such thing
as neutrality; no such thing as isolation — geographic, economic,
intellectual or moral.    Two social philosophies fundamentally
opposed to each other are in conflict.    We are at war — total
war — war, devasting, relentless and ruthless in the extreme.
And yet we do not meet this morning In any defeatist
spirit   The resourcefulness, the self-sacrifice and the dogged, Indomitable courage of the men and women ln the
Mother Land move us deeply and hearten us greatly; while
their unshaken confidence as to the final outcome Inspires
to face our tasks resolutely and with high courage.
Today the leaders in this grim contest are formulating and
giving effect to policies which are designed to meet the requirements of a long-term campaign, while at the same time they
are planning and working to build up an organization which will
meet the challenge and the peril of the moment.   In thia scheme,
by common consent, the universities have an important part
to play.
ATTITUDE OF GOVERNMENT TOWARDS UNDERGRADUATES CONTINUING THEIR COURSES
The pronouncements of the National Research Council on
matters academic are more nearly official, and hence represent
more accurately than those of any other body ln Canada, the
mind of the Oovernment. The following statements by Dean
C. J. MacKenzie, Acting-President of the National Research
Council, and of Colonel A. A. Magee, the representative of the
Minister of National Defence, may therefore be regarded more
or less as official declarations of governmental policy.
At the Conference which representatives of Canadian Universities had on July 5th with representatives of the Department of National Defence, Dean MacKenzie said that the techn-i
cal staffs of Universities were a very important part in the organization for training men for basic war efforts, and that any
depletion of such staffs at this time would be a serious mistake.
Colonel Magee stated, at the same Conference, that
men in colleges should not feel that they are shirking responsibility In continuing their University courses since the
reserve militia man is Important in the Service.    He also
pointed out that If University students were taking military
training there could be no criticism on the basis of making
them a privileged class.
Further, it was agreed at this Conference, that the training
of graduate students, more particularly in science, pure and
applied, should be continued, not only because there is a special
need for demonstrators and research workers, but also because
the disruption of university work in Great Britain reduces the
possibility of obtaining trained men there and makes necessary
the development of a substitute supply elsewhere in the empire.
Engineering, Mathematics, Chemistry, Physics, History and
Agriculture were some of the subjects specifically mentioned.
CO-ORDINATION OF MILITARY TRAINING WITH ACADEMIC TRAINING AS BETWEEN THE DEPARTMENT OF
NATIONAL DEFENCE AND THE UNIVERSITIES
On August 27th, 1940, the Department of National War
Service announced its regulations for the calling up of men for
compulsory training under the National Resources Mobilization
Act. These regulations provide, in effect, that a bona fide student of a recognized University or College, of the class or classes
called up for compulsory training under the National Resources
Mobilization Act, will be entitled to have his training postponed
until the end of the college session, provided he ls undergoing
compulsory training at his University or College when such
training is considered equivalent to that being given at the
Non-Permanent Active Militia Training Centres for those called
up under the National Resources Mobilization Act.
The compulsory training of students under twenty-one
years of age Is, however, entirely at the discretion of each
University. It Is also left with the Universities to determine how best to meet the military service requirements
they may impose with the least possible dislocation of the
academic work of the Universities.
RECOMMENDATIONS OF REPRESENTATIVES OF CANADIAN UNIVERSITIES TO THE DEPARTMENT OF
NATIONAL DEFENCE, RE MILITARY TRAINING AT THE
UNIVERSITIES.
It is desirable that all physically-fit students should take
the course of training prescribed by the Government.
It is desirable and necessary that adequate administrative
and instructional staff be provided by the Department of National Defence to carry on the work of both the C.O.T.C. and
the Reserve Militia unit.
The universities accept the recommendation that an average of six hours per week throughout the term should be devoted to military training, an amount which would permit students to carry on their normal academic work.
The O.T.C. will continue as at present, its work of training
officers, and may select men from any year at the discretion of
the Officer Commanding.
ATTITUDE OF UNIVERSITY  TOWARDS  COMPULSORY
MILITARY TRAINING
(a) Action of Senate—August 23rd, 1940.
"That Senate approve of the principle of compulsory Military Training for all physically-fit male students for the
duration of the war."
(b) Action of th© Board of Governors—August 29th, 1940.
"Whereas   the  Board   of   Governors   of   the   University   of
British  Columbia  is in  agreement  with the  resolution of
Senate rehiring Military Training of all physically-fit male
students in  the  University,  the   Board  goes  on  record  as
being prepared to co-operate with
tho Department of National Defence to give effect to such policy."
(c) Action of University Committee on
Military Education.
The Committee on Military Education has proceeded to make
arrangements for the carrying out
of the principle of compulsory
Military Training as adopted by
the Senate and the Board of
Governors.
RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE REPRESENTATIVES OF CANADIAN
UNIVERSITIES RE INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS
Dr. J. C. Simpson, speaking on behalf of the athletics authorities of
Queen's Toronto, Western and McOlll universities atated that they felt
that athletics must be a part of military training, but a secondary object
at the present time. They felt lt unwise to continue senior lntercoUeglate
competition this year for aeveral
reasons; the energy and time of male
students should now go Into mlUtary
training; atudenta muat learn to make
sacrifices of some of their Interests
in order to have time to do their duty
to their country; and the cancellation
of senior competition would do
something toward removing the feeling that students are a privileged olass.
Competitive sport on an Intra-mural
basis Is advantageous in producing
self-discipline and physcal fitness and
such sport might weU be developed tn
conjunction with mlUtary training.
The representatives of these universities had, therefore, agreed unanimously that senior lntercoUeglate competition be abolished for 1940-41.
ATTITUDE OF UNIVERSITY TOWARDS INTERCOLLEGIATE
ATHLETICS
(Recommendations of the Unlveralty
Council   on   Athletics   and   Physical
Education)
Whereas the University will require
military  training of all phyaicaUy-
fit male students and whereas the
'times   schedule   of   accommodation
necessitates the utilisation of Saturday afternoons for mlUtary training.
Resolved:
(1) that all Intercollegiate aport be
discontinued for the current
academic year;
(2) that no Unlveralty teams be entered in extra-mural league
games which would interfere
with military training on Saturday  afternoons.
POLICY OF UNIVERSITY AN
EVOLVING POLICY
In  these  stern,  abnormal  days,
the   Unlveralty   has no  desire  to
conduct  work as  ln  peace times.
Its policy must be a freely-evolving   policy  —   a  poUcy   which   is
determined by the -hanging needs
of Canada and of the Empire.
The basis of University organization
ls  primarily academic,   but  the existing  base ls  being  broadened  to meet
tho requirements of the now situation.
As was stated a year ago upon the outbreak  of  war,   the University  ls prepared  to  put   at   the   disposal   of  the
Government all possible assistance by
way   of   laboratories,   equipment   and
trained personnel, insofar as such action  Is  consistent  with  the  obligation
to provide faclltles for teaching.
PERSONAL   AND  CORPORATE
ATTITUDE OF STUDENTS IN THE
SITUATION
The issues at stake in thla war are
the most momentous Issues that have
ever confronted mankind. Their solution demands the utmost in personal
and corporate efficiency and in the
development of individual self-reU-
ance as weU as in co-operative endeavour. We now have far heavier
financial demands made upon us than
formerly and fewer surplus resources
with which to meet them. This stern
fact we cannot realize too soon. The
needed adjustment wlU necessitate
greater personal sacrifice, the exercise
of rigid self-discipline, and less dependence upon the State. It haa been
said, and said truly, that our national
destiny ls inseparably bound up with
our individual Initiative and resourcefulness.
Most assuredly a sterner and a
harsher world awaits us — a world in
which we shall be forced to distinguish between the standards of living
and the standards of indulgence. The
present is not too soon to begin to
prepare for the time which wiU test
to the utmost our resources of hardihood and the quality of our moral
fibre.
On our campus there is urgent need
to demonstrate that we appreciate our
privileges, that we recognize our re-
sponsibllities and that we assume the
obligations which these Impose. These
constitute a challenge which calls not
alone for official action, but what Is
even more important, for self-imposed
disciplined effort as well.
To be specific: Since the rank
and file of our citizens perforce
are reducing their personal expenditures, increasing their voluntary contributions towards innumerable deserving causes, and
assuming, with scarcely a murmur, a burden of taxation which
a year ago would have appeared
fantastic, students might well reduce their budgets for social functions and extra-curricular activities as the university has ruled
they must do In the matter of lntercoUeglate  athletics.
Another  way  In  which students
might  well show more regard  for
(Please  turn to Page  8)
Co-Ed Models
Nancy Martin, Jackie Ellis and Dorothy Stamatls three of the
U.B.C. co-eds who will model college clothes in the Hudson's
Bay Company Campus Fashion show this afternoon.
FASHIONS FOR CO-EDS
MODELLED THIS AFTERNOON
The Hudson's Bay Company is pleased to invite all U.B.C.
Co-eds to its Camptts Fashion Show in the Fashion Centre,
Third Floor, at 3 p.m., this afternoon, Tuesday the 24th.
Eight co-eds have kindly consented to model. They include
Beverley Matthew, Frances McClean, Jean Clugston, Mary
Frank Atkin, Jackie Ellis, Margaret Ewlng, Dorothy Stamatls
and Nancy Martin. These girls have chosen their own favorite
clothes from our Twlx-Teen Shop, Sportswear and Dress Departments.
—Fashion Centre, Third Floor at the BAY
iNcoNPOftA-rce ■** may te'o
1
British Columbia's
Mining Industry
With the Empire at War, the Mining Industry becomes more than ever
of vital importance. Of all'British Columbia's manifold activities, none ls
better organized to play its part in the War Effort.
With Gold, Silver, Copper, Lead, Zinc and Coal all contributing to its
mineral wealth, British Columbia becomes a leading factor in Canada's war
economy.
Everywhere in the Province the search for War Minerals is being vigorously prosecuted, and no effort is being spared to uncover the vast resources
which it is known to possess.
1939 was a highly successful year, with Production to the value of $66,-
600,000, and paying Dividends of over $11,000,000. Of this Production, $22,-
700,000 was in Gold, the highest in the Province's history.
Far from taking advantage of the situation, British Columbia's metal producers are co-operating tflosely with the British Government and are taking
only a very reasonable profit from their operations.
The Department of Mines
PARLIAMENT BUILDINGS
VICTORIA, B. C.
John F. Walker,
Deputy Minister.
Hon. W. J. Asseltine,
Minister. THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 24. 1940
_BBBSB_OB.^BSB_gisB_^_a_^s_s_B_^_BSBaasaaa_SBBt
THE CCLQPSE ON TtiE
BCCLKSTCCE   r_LCO_P
Why Did the Orange Crush?
A Chang Suey Serial
Packed like so many Sunklst grapefruit in the window of Varsity Produce, row upon row of Freshies'
beaming faces clogged the Auditorium. Danny de Dean Ovarts was telling the children a moving tale about
Miranda, the last year's glamour girl
who got bounced, and they were
hanging onto his words until their
biceps bulged.
OSCAR AGAIN
But down ln the press box an ugly
mug with a bored expression marred
the general array of sweetness and
light. Oscar Scrlbblewell, super
scribe of the Dirty Rag, had sat
through so many Freshman Daya that
he knew the speeches better than the
birds on the platform.
His eagle eye wss fixed on the
twenty-one Jewel olook (courtesy
Hootnannle's Limited) whieh was
stuck In the bottom of sn exGreclan
urn. Only forty-four minutes and
thirty seconds more, aooording to ths
program with whieh the White Shirts
st the door had so kindly furnished
him, and he would be sble to oil out
the fire exit and down to the Caf to
slug a coke.
UGLY MUG
He watehed the hands ss they rotated with the speed of a sufferer In
the last stages of sleeping stekness;
ln faot, he watched them so long thst
his never-too-strong brain popped
under the strain and he eould have
■worn he saw the dial swing inwards.
In its place for a moment was the
crafty phy-dog of an evil oriental, his
grimy string moustache dribbling
across his Jowls.
"Chang    Suey!"   gasped   Oscar.
<P Ho rubbed his eyes wtlh an old
dish rag and looked again, but the
apparition had disappeared. "That's
what comes of having clam (-how-
dor for breakfast," he said to hint-
self, "It's never agreed with me
since I took Bl I."
For Oscar knew that Chang was
answer to "Why did the chicken
cross the road?" The Clean-Up Campaign had wiped Chang out last year
and the year before, and back in the
spring of '35 the Dirty Rag had killed
him three tlmea by popular demand.
Having thus solved the problem to
his own satisfaction, Oscar dozed off,
for since hla adenoids had been removed he could relax ln public places
without the danger of resembling the
Point Atkinson fog horn on a binge.
Having awakened Just as Chief
Appleyard completed his course on
"How to Run a Scooter In Ten Easy
Lessons," he vaulted out the fire exit
before the oncoming wave of Freshies
got to lt, and a moment later was deep
ln a coke bought from the gorgeous
Angeline, the frizzy-haired waitress.
HICI
But the Joke was on Oscar, for In
front of a make-up table up in the
Emerald Room sat a fiendish oriental,
very much alive, pinning a big green
bow beneath his lnflnitesmal Jaw. He
curled hla whiskers coyly, added a
bushy wig, and In the place of Chang
Suey aat Alarlc, the Hick from Tim-
berley, the heart-throb of the baok
wooda maidens. But he gurgled the
wicked gurgle of sn Asiatic maniac
aa ho slunk to the door and wiggled
down the corkscrew stairway to the
quad.
Pushing his way through a
crowd of Sciencemen frantically
looking for their Big Sisters, he
found the Freshmen listening to
Maurice the Fleet confiding that
ping-pong developed the physique.
His disguise wss so good that a
group of the embryo caf loafers
ahouted "Aggie!" ss he rolled
Into the room, ss inconspicuous
aa the pork In a can of beans.
But beneath the stupid smile which
he   draped   across  his  mug,  his  evil
mind   was   functioning   on   all   four
cylinders.
"Gaping   fools,   aoon   you   shall   be
my   slaves.     The   time   has   not   yet
Freshman Freddy
Writes Homme to Pa
DEAR PA,
You know Pa, this university isn't
half bad. I thought before I came
down here that all the guys would
be corny — you know, all intellectual
and spouUng Latin and square roots,
but they sure are regular guys.
'Course there's lots of things I don't
quite catch on to, but just give me
time, you can't keep the toughest guy
in Dead Cow Canyon down for long.
And boy — the blondes — you know
I used to think that little squaw who
lived by the bootlegger's joint in old
Dead Cow was a honey, but here,
they sure have class. None of your
gum-chewtng babes for me, anymore
—I like 'em lady-like like they have
them down here, you know, all sitting round tables In the Caf, smoking
and pretending they don't see us guys
kind of giving them the once over.
More subtle, sort of.
NO SHYNESS
And gee, do I feel swell — first go
off, I saw it didn't get me anywhere
being shy with these dames, so I goes
up to one of them and we gets to
talking, and first thing I know, she
asks me to the freshette supper. Ouess
I alwaya was sort of good-looking.
Right away, I saw my clothes aren't
*o hot here — so I go down town
and trade ln my bright blue number
which sure looks slow here for some
bright green pants, yellow shoes, and
a red sweater, I'll sure cut a swath
at that freshette supper—oh boy, oh
boy !
But I guess some of the guys didn't
like my red sweater. Anywaya, I'm
walking along sort of peaceful-like,
thinking about nothing when I see a
lot of guys ln red sweaters, sort of
like mine with white letters which
said Sc '43 on them. They sort of
looks at me, queer like, and one of
them asks me something about Mr.
Noah.
<$> 'Course I never was one for this
religious stuff, so I just stands there.
Then they starts picking on me and
hauling me off to a building full of
engines and stuff. I wasn't scared
mind you, but as there were five
of them and only one of me, I thought
I'd better go quiet-like.
TCH! TCH! SUCH LANGUAGE
They  stood  me  up  on  a  table  and
began   asking   me  what  —   —   fresh-
come,  but when  all la  calm I  shall
strike!"
Pulling a  Ume bob crammed  with
Chem 3 exam papers from his pocket,
he patted lt lovingly, then pole-vaulted out an upper window, and over to
the Brick Building to make facea at
his   arch-enemy,   Marmaduke   Buma-
den, the leader of the Dirty Nine.
(Where will the wicked Chang
strike?    And does he knew that
three  strikes snd he's  out?    We
forgot   the  corpse  on   the  bookstore   floor,   but   perhaps   if   you
go up_ there now you may aee Its '
In   fact,   If   you   bother   enough
people while  you're looking, you
even be It.)
Mtt ptte' We"  flM;  lmrCt*lS**
man, (I know Pa, you're as broad-
minded as any guy ln Dead Cow
about strong language, but these sure
were some new words on me) was
doing in a red sweater.
Then they all sort of rush on me
and first thing I know I'm standing
there with no sweater on. I guess
that encouraged them because they
began to get enthusiastic and take off
my pants too. By thla time I begin
to forget the odds against me snd I
aak them what the — — do you mean
you — 's . And Pa I sure was glsd
I hadn't got those red flannel affairs
on that Ma made me drag down because just then I was plenty hot
enough without them.
Anyway, they didn't seem to like
that, 'cause one of them rushes at me
with a waste paper basket. Then the
other four shoves me Into lt and
puts another basket over It and locks
them together with a padlock. And
I put up a good fight too—two of these
darned guys had black eyes. But
there I am grinning at the world from
behind the wire of those baskets like
a gol-durn ape.
WE'RE SCIENCE MEN — SEE
Then they all alts round me and
explains that they're Science men and
that they're the only people that wear
red sweaters around here and live.
Oee, I 'bet even the professors don't
dare wear red sweaters without asking them. 'Course some of the profs
are kind of Uttle guys beside them,
but I guess the profs got brains all
right.
After awhile, I have to learn a song
about Mr. Noah which they make me
Rainy camping weather Is deflnlte-<|>ployed
ly dangerous — It Induces drinking
alone to keep yourself warm, as two
soph Westmlnsterites, one of them a
Fiji, found as they slowly got inebriated under their drenching tent—
all by themselves too, which seems
doubtful, not to mention pointless, to
us! .... We've just discovered the
most collegiate shop in town, with
smooth modernistic fixtures abounding with little knicknacks that college
girls adore . . . It's the Suzotte and
Inez Shop just below the Orosvenor,
on Howe, Suzette has sweaters and accessories, and Inez has frocks for
every occasion . . . styles shown In
Mademoiselle are their specialty, and
you know what those styles do for
you! . . . speaking of atyles, we hear
that the tall, dark, sleek looking Phi
Kap Sig was disappointed in his girl
friend's frigid "style" at a beach
party, because she blew a cold breeze
over everything despite the efforts of
a prominent, curly haired, bespectacled Fiji, and his girl friend, who
didn't need the bonfire to keep them
warm . . . speaking of cuddling, the
most adorable cuddly looking sweaters, with turbans to match are being
shown by Suzette.
*   •   .   •
Dear me, theae Phi Kap Pi's are always making this column . . . the
latest is about the most glamorous of
the group, who has planted hla pin
for the third Ume, this one being on
a girl from his home town on the
prairie ... all last year he and one
of tho brethren were rivals for the
attentions of a brownette aoph, also
from the aame prairie town . . . shoes
of every kind Including the newest
In saddles, all colours, and wedgies,
crepe soled all of them, so comfy for
oampus ... dress shoes, too .., may be
found at Stacy's, 762 Oranvllle . . .
frogskin and snake-kin are the neweat
trimmings for theae shoes ... by the
way, several ex-varsity boys are em-
sing to them—sort of like a solo.
Then they let me out. And aay,
Pa, they tell me I have a beautiful
voice — guess I'll have to join the
Musical Society and do a little singing and dancing on a real atage.
You got to take it from me, Pa, u
higher education is a swell thing, just
like you said.
FREDDY.
there, and so they know
exactly what's being worn on the
campus ... In men's shoes, Stacy's
are featuring the hand stained custom-built oxfords, with darker staining In the perforations . . . the priced
will fit your war-time budget, too,
they're so reasonable!
. . . that's a word that descrbes how
a certain blonde Sigma Phi Delta
didn't act, according to messages received from the far northern outskirts of B. C. . . . it seems that his
colleagues put a nice tame little frog
in his bunk one night, thinking it
very funny, but the scienceman really
saw red then ... he nearly packed up
and came home . . . oh, well, science-
men must have their fun !
*   •    •   *
The Arts and Crafts Shop, 807 Howe
St., has the most oomph Inspiring
brassieres that any Joe College ever
looked twice at the result of which
. . . they're the "Helene of Hollywood" atandard ot requirement for
the movie studios, yes, sorry to disillusion you, but those glamour girls
don't come like that, it'a the brassiere,
Helene of Hollywood that does lt . . .
Mra. Frayne also haa jewelery of all
aorta and description, to give thst
added bit of chic to any costume,
whether informal or formal . . two
tall blonde freshmen aren't so fresh,
lt seems ... on the way down from
the smelter city, their girl friend's
berth was just below thelr's . . .
■   .   .   •
Your permanent will be just like the-
pictures in Mademoiselle if you get
it at Clou's, corner of Robson and
Howe, where they use the MacDonald
system of steam permanents, a time-
tried method whloh has won prises aU
over the world . . . many of you know
Mra. Clou, who lias given fireside chats to Varsity students, and
knows exactly what suits co-ed's
coiffures . . . my, my, Joe Collltch
certainly wows the natives on his
summer jobs over the Province,
doesn't he? On* particularly rosy
Commerceman gets the whole-hearted
co-operation of the young (and I do
mean young) lady's parents . . . maybe she hasn't met any college boya
before to know what they're like!
Greetimgs to the University at War
COL. VICTOR SPENCER
Mr. W. C. MURRIN
Mr. T. S. DIXON
Mr. SID. G. SMITH
Mr. J. E. THOMSON
BELL & MITCHELL LTD.
541 West Georgia Street
Mr. HENRY REIFEL
BORGARDUS WICKENS LTD.
Mr. ANGELO BRANCA
Mr. GORDON WISMER
HON. T. D. PATTULLO
Mr. GORDON FARREL
A. E. JUKES & COMPANY LTD.
STOCKS   -   BONDS   -   INSURANCE
840 W. HASTINGS TRlnlty 2541
Canadian Salt Herring
Exporting Co. Ltd.
Mr. FRANK PARSONS
Mr. W. CHARLTON
MARSHALL-WELLS, B. C., LTD.
Mr. C. H. SELBY
Mr. C. P. FOSTER
Mr. HAROLD FORRESTER, M.L.A.
FELIX BOTTLERS LTD.
COAST BREWERIES
VANCOUVER SUPPLY LTD.
HAZEL WOOD CREAMERY LTD.
CANADA PACKERS LTD.
NEW YORK FUR CO.
Mr. GORDON FRISBY
Farris, Farris, McAlpine, Stutz,
Bull and Farris
We Are Very Proud Of Our Contribution to B. C.'s Mining Industry.
Boyles Bros. Drilling Co. Ltd. THE      UBYSSEY
Page Seven
The Ink
Pot   •
By the Campus Scribe
SMASHING TRADITION
"You will have to start off by saying you are sorry," said Ambrose, the
printer's devil, as he poked his black
little face out of Jhe Ink pot on the
desk, and clambered up the side of
my typewriter.
"Sorry?" I queried blankly, "What
for?"
"For the column you're about to
write," retorted the devil Importantly.
"Every Ubyssey columnist starts out
by apologizing for his first efforts. It's
quite the correct tiling to do."
Ambrose, I may explain, knows
these   things   because   he's   Been
Around.   He's lived In that bottle
ot printer's Ink  ln  the  Pub ever
since they moved him front Fair-
view and he's aat on the shoulder
of  every   Ubyaaey  columnist   and
reporter since the days of the four
column   paper.     Ambrose   is   an
awful stickler for tradition.
"It ls with regret that inform you
that I refuse to offer an apology for
my  column,"   I told  him.    "How  do
you expect me to influence the student mind It I commence by licking
tlie  readers'   boots?    I  repeat,   there
shall be no apology."
"You are smashing tradition," the
Utile devil warned.
"To blazes with tradition," I retorted
savagely. "Thla ls a column of opinion and comment, I will leave the
apology notes in the hands of the
Oriental gentlemen on the other side
of the pond."
And with this conviction, we commence to shape the mind of the 1940
atudent. Perhaps warp would be
better word.
THB OLD, OLD STORY
"You know," Ambrose the devil remarked, morosely, after our little tiff
on the subject of apologies had subsided. "It ls *,. thU time of year that
I alwaya ahed a salty tear or three
for last season's freshettes."
"You are doubtless referring to the
fickleness of the male undergrad," I
murmured.
••Precisely,"   replied   the   devil,
chewing moodily on a frayed bit
of    typewriter    ribbon.      "Every
year,   our   friends   the   sophettes
find they've been done dirt. Eaeh
new fall terms sees the soph coeds getting the gate ln  favor ot
the   lassie,   with   the   green   ribbons.   It never falls to happen."
Ambrose    never    uttered    a    truer
word.    There's nothing so pathetic as
a second year co-ed  on the first day
of the new term.    She doesn't realize
that   all   of   a   sudden   she's   lost   her
novelty and her freshness — that her
light   has   paled   beneath   the   starry-
eyed dazzle of the 1940 model.
It's a hard, cruel blow for the bewildered sophettes when they return
to tho campua for another season of
triumph, only to find that former
male admirers have left them in the
lurch to go ga-ga over the latest crop
of legs and eyelashes.
A SORRY LOT
See them on the campus today —
a sorry lot, huddled together by themselves,   bravely   smiling   wan   smiles
and watching the malea go by on the
trail of a flossy blonde with a green
freshette ribbon on ln her hair.
Just one year ago today, these
aame maids were the centre of a
cluster of masculinity.   The entire
male   population   of   the   campus
grovelled at their feet.   They were
new and they were fresh and they
were  very,   very  popular.    Now.
they   aro   has-beens.     The   light
has left their eyes, and there'a an
examination wrinkle or two across
their brow.   Even their hair seems
to   lack   the   lustre   of   their   old
freshette days.
It's no use sobbing, girls, you've
got to admit you're second hand by
now. ..It's the beginning of the Great
Blight and there's nothing you can
do about it until you achieve the
status of a Junior and become Interesting, or the status of a senior and
become sophisticated. Right now
you're a soph and compared with 200
brand new co-eds you're pretty dull.
MEN ARE HUMAN
It's no use saying that all men are
"Heels" and resolving to become career women. Men are human ond demand a change. They're like little
boys who tire of their playthings and
want fresh toys with more oomph.
Change the old toy, give it a re-paint
job, and they'll come back to It and
think they've got a different piece of
good.. That's the secret of the
Junior'-) charm.
I know it's bitter, girls, but you've
just got to weather it. It happens
every year. It happened last year, and
although they don't believe It, it's
going to happen to the present crop
of freshettes next year. Besides, girls,
it'a a good chance to do a lot of
swotting.
By the way, Ambrose, remind me
to get the phone number of that cute
little brunette in First Year Arts.
You can't get away from it, there's
something about these new lassies
that gets  you.
Ubyttey   Campaign
Purges Campus of
Waddle  Menace
Strong possibility that the world
famous waddle of the U.B.C. co-ed
may Vanish forever during the 1940-
41 session, is indicated by certain
signs that have appeared in the wind
during the past week.
These facts, garnered during the
week, tend to prove that the ducklike swing of the U.B.C. co-ed will
slowly disappear:
1. Vigorous classes In good posture
conducted by Miss Gertrude Moore In
tho Gymnasium, for all co-eds.
2. Report by the Ubyssey Fashion
Expert that saddle shoes (said to be
ono of the major causes of the waddle)
aro definitely OUT this year.
3. Increased chivalry of the males
of the campus, prompted by military
training, which results in the men
carrying the ladles' heavy load of
books (second major cause of the
waddle.)
4. Heavy research, conducted during the summer at the suggestion of
tho graduating class, by Professor
Geoffrey B. Riddehough (third major
cause of the waddle).
New Guinea and Old Clippings
And then there was the time when
tho baseball game on one of the Aggie
pasture fields broke up In an uproar,
when one of the players slid Into
what he thought was third base.
Students   Can    Go   Native     In   Bill   Tansley s   Museum
.mm. •«*• ****
Misplaced Exhibit Houses Horror and History
By ERIC NICOL
There is a sombre nook in the Library where barbarism reigns supreme, and I don't mean the main
reading room. There is a heavy door
through which generations of freshmen have peeped with awe and a
librarian. Led around more or less
by the ear, eacn newcomer gets a
brief flash of the grim array of
savage cutlery, then he Is whisked
away, to trundle through the remainder of his academic career with merely a hazy recollection of what lay
beyond the door.
Few ever return to It. Some
cannot remember where It Is.
Most refuse to beUeve that they
ever saw lt at all. One freshman
never got out of It. He may be
seen today under one of the glass
cases, and, though the specimen
card claims that he Is a Melan-
ealan rice-bowl, we know, don't
we?
MEET MR T.
Mr. Tansley admits that he cannot
see very weU without his glasses. Mr.
Tansley ls the curator of the place,
which you ahould have guessed to be
the   UB.C.   Ethnological   Exhibit,   or
<>tho   Museum,    as   it   Is   less   rarely<J>
known to  a  handful  of close friends
and admirers.
Ho Is a very obliging gentleman of
some 81 years, eager to show you his,
18 lager volumes of newspaper clippings and souvenirs pertaining to
University events and personalities,
and dating back to 1916. Included are
somo enlightening photos of the Institution when it was still ln swaddling clothes, the Infantum Fairview,
husky, and bawling for more room.
It is especially illuminating to study
the faces of some of those classes that
graduated when the cenjtury was still
in  its teens.
Tho fighting spirit that lugged
the Cairn up to the new site, stone
by stone, fairly radiates out of
thoso old tintypes. Which brings
up the time-worn riddle: when
does a body of students turn Into
a student body?
But it's an inspiring sight, folks.
See the men when they used to peel
their Adam's apple on the old-fashioned, bowzer-type collars, and understand why they went around spoiling for a chance to take them off.
See the women in the Jones' Tent and
Awning Co. specials of a day when
a gal bought material by the yard,
rather than by the milUmeter.
Then take a look at some of the
more inviting items of the Museum:
homey, little utensils from the Fiji
Islands that slice up a guest without
leaving any crumbs.
SKULL DUGGERY
See the ghastly whatsit from New
Guinea. Take a quick squint at some
of the gory thlngamobobs from the
Gilbert Islands, and realize why even
Gilbert didn't like it there. Look over
what the Indians used to make, before
they put Huble Smith on the team.
And, most interesting of all (step up
a little closer, folks) don't miss the
human skulls from Borneo, where
they liko to have something to remember you by, and take It, from the
neck up.
Cast your gllmps on the slightly
used noggin of Chief Wugga
Wugga Roo, who met his death
at the wavy edge of a rival's krla.
Friends of this kinky-haired Casanova report that he died almost
Immediately after eyeing his
brother chieftain's assorted
spouse*, and murmuring to the
tenth from the left, quote "You
look juat Uke Margie!"  Unquote.
And speaking of Margie, folks, you
should see what she did to the Solomon Island Group.   Th. reUcs are on
Classified
Wanted: one or two more women
students to share modern apartments
with excellent accomodation. Apply,
ALma 1600L, after 4:00 p.m.
*   *   *   *
Wanted: three boys for Co-op
houses. Phone, ALma 1268-Y evenings.
display inside. And, as if that were
not enough, we have obtained, at
great cost in money and blood, an
actual photo of Margie, in aU her natural splendor, and nothing else. Decide for yourself whether she looks
more like a hop-happy kangaroo or
Mickey Rooney. Children under 6
years of age and freshmen will not
be permitted to see this show unless
accompanied by parents and a leash
respectively.
HOLD ON A MINUTE
Now, don't go away, folks. The
show is continuous all day. The price
is, for this performance only, 10c, one
tenth of a dollar. In fact, If you ask
nicely, I think Mr. Tansley wlU let
you in gratis. AU you have to show
ia your Interest, no principal.
It may be argued with justification
that the frosh should be the first to
bo introduced to our collection of un-
clviUzed articles, but Mr, T. has
reason to wonder why some of the
upper year people don't totter in once
in a while. Don't let anything we
may say stir you out of that deUdous
form of Indifference now rampant in
the best circles, however. Be an old
fuddle-duddle, for all we care* It's
no skin off our beak.   Oee whiz.
Were Ready for the University Man !
FOUR   WAYS   TO   PAY
By cash, by lay-away with
smaU deposit, charge it on a
monthly charge account or
budget it through monthly
payments.
Forecaster Suits
and Xopcoats
Men's Shops,
Spencer's, Main Floor
Gone are the days when every male Varsity student was looked upon by the
public as an addict to "queer" clothes. Now, as part of the more astute section
of the public, he has a sound business judgment. He pays enough for his
clothes but not too much. He looks for good fabrics, good tailoring and modish
styles.     That's   why   Spencer's   Men's   Shops   recommends   Forecaster   Suits
and Topcoats.
Complete Your Ensemble
with fancy all wool hose at 75c, new Fall dress shirts by Arrow at $2.00, and
smart new ties at $1.00 Page Eight
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 24, 1940
U.   S.   STUDENTS   ASK   TO   AID   IN   WAR
May Use UBC Co-Ed's Plan
For Nation - V^ide Dances
Panhellenic   and   inter-fraternity   councils   throughout   the^
United States and Canada, may put into action the suggestion
of a U.B.C.  co-ed  that they  sponsor  a nation-wide series  of
University balls to aid the Canadian Red Cross Society.
Tho suggestion came from Ruth ■
Wllaon, women'a athletic representative on the Students' Council, and activities chairman of the
Alpha Gamma Delta sorority. It
came ln answer to a query from
Virginia Wiley, head of the West
Coast section of Alpha Gamma
Delta In Berkeley, California, who
wrote asking whst American sororities snd fraternities could do
to aid the Canadian war effort.
ANXIOUS TO HELP
"As you must surely know, we here
in the United Statea are deeply grieved
concerning the war and are anxious
to co-operate and help Canada In any
way possible," Miaa Wiley wrote, asking for suggestions from the University of British Columbia as to how her
sorority and others could aid Canada
In.refugee and war work.
Ruth Wilson dispatched an Immediate reply, suggesting a nation-wide series of formal bells,
sponsored by Panhellenic and
Inter-Fraternities councils, which
would take pises simultaneously
st every University in the United
States and Canada — all proceeds
to go to the Canadian Red Croas.
REFUGEES
iShe further suggested that every
Alpha Oamma Delta chapter in the
United States be responsible for one
British refugee child for the duration
of the war.
Miss Wilson indicated that the
U.B.C. Inter-fraternity and Panhellenic councils would follow the matter
with a more comprehensive plan, and
at the same time obtain the reaction
of other American Universities to the
suggestion.
S. CM. Appoints
New Secretary
Appointment of Sheila Hutchinson, graduate of the University
to succeed Mark Tnlnlkoff as
general secretary of the Student
Christian Movement has been announced.
Mlas Hutchinson, who returns
from the Esst this week hss spent
the summer attending a aeries of
8.C.M. camps and conferences.
With Good Wishes
Borland Ice Cream Co., Ltd.
Phone BAyview 1524 1520 W. 6th Ave.
VANCOUVER
5. C. M. Firesides
Camps , Popular
Sunday afternoon firesides will be
held periodically throughout the University session by the Student Christian Movement.
These friendship sessions aid in
drawing the group nearer together In
as weU aa introducing lt to travelling
speakers.
The S.C.M. also holds three camps
during the year. One week-end camp
will be held at Thanksgiving, another
In February, and a week's camp at
the close of the term. Camps are consistently good regardleaa of weather
conditions.
y..
Alfred W. Chard
L.R.SJM., L.T.C.L., A.T.C.M.
Teacher of Piano, Organ and Theory
Vocal Coach
Organist Holy Trinity Church   —    Accompanist Lions' Olee Club
INTERESTING COURSES FOR
UNIVERSITY STUDENTS
Residence Studio: 479 West King Edward Avenue
Dunbar Studio: 3S19 West 28th Avenue
PHONE FAlr. 0371-R
CARRELL PERMITS
Three types of Permits will
be granted this year — "A",
"B"  and "C".
"A" Permits — "A" Permit
holders are assigned to a definite
carrell, with right of access to
carrell during aU houra in
which the Ubrary is open. Carrell privileges are not transferable.
"B" Permits — The privileges
of "B" permit holders are subordinate to thoae In "A" class.
"B" permit holders' privileges
are limited to consultation of
books In the stacks, and to the
use ot Carrells not occupied by
an "A" permit holder. In the
event of the return of an
"A" permit holder to his Carrell, the "B" permit holder must
seek  accommodation  elsewhere.
"C" Permits — The privileges
of "C" permit holders are
strictly limited to consultation
of books ln the stacks, and use
of Carrells only when not wanted by "A" or "B" permit holders.
ALL STUDENTS IN THE
STACKS MUST PRESENT LIBRARY CARD AND CARRELL
PERMIT UPON REQUEST.
Applications For
Carrell Permits
Application forms for stack
permits are now available at
the Loan Desk. Such applications will be received up to and
including October 1.
Those eligible for permits
are:—
"A" Permits-
Graduate   students   who   are
working on a thesis.
4th year Honour students —
especially those in the fields of
language, literature and the
social sciences.
"B" Permits-
All 4th year Honour studenta
who do not receive an "A" Permit.
4th year—eth yean* Applied
Science.
4th year Agriculture.
"C" Permits—
4th year paaa students.
3rd year Honour students.
Teacher  Training.
A personal Interview with Mlas
Lannlng is necessary to obtain
an "A" Permit.
W. KAYE LAMB,
Librarian.
W.U.S. PLAN SEASON
OF GAY ACTIVITY
First activity of the WUS or Women's Undergraduate Society was the Little Sister Booth. For the week preceding the
opening of lectures, the booth was stationed in the Administration Building so that every freshette might obtain a Big Sister,
that is, an older girl who is well acquainted with the University
and who is able to straighten out any difficulties for the freshette.
TEA FIGHT
During freshman Initiation week
KLINCK'S ADDRESS
MMOYilD
Drawing and Art Materials
For Students
TRlnlty 2132
621 West Pender Street
WISHING U.B.C. CONGRATULATIONS
CRYSTAL  DAIRY   LTD.
ICE CREAM and DAIRY PRODUCTS
Fresh Milk Delivered Daily
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Highland 0133
With QUALITY,
Practical KNOWLEDGE and
UP-TO-DATE Equipment we serve you
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928 Granville St. Vancouver, B.C. TRlnlty 6584
If it's for Sport, Sparling's have it.
CARRELL PERMITS
(Continued from page S)
tho opinions of a host of hard-
pressed taxpayers, and at the same
tune give evidence of having put
away childish things, would be to
discontinue many of the present
practices followed in introducing
newcomers — both men and women — to University life.
No single action of the atudenta
does more, In my considered opinion, to create an unfavorable Impression In the public mind than
tho perpetuation of certain of theae
childish   Introductory   ceremonies)
snd, certainly, within recent yeara
nothing hss been more Ineffective
in   disciplining   the   freshmen   or
more damaging to the prestige ot the
osphomeree and of the upper years.
Therefore, at a time when there ls
Imperative need for greater effectiveness in living, for giving unmistakable
evidence of our seriousness of purpose,
and for demonstrating our determination  to  do  our  full   patriotic   duty,
these  matters should  receive  careful
consideration   by   the   elected   representatives ot the student body.
There are patterns ln history and
these patterns repeat themselves. The I
pattern that stands out moat prominently today ls this: The nation that
cannot endure hardness that cannot, or
will not, give up some of its pleasures,
some of Its comforts, some of Its luxuries, some of its hard-won rights,
even — the nation that Is not prepared
to sacrifice all that It has ln the defence of the principles by which it
professes to live, is doomed to destruction. It is not, "After us the deluge". As the President of Columbia
University said at a recent congregation: "The bell Is ringing."
There must be some charting of the
world of tomorrow, and surely in this
universities and university students
ahould be In the van. The experiences
following the last war do not justify
the optimistic view that a brave new
world awaits us tomorrow, but surely
we are capable of thinking and working to that end; and It wlU not affect
our morale adversely if, while laboring valiantly to banish today's evils
in the world, we strive, with equal
resolution, to fashion a new world
more nearly ln conformity with our
heart's desire.
CONCLUSION
And so the question arises: WUl
the students have the Independence, the courage and the moral
stamina to face these Issues and
to help solve them? The tradition of former generations of students supplies the answer: They
wtll.
During occupancy CarreU
permits should ALWAYS be
posted in the lower right hand
corner ot the glass partition at
the front of the CarreU; they
are to 'be removed on departure.
A RECORD MUST BE LEFT
AT THE LOAN DESK FOR
ALL MATERIAL USED IN
CARRELLS.
Types of Loans
a. Dally Charges—For material marked "For use in the Library building only, and as a
'Reserved' Loan". Thla includes periodicals, government
documents, and certain other
special material. Call slips
must be left at the Loan Desk
and material returned to the
Desk dally for discharging.
b. Weekly Charges — This is
the ordinary weekly loan, available to all studenta. These
weekly charges, if left ln the
carrells, must have a white slip,
visible, and showing the due
date.
c. Carrell Charges — Students
with assigned Carrells may have
books charged to their CarreU
number. Material so charged
must be limited to that needed
fa* actual thesis work, and may
Include nothing In general demand. Books on CarreU charges
may be taken from the Library
from 3 p.m. to 8:30 a.m. the
next day. Thla applies only to
material authorized for home
use.
W.  KAYE LAMB,
Librarian.
September 33, 1940.
tea ls held ln the cafeteria, Tuesday
afternoon, so that the freshettes may
get to know the various clubs on the
campui).
Beat entertainment of the week ls
tho freshette supper, Wednesday evening. All freshettes must wear children's clotHlng, and they are to be
cared for by their Big Sisters. For
thoae freshettes who have not worn
their insignia diligently for the flrat
three days, certain penalties are enforced upon them at this supper. It
will be "one big barrel of fun" says
Dorothy Hlrd, WUS president.
TWO TEAS
Two teas for the out-of-town girls
will be held In the week following the
Initiation week. They are to be held
in Brock HaU at 4 o'clock on Tuesday
and Thursday afternoons. The tea
on Tuesday Is given by Arts '41 and
'42, the one on Thuraday by Arts '43
and '44. These teas are held so that
the out-of-town girls m*y get to know
one another, and also the ln-town
girls.
A  series of lectures on  beauty
culture, fashions, and hygiene will
be  held  this  faU  for  all  women
students.   Details will be given at
tho combined WUS-WAA meeting
on Thuraday at 12:48 In Arts 100.
Past Christmas activities include the
annual Hi-Jinx and the ever popular
Co-Ed   Ball,   but   further   details   on
these affairs will be given later.
For those freshettes who as yet have
no Big Sister, there ls an Information
Booth stationed outside the Women's
Lower Common Room ln the Arts
Building fhere they can make inquiries, or they may ask Dorothy Hlrd, or
any other member of the WUS executive.
PROSPERITY
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CLIPPER
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By Sheaffer
•2.50
It's   easier,   quicker   and
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CUNNINQHAMS
Cunningham Drug Stores
Ltd.
ALL LAST YEAR CLASS
REPRESENTATIVES
PLEASE SEE MAURY VAN
VLIET NOT LATER THAN
THIS WEEK CONCERNING
INTRA MURAL PROGRAM.
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Manufacturers of
PORTLAND CEMENT
Guaranteed to Pass Standard Engineering Specifications
Plants at
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Deliveries made by water and rail anywhere in British Columbia.    Write us for
prices   or   advertising   literature   describing  the  hundred  uses  to  which  concrete
can be put.
SUPPORT HOME INDUSTRIES
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Concrete for Permanence" "Tuesday, September 24, 1940
THE      UBYSSEY
\
•!
DOZEN NEW PROFESSORS JOIN U.B.C. STAFF
-«>
Meet Kaye Lamb, His Motto: Work
New   Librarian   Takes  Over  170,000  Tomes
King John*s Successor Grew Up With U.B.C.
King John's castle has a new master.
You'll find him seated at King
John's desk in King John's big office
overlooking the Illy pond In front of
the University Library that was John
Rldlngton's castle for 15 years.
And if you catch him when he's
not busy — a difficult feat In itself
— he may consent to tell you about
the time King John gave him his first
job as assistant In the brand new
stone library which opened on the
Point Grey campus In 1925.
HE'S HOME AGAIN
To Dr. W. Kaye Lamb, the University of British Columbia Is
home, for he spent seven years as
an undergraduate, and later as a
graduate on Its campus. He knew
the University when It was nothing more than a motley collection
of shacks at Fairview and he
still recalls the first few weeks at
Point Grey, when students aat on
the Auditorium floor, when the
graduating class sold hot dogs ln
front of the Arts Building, and
when the only means of reaching
the Library was by a plank walk
through the mud.
It's a very different Library and
campus from the one he knew and
worked in 15 years ago.
Stepping into John Rldlngton's shoes
Is no easy job, but Dr. Lamb has
plunged Into his new work with the
vitality that has always characterized
any task he has undertaken. For
seven years he was Provincial archivist and libarian In Victoria. The
capital city's loss Is U.B.C.'s gain.
The new librarian's main hobbies
are hard work and history — In that
order. He is the editor of the British
Columbia Historical Quarterly — a
publication that has the highest subscription list of any magazine of its
kind in the Pacific Northwest.
HARD WORK
As for hard -work — Dr. Lamb has
had plenty of it ever since John Ridington first hired him as a student
assistant in 1925.
The    thing    Dr.    Lamb    notices
about   the   University,   outside   of
Vancouver's Used Car
Headquarters
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—Photo  by  Bill Orande.
DR. KAYE LAMB
. . . Noise within reason
1940   Faculty
List   Includes
Eminent Names
A dozen new names appear on the
U.B.C faculty list this year to replace those of professors who have
been retired, transferred, or who have
gone on active service.
The new  faculty  members are:—
Vernon C. Brink, M.S.A. (Brit. Col.)
—Instructor in the department of
agronomy.
Dr. W. A. Clemens—Head of the department of zoology.
Ian McTaggart Cowan, B.A. (Brit.
Col.); Ph.D. (Calif.) — Assistant professor of zoology.
Alexander Hrennlkoff — Assistant
professor of civil engineering.
Stephen A. Jennings, M.A., Ph.D.
(Toronto) — Lecturer ln the department of mathematics.
Joseph M. Keller, B.Sc. (Harvard)—
Lecturer,  department  ot  physics,
Miss Dorothy Mawdsley, B.A. (McGiil), M.A. (Brit. Col.), Ph.D. (Chicago)—Assistant professor of English.
F. E. L. Priestley, M.A. (Alberta) —
Assistant professor, department of
English.
D. H. Russell, B.Sc., M. Ed. (Sask.),
Ph.D. (Columbia)—Associate professor of education.
Daniel W. Thomson, B.A.Sc. (Brit.
Col.), M.A. Sc. (Illinois)—Instructor ln
the department of mechanical and
electrical engineering.
George Mlcliael Volkoff, M.A. (Brit.
Col.)—Assistant professor ln the department of physics.
Dr. William Kaye Lamb—Librarian.
the fact that its campus Is the
most scenic on tho continent, Is Its
compactness.
"Few students realize how compact
their campus really is here," he told
interviewers. "That's because they
haven't visited other campuses and
discovered the long distances students
havo to walk between buildings."
NOISE WITHIN REASON
"Noise within reason" will be Dr.
Lamb's motto as far as library conditions go. He realizes that students
can't be completely silent and is prepared to make allowances for it. At
tho same time he expects male students will find Brock Hall a more
convenient place to go visiting and
believes this will aid in inaugurating
a silent era in the library.
The new librarian hasn't been at
work long enough to make many
plans for changes In his castle. But
ho admits that he has visions. He has
caught the torch thrown him by
John Ridington, and students may remain confident that the U.B.C. Library will continue its progress onward  and   upward.
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Dean Bollert Tells Freshettes
ial Life  Should
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Speaking to the Freshettes on Friday morning in Arts 100,
Dean Bollert advised them to carry on with their social life, despite the war.
She emphasized the fact that the happier they were, the
better they would feel and the better they -would be intellectually. However, she suggested that students cut down on the
elegance of Varsity functions so that the maximum amount of
money might be left for war work.
WAR WORK
Til-. Dean added that attempts
arc being made to secure a room
in the Brock Building for Women's War Work, for Uio co-eds
to feel thut they as well as
the men are doing their part to
win   the   war.
She told the newcomers that it was
advisable for them to join two organizations,   but   warned   them   not  to
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attempt to crowd too much into the
first year for fear they might not be
back to do it in the second. How-
over, she recommended that the girls
attend all Women's Undergraduate
'Society and Women's Athletic Association  meetings.
Dr. Hallamore, who as chairman
introduced Dean Bollert, told the
Freshettes that their first duty as college women -was to keep physically
fit, and Miss Moore, the girls' gym
instructor and Miss Marshall of the
University Health Service emphasized
this  fact In short  addresses.
Prof. Gage Back
NO CO-EDS AT CAL.  TECH.
SO BOYS GET WORK DONE
Back from a busy year at the Cali-^cordlng to Mr. Gage, and they are al-
fornla    Institute    of    Technology    at
Pasadena,   Mr.  Walter   Oage,   popular
professor of mathematics, resumes his
many  activities on this campus,
Mr. Gage reports that the staff of
the Institute has been clamouring for
action on behalf of Oreat Britain since
the start of the war. The students
at first, he said, were strong isolationists, but since the fall of France, the
tide has turned in the opposite direction, and now the students are demanding that the United States do
something  very   quickly.
ALL MALE CAMPUS
hours
Mr. Gage's Impression Is that
mur own students here In B. C.
compare favourably with any
others he haa met. In Pasadena,
he sold, the students work very
hard and very long hoars, Tho
campus Is small, most undergraduates "live In", there Is Uttle
student life, and there are no women on the campus, of course,
and so the students work most of
the time.
With   all   this   work,   their   best   Is
only equal to our best, he said.
The  Institute  Is  always  keenly  Impressed   wtih  Canadian   students,   ac-
U.S. Collese
Pro - British
Says Irving
"Pro-British sentiment is
very marked In the Universities of the Eastern States," stated Professor J. A. Irving, head
of the Philosophy and Psychology Department.
Professor Irving, who has just returned from an extensive tour of
such important centres as Harvard,
Yale, Columbia, Chicago, Minnesota,
Wisconsin and Toronto, said that during the Blitzkrieg on England allied
sentiment took  a definite  upswing.
"I don't know how military training will affect the students in the
States but the Universities are very
active, with no decrease in enrolment,"  the professor said.
"It   feels   good   to   be   back   on   the
most   beautiful   campus   in   Canada,"
.smiled Professor Irving.    "This prom-
ses to  be a very  active  and stimula-
ing year, with plenty of work for us
all."
ways   anxious   to   get   more   students
from Canada in Pasadena.
Mr. Oage Is renewing his work with
the Players' Club and with the Musical Society, and as usual, he has the
job of welcoming the freshmen and
freshettes to U.B.C.
S.CM. CONTINUES
STUDY GROUPS ...
Noon hour study groups, the weightiest activity of the Student Christian
Movement will continue throughout
the session.
Topics chosen for study this year
Include "Social Change ln Canada,"
"The Nazarene," "Cosmopolitan
Group," "Pathway to Certainty,"
"Psychology and Life," as well as a
group for freshettes, and a joint Newman club—S.C.M. group called "Living Creeds."
Leaders Include Rev. J. W. Melvln,
Rev. Hayden Stewart, Robert McKenzie, Jerry Hundall, Emily Fraser and
Shellah Hutchinson, general secretary.
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Cosmopolitan   Club
A main topic of discussion at this
year's meetings of the Cosmopolitan
Club will be the present war. Special
attention at the meetings will be given
to  the  belligerent  countries.
Travellers In these foreign field-
will address the members, In an effort
to clarify the issues at stake. Those
who would have a better understanding between nationalities will find this
group most stimulating.
The club meets monthly on Sundays. Applications for membership
may be obtained from Jack McMillan,
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'38 Chevrolet — 1219   $793
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'29 Studebaker    - 1193
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'38 Ford V8 — Std. 85 $693
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Tuesday, September 24, 1940
FOUR    STUDENT    CO - OPS    LAUNCHED
System  Spreads To Co-Eds;
Plan  Proved  Successful
\
Can ten co-eds live together in co-operative peace and harmony for seven months?
That's the question facing Dorothy Brown, head of the first
co-ed co-operative boarding house at the University of British
Columbia.
"If the men can do it, the women can too," says Dorothy,
and she's out to prove it.
POOL RESOURCES
At the co-ed co-op, 4463 West 13th
Avenue, the out-of-town co-eds wlU
keep   house,   pooling  their   resources
so that Uving expense. wlU be cut to
a   minimum.    They'll  do  their   own
washing, cooking and house-cleaning,
on a very strict budget.   They expect
to Uve for less than $23 monthly.
The  ladiea took the Ides from
13  campus males  who  lived together   on   a   co-operative   basis
during the 1030-40 session at a coat
of  less than  920 a month.    Ihe
boya found that they could handle
the situation with a maximum of
48 minutes of work per man per
day.
Growing Uke the proverbial snowball, the co-operative system hss expanded this year until lt embodies
thre. men's residences and one co-ed
house. Some 35 males wll Ibe accommodated, Alf Carlsen, head of the
student committee on co-operative
reports. AppUcatlons are still being
reoeived.
20 DOLLARS MONTHLY
Because oi rising Uving costs, eaeh
student embarking on the co-operative scheme, wiU be assessed a
monthly 926. A r.bat. will be given
at the end of the year if possible.
All houses wlU pool their buying
and laundry resources to bring down
costs. Students wlU find the houses,
roomy and comfortable and the company more than congenial.
Address of the throe male co-ops,
which are under the supervision of
Tom Pepper, are 4083 West Eighth,
3928  Weat  10th,   and  4324   West   13th.
4>-
Applications may be made by phoning Carlsen at the latter address —
ALma 1430-M.
The   co-operative   system   may
also extend to embody a campus
bookstore which wUl send and sell
textbooks and school supplies on
n co-op basis, it waa Indicated.
The atudent committee is investigating the  bookstore's posslblUties and
expects to prepare an early report on
the situation.
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GRANVILLE ISLAND
Player's  Club
Announces
Fell Program
Beginning st once, the Players' Club
has drawn up s program of activities
for the first few weeks until rehearsals for, the Christmas plays start
in earnest.
A meeting of old members wiU be
held on Tuesday, September 94.   AppUcatlons of prospective members muat
be in by Friday, September 27.
Prospective membera wW nteet
st noon on Friday when the try-
out parta will be given out. Various groups who will try out together wiU be posted. Pr_ap_«tive
members  will  have ttU  Tuesday,
October   1,   to   learn   their   parts
snd rehearse.    Tryouts take place
on October  1,  and the namea of
those who have mad. the grade
will be posted.
A general meeting of old and new
members will be held at noon on
Wednesday, October 2, ln a room to
be  announced.
There will be a reading of the
Christmas plays Thursday noon and
afternoon when members must make
up their minds what parts they want
to U-y for. Saturday, October 5, is
the deadline for deciding what parts
they want and for getting the actual
parts.
Tho final tryouts for the Christmas plays is on Thursday, October 10.
After that,  rehearsing !
Applications are being called for
now, and forms are available as well
as the boxes to put the fllled-ln
forms ln.
Co-op Chief
Alf.   Carlson,  shown  above,
{complete    with   his   engaging
grin, is feeling happy because
the  men's  co-operative  movement is proving to be a success.
Attend Conference
Three local members of th. Student Christian Movement attended
the National Youth Congress, held this
summer in Montreal from July S to
7 . They are Shellah Hutchinson, Joyce
Carter, and Frank Bertram. *
C.S.A. Delegates
Fight Award
Restrictions
Study Groupa
Feature of S.P.C
Study groups on "Modern Trends ln
Social Thought," "The Student and
Hla Future Work" and "Art and Literature" will launch the Social Problems Club into another year on the
campus.
These groups will be held during
the noon hour In the club room. Another S.P.C. feature ls the Noon-hour
Recital from the Carnegie coUectlon
of fine recordings.
Regular free camp wlU be held during the Armistice week-end. During
this period of study, companionship
and fun, new S.P.C.'ra can really come
to know the "regulars".
Summer activities of the club included a study group on Canadian
History and another on current good
books. Spring and summer camps
held at Deep Cove were pronounced
J I very successful.
The C.S.A. Discussion Club summer
committee has been active aU summer . Perturbed by the announcement that the scholarships awarded
under the Dominion-Provincial Youth
Training Program would be restricted to previous holders of the awards
and to students ln Engineering, Medicine, or Science courses, and preferably to those ln the senior year of
such courses, the executive of the
C.S.A.D.C. Instructed the secretary to
look further Into the matter.
A delegation Interviewed Dr. H. B.
King, Chief Inspector of Schools for
B.C. regarding the matter, and subsequently drew up a brief containing
the arguments against restrictions ln
awarding the scholarships. This brief
was sent to Dr. King, to the Hon. Dr.
Weir, and to the Hon. Norman Mc-
Larty, Minister of Labour at Ottawa.
Dr. King and Dr. Weir both expressed agreement with the points in
the brief, but th. brief reached Ottawa too late to effect any change
for this year. The executive hopea to
press the matter in the future, however.
CO-OP BOOK STORE
Archl. Bain Is obtaining Information from other universities, regarding the setting up of a profit-
sharing book-ator* Val Bjarnason,
president of the C.S.A. Discussion
Club  Is  obtaining  facta   relating
to the  operation  of employment
bureaus on ether tainpn—s.
During the summer a dance and a
beach party w.re held by the membera  of   this  club.    For   the  coming {
term,  a  party ls planned where re- j
ports on summer work wlU he given ,
and plana for the winter program wlU
be dlacuaaed.
Tin Gods Earn Summer Cash
For Fall Tuition Fees
Council members, like most of the common herd, work in
the summer to earn money for their Varsity tuition.    Here's
what the tin gods did this year.
A.M.S.   President   Harry   Lumsden<%>Hls  work  on the  experimental  plots
worked In a warehouse of the Amerl
can Can Company. Harry says that
lt was not a glamourous Job in the
least; ln fact, the thing he enjoyed
most about it was the week-ends off.
For the fourth summer Jim Harmer,
Men's Athletic President, worked at
Pioneer in the mine, running a stone,
He earned more than enough to cover
his fees for thla year.
Both Dorothy Hlrd, Women's Undergrad Prealdent and Women's Athletic
President Ruth Wilson spent their
second summers as playground supervisors, Dorothy at Ceperley and Ruth
at Brewer's. There they taught children handicrafts and swimming, supervised volleyball and baaketbaU games
and helped ln the staging of a mock
wedding. They enjoyed most of tho
work, but Dorothy said that teaching
folk dancing was the bane of her Ufe,
and Ruth agreed.
Work on the University farm claimed Men's Undergrad President Todd
Tremblay, the only Aggie on Council.
prepared him for a career as a soil
chemist.
Bob Bonner of the Literary and
Scientific Executive was an assistant
In the layout department of the Dominion Bridge Company, helping to
measure aheet metal.
Betty Bolduc spent her third summer at Art School. Sh. is speclaUz-
Ing in commercial art, and has already
sold some nursery pictures to Christie-Barbara's.
Scienceman Charlie Nash, the Junior Member, spent the summer in the
dried out area of southern Alberta,
an employee of Ducks Unlimited.
Editor -in - dhief Jack Margeson
strayed from his preparations for a
literary career to work in the Trail
smelter switching trains.
As a salesman in Charlton and Morgan, Council-Treasurer Peter McTavlsh gained experience In handling
cash which wiU be useful during the
coming year.
Absence Of Male Warblers
May Force All-Girl Show
Don't look now, but there may be a full fledged leg
show on the campus this year with all the trimmings.
Yessir, an all-girl, all-musical high kicking foot-
light performance oozing with lipstick, mascara and
snappy jokes. 1
Harvard does it, Cornell does it, even Saskatchewan
does it. It's quite possible that the University of British
Columbia may follow suit.
WHAT ! — THE MU9 SOCS?
And while you're eyes are still popping, listen to this: The
would-be producers of the aforementioned female frolic are none
other than the University Musical Society, still rosy from previous
successes such as "The Gondoliers", "The Mikado" and Victor
Herbert's immortal "Serenade".
"C'est la guerro" musical society ofifclals mourn In their best
French accents. "Our men arc too busy training to be soldiers. It
looks like we'll have to choose a production with an all-girl cast."
The said officials then hinted broadly that they would
not be averse to giving the campua an eyeful of scantily
clad pulchritude appropriately accompanied by breezy musical selections of a brass-section origin. (No violins, please,
by request.)
The heavy burden of military training coupled with the crushing
load of currlcular activities will probably keep most of the male
warblers ln mothballs aa far as the Mus Socs are concerned. This
will doubtless apply to behind-the-scenes work as weU, and the
1040-41 season may find fragile co-eds groaning under the weight of
heavy sets, their pretty curls mussed up by constant conflict with
stage machinery.
Gilbert and Sullivan may do a double flip ln their respective
tombs when they find they've been discarded by the ever faithful
Mus Soccers, but ln wartime, you've got to make the best of everything.
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ALL LAST YEAR CLASS
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VLIET NOT LATER THAN
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THE      UBYSSEY
Page Eleven
ALL LAST YEAR CLASS
REPRESENTATIVES
PLEASE SEE MAURY VAN
VLIET NOT LATER THAN
THIS WEEK CONCERNING
INTRA MURAL PROGRAM.
ALL LAST YEAR CLASS
REPRESENTATIVES
PLEASE SEE MAURY VAN
VLIET NOT LATER THAN
THIS WEEK CONCERNING
INTRA   MURAL  PROGRAM.
CC-CD
S _P Cjp T $
Do you hike, dance, golf, swim,
ride? It sounds like an ad for an
exclusive summer resort, doesn't It?
But it's only the beginning—of what?
—of the list of activities offered to the
sports-minded freshette. See page 10
ot the registration booklet. But perhaps, by that time, your pen automatically checked off your favorites,
when you were filling out your
couraea. Nevertheless, there are Innumerable sporta to choose from, the
favorites Including grass hockey, basketball, and archery.
NOT YET)
Compulsory physical education?
Not   yetl    Th.  laat  Issue  of  the
Ubyaaey didn't mean  a thing, at
lesst not ss for as girls' sports, and
credits are eoncermd.
Sadly mlaaed on this year's Athletic
Directorate will be newly appointed
Hortense Warne, of grass hockey and
archery fame. Big plans were ln
store for thla new catch of the Normal School.
Could It be that Miss Moore's posture-charting evolved from that phantom of iU repute, the campua waddle?
Don't forget the all-Important
W.A.A. meeting under new prexy,
Ruth Wilson, on Thursday.
Minor Sporta
By Dim GWOT
With the military training
putting the damper on most of
the major sports on the campus
this season, the "minor" sports
of former years will now assume a position of more importance.
BOXING
Boxing, which was given a good
start last year, will receive even more
attention than before. The followers
of the great art of the gloved fist will
bo able to turn their attention to the
sock-and-run pastime and get in
soniu retilly good training. With a
swell. riiiK all set up in the dunguoii
oi tho Stadium, the boys will bo able
to give vent to their dudgeon with a
little bludgeoning, and with a little
work the sport may be developed into
one of major importance in a few
years.
Maury has Ideas of having the
University take part In tho Annual
Western Inter-Collegiate boxing,
wrestling and fencing competitions
which are held on the prairie
every year. Of course this aim
cannot be realized until after the
War, but Maury's plan Is to get
In the ground work In the next
few years.
SKIING
Although the Skiing Club has as
yet not been organized, lt is believed
that the group will sponsor a larger
membership than last year and wiU
be more active than In former years.
There is a rumour to the effect that
there will be two branches of the
Club, one operating on Orouse, and
one on HoUyburn. It seems as though
this would be a logical Idea, as the
group could then quite easily handle
a larger membership.
GOLF
Golf will doubtless come into its
own this semester, since the campus
Is literally swarming with young hopefuls anxious to cleave the clods. Many
of the old gang will be back with us
once more, and such players as Orme
Hall,   Hans   Swinton   and   Bill   Charl-
Intra-Murels
Take Top Spot
In Athletics
With the loss of most of our
major sports this year, that
"lost dog" of University athletics, Intra Murals, comes into
its own again. The Intra-
Mural loop has been sadly
neglected (by the students) in
the past few years, but with the
exit of Canadian Football and
English Rugby, it is expected
that the Inter-Class competitions will once more become a
major part of our sport roster
Our hard-working Mr. Van Vllet
has enlarged on last year's plans for
tho Class feuds, and has bigger and
better plans for the undergrads this
year. Basketball wtll again form a
large part of the program and it
ls expected that the Arts-Aggie battles
will continue with renewed strength
(with the occasional Scienceman ln to
add colour to th. picture — and humour — and pathos — and stuff).
Volleyball will also figure largely
In the loop this semester, and along
with badminton ahould provide a lot
of fun for the lada and lasses.
In the minor side of the bracket,
such stuff as rope cUmblng, baseball,
tumbling, etc., will be featured for
those who prefer the more individual
lines of sport.
AU those interested in Intra-
Murals should report to eithei
class representatives or Maury
Van Vliet.
Watt's Watt -
o     o
WE     QUOTES
Miss Gertrude Moore, Women's Physical Education Instructress.
With the government providing for
the physical fitness of the men, the
women on the campus should take
advantage of the splendid opportunity
open tu them to keep in good condition. They, too. must be capable of
cai-ryinj- out war-time re.sponsibilitiea
and. of proving themselves good, cheer -
'.'ul.   and   vivacious   companions.
This; year, the girls are fortunate in
having the gym evei-y morning, nnd
are invited to form large classes, even
though not required to report to a
sergean t - ma j or.
HIGHLIGHTS
The following are a few highlights
in this  year's  program:
Badminton will be played every
morning at 8:30, Tuesdays and Wednesdays being reserved for beginners'
lessons.
Gym classes will Include posture,
keep-fit exercises, tumbling, Ught
apparatus, and games.
In  response  to  numerous  requests,
charting of posture will take place in
the   gym   office   any   afternoon   this
week between the hours of 2 and 4.
Dancing classes will cover rhythmic, folk, tap, national, and recreational dancing, as well aa theory
of   dancing,   an   Innovation   with
possible  credits  for  teachers.
Last  years'   Recreational  Leadership
course becomes a Playgrounds Course.
Registration    begins    at    once,    all
registrants,    of    course,    requiring    a
medical examination.
By DOUG. WATT
Along with the blank-faced, green-clad specimens of humanity which annually haunt our renowned university around
this time of year, (called by such various names as punks, greenhorns, mugs, freshmen, and "those ZxSxzdc %$') (Zx) kids"
comes the news of plans for our sporting year. With, as Professor Gage, Sage of Science, would say "all other things being
equal" the University of British Columbia was looking forward
to one of its finest years in the line of athletic accomplishment.
However, the unknown factor as usual entered into the
affair, and threw the athletic heads for a severe loss. In this
case said unknown factor turned out to be the War, and unfortunately it has put a definite cramp on the hopes and plans
of that sporting mastermind, Maurv Van Vliet.
VAN VLIET GLUM
In an Interview with Mr. Van Vliet yesterday, yours
truly found'him a little glum concerning the hopes (shattered hopes, I may say) of his super Canadian Football
squad.
After a year of really hard driving, Maury is now faced
with the prospect of seeing his unbeaten group of top-notch
players languish on the sidelines of inactivity.
As a matter of fact, there is grave doubt as to whether
there will even be any sidelines at all this year, as none of the
Big Four of last year have said anything concerning teams this
year. However, there is a rumour travelling via the well-
known grapevine that Bob Brown ls going to organize a team
If any competition ls forthcoming, so in conjunction with this
movement it has been hinted that the Varsity squad might play
four night games this semester. All these games would of
oourse, have to be run off in Vancouver, as the boys would
not have time to travel, -what with military training and all
stuff like that there.
A FEW GAMES
The main idea is that there should at least be an attempt
made to get in a few games this year, as they proved to be a
real drawing card for the students during the fall season last
year.
The military training has put any ideas of English Rugby
out of the running altogether, since there is no field equipped
With lights that is suitable for the eliptical leather activities,
and any chance of daytime games is out of the question entirely. All of Saturday afternoon will of course be taken up,
and it is doubtful whether the different students' programmes
can be co-ordinated successfully on the other afternoons.
BASKETBALL
Baskctbull this year provides the only shining ray
among the gloom. It will rank far above the other sports
on the Campus as the top athletic objective. At a recent
meeting down town it was agreed by all concerned that the
same six teams as competed last year would again make up
the League this season. With the exception of Joe Pringle,
Dougle Alexander, and possibly the redoubtable Mr.
Straight, Maury will field the same team as last year.
Jim Scott, ace sniper from Chilliwack, will again be in the
forward line; Pat Flynn, Wally Johnson, and Dick Miller will
work together once more; whie Doug Pedlow, Brud Mathison,
and Jo-Jo Ryan will also be wearing the blue and gold. Most
of the city teams have managed to maintain the same roster
despite the war, so the competition will be about the same'as
last year. Maury holds high hopes for ending up in the top
spot come playoff time, and with a little more polish on last
year's work, the boys should stand a good chance of grabbing
any gardenias dished out in the melon-tossing world.
CO-EDS shop atTRACY'S
ton, who pound a mean pellet will be
around to spark an ace-high Varsity
squad of divot-delvers.
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Newest fabrics Include genuine
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ALL LAST YEAR CLASS I VLIET NOT LATER THAN
REPRESENTATIVES! THIS WEEK CONCERNING
PLEASE  SEE  MAURY  VAN ! INTRA   MURAL  PROGRAM.
After the Show
Stop at the
GOOD EATS CAFE
Dance
Dine .
GOOD ORCHESTRA EVERY NIGHT
NO EXTRA CHAROE OR COVER CHAROE
NO MORE OF THIS FOR MAURV
FOOTBALL, HOPES SHATTERED , to.-. Maury is feeling glum these days,
—Maury Van Vliet, genial owner of Lbecaus- his football hopes have been
"Varsity", the can-pus mascot, pic- .shattered by military training plans,
turert elsewhere, also wins renown by but he still expects to do a lot in the
hi:   position   as   Men's. Athletic   Direc-    way   of   inter-mural  sports.
JOE  MILLER?
mmf*
,jrvi8\\
■
^Mh
\
*4
Pr-^1
^
1
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Sterling's Ltd.
806 Granville Street
To The Students
OF THE
If you don't recognize Joe
by  this photo,  come into
our store, and see him In
peraon.
U. B. C.
We Salute You
We hope our store, wiU be
your store, come In anytime
and meet Joe, an old Arts
'42 student.
He will show you our
Suits, Topcoats, Raincoats or
anything you may desire,
If you are real nice to him,
he might let you ose the
store's Bndget Plan if you
are thinking of buying a
Suit or Topcoat.
$5.00 Down
$2.00 a Week
STERLING'S LTD.
THE STORE FOR MEN
Commodore Bldg. 866 Granville St. Page Twelve
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 24, 1940
rules re_p
f _pc$u ...
RULES  FOR FRESHETTES
1—Sorry,  I'm  dated up.
2—Charlie Nash (wanta buy a
duck?) may be found in the science
building   and   the Georgia.
3—Always conduct yourself in a
ladylike manner. Then people will
know you are a freshette.
4—Say over to yourself carefully,
"Toy Boat." Now say It fast for three
consecutive times. Can't do It, eh?
Neither can I.
S—The voice of experience says that
It's no use trying to make up to Ahe
professors for _"->od marks — that ls,
unless they are well . . . anyway, In
a good humour, when they're marking   papers,   and   they   can't   teU   you
apart anyway.
.   .   •   •
RULES FOR FRESHMEN
1—Never wear a baggy suit. People
may think you are a professor.
2—If you want to know anything,
aak somebody without a yellow badge.
They don't know anything either, and
it will make you feel better to find
that out.
3—The pool in front of the Library
la expressly for your use. Drop ln
sometime . . . Varsity does — often.
It's great for what ails you.
4—Never cut in on an Upperclassmen at a major University function.
You'll only meet Freshettes that way.
S—Read the Handbook carefully.
Study Ezeklal 1:7, Psalms 23 and 107,
and Luke 2:52.   AU are Important.
RENT THE
Alma Academy
For Your Club Dances
Public  Dances
Wednesday and Saturday
Thjs It Your Building—Respect It
VARSITY THEATRE
Thurs., Fri., Sat. — Sept. 26, 27, 28
The Biggest Hit of the Season 1
Anna Neagle, Ray MiUand
Robert Young in
"IRENE"
also
Edmund  Lowe,  Margaret  Lindsay   in
"Honeymoon Deferred''
Cartoon and Serial - Saturday Matinee
"During the Holidays we renovated our
interior, now we're ready to attend
to yours."
SNOW-WHITE LUNCH
ON TENTH AND SASAMAT
Compliments of
SHEARS & CO. LTD.
Telephone FAlr. 2202
PRINTERS
Vancouver
2218 Main St.
■£VA*
SUITS
and
Topcoats
$2500
to
$40
00
Kensington
$4.00
HATS
Brock
$5.00
Haberdashery
to Match
Shirts, Ties and Socks to
match   your   outfit.     Our
stock   is  youthful,   bright
and snappy.
Budget Terms
Can Be Arranged
Stetsons
$6.00
Open until 9 p.m.
Saturday-
Brock Hall   Erected At   a   Cost
Of   $81,000, Auditor   Reports
Cost of the Brock Hall, one of the finest building of its type
on the North American continent, erected on the U.B.C. campus
last January, was $81,561.42, according to a recently released
audit. All but $417.22 was raised by the university itself toward its erection.
The university procured $13,182.86 for the furnishings,
which was $243.44 short of the objective of $13,426.30, figures
show.
Following is the auditor's statement.
"It's the CLOTH
and CUT
that COUNT"
KEN DOCKER'S
CAMPUS WEAR
It costs no more to be right up
there in the front ranks of well
dressed undergraduates when you
wear Docker clothes . . . suits, topcoats, sport jackets, or slacks,
beautifully tailored of finest imported  wooleru..
NEW colorful
WORSTED or
TWEED SUITS
distinctively
styled and cut
from IMPORTED
BRITISH WOOLENS
In stock, or
tailored-to-measure
from  927.50
Topcoats
Manx   tweeds,   Brae-Burn   tweeds
ln   English   Raglan   or   Balmaccan
Models.
LADIES' ANTTTiEN'S LIGHTWEIGHT ENGLISH RAINCOATS, $15.00
Women s Tailored Clothes
Masculine-styled   ladles' Tailored jackets In exclusive
tailored suits from  $27.50 . »_, *_ , «_•
men s  patterns, from  richly
Women's reversible
raincoats    $19.50     colored tweeds. From.J17.5t
BUDGET PAYMENTS
B*ck.*f»
*\m» .«•__.»*•*
TAILOR BO    CLOTHS*   "Oft   MSN
FUND
BUILDING
Expenditure-
Holding Trustee acct $80,358.34
Less balance due A.M.S       248.30
f80,110.04
Extras  acct    1,224.08
2561 Granville South       and 301 w. Hastings
Extras   (Trust  acct.)
181,334.10
227.32
181,561.42
Funds Raised—
Ex-Bond  Issue   |40,000.00
U.B.C. Grant for Services   4,000.00
Interest  coupons
(W.U.B.F.   investments)     62.50
Studenta,  A.M.S.,   Public     33,738.65
U.B.C.  Faculty    761.27
Summer   Session   1938-39     300.00
Inter-Fraternity   Council     150.00
U.B.C.   Faculty     156.00
A.M.S. Donation for floors 56.00
Campbell,  Meredith  de
Beckett (A.M.S. lawyers) .... 5.00
B.M.B.  Opening BaU    398.55
B.M.B. Furnishings (pelmets) 142.10
Bank, interest on deposits—
(Nov.   30)     202.89
(May  31)     61.33
Ex Bond Issue   854.67
Banjc  Interest    8.54
U.B.C.  Faculty    246.70
Women's   Undergraduate Society—
B.M. Furnishing Fund;
Proceeds of Co-Ed
Balls, HI-Jinks parties,  "Mile-o-Nlck-
elii", etc. of prior
years    $1,140.97
"Apple Day" 93.01
655 Howe St. ( Va Block North off Georgia)
MArlne 2037
Faculty  Women's
Club    $500.00
207.00
1,233.98
707.09
$81,144.20
Building  Cost   $81,561.42
Funds  Raised     81,144.20
Over   expended    $     417.22
FURNISHING  FUND
Expenditure—
Purchases of Furniture and
Furnishings—
Charged to Trust acct.—-
Brock Memorial Furnishing  Fund   $12,392.44
Charged to B.M.B. Furnishing — Extras      1,033.86
Total  expenditure  on
Furnishings     $13,426.30
Funds Raised—
Brock  Memorial  Furnishings  Fund—
B.M.B. Bond Issue
(part   of)    $10,000.00
U.B.C. Grant for
kitchen           750.00
Phrateres            10.53
Bank   Interest     98.04
Women's Undergraduate Society—Proceeds
of Co-Ed BaU and
Hi-Jlnks  (1939-40)       383.31
Total   Funds  Raised    $13,182.8
Excess of Expenditure over
Funds  Raised   	
243.44
Excess accounted for as
follows:—
Deferred   Expenses    Dr.
B.M. Furnishings Fund   Cr.
(Donation reserved for purchase  of  2  writing  tables
—not  yet  purchased)
450.44
207.00
$    243.44
"IMMACULATE
CLOTHES  FOR
UNIVERSITY
STUDENTS"
SWAN BROS.
CLEANERS
401 E. 12th    -    FAir. 6200
ALL LAST YEAR CLASS VLIET NOT LATER THAN
REPRESENTATIVES THIS WEEK CONCERNING
PLEASE SEE MAURY VAN   INTRA MURAL PROGRAM.
•   '
Best Wishes To U.B.C.
FROM
Jantzen Knitting Mills
of Canada Limited
10th Ave. and Kingsway
Vancouver, B.C.
... It will holp your
standing  at  cellogo
. Win
applause at homo I
# Unique, and utterly different,
this gleaming laminated-pearl
Parker Vacumatic Pen has everything! Patented "one-hand" filler
— a simple diaphragm sealed in
the top . . . gives the pen nearly
twice as much ink capacity, because there's no need for old-
fashioned rubber sac and filler
mechanism inside.
Its patented "Television"
barrel lets you SEE the
level of the ink.   It can't
run dry unless you let it.
Its 14 Kt. Oold Point is
skilfully tempered for
resiliency—tipped with
selected   high-polished
Osmiridium—as smooth
as oil.
Parker's Blue Diamond Mark on the
smart   Arrow   Clip
means Guaranteed for Life—you will never have to
buy another.
Start right with a Parker.   All good pen counters
have a selection of grand new styles. See them today.
Ths Parker Fountain Pen Co., llmllad, Toronto, Canada
.      i
Pens
ns marked with the Blue Dii
fATMC-i
          witn tne Blue Diamond are guaranteed tor
. life against everything except loss or intentional damage
subject only to a chargeof 35<* for postage, insurance and
handling, provided complete pen is returned for service.
485C
BUY YOUR
PARKER    PEN
AT
Wilson's
Stationery
830  W.   Pender
Mitchell-Foley
Ltd.
522  W.   Hastings

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