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The Ubyssey Oct 2, 1956

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 THE UBYSSEY
Volume XXXIX
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 1956
No. 5
-L 1-
Judgment On Hazers Friday
Faculty   Council    Will
Meet   To   Decide   Fate
By JOHN MATTERS
Engineers and Freshmen involved in a mid-day melee last Thursday which
saw portions of the Engineering building flooded with water will learn their fate Friday.
Faculty Council of the university will meet Friday to decide on any action
which might be taken against the offenders, an offical announcer yesterday.
MacKenzie Speaks
Wednesday Morning
All 11:30 lectures and labs
will be cancelled Wednesday
for President MacKenzie's annual address,
Dr. MacKenzie will address
the entire faculty and student
body in the Armories at 11:35.
Certain parts of the engineering building were flooded.with
water in an encounter which involved fire hoses. Students were
soaked and the structure was left
in a state of general disorder.
It is not known how many
students have been named as
participants in the affair.
University president Dr. N. A.
MacKenzie announced    at   the
'TWEEN CLASSES
UN Commisioner
To Speak Today
Mighty happy to hear she s been crowned iy56-5V
Frosh Queen is pert 18-year-old Patty D'Arcy. The former
New Westminster May Queen graduated last year from
Lester Pearson High School in the Royal City. Coronation
took place at Saturday night's Frosh Reception, whieh attracted over 2,000 students. Frosh Princesses were Wendy
Brown and Wendy Oates.
—Brian Thomas Photo
Bishop Predicts
World Government
A  world  government to  which  nations  would  surrender much of their sovereignity was predicted by the Anglican Bishop of Oylon on the campus Friday.
Speaking under the  auspices
of the United Nations club, Bish-1 government   to   which   nations
op Laksdasa Demel told his au- would surrender more sovereign-
TODAY
DEAN MacPHEE WILL speak
to a general meeting of all Commerce   students   in   the   Audito«
weekend that  he  was  going to \ riUm at 12.30 Wednesday,
undertake   an   investigation   of j #    #    >f.
certain aspects of the issue. U.   N.   CLUB   WILL   sponsor
No members of the Faculty John Humphrey. Director of the
Council were available last night Human Rights Commisson of the
for comment on Friday's meet- UN speaking on "The Problems
ing, of Human Rights," in Wesbrook
Meanwhile, Alma Mater Soci-   10(> Tuesday noon,
ety  president, Don  Jabour, has; *    *    *
issued a firm warning to prank- j     THE VARSITY  BAND  is re«
! sters   who  maliciously  use fire   Quested   to  play  at  Clubs  Day.
Totem  Editor,  Joan  Crocker, j hoses for other than their desig-  Brin8    y°ur    instruments    and
i i  j  . j      ..i«r    „o„ „.,♦ moto  natprl nnmnwe meet in the Music Room. North
stated today "We can cut costs  naiea purposes.
♦   ^ravine   for   the   1956-57  B    In    his    statement,    Jabour, Brock on Thursday at 12.30. AU
of   engraving   for   the   1956 57  ^   ^  ^.^   ^ '^ new  members are requested to
yearbook by about three and a  Tnursdav,s affajr    to    emmciVn  attend.
•T*        *r        *P
PRE-DENTAL SOCIETY will
Totem Cut
Cost$3500
half thousand this year.
The big cost cut will mean
an added 100 pages to the former 300 page annual.
Architecture students have
been asked to take over the job
of illustrating the cover and divider pages. Miss Crocker added
referring
Thursday's affair    to    council's
special investigating committee.
He reiterated that lawless use
of  any   fire-fighting  equipment] ™et T"esday  noo,n  ir\ Phy*lcs
202.   All pre-dental students are
on the campus would bring the
offender before the student
court.
"An indictment will be issued
to any person who is found or is
suspected of taking part in any
mischievous   activity   involving
that  due to rises in engraving fire hoses    or    other necessary
costs,  the staff has decided to
appoint a student art editor.
clience in Arts 100 that although
man today may appear to be
wandering in the wilderness he
is heading for a new and better
world.
He  forsaw a  form  of world
U. Nations
Director
Speaks
United Nations' Director of
Human Rights John Humphrey
will be speaking on the campus
today at noon in Wesbrook 100.
Prominent in the world affairs,
rir. Humphrey's topic will be
"The Universal Declaration of
Human Rights." one of the main-
Mays   in   the  UN's organization.
When the declaration was a-
f.T((d upon in 1948, he signed
Ihe document in the company of
Ceneral Romulos, president of
the General Assembly at that
time.
Mr. Humphreys is widly traveled and i? staying in Vancouv-
11 for a few days before going to
the Universal convention in
Ec'.r.fckck.
ty than they presently do to the
United Nations as the keystone
of that "better world."
Turning to his subject: "The
Awakening of Asia" Bishop Demel characterized the refusal of
many Asian countries to cast
their lot either with the East or
West by saying that "a hungry-
stomach has no politics."
"The main concern of the 1,000
million people of Asia is to have
ihe advantages of modern progress," he said.
"We have seen the power of
modern machinery, felt the power of modern chemicals and tast-j
ed the power of modern drugs
and we are eager for more," the
Bishop told his audience of 200
students.
The   Bishop   who   is   touring
Canada on the nvitation of the
Anglicm    Church    of    Canada, |
thanked the students for the con- j
tribution   Canada  is  making  to ;
Asia through the Colombo plan,   i
However, he warned there is a
danger in the Colombo Plan—
the difficulty in giving gracefully  and  taking  gracefully.
"The burden of gratitude in
Asia is becoming intolerable" he
said. i
"I think that it would create
more of an interest if the art
work were done by the students
instead of paid engraver," said
Miss Crocker.
Editors say that the theme
for this year's Totem will most
likely evolve around some sort
of campus life theme instead of
the standard Indian one.
equipment," Jabour pointed out.
(Continued on Page 4)
See JUDGEMENT
requested to attend.
9ft       9ft       9ft
VARSITY ROD    AND    GUN
Club will hold an organizational
meeting on Tuesday at 12.30 in
HL-1.
T        *T*        "Tr
BADMINTON CLUB will hold
its first official club night Tues-
(Continued on Page 4)
See 'TWEEN CLASSES
PREDENTS MEET TO
DISCUSS NEW FACULTY
Those students who are considering a career in Dentistry
at this or any other university
I are asked to contact Tom
! Wong, Acting President of the
Pre-Dental Society immediately.
An approximation of the enrollment in UBC's proposed
new Dental Faculty is necessary.
The Pre-Dental Society
holds weekly meetings in
Physics 202, announcments of
which appear in the 'Tween
Classes column on the front
page of the Ubyssey.
Special Open Council Meeting,
To Enlighten Newcomers
Student Council will have its doors open to all
students Wednesday afternoon.
The meeting, president Don Jabour announced
last week, has been called explicity to let students have a
glimpse of council methods.
The meeting will begin at 3:30 Wednesday in the
double committee room upstairs in Brock's south end.
Part of Jabour's election platform last year was
a promise to give more students an opportunity to understand the student government mechanism-
Regular council meetings are held every Monday
night. However, the chambers are small, making it practically impossible to accommodate a large group of spectators.
The Agenda i.s a.s follows:
(1) UBC's plan for reform of N.F.C.US. to be
presented at the fall Annual Meeting in Montreal October
8-12th.
(2) Report of the Committee on Rowing Crew
Recognition.
(3) Report of Committee investigating Student
representation  on  University  Administration  Committee.
(4) Homecoming Report, dance, Parade, Queen
Contest, Liquor.
(5) Budget   Presentation. THE UBYSSEY
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 1956
THE UBYSSEY
Authorized as second class mall, Post Office Department,
Ottawa.
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Student subscriptions $1.20 per year (Included in AMS fees). Mail
lubacriptlons $2.00 per year. Single copies five cents. Published
In Vancouver throughout the University year by the Student
Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society, University of
British Columbia. Editorial opinions expressed herein are those
of the editorial staff of the Ubyssey, and not necessarily those of
the Alma Mater Society or the University. Letters to the Editor
•hould not be more than ISO words. The Ubyssey reserves the right
to cut letters, and cannot guarantee publication of all letters
received.
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF       SANDY  ROSS
Managing Editor _. Pat Russell City Editor Jerry Brown
Business Manager .. Harry Yuill Sports Editor   Dwayne Erickson
Senior Editor this issue     Oleg Wurm
Reporters and Desk: Carol Gregory, Barry Hale, John Matters, Betty Sangster, Pete Bartlett, Mike Raynor, Sue Ross, Marilyn Smith.
Sports Reporters and Desk: Joan Crocker, Ken Wiebe, Lou
Huberman, and Bruce Allardyce.
We'd Feel Safer With
Adlai At The Helm
The outcome of next November's Presidential election
in the USA should be an event of more than passing interest
to Canadians. Canada and the U.S. are each other's best customers; and the economic symbiosis between us is so intimate that whatever happens below the border often affects
us in direct and rather important ways. The choice between
the two Presidential candidates, Dwight Eisenhower and
Adlai Stevenson, and between the Republican and Democratic parties i.s a question we can hardly afford to ignore.
In all fairness, it must be stated that the Republicans have contributed to North American prosperity. Like
Social Credit, they're not responsible for the boom, but they
can legitimately claim credit for having kept it so high for so
long. This, of course, has done Canada no harm; for in this
era of economic interdependance, a prosperous U. S. means a
prosperous Canada.
We believe however that a Democratic victory in Nov-
vember would be better for Canada. The Democratic Party
is traditionally committed to a free trade policy, and although
its 1956 platform contains protectionist planks which could conceivably harm Canadian economic life, the overall picture is
hardly frightening. The Republicans, on the other hand, have
long been committed to a protectionist. "America First" policy;
and only the personal intervention of an enormously popular
President has prevented the recurrence of tthat policy over the
past four years.
Any moderating effect President Eisenhower's "dynamic conservatism" has had on the rest of his party would
be lost if he were re-elected. For Eisenhower would be the
first President to be affected by the "no third term amendment to the Constitution. With Ike's vote-getting potential
lost forever, the GOP Right Wing would have a free hand
for the next four years. With messrs. Nixon, Knowland, Jen-
ner et al. at the helm, Canadians could reasonably expect a
higher U.S. tarrif wall, which would stunt our economic
growth.
In addition, the "America First" approach to foreign
policy might do the rest of the free world irreparable harm
abroad. GOP-plus Ike's foreign policy has been, at worst,
clumsy and inflexible; under Nixon it could be disastrous.
Fortunately, tho independent Amercan voter views
the GOP-minus Ike combination with distrust; and as always,
it i.s the independent voters who hold the balance of power
in U.S. politics. It is no longer safe to assume a Democratic
defeat; the popular vote is today predominantly Democratic,
just as it was in 1952. And Mr. Stevenson's recent gains—
especially in Maine— have been impressive.
We hope the American voters will elect Mr. Stevensn
and his Party in November. If they do, they will have made
the best decision for their Nation, and for the rest of the
free   world—including   Canada.
And further, we're willing to bet it will be close.
The Big U.S. Election:
Ike Or Adlai, And Why?
MAX   ASCOLI
The Reporter Magazine
Seldom in American history
have the program and pronouncements of the two parties
been more similar; seldom has
the real difference between
them been greater.
The actual difference between the two parties is the
one between politics and mythology. Chicago was an assembly of poiticians. San Francisco of mythmakers. There was
no poitics transacted there,
aside from the aborted nomination of Joe Smith — a most
unseemly thing since one Joe
Smith after another was
brought in to second Eisenhower's nomination.
COMES FROM KNOWLEDGE
Moderation, it is said, is the
climate of American politics in
our day. To a very large extent this is true, but even on
this point the difference between the two parties is most
striking. Republican moderation, the propensity to go not
too far to the right, not too obviously into Fortress America,
all this comes from thc wish not
to put too great a strain on
General Eisenhower's emotional thermostat. What will happen afterward, when the Know-
lands and the Bridgeses have
their way, is not likely to be
overmoderate.
QUESTIONS
For men like Adlai Stevenson moderation comes from the
knowledge, partly intuitve
partly rational, that the most
radical reforms, the most radical measures of institution-
building are needed, both in
our country and in the rest of
the world — yet there is no
trace of dadicalism in these
men, neither are there radical
philosophies available. In fact
all good democrats, with or
without a capital "D", are
weary of ideologies, have no
inclination to look for predictable, prefabricated answers to
the questions that harass them.
These questions have* to do
with the coming into being of
new spheres of government between those of the nation and
of the states, so that the enormous concentrations of power
now lying in private hands may
become accountable to the citizens they are supposed to
serve. There are too many
unchecked organizations around
that take care of the citizens'
needs as producers, as employees, as recipients of information or beneficiaries of entertainment, and all these organizations together make too
heavy a demand on the citizens privacy. Many skills are
demanded of our leaders if
democratic freedoms are to be
re-established, but the least demanded now is the one of legislation. In other words, lawmaking is at the end of the reforming process, not at the beginning.
ADVANTAGE
There are quite a number of
good middle-of-the-roaders among Democrats.   The advantage
of the Democratic Party is that
it has at its head good men —
moderate men, sensible enough
to shun the temptation to become the object of mythmaking
and hero worship.
The relationship between
these leaders and their followers is increasingly becoming a
direct one, with much of the
power of the old-fashioned in-
betweeners by-passed.
At the same time, the number of special interests making
demands on them has greatly
increased. They must give
some satisfaction to these interests, keep them at bay, play
one against the other or call
their bluffs. These men must
be tough and shrewd and kind.
If they are skillful, the conflicting multiplicity of the interests surrounding them can
greatly increase the range of
their independence.
OUTSTANDING
Of these Democratic leaders,
the outstanding one is Adlai
Stevenson. He has the double
virtue of political skill and of
a demanding, ungarrulous idealism. Yet his greatest virtue
as far as his party and the
nation are concerned is that he
is not the only one of this type.
He is far from being alone; his
campaign and his tenure of
office will bring forth more and
more people like him. This is
what makes these elections
unique: On one side there are
men, on the other a ruthlessly
manipulated myth.
Frantic Grassroots Activity
Underlines Deceptive US. Calm
President Eisenhower and
was still in the process of get-
down to the political "grassroots" in the campaign which
has just opened. Both men
have changed since 1952, and
so has the temper of the nation.
Four years ago the two candidates were unpractised campaigners. General Eisenhower
was still, in the proees ot getting a grip on (or, as some
would say, of getting into the
grip of) the Republican party.
ELECEORATE SWAYS
Mr. Stevenson never got a
strong grip on the Democratic
organizalon. The electorate
was swayed by strong feelings
—devotion to Eisenhower, weariness with twenty years of the
New Deal and Fair Deal, and
above all a yearning for peace
in Korea.
All that has changed. There
are at present no burning issues between the parteis except
the akward issue of the President's health.
Moderation reigns, even over
civil rights. Public power,
farm incomes, pockets of unemployment provide talking-
points in some areas but not
nationally.
Though Mr. Stevenson is
eager to attack the Administration on foreign policy, the
electorate is not visibly stirred.
So it is not surprising thai for
the moment the two parties
are concentrating less on issues
than on getting out the vote.
UNPREDICTABLE
American election campaigns
are unpredictable; this one may
not match the well-charted te-
pidty of our own contests of
the fiftes. There is still room
for one of those waves of emotion to form and come crashing
in, perhaps surprisingly, on
polling day.
So far, however, the only ap-
partnt groundswell is that
caused   by   the   President's   ill
health; and since the President
seems to be making a good recovery it does not bulk large.
Apart from the unexpected
turns which his health may yet
give the campaign, the Presidential contest is not so much
a foregone conclusion as seemed likely a few months ago.
FIGHTING CHANCE
Mr. Stevenson is at least given a fighting chance. If he can
hold thc South together—after
the Democratic convention he
stands a good chance of doing
this — then he needs only a
mild swing in some of the more
populous northern states that
voted  for Eisenhower  in 1952.
Small wonder, then, that in
an era of moderation both parties feel the need to dig down
to the last voter under thc
deepest grassroot. PLACE THIS PROGRAM IN YOUR LOOSELEAF FOR SAFEKEEPING
U.B.C.  FILM  SOCIETY
1956-57 PRESENTATIONS
University Auditorium
uesday
Admission
Thursday
^45- j.'■ -r^
35c
12:30
6:00
including lax
to
8:15
Students and Staff Only
2:30
TUESDAY
OCT.   2
Tobacco Rood
wi th
GENE TIERNEY       DANA  ANDREWS
TUESDAY
Oct. 23
Cavillerla Rujtlcana
Lo Tteviefir
in Technicolor
SUPERB    DOUBLE    BILL
THURSDAY
NOV.   15
Where's Charley
with
RAY  BOLGER
TUESDAY
OCT.   9
THURSDAY
NOV.   1
TUESDAY
NOV.   20
Martin Luther
A MUST    for all     students
GREAT CHARACTER PORTRAYAL
WALT DISNEY'S
Vanishing Prolrie
WILD-LI FE  in Technicolor
LAURENCE OLIVIER
Hamlet
SHOWS AT 3:30.   6:00,   8:30
FOR THIS  FILM ONLY
TUESDAY
OCT.    16
Technicolor
Mutiny on tho Bounty
CHARLES LAUGHTIN  A  CLARK   GABLE
TUESDAY NOV.   6
ROBERT  NEWTON  A   ALEC  GUINNESS
Oliver Twist
A GREAT   DICKEN'S CLASSIC
THURSDAY
NOV.   29
The Marx Bros.
60 West
THE  FUNIEST  THREESOME   IN   THEATRELAND
THURSDAY
OCT.   18
THURSDAY
NOV.   8
7 Deadly Sins
(English Subtitles)
M I CH EL E MORGAN  A   FRANCO I SE  ROSAY
Dam Busters
The true story of precision
bombing of the Ruhr Dams
Don't Miss   the War Series
Why We Fight
12:00   NOON
Authentic American Army propeganda
Films release during world War  11
NOV.   5.6,7,   A 9 10tf only
TUESDAY
OCT.    23
TUESDAY
NOV.    13
TUESDAY
DEC.    25
Good-bye Mr. Chips
ROBERT  DONAT A   GREER  GARSON
I Was A Male
War Bride
A H i 1 arious Comedy
CARY   GRANT  A   ANN   SHERI DAN
Merry Xmas
KRIS KRINGLE A  SANTA CLAUS
This Shov only held at North Pole SPECIAL TUESDAY NOON SHOWS
12:30  P.M. 10* AUDITORIUM
18
PROGRAMS OF TOP   ENTERTAINMENT  INCLUDING:
DUST OR DESTINY,   THE MYSTERY OF THE CLOCKS,   VOICE OF  THE DEEP
RED RIVER OF LIFE,   HIDDEN  TREASURES,   SEAL   ISLAND,BEAR COUNTRY,
BEAVER VALLEY,   THE TOYMAKER,   MAGOO'S MASTERPIECE,   BECOME DULL
CARE,   HEN HOP,   DESTINATION MAGQO.
ALSO  NEWS AND MANY OTHER FEATURETTES.
Current News at all Shows
BUY A PASS
FOR <1.00
FOR $1.00   YOU  CAN   BUY   A PASS
ENTITLING YOU  TO  ALL   104 NOON
SHOWS (18   TUESDAY  SHOWS PLUS
WAR SERIES,   PLUS THOSE SHOWS
TO   BE ANNOUNCED )
ON  SALE  IN  THE ARMORIES ON
REGISTRATION * CLUB DAYS,  AT
AUDITORIUM DURING SHOWS.
TUESDAY
JAN.   15
Blackboard Jungle
THURSDAY
FEB.   7
Harvey
The Rabbit that wasn't there
THURSDAY
FEB.   28
The Egg and I
The first MA 4 PA KETTLE Film
THURSDAY JAN.   17
JAMES MASON       MICHAEL   RENNIE
TUESDAY
FEB.   12
TUESDAY
MAR.   5
5 Fingers
The highest paid spy  in history
The Colditz Story
Escape from prison camp
ALEC  GUI NESS
Lady Killers
in Technicolor
TUESDAY
JAN. 29
THURSDAY
FEB. 14
THURSDAY
GREATEST OF ALL CLASSIC FILMS
Battleship Ptomkin
(in Russian)
Just released by the censors
Technicolor
Doctor ot See
The wonderfully hilarious sequel   to
DOCTOR   IN   THE HOUSE
The
MAR.   7
Chlltern Hundreds
Wonderful  Comedy
THURSDAY
Brooking
JAN.   31
THURSDAY
FEB.   21
the
Sound Borrier
Lody Godiva
Especially for Engineers
TUESDAY MAR. 12
LAURENCE OLIVIER A GREER GARSON
Pride and Prejudice
Presented especially for English 200
students
TUESDAY
Technicolor
FEB.   5
TUESDAY
FEB.   26
TUESDAY
MAR.   19
30 Seconds
Over Tokyo
The story of Jimm>   Dol it tie's
famous raid
To be onnounced
Great Expectations
starring
ALEC  GUI NESS 4  JEAN   SIMMONS FROSH  ELECTION CAMPAIGN
Hopefuls To Speak
Ten candidates for Frosh executive will deliver their campaign addresses at noon today
in the Physics 200 room.
Balloting   will   take   place
Wednesday from 10 to 4 at
the quad and in front of the
library.
Since   AMS   cards  arc  not
available, library cards must
be presented for identification
Regulations for campaigning
state that all posters, with the
exception of one for each candidate, must be down tonight.
PETE ROLSTON
Pete Rolston is a graduate of West Vancouver
High, and plans to take commerce and law. Some of his
past activities includes president of West Van Boy's Hi-Y
club, president of Vancouver Hi-Y Grand Chapter, cabinet
minister in Older Boy's Parliament of Victoria, and member of high school student council. He also participated
in Demolays.
Pete swims, skis, and plays rugger and golf. Recently he attended the YMCA centennial conference in
Paris, France.
Here is the man who will make the Frosh Council
really click this year. Pete will lead this year's frosh
through a successful and enjoyable year.
DAVE RICHARDSON,
Campaign   Manager.
THE UBYSSEY
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 1956
II*
ON HILL
Not often does a man come
along who possesses all the
attributes for success—clearheadedness, reliability, personal magnetism—yet these are
Don Hill.
Seldom docs a student manage to participate in a number of snorts and activities and
still maintain consistently high
grades—Don Hill has and will.
Even   more   rarely   does   a
person with all these advantages remain friendly and likeable—Don Hill is,
Coining before you with a
record of administration experience, Don Hill will satisfy
the most demanding student.
These reasons coupled with
our admiration for Don as a
man, lead us to second his
nomination for Frosh President.
HANK HAWTHORNE,
Campaign  Manager.
JIM ORIEUX
, Jim Orieux i.s the man for president for the frosh
class He is a graduate of North Van High and is going
in to education secondary field. Orieux has initiative, experienced and a sense of duty.
He received citizenship awards in Grades IX and
XII.
Four years as a Sea Cadet has trained Jim to accept
responsibility, to lead.
He was honourably discharged with the rank of
Chief Petty Officer.
Jim can carry the load of Frosh President. His
marks have been average and above throughout High
School life.
A recap of his activities are: Boy's Hi-Y member
right through High School, Secretary oi Hi-Y Grade IX,
treasurer Student's council, president of A-House, secretary of grad. class council.
Vote for Jim Orieux if you want a president who
will in your first year at UBC.
BILL FRIESEN,
Campaign Manager.
Readings Replace
Major Productions
Play readings will be emphasized this year by the
University Workshop Productions in place of the annual major
production, UBC drama supervisor Miss Dorothy Somerset
announced Monday.
Plays to be read will be selected from those studied in English literature courses, beginning with Bernard Shaw's
"Pygmalion" this term.
The new program is geared at
"eliminating long hours of rehearsal and memorizing of
lines," Miss Somerset explained.
"Wc realize that there arc
many students on campus and
some faculty members who
would be interested in active
theatre participation if it weren't
for the long hour- required," she
! said.
!     Devices of scenic decor, light-
: ing and musical background will
be used for the readings which
will  be  under  the  direction   of
; thc Department of English, Miss
i Somerset and Norman oung.
j     Tlie first of    the   dramatized
readings   will   be  Shakespeare's
"Richard  II" to    be    presented
early in January.
"Wc are excited about developing a .style cf play reading that
will provide a stimulating theatre experience," Miss Somerset
said.
A meeting will be called soon
at which plans for the reading.-
and for the try-outs for casting
will be explained fully. Opportunities for students interested
in thc technical production of
the readings is also promised.
Govt. Makes
$10000 Gift
To   Rowers
Fund to send UBC's star rowing team to the Olympic games I
this fall swelled to the tune of
$10,000 over the weekend with
a gift from the provincial gov«|
eminent.
Hon. Les Petersen, recently I
appointed Minister.of Education,!
made the announcement.
Present total is only $5,0021
short of $25,000 objective.
A rowing club official reported that the province-wide appeal|
for funds has been very well supported.
UBC's   rowers   will   compete I
with   other   strongholds   in   the
.-port, such a.s Australia and the|
United  States.
The event will take place inl
the Australian capital early in|
November.
Coke puts you at
your sparkling best
You taste the difference ;::
even the bubbles taste better;
You feel the difference .: :
there's life, there's lift in Coke:
DRINK
"Coke" is a reglttered trade-mark.
c-so
COCA-COLA LTD. THE UBYSSEY
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 1956
EYES
EXAMINED
J. Abramson
I. F. Hollenberg
Optometrists
Immediate Appointment
Vancouver Block
MA. 0928 MA. 2948
CANADIAN
OFFICERS
TRAINING  CORPS
Applicants are now being accepted for the Canadian Officers Training Corps. Applicants must be able to meet
academic and physical standards. ♦
There are still vacancies in
each of the fourteen Corps,
however, candidates are advised as to apply as soon as
possible as the Contingent is
allotted a certain quota in
each Corps.
1956-57 Winter courses will
consist of:
Tactics.
Fundamental Training
Current Affairs
Military History
Military Geography.
The Contingent parades on
Monday nights. Each parade
is considered as half day for
pay purposes. Earn money
while you recieve valuable
training in the field of your
choice.
For further information, students are advised io consult
the Resident Staff Officer,
Major P. W. Ayriss, in the
University Armoury.
"Serve yourself while you
serve your country"
JUDGEMENT
(Continued from Page 1)
"The Faculty Council will certainly chastise to the limit persons who take part in any such
activity. The students' council
is bound to take the matter before the Student Court."
(Jabour issued his statement
before the announcement of the
Pitman Optical Ltd.
Complete  Optical  Service
Vancouver Block
MA. 0928 MA. 2948
Faculty Council's meeting was
made public).
"I am therefore issuing this
warning for the protection of
future pranksters," he added.
Main problem created by the
activity is that the hoses must be
thoroughly dried out after every
use,
During the drying-out period
the building is deprived of that
essential piece of fire-fighting
equipment — a serious situation
in the event of an emergency.
"It is not that the Students'
Council is opposed to practical
jokes or to inter-faculty rivalry.
The opposite is true," said Mr.
Jabour.
"However, it must be understood that activities should not
take place which are designed to
damage the university property
or disrupt important fire protection services," he said.
'TWEEN CLASSES
(Continued from Page 1)
day at 7.30 in the Men's gym.
Birds free. Everybody welcome.
...    *F       V       V
MEN INTERESTED in managing
basketball meet in room 213 of
the War Memorial Gym, 12.30
Friday, October 5.
V *P •?•
ALPHA   OMEGA   SOCIETY
meeting will be held on Tuesday
noon in A-101. Everyone welcome.
9ft       9ft       9ft
LETTERS CLUB WILL hold
its first meeting at the home of
Mrs. L. J. Ladner, 1837 Matthews
Avenue, at 8.00 p.m. Tuesday.
T        T       *r
VARSITY CHRISTIAN FEL-
LOWSHIP are • holding an important general meeting on Tuesday noon to elect officers to fill
vacancies left by students who
did not return.
9ft       9ft       9ft
WALT DISNEY'S SEAL ISLAND and Norman McLaren's
Blinkety Blank are Filmsoc's
noon attractions today in the
Auditorium.
TOBACCO ROAD, Erskine
Caldwell's sensuous novel of the
south, will be shown by Filmsoc
at 3.30, 6.00 and 8.15 in the
Auditorium on Tuesday.
V        V        V
WEDNESDAY
WUS   REGULAR   TUESDAY
noon meeting will be held Wednesday in the Mildred Brock
Lounge. This Tuesday is "Sorority Screech Day." All representatives please attend.
9ft        9f>        9ft
PRE-MED SOC WILL hold
their first meeting of the year in
Wesbrook 100 at 12.30 Wednesday. Two films, "Science vs.
Cancer" and "Cancer Surgery"
will be shown. All students interested in Pre-med welcome.
•*•        *r        *P
VOC LONG HIKE. Prospective members and anyone interested in having a good Thanksgiving weekend are invited to a
meeting on Wednesday noon in
Eng. 200 to discuss details of the
hike.
(Continued on Page 7)
J
i
t
t
t
%
V
♦      I did my wash'
this morning.
Dried it too.
* •
So did I.
Don't know what
d do without my
automatic dryer
these wet days.
%'
:*•
about 5$ worth of electricity dries the    ***     ik
average load of washday doings.   Those few     t</
pennies will never be missed. But how you'd hate to    ■«?
part with the convenience of having a dryer at your
beck and call J Talk to your appliance dealer - and outfox the
weatherman every washday I >
^Tb.c.electrio ,      THE UBYSSEY
\.     TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 1956
Heading for the drink. One of the losers in a burling contest is seen going to a watery doom during the
forestry club outing. The ringing of axes and the age-old
cries of the lumbermen echoed through the wood when this
club took to the bush.
Forestry Club Have
Frolic At Haney
By BARRIE HALE
UBC's Forest Club went back to nature Saturday.
Bear, deer and other wildlife fled the Haney Forest
Reserve lands as bus loads of axe-wielding foresters arrived,
honed to a fine edge for the affair.
Faculty members participated
Varsity Revue Returns:
Talent Search Now On
Musical comedy will be added to UBC's cultural
life this fall as the Varsity Review returns to campus.
The Review, resurrected after three years absence
by producers Paul Fritz and Ain Sudor traditionally
features musical-comedy satire of university life.
This year's fall production will be no exception,
producer Sudor affirmed Monday, as the Review will include a few well-placed jabs at the foibles of standardized education, boardinghouse life, and abject post-exam
orgies.
Co-producer Fritz has announced that auditions
for speaking, singing, and dancing roles will be held Thursday evening at 8 o'clock in the second floor Brock Music
Room. All those desiring such production jobs as properties, costumes, and scenery are also asked to attend. Fritz
stressed that musicians, especially are needed.
in the program, which saw axe
throwing, log burling, boom-stick
racing, and log jousting.
Also on hand were the faculty's two female members, who
prepared food, cheered the victors and provided sympathy for
such unfortunates as the anonymous forester who became lost
during the compass traverse.
Bull of the Wood, he who emerged from the fray with the
highest accumulations of points
and abrasions, was Jerry Richardson, Forestry.
He was awarded a pair of
caulk boots, donated by W. J.
Head Ltd.
The traditionally raucous even-
Community
Planning
Eighteen Wednesday evening
sessions of a course in Community planning and housing will
begin on October 3 at the Kits-
ilano  High  School.
This course, under the sponsorship of the Extension Department of UBC, will have Professor I. M. Robinson as instructor.
It is designed to give those
with community living an opportunity to keep up with the
tremendous growth and popularity of well planned communities.
Subject matter will cover the
history and development of
modern methods of planning.
The fee is $20 and enrolment
is open to all those interested
in  community betterment.
ing program of skits, speeches,
and progressively lusty singing
was this year organized by Trev
Jones, Forestry IV.
The lady Foresters, Smyth
hastened to add, were absent
from the evening procedings.
CLASSIFIEDS
WANTED
Expert Typing done at home.
Phone CEdar 5607.
Wanted: Men to win prizes in
Handicap competition Monday
nights at 7:30 p.m. at Tom Tothill Billiards, on Broadway, just
off Alma.
FOR SALE
Electric stove,   cheap.  Phone
Mrs. Hill, KE. 4086.
Frosh second-hand    first-year
texts. From Brian at WA. 2-2576.
HELP NEEDED
To feed a one year old '55
Buick, between New Westminster area and UBC. Phone John
Petrunia, LA. 1-8029.
The UBC Olympic Rowing
Crew needs a Manager immediately. Phone Ted Dubberley,
MA. 7928.
Tost
Black Shaeffers Fountain Pen
on Library lawn. Tel. Art LA. 2-
8596.
Black leather wallet during
Frosh scuffle. S. W. corner Aggie
Bldg. Reward. Phone J. Martin, AL. 0035.
Lost Landau, Grundlagen der
Analysis. Call No. QA 241 L25,
1950. Will finder please return
it to Library or Fort Camp Hut
6, Room 6. L. J. Muenster.
Lost—Crown Brand Raincoat
in Brock, taken by mistake.
Phone Jack at WA 2-8178.
Part-Time Help Wanted
Twenty students in third and fourth year Science
or Engineering urgently required as Laboratory Assistants. Even second year students with good standing in at
least two courses in Physics will be considered.
Apply immediately at Physics Office, Room 325,
Physics Building.
WANTED
Your old double breasted suit
... to be made into a smart
new single breasted model
with the new trim notch lapel.
UNITED  TAILORS
S49 Granville PA. 4649
.. UBC FILMSOC ..
Presents
William Tracer
Gen* Tierney
Dana Andrews
TOBACCO
ROAD
Novel by: Direction by:
ERSKINE JOHN
CALDWELL FORD
Today at 3:30, 6:00, 8:15
Auditorium
SPECIAL
TUESDAY  NOON SHOW
SEAL ISLAND
Walt Disney
BLINKETY BLANC
Norman McLaren
10c OR BY PASS
. . . COMING . . .
The Show of The Year.
MARTIN LUTHER
Coming Soon!
to The College Shop, a brand new shipment of those
smart looking melton cloth UBC jeckets. These blue
jackets, with "University of British Columbia" on the
back, are really swell for fall and winter wear, and
there's nothing finer for a football game. You've seen
them around the campus, and soon you'll be able to get
yours at The College Shop, we'll let you know when.
i i i i i i   i   i
Sffi?
ARTS  PINS
BLUE  &  GOLD  SCARVES
Now In Stock
The College Shop
SOUTH BROCK - OPPOSITE THE COFFEE SHOP
Open Monday to Friday - 12:30 to 1:30 MHWiaiMI
Inco Metals ot Work in Canada
k
Workmen installing a cable that carries electricity        and cable made from Inco copper go into the power       tributing electricity in Canada. Nearly half of the cop-
underground. Hundredsof thousandsofmilesof wire        cables,transformers and other equipment used fordis-       per used in Canadian power cables comes from Inco.
Cables made from Inco Copper help bring you
electricity... and provide jobs for Canadians
It takes thousands of miles of power cable to
carry all the electricity Canadians use. And nearly
half of the copper used in Canada's power cables
comes from Inco. Through all the processing
operations, this copper stays in Canada to help
provide employment for Canadian men and
women.
1. At Inco, Canadian workmen mine, mill, smelt
and refine the ore. About 18,000 people are
employed by Inco in Canada.
2. Refined copper is used in Canada for the
manufacture of wire and cable. Several thousand more people are employed in this work.
3. The copper wire and cable goes to power
companies where it is installed by Canadian
workmen.
From Inco copper, Canadian industries manufacture hundreds of useful products—thus helping
provide employment for many thousands of men
and women in Canada.
INCO,
/      \
I   B   A   b   I        M   A   I   K
Write for a free copy of
lha illustrated booklet,
"Tho Romance of  Nickel".
THE INTERNATIONAL NICKEL COMPANY OF CANADA, LIMITED
26    KINO    STREET    WEST,    TORONTO
Producer of Inco Nickel, Nickel Alloys, Copper, Cobalt, Tellurium, Selenium, Iron Ore and Platinum, Palladium and other Precious Metals. .THE UBYSSEY
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 1956
:*.-?
"ft **. * "
.,*v
" *UJ
Major P. W. Ayriss, former deputy secretary-
general of the Laos Commission takes over the position
of resident staff officer of COTC.
Major Ayriss saw action in the second world war
when he commanded the only Canadian tank to fight from
D-Day  to V-E Day.
New COTC Head
-Day Asia Veteran
UBC's COTC detachment has a new Resident Staff
lOfficer.
Major P. W. Ayriss, CD., will take over this month
ihe position vacated by Major G. Hartling.
ilphinstone
.eadership
Conference
Campus leaders and organizers
Dgether with faculty deans and
Irofessors will converge on Camp
piphinstone this weekend to at-
»nd UBC's second annual leader-
lip conference.
Purpose of the gathering is to
ffect   a   spirit   of   cooperation
Imong the various clubs, the stu-
lent council and the faculty on
|ie campus.
Approximately   130   students
id 25 faculty members are exacted to attend, the latest AMS
jgures show.
Discussion topics will include
le latest campus affairs, athletes,  club   and  society   activities
id student-faculty-alumni rela-
lons.
Students attending will be rep-
ssenting  the  students'  council,
Jub and society presidents, last
■ear's recipients of honorary degrees and members of last year's
udent council.
Delegates are charged $4 reg-
tration fee and the remainder
f the expenses are subsidized by
ie Alma Mater Society.
Those who intend to drive up
i Saturday, and those who need
des   up   on   Saturday   should
ut their name and phone num-
?r on the list in the AMS office
>day, with  the time they want
» leave, according to Phil Gov-
•n, transportation chairman.
Conference executive includes
ynda  Gates,   John   Butterfield,
lil   Govan,   Bill   Montgomery,
»yce Thrower   and  Betty  Ann
ompson.
Major Ayriss was a Major of
the Armoured Corps, a D-Day
veteran, and a member of the
Indo-Chinese Peace Commission.
He saw action with the Sher-
broke Fusilliers in North West
Europe. He also commanded the
only Canadian tank to fight from
D-Day to V-E Day. While travelling in the tank, they had to
make two complete engine
changes along the way.
"A very difficult thing to accomplish under constant enemy
fire,"  the  Major  said.
Major Ayriss has just reurned
from a post in Indo-China, where
he acted as deupty secretary general of the Laos Commission. He
was in charge of eight truce
teams composed of Polish, Indian, and Canadian representatives.
"One of my jobs was transporting these teams to the war
zones," Major Ayriss said. Although thc distance was a scant
500 miles, the transportation had
to be done by plane, as the roads
are flooded most of the year.
Major Ayriss said that the people of Indo-China are honest and
industrious. "Their main occupation is rice farming. To produce
their one crop, they must burn
all the foliage off the hill tops,
and plant dry at the beginning
of Die annual flood season." he
snid.
The main thing he noticed
about the native women was
•'The extraordinary amount of
family jewellry they managed to
balance around their necks."
Major Ayriss is completely satisfied with his UBC post. "UBC
1 has a beautiful campus and an
extremely friendly staff," he
said. "I have served with many
COTC graduates from this university, and I always found them
to be £>f the higheat .calibre.."
Tobacco Road Now
In Film Version
By FRANCIS KIMBALL
Erskine Caldwell's "Tobacco
Road" as a book is not for the
squeamish, as a movie it is
not for the intelligent.
Unfortunately, it is the movie that UBC Film Society is
showing in the Auditorium today.
From a stark, highly-moving, realistic story of shiftless
U.S. backwoodsmen, Director
John Ford has constructed a
slow, sentimental comedy that
has about as much drama and
plot as would a Grade Three
production ol "Uncle Tom's
Cabin."
Caldwell's original high volt-
tage tale shows the raw tragedy of an old man, Jeeter Lester, clinging stubbornly to his
few remaining acres, determin
ed someday to plant another
cotton crop.
In Ford's movie version,
however, Jceter's tragedy becomes sheer mawkish melodrama with a stero-typed banker foreclosing on the land. The
original pathos of Jeeter's continual procrastination becoming as effective as lukewarm
lemonade.
The slow-moving, dishevelled plot is not enlivened by
the effort of Marjorie Ram-
beau as Sister Bessie. Caldwall
vividly portrays a cynical
"noseless" prostitute - turned-
preacher whose movie counterpart mysteriously becomes a
singing, folksy Billy-Graham
type "Woman of God."
Gene Tierney as Ellie May
ignores Caldwell's tragic hare-
lipped character but still manages to turn  in the movie's
'TWEEN   CLASSES
(Continued from Page 4)
PARLIAMENTARY   FORUM.
Executive meeting Wednesday,
October 3, at 330 p.m., Men's
Club room.
9ft       9ft       9ft
HOMECOMING COMMITTEE
will hold an important meeting
at 7 p.m. in the Board Room of
the Brock hall on Wednesday.
This is a joint meeting with the
faculty committee, so all members are requested to attend.
9fi        9ft        9ft
MUSIC APPRECIATION CLUB
will hold a general meeting on
Wednesday noon in the Brock
stage room. Everyone is invited
especially the executive.
9ft       9ft       9ft
COMPETITIVE   SYNCHRON-
ized swimmers. All girls interested in swimming please come
to a meeting on Wed., Oct. 3, in
the women's Gym at 12.30 noon.
Experience not necessary.
9ft       9ft       9ft
GIRLS' RULES BASKETBALL
will be holding its first practise
of the season this coming Wednesday, October 3, at 4.30 in the
Women's Gym.
9ft       9ft       9ft
MUSSOC. FIRST REHEARSAL of Choral Society, Wednesday, Hut M-l, 5.30 p.m. All
students interested welcome.
INTRAMURAL    MANAGERS
are requested to attend a meeting at 12.30 on Wednesday in
the Women's Gym.
9ft       9ft       9ft
LUTHERAN STUDENTS ASSOCIATION discussion, Wed., in
Hut L-7, 12.30. Everybody welcome.
9ft       9ft       9ft
THURSDAY
NEWMAN CLUB WILL hold
a Club Day Tea in the club house
HL-5 from 2 to 5 p.m. on Thursday.
only memorable performance
as Jeeter's oversexed, moranic
daughter.
Later the movie again
brightens—this time with a
fairly funny slapstick comedy
of destruction as Ward Bond
(Love) and William Tracy
(Jeeter's car crazy son) happily
wrecks a few of the slatterly
sets apparently left over from
"Gone with the Wind."
The general low-down of
dirt, malnutrition and moral
decay is given a gooey happy-
ending by stiff-upper-lipped
Dana Andrews who comes
striding on in the nick of time
to save Jeeter's land but not
the movie—-from destruction.
Rushing Extended
RUSHING HALE
Fraternity rushing is down
from last year, Inter-Fraternity Council announced today.
PRO John Williams expressed concern over the situation.
Registration ends officially
at 4:30 Tuesday," Williams
stated. "However, the Council
has decided to permit rushing
registration until Firday."
DR. JOHN B. R0SEB0R0UGH
DENTIST
2130 Western Parkway
Behind the Canadian Bank
of Commerce
University Boulevard
Phone  ALma  3980
NOTICE
Office of Building and Grounds
Applications  for  Building Permits,   Keys,  Parking
Stickers and Bookings will be issued as follows:
9:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon—Monday to Friday
1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.—Monday to Friday.
Parking Fine Appeals
9:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon—Monday and Tuesday.
For Pure Pleasure
...HAVI A
"MILD"
the MILDEST BEST-TASTING ogam™ Thunderbirds Drop League
Opener to Pacific Lutheran
Defence Improves But
Passing Attack Poor
Bruce Lagle, holds on to tne bail and
scores one of UBC's few gains on the
ground in Saturdays football contest
against the Pacific Lutheran Gladiators
Lutes  won  the  contest  34-0   displaying  a
great passing attack which the birds
couldn't stop. Birds meet Eastern Washington Savages next Saturday in their
first away game of the Season.
NEED HELP FRANK?
Varsity Rugger Squads
Ready For Season Opener
Fall and football are two
sixty young men, husky chaps
season for Rugby.
—.__ .—,—       (
SpoJdtA   ShoJdA
Women's Intramural Managers
will meet Wednesday at 12:30,
in the Women's Gym for the
•purpose of organizing the fall
activities. All managers please
fttend.
9ft       9ft       9ft
The UBC Women's Ski team
is in need It the present timf.
of a team manager. Any girl
who is interested in managing
the team, please send in application letter to Chas. Warren, co
Women's Gym, within a week.
9ft       9ft       9ft
Tuesday night is the big night
for Badminton on campus. T.ie
Badminton Club will begin the
season with an Open House
r.ight. admission as well as birds
will be free, starting at 7.30 in
the Men's Gymnasium. Membership will be taken the following
club nights. Regular club play
takes place Tuesday, Thursday
nights in Men's Gym, and Sunday at 2.30, Women's Gym.
9ft        9ft        9ft
Both Junior and Senior women basketballers will hold a
(practice Tuesday evening. 6.30,
in the Women's Gym. All girls
who would lik.? tr try out for
either team, please attend this
practice.
Women's Synchronized Swimming will get under way this
Wednesday, with a meeting in
1he Women's Gym. at 12.30.
By BRUCE ALLARDYCE
words synonym cms to many college students, but for about
the likes of which Frank Gnup would like to have, this is the
Albert Laithwaite's and Max i
Howell's charges are practising]
three times a week in prepara- >
tion   for   their   opening   Miller
Cup contest, October 12.
This year may be the biggest
and the best ever for Varsity
with the appearance of an English Touring Team on the campus.
j There is also the trip to California for the annual World Cup
Series and an excursion to the
eastern states is a possibility.
LOVE GRASS?
The rugger schedule runs right
through until Easter at UBC, and j
the Miller, McKechnie and World
| cups  are  up  for   grabs.  Laith-
| waite's Varsity Ciew means busi-!
i ness this year, and no man will
be playing "just for the love of \
1 the   taste   of   the   grass."   They
i want to win. j
I     Competition will be fierce for '
spots on the Varsity teams,  especially   after  Christmas,   when
the   annual  epidemic   of  "Cali-
I fornia fever" spreads among the
players.
!     Everyone has a  good  chance
to  be   among   the   twenty   who
I make  the  trip;  last  year  three
j boys, members of the third team
I before Christmas, made the sel-
i ect list.
are iorwards Doug Muir, Dave
Brackington and Gerry McGav-
in.
EXPERIENCE
Victoria College and Shawni-
gan Lake school are well represented among the hopefuls, and
several appear to have the size
and experience necessary. It will
be interesting to see what fellows
like Alex Hood and Dick Fraser
of Victoria, Brian McGavin and
John Perry of Snawnigan, and
Merlin Hawes and Phil Willis
have to show.
Coach Laithwaite is looking
for wing three quarters, full
backs and more forwards. Are
you fast? Can you kick?And
some of you big men, do you like
to mix it up? Here's your big opportunity and its far from being
too late.
Practises are held Tuesday at
3.30 Thursday at 12.30 and
until October 12, 12:30 on Saturday.
FEW  LETTERMEN
Among the lettermen are
wings Gary Sinclair and Jack
Maxwell: forwards Dick Mcintosh, Mike Chambers and Don
Shore and fly-half Ted Hunt.
Scrum half Hugh Barker will
be back and Pete Synan will
remain at centre where he finished out the season last year.
Also   with   Varsity   experience
Varsity Ties
i Varsity Cricket Club was
forced to a draw with Kerrisdale
at Upper Brockton Saturday in
the final round of league p'.ay.
The score was 32 for 4 to 174
for 2.
Vancouver Rowing Club,  cel-
. lar-dwellers in the Mainland
Cricket  League,  won  the  Fyfe-
! Smith  Shield  despite  a  loss  to
! Brockton Point. 110 for 5 to 111
for 4. In the remaining Fyfe-
Smith match South Hill received
| a draw with Occasional. 109 to
! 39 for 4.
Scoring in every quarter, the Pacific Lutheran College
Gladiators put on a great passing display to stop the UBC
Thunderbirds 34-0 on Saturday afternoon at Varsity Stadium.
To coach Frank Gnup, it was
a disappointing and pleasant surprising game. Disappointing to
the extent that his two best backs
Donn Spence and Frank Tarling
lacked the height in the key
pass defense positions.
The factor which surprised
Gnup was the terrific defensive
line play which stopped the
tough offensive front wall of the
Gladiators. "If we played like
that against Western, the score
would have been much closer,"
said Gnup.
SUCCESS
The line did a good job of containing P.L.C. Lutheran had success with wide plays around
end. Lutes Quarterback Tommy
Gilmore operated the split-T very
well.
To solve the problem of height,
Gnup will probably move Bruce
Eagle and Ian Stewart into the
defensive back positions.
Lutheran scored first near the
end of the first quarter. Fullback Jack Newhart went over
tackle from  15 yards out. Gil-
I more  converted and the score
j was 7-0.
I Halfback Galen Nusbaum
made  it   13-0  midway   through
| the second-quarter when he scored on a 48-yard screen pass play
from Gilmore.
Shortly before the half, Vern
Clark plunged over from tne one-
yard line to give the Lutes a
19-0 lead. Lutes countered another point on the convert to
make the score read 20-0.
COMFORTABLE
Ron Storaasli scored another
major for the Lutes in the third
quarter on a long pass from Gil-
! more than bounced around on a
I few   shoulders  and   backs.  The
Lutes star pass-catching end was
; laying on the ground when the
ball fell into his arms.
j Dave Ramussen completed the
', scoring for the flying Lutes  in
the fourth quarter with another
| major.  Both were converted  to
bring the total to 34 points.
Gnup said that they learned
a lot from the game and he figures it will benefit him in later
Conference play.
Gnup  plans  to  work  on  the
defensive back situation and the
passing   attack   this   week.   He
feels confident that they will put
up their best game ever against
Eastern Washington on Saturday.
However, a physcological factor
1 may   ccme   into   the   week-end
Iga-me. The contest will be play-
! ed   in   Cheney,   home   of   the
Savages. Without a home crowd
and   on   a   strange   field,   could
have some bearing on the game.
TRAVEL?
Soccer
Action
Nearing
By IAN TODD
Highlight of this season's soc-
eer action occurs on the 3rd and
5th of  November,    when    the
Birds  travel   to   Berkeley  and
Stanford for a two-game series.
The oft-promised .but seemingly never materializing trip is
guaranteed this fall as Athletic
Co-orciinator Bus Phillips is in
possession of a signed contract.
With the opening date of the
Mainland League First Division
set for Octcber 5th, coach Ed.
Luckett should announce his
starting line-up this Thursday.
With a total of more than 30
players to choose from, including 6 returning lettermen, this
year's edition of the 'Bird*
should be comparable to last
vear's 2nd-place team.
Coast League stars Bruce Ashdown and Frank Sealy will be
returning to the 'Birds, but are
ineligible until the third week
in October, or until the PCL
"summer" league is completed.
They should experience no difficulty in holding their positions
of last year, inside left and right
respectively. The other returnee from last year's high-scoring
forward line, Fred Green, will
again patrol right wing.
Freshman Ken Ferrier will in
all likelihood capture the left
wing spot, while a fugitive from
Rugger, Irv. Knight, looks pretty
fair at centre-forward.
The half line will have two
new faces, probably John Cervi
at centre, and Frank Iaccobucci
at left-half, while letterman
Ralph Phelps should again be at
right-half.
Ian Todd will fill the left back
spot once more, but the right
back position is still wide open.
Clive "fumbles" Hughes, with
last year's 2nd lowest goals-
against average, will be in the
nets again.
Coach Bruce Ashdown of the
Chiefs is looking forward to another successful season for his
team, which operates in the
Mainland League 4th Division.
Registration For Gym
Classes Ending Soon
Students in first and second
years who are required to take
Physical Education are reminded that registration is
now taking place in the Memorial Gymnasium.
THE UBYSSEY
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 1956
8

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