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The Ubyssey Feb 9, 1956

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Volume XXXIV
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 1956
Number 47
ANDREEN,   SCOTT.   ELECTED
DON JABOUR WINS
ANDREW CALLS CLU
ENTRY FORM PROBE
Faculty admision requirements will be investigated at
noon today to see if discrimination exists.
Dean Geoffrey Andrew arranged for a discussion with
Civil Liberties Union executive after the project had
been suggested to CLU by other professors.
Dr. Nelson of the Faculty
of Medicine will also attend
the discussion in the Brock
Double Committee room noon
today. CLU members and interested students are free to
attend.
Edges
By 22
Beck
Votes
Finlayson
Attacks
Budget
DON JABOUR, New AMS President
—Photo by Frank Karpick
IN   MOCK   PARLIAMENT
Socreds   Move   Up
As Grits Win Again
The Liberal Club, with the help of Louis  St.  Laurent,
Wednesday swept the Mock Parliament elections.
   --* Daryll Anderson's crew ended an all-out campaign by taking
1248 votes, a total of 41.6 per
cent of the political vote.
Exotic Van
Calling For
Sales   Staff
The World University Service still needs students to complete their sales staff for the
"Treasure Van" coming to UBC
February IS.  16, and  17.
This showcase of Tuitions with
a display of over 100,000 items
travels across Canada yearly
providing the World University
Service with funds for their exchange scholarships, seminars
■mid international university aid
Admission to the exotic display is free: items cm sale range
in price from five cents to hundreds  of dollars.
Students who staff the various sales counters will be hand
ling unique and valuable handicrafts from Malaya, Japan,
Cireece, India, Lebanon, Jordan,
mid  Egypt.
j The most significant gain.
I however, was made by the Social
Credit group, led by Mel Smith.
j Contrasted to last year's total
j of 333 votes. Socreds upped their
popularity to 653 in the recent
i running, amounting to 21.7 per
i cent of the entire vote.
"The present budget is a gambler's budget," B.C. Conservative
leader Deane Finlayson said
Wednesday.
Finlayson strongly criticised
the Social Credit government's I Hebenton 1773 to 963.
By PAT RUSSELL
Ubyssey Elections Reporter
Don Jabour, a first year law student and President of the
Pep Club, Wednesday became President of the 1956-57 Alma
Mater Society. \   ■       —
'tween clouts
'Great Gamblers'
SBSU Topic Today
"WANTED—GREAT   GAMB*
lers" is Ross McPherson's top*
of j ic today at noon in Physics
42 202. This is the last lecture of
this series on the Christian Philosophy of Life given by the
Southern Baptist Student Union.
*       *       *
CRITICS'     CIRCLE    MEETS
al 8:15 tonight  at the  home ol
Dean    Chant,    1(550    Wesbrook
Crescent,  Topic:  Conrad  Aiken
story     Mr.   Ar-
In one of the closest contests
in UBC's election history, Jabour chalked up only 22 votes
over runner-up Stanley Beck.
Ron Longstaffe, third candidate
in the Presidential contest, was
eliminated in the first count.
1567 VOTES
Jabour gained a total of 1567
voaes to Beck's 1546.
I     Peggy    Andreen,    ahead
■ Betty-Anne    Thompson    by
; votes on the second count, won
! the   secretarial    post   on    next
; year's    council,    Valerie    Haig-
I Brown   being   knocked   out   on
i the first  count,  Peggy  sneaked
j up   from   a   35-vote   deficit   to
the lead.
Robin Scott, this year's Engineering Rep on the Undergraduate   Societies   Committee, I and   his   short
| took  a   clean   majority on  the ! cularis."
i USC ballot. In the only election
I not   requiring   a  second  count,
! Robin   took  every   one   of   the
nine polls, beating Sholto (Heb)
"spending spree" which he
claimed, favored big business.
"The Premier is no doubt
contemplating a provincial election this year," he said "He is
going to point at the budget and
say 'Look at our highway program. Look at the PCJE. Look
at all the money we're spending
on B.C.' He is not only gambling
on this budget to put him back
in power, he will probably have
about 100,000 copies of this budget printed, together with a long
song and dance about how good
times have come to B.C with
their form of government."
Speaking of the much publicized   provincial   debt   "reduc-
"Tiki" Graham managed to |
fool voters in every booth ex-!
cept Vancouver General Hospi-,
tal, winning 405 votes.
DISTINCT CHANGE
A distinct change in attitude I
marked the entire election, Nine (
candidates contested the first-1
slate, while only four names j
appeared on last year's ballots. !
* *      *
HILEL HOUSE presents Rabbi Allan Schwartzman from Ta-
c o m a speaking a t the Hillel
House today at noon. Topic:
"They've Got to be Taught."
* *       *
PRESENTS   "The
the story of Rom-
at   noon   in   the
j FILMSOC
I Desert Fox"
I mel. Today
! Auditorium.
*
3201   students,   over   50   per
All
'Father Divine"
Noon
invited.
*      *
CCF   FOURTH
tion" he argued "they have
changed the system of bookkeeping—but since debts incurred by the PGE, B.C. Power Commission and others are guaranteed by the government they are
therefore contingent on the peo-
Despite their gain in the num- Pie of this province and must
ber of votes this year. CCF,' he counted as part of the pro-
headed by Bill Marchuk, lost \ vincial debt."
its position as official opposition j ———■——— i
to the Socreds, placing fourth
behind the Progressive Conser-1
vatives.
Chiefed by Phil Govan, the
Conservatives were .4 per cent j Reference in Tuesday's pa-
ahead of the CCF, polling 479 : per to two Thunderbird bas-
votes.
BIRD REGULATIONS
PROHIBIT DRINKING
The Labor Progressive Party |
won only 5.2 per cent of the j
total, which should give thorn \
two seats in  Mock Parliament, t
i
Said   Daryll   Anderson   after I
Anybody   interested   in   deal- | the election: "It's highly signifi- j
ing in treasures is asked to eon- j cant that the Liberals can hold
fuel    Christine    Smith    Handle   UBC when Social Credit is run-:
Jones or Don Cox  at  the AMS ; ning •exteremly high in the pro
Office. vinee''
ketball players as 'soggy with
inferior American beer" was
meant to be humorous and not
in any way descriptive of the
actual case.
Strict training regulations
prevent players from drink
Ing during road trips. The
Ubyssey regrets any misunderstanding that may have resulted   from   Tuesday's   story.
*       *
ASUS   DEBATES    Engineers
on    "Engineering   Inventiveness
is a Threat to Humanity." Prof.
cent of the student body earlier j Read of the En«lish D^1   and
dubbed  "apathetic"  stopped  at | Alade Akesode oppose Prof. Hes-
the polling booths. j loP and Ra,P"
At  almost  every   poll,  votes j Sullari in Engineering 201.
were   unusually   even.   Jabour 1 Thursday.
won   out   with   the   Engineers j *
j taking 291  votes to Beck's 91 !    GRADUATING    CLASS    ex-
I and  Longstaffe's  73,  and  with j ecutive    meeting   Thursday   in
the nurses at Vancouver General
j Hospital, 27 to Beck's 3 and
! Ron's 16.
Elsewhere Beck took six of the
' nine polling booths; Longstaffe
i took one. Stan  gained 80 votes
on the second count.
j CURIOUS SPECTATORS
i As the ballots were counted
| by Dave Hemphill's election
' crew Wednesday night, Brock
! Hall gradually filled with cur-
1 ions spectators. But no one was
, able to predict the outcome of
| either the presidential or sec-
| retarial contests until the second
j count   votes   were   added.
Probably the greatest surprise
came when Peggy Andreen poll-'
ed 419 votes on the second count,
sufficient to overcome Betty- <
j Anne's 32 vote lead.
With no "hot" issues clouding i
1 the atmosphere, all winners pro-<
! mised  the same old  "good gov-
ernmenl," and hurried off to!
; respective phones in the Brock i
, to inform the uninformed ui the :
news.
Arts 102 at 12:30 noon.
* *       *
i     NISEI  VARSITY  CLUB  gen-
' eral   meting on  February  9  at
i 12:30 noon in HL-3.
j *       *       *
j     MR.   GEORGE   NELSON,
prominent architect, industrial
designer, furniture designer, edi-
j lor and author from New York,
' will be speaking to students on
"Modern Design" in Physics 200
| al 12:30 p.m. today.
; * * *
! SOCIAL CREDIT CLUB gen-
! eral meeting will be held at
\ noon   today   in   Arts   208.   Noel
Murphy   will   be   the   speaker.
All members please attend. Now
' members welcome.
* *       *
I SLAVONIC CIRCLE present*
Dr. Rose speaking on the "Uses
, of Slavonic Studies" today at
noon in Physics 201
3)     ,
(Continued    on   Page
See CLASSES THE UBYSSEY
Authorized M second clan nail, Post Office Department,
Ottawa.
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Student subscriptions $1.20 per year (included In AMS fees). Mall
subscriptions $2.00 per year. Single copies five cents. Published
in Vancouver throughout the University year by the Student
Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society, University of
British Columbia. Editorial opinions expressed herein are those
of the editorial staff of the Ubyssey, and not necessarily those of
the Alma Mater Society or the University. Letters to the Editor
should not be more than ISO words. The Ubyssey reserves the right
to cut letters, and cannot guarantee publication of all letters
received.    ,.,.,..
ACTING EDITOR-INCHIEP  SANDY ROSS
City £ditor ... Jean Whiteside      Feature Editor.. _. Mike Ames
Past© Editor -.. John Robertson      •sorts Editor_.. Miko Olaspto
-a^-^             Buslniss Mjf. .. Marry Yuill
8ENIOW EDITOR -ROSEMARY KENT-BAHlEH
Reporters and Desk: Dave Robertson, Ted Nicholson, Marie
Gallagher, Marilyn Smith, Al Forrest, Cliff Millward, Carol Gregory, Carolyn Forbes, Tiki Graham, Murray Ritchie, M. B. Smith,
Sammy Cromie.
Sports Reporters: Rae Ross, Bruce Allardyce, Lord Trevor-
Smith, Dwayne Erickson.
A   Pity
The results of yesterday's AMS election were, in the
main, satisfying. It's always nice to see democracy in action,
even on a miniature scale. One small thing disturbs us, however; and that is the poor showing "Tiki" Graham made
in* the USC Chairman election. It indicates the low estate to
which the noble campus art of tomfoolery has fallen at UBC.
"Tiki" Graham, 4s you've probably heard by now, is in
reality a small, wooly poodle who decorates the Marine Drive
estate of F. Ronald Graham. The idea of running him for USC
Chairman was born in the South Brock basement offices of
t«e Mamooks Club, where all the posters on campus are
painted.
We're disturbed because the paintbrush boys didn't put
it over. Practically no-one was deceived by the mysterious
candidate, and the few that did vote for "Tiki," we suspect,
did it from sympathy for the Mamooksters' tired prank.
There was a time, in the dear dead days of the Jokers'
Club, or before Baru graduated, when the campus could count
on at least three hoaxes, trophy thefts, or mock riots per week.
We've heard of horses getting elected President of the
Students' Council, and non-existent students getting their
B.A.'s, and football players being shanghaied onto oil tankers
bound for Venezuela. But UBC, apparently, is incapable even
of getting a poodle elected to USC—a task the Joker's Club
could have performed with ease, before breakfast.
These things take a fair amount of time and planning;
apparently, UBC students haven't got the time or the interest.
It's a bit of a pity, we think. If we're this dull now, what will
we all be like when we're 40?
Peace   Bid?
Reprinted from
THE MANCHESTER GUARDIAN
Where the Geneva negotiations failed, could a loose "treaty
of friendship" between the Soviet Union and the United States
help? It seems unlikely. Rather as President Eisenhower says
in his reply to Marshal Bulganin, it might work against the
cause of peace by creating illusions, It would suggest that real
steps towards better understanding had been made, whereas
in fact all the old difficulties would remain. The agenda at
the second Geneva conference covered the most vital points
—reunion of Germany, disarmament, and the improvement of
contacts between East and West. On none of these was any
progress made.
Mr. Molotov said that the time was not ripe for reunion
of Germany through free elections, particularly since these
elections might lead to a revision of the "social reforms" of
the past ten years in Eastern Germany. He insisted that the
North Atlantic Treaty Organization must be dismantled before
Germany is reunited.
On disarmament, he declined to be more specific about
the Russian proposals on international inspection, and in the
end he went back to demanding an unverifiable "ban" on
atomic weapons. On contacts between East and West, he refused to permit the general distribution of Western books,
newspapers, and periodicals in the Soviet Union, and he would
do nothing about the jamming of broadcasts. President Eisenhower is right to ask for a solution of these difficulties first.
Even if at Geneva the Western ministers did not do all they
might have done—notably in not following up Sir Anthony
Eden's suggestion of a demilitarized zone in Germany, in not
offering outright to drop Germany from NATO in return for
free elections, and in doubling back on their own disarm anient
proposals—it was nevertheless all too plain that Mr. Molotov
would not have come to any agreement. In the President's
reply to Moscow it was sensible to emphasise that a new troaty
would mean little while the Geueva ssues are unsettled.
Is Decapitation The Cure *
For Fraternity Dandruff?   .*
"Fraternities Without Brotherhood," by Alfred McLung Lee,  (Beacon Press, $1.95) is
a recently-published book which reviews the question of discriminatory clauses in American
fraternities. The book, and Ihe review of it printed here, should interest many UBC students.^
Mr. Malcolm, the New Republic Reviewer, takes the view that the most effective way to rid
fraternities of discriminatory clauses is to rid campi of fraternities.
The New Republic
By D. F. MALCOLM L*
There is some special magic
which surrounds college social
fraternities making them all
but invulnerable to sane analysis. If you bring the plainest
Statement of fact within ten
inches of a Greek letter it will,
likely enough, explode in dazzling absurdities under your
nose.
The obstacles being what
they are, Alfred McLung Lee
deserves a special commendation for his sober — even
(straight-faced—report on racial and religious prejudice
among the Greeks. The strain
upon the author must have
been terrific, and in a few
places the hyperbole, peculiar
to the subject shows through.
The preface, for instance, contains this sentence: "To the extent that Aryanism persists in
them, social fraternities represent a basic threat to democracy
in the United States ..."
Now here I can't help feeling
that Mr. Lee, himself a member of no fewer than five fraternities, is overstating the case
just a little. I prefer to believe
that democracy might manage
to limp along in the future,
as it has in the past, without
conspicious help (or hurt) from
the fraternity system.
This reservation aside, I have
no quarrel with Mr. Lee, He
has performed a scholarly and
exhaustive study of the discriminatory clauses in fraternity constitutions, the progress
made toward their removal,
and the sources of opposition
to that progress. Further, he
has evidently gone to a great
deal of trouble to collect all
the arguments that have been
offered in defense of the status quo and has dissected these
delicate creatures with meticulous care. Altogether an impres
sive job and I warmly recommend the book to all those
who, like Mr. Lee feel concerned about preserving and improving the fraternity system,
as well ai those who, like my*
self, merely enjoy watching
fraternities as some men enjoy
watching birds.
Yet I wonder if Mr. Lee's
group isn't making things unnecessarily    hard    for  itself.
It seems to me that the simplest, speediest, and most effective way to solve the problem of discrimination in fraternities is to abolish the fraternities. The affiliate will no doubt
find this a rather indecent sort
of suggestion—like proposing
to cure dandruff by decapitation. But why not? at least
there can be no question about
its effectiveness. And the loss
to American education is one
that it could well sustain.
V!
THREE   JUSTIFICATIONS
I can think offhand of only
three justifications of the fraternity system. The first—
that it constitutes a sort of
athenaeum for the mutual promotion of learning among the
members—is rarely encountered these days, except deep in
the dull columns of fraternity
magazines where it is safe
from irreverent snickers. The
second—that it educates the
student to take his place as a
responsible citizen in an adult
society — gives rise to interesting speculations as to what is
meant by "responsible citizen"
and "adult society." The third
and most prevalent simply relies upon the spirit of fellowship, of brotherhood, that supposedly pervades the system.
This spirit has always puzzled me, and this in spite of the
fact that I was given a firsthand glimpse of it in the Fall
of 1950 when I pledged a fraternity at the University of
Michigan.   (I   gather   that  the
group in question considered
my subsequent behavior pretty
outrageous so I won't add to my
disgrace by dragging its good
name through these columns.
Instead, with consummate delicacy of feeling, I shall refer
(only to the initials—which
were ATO.)
In the beginning at least,
I think I made a tolerably good
fraternity man. I diligently
memorized the words of the
fraternity's songs, e.g., "We are
the great big (boom) hairy-
chested men (boom) . . . etc."
I learned not to say "frat"
for "fraternity." In time I
think I would have mastered
the Laocoonesque complexities
of the Secret Grip.
But somehow I never got
the hang of the brotherhood.
This was not for the want
of helpful lessons. I was walloped on the derriere In the
name of brotherhood. I was
made to stand on a chair and
answer absurd questions in ihe
name   of  brotherhood.   I   was
generally chivvied in the name
of brotherhood. I was told
about the coming Hell Week
with its further wallopings,
chivvyings, humiliations, absurdities, dose* of pills with
Technicolor effects, and general
abuse; all to be administered
in the name of brotherhood.
Yet somehow the feeling of
brotherhood eluded me. I suppose I'm juit insensitive to its
I couldn't even find much ••tit-
faction in the knowledge thai
I would be permitted to mistreat next year's pledges.
My misgivings on the matter reached some sort of climax one afternoon when a
member of the student legislature came around to the
house to explain a debated bill
.calling for the removal of
all bias clauses from fraternity
one had seen fit to hell me that
the ATO constitution contained such a clause.) His efforts
to gain support for the measure
got nowhere.
TRUCULENT   RESPONSE
The responses varied from
truculence — "No one's going
to tell us who to pledge"— to
naivete— "But they've got their
own fraternities"—to practical
—"The national organisation
would never allow it"— but all
to the same general effect. The
ilegislator patiently grappled
with each of these arguments
in turn—but without producing the slightest change.
I leave it to the reader to
root around for this arriere-
pensee if he wishes. For my
part, I will simply note that
at this point my pledgeship
ended on a note of symmetrical
diesenchantment with theATO
notion of brotherhood. I had
been physically abused at one
end and then, perhaps by way
of compensation, thoroughly
disbused at the other. Murmuring a polite excuse, I depledged.
But it was not to be so easy.
Delegations troth the fraternity
devoted several days to trying
to persuade me to change my
mind. This was not a tribute
to my winning ways; there persists in fraternity circles the
odd belief that it is a black
mark against a house to lo a
a pledge, and likewise, that it
is dishonorable for a pledge
to resign. When I remained
stubbornly unreasonable, a sudden coolness was noticeable in
the house's attitude towards
me. Not to put too fine a point
on it, most of my erstwhile brothers cut me dead whenever
we met on the campus, so fragile a tiling is the brotherhood of man.
In a surprisingly short time
I recovered from this blow sufficiently to sit up, take a little
light nourishment, and watch
the progress of the bias clause
bill (which Mr. Lee discusses
at considerable length). It
squeaked through the legislature,   wws   approved   by   the
Student Affairs Committee 7 to
6 and went before President
Alexander G. Ruthven who vetoed it, arguing with delightful inconsequence, that "it is a
long established rule of law
that no individual has an inherent right to membership in
any particular organization."
A watered-down version of the
bill was presented the following year to Rnthven's successor,
Harlan Hatcher. Although his
veto lacked the Puckish charm
of his predeccessor's, it did at
least provide another butterfly to be broken on the wheel
of Mr. Lee's stern logic,
The new president opted for
"thjc processes of education
and personal and group convictions," which would, he said,
"bring us forward faster, and
on a sounder basis than the
proposed methods of coercion."
But the last I heard ATO
still had ite bias clause. BEER   NEAR
Dear Charles   Hit
Breezy-Says Ames
By MICHAEL  AMES
Alan Melville's adaption of
the play "Les Enfants d'Ed-
ouard" by Marc-Gilbert Sau-
vajon and Frederick Jackson,
called "Dear Charles," is being received enthusiastically
this week at the York Theatre
on Commercial Drive.
Produced by the Vancouver Little Theatre Asiciation
•nd directed by Phoebe Smith,
•Dear Charles" is a light three-
act comedy about shapely novelist Denise Darvel (Gay Sri-
vener) who goes about collecting children without bothering to have any husbands.
Life catches up to the Spirited lady, however, and so do
the fathers of her children
(who catch up at her request),
and the play chuckles to the
usual everyone-is-happy ending.
DOMINATED
, Gay Scrivener as the leading lady dominated the play,
but she shouldn't have. Des
Norman   as   her   son   Bruno
Tiki' Graham Barks
To 405 USC Votes
By PAT RUSSELL
Tiki Graham household pet of Ronald F"., Wednesday won
405 votes for Undergraduate Societies Chairman of the Alma
•—■———i———"-"Mater Society.
Read, Akesode
vs. Saltan Today
Arts faculty tackles the engineers in a debate noon today.
English professor Stanley
Read will argue  "Engineering
Tiki managed this with subdued publicity, a run-of-the mill
campaign, no campaign speech,
and ten names on his seconder's
statement.
With the permission of his
owner, and the backing of the
"South Brock" crowd, "Tiki"
was placed first on the ballots
for USC chairman. The purpose
of running the shaggy-haired
dog was to test the interest of
Inventiveness — Threat to Hu-j the student body in other candi-
manity?" with engineering
professor W. G. Heslop In Engineering 201.
Also involved in the skirmish will be ASUS temporary
chairman Alade Akesode and
E.U.S. president Ralph Sultan. The event is sponsored
jointly by the two undergraduate societies.
CLASSES
• (Continued from Page 1)
CIVIL LIBERTIES executive
meets with Dean Geoffrey An-
., drew in Brock Double Committee room noon today. Faculty
admission requirements will be
discussed and interested students
are welcome to particapte,
*       *       *
VARSITY   ROD   AND   GUN
-^Club are holding an important
meting at noon today in HL1.
New members are welcome.
dates than the President.
Unfortunately news leaked out
before the election, Wednesday
of the "goon" stunt, yet despite
the leakage, 405 innocent voters
made their first choice without
inquiring into the qualifioations
of the candidate.
The results of the "Tiki' campaign might answer the question
of how much advantage there
is in having a name near the
beginning of the alphabet when
running for election, Ballots run
in   alphabetical  order.
Seconders Gerry Hodge and
John Riddington said after the
publication of results: "We feel
we have proved that even with
the increased number of voters
this year, there is still too little
interest taken in first slate candidates who run in the shadow
of the presidential campaign."
and Otto Lowy as Jan Letzar-
esco, one of her bed partners,
provided most of the humour; Norman was the only
one who kept the first act
alive, for that matter.
Both Norman and Lowy,
with some aid of Jim Beaton
as Sir Michael, and sometimes
Douglas Kerr as Dominque,
two more of the heroine's midnight friends, carried the
whole play.
CONVINCING
Frank Crowson, who turned in a convincing performance as Edward the family
doctor, worked well with Scrivener. Mona Sutherland who
played Martha the maid was,
if anything, miscasted.
A number of also-acteds
completed the semi-profesion-
al cast of this 176th production of VLTA, which is worth
seeing if you like breezy comedies.
BEER PARLOUR
And if you do not like this
type of breeziness you can
be comforted by the fact that
the nearest beer parlour is
only a two-minute walk away:
it is just close enough to
make it during the first intermission.
38 YEARS OF SERVICE
TO THE  UNIVERSITY OF
4 BRITISH COLUMBIA. •
ITS FRATERNITIES
AND SORORITIES.
THERE'S A REASON
* /   PRINTING CO. LTD.
PA ci i <l  OI7 I
1035 Seymour  Street
Vancouver 2, B.C.
THE UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 9, 1956
■MM
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"Thrift Tours" to continental
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4437 West 10th Avenue
UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE
Hrs. 9 a.m. • 5 p.m. Sat. 9 a.m. to Noon
Loose-Leaf Note Books, Exercise Books and Scribblers,
Graphic Engineering Paper, Biology Paper, Loose-Leaf
Refills, Fountain Pens and Ink and Drawing Instruments
and Operated by
Tie University el B.C
TOTEM SHOES
Men's and Women's Casuals
4550 West 10th Ave.
Opp. Safeway Parking Lot
AL. 2540
FROSH PRESENT
Cupids  Capets
February 11th
9-12  P.M.  IN THE BROCK
WALLY LIGHTBODYS ORCHESTRA
LOUISE BLANCHARD ENTERTAINS!
$1.75 Couple - 75c Stag
DOOR PRIZES!
A beautiful Valentine for
every sweater girl on your list!
They're divinely soft, fashionable,
a fantasy in colour, in orlon
or wool. Just drop in at the
nearest good store... anywhere.
• OYAl KHIT1IM9 COMPANY 4*1 WtMingfaa Si. W., Tor*al«
V-9* THE UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 9, 1956
»*»>• |«
UBC  In  Play-Offs
After Marpole Win
By DWAYNE ERICKSON
UBC Braves will open their Junior "A" Men's playoffs
on Friday night at Lord Byng Gym when they take on the
second place West Van team in a best out of three series to
decide who will meet the top place YMCA team for the league
final. Game time is 8:45 p.m.
If   the  Sr.  "A"   league final
has to play their deciding game
on Monday night at King Ed
gym, the Braves and West Van
UBC (55)—Horton 8, McNee
6, Gustan 8, Oldham 2, Yada.
Stephens 18, Corbett 2, Symonds
5, Russell 4, Hoar 2.
Marpole     (48)—Stemler     16,
teams will meet for their second j J^i 8. Foster 2, Feild 2, Bor-
.    L ... tollo 7, Langhout 4.
contest as the preliminary.	
Last   Tuesday   night,   cellar- j
dwelling Marpole made a final j
attempt to overtake the Braves j
in   a  regular scheduled league j
game.   But,   the  Varsity   squad i     Men's   intramural   basketball
held   on   to   take   the   decision \ha*  reached the midway point
55-43.   Lance  Stephens led the
Bra\ s on the scoring sheet with
18  points  while high  man  for
Marpole was Bill Stemler with
16 points
BIRD GUARD Jerry OFlan-
agan will join Ubyssey football editor Rae Ross in the
pro ranks next season when
he toils for the Toronto Argonauts.
Eight Tied In   Murals
in the season and leading the
way with three wins each are
Aggies, Acadia, Alpha Delts,
Phys Ed, Engineering, Commerce, Union College, and Ev-
In the preliminary, YMCA j Surrey, The teams have the add-
completed ho season without a 'ed >n«mnve 0f « gatne in Bell-
defeat wl\-m they slaughtered i >n«ham in March against the
West Van (58-43. Ken Oddy led : intramural winner at Western
Y with 15 points, while West j Washington.
Van's stai   Bill Nicol scored 13.
Football  Meeting
Topping the women's hoop
parade are the Phrateres teams
with a total of seven wins in
ten starts. Next in line is Wes-
Coach 1-: ;mk Gnup has call-; brook with three wins while
ed a mi"'ing of his football! Alpha Gams, Kappas. D. G.'.s,
players fo noon to-day in Room VOC, and Alpha Pi all have two
212 of tin War Memorial Gym. j wins each.
All   players   are   asked   to   at-] *       *       *
tend. Other Evergreen Confer-] At noon today, weigh-ins for
ence teams may protest Gnup'si boxing and wrestling will be
meetings on the grounds that j held in the Men's gym for the
UBC is breaking regulations by 90 entrants. The draw will be
holding the spring training sea-1 announced at the time of the
son. ) weigh-ins.
The men's golf touney is also
scheduled   for   today   with   the
entire field of 48 entrants teeing off between 12:30 and 1:30.
*       *       *
Men's and women's intramur
als  will  hold  a   combined  ski
meet on Grouse Mountain Sun-
i day. The 45 entrants must rc-
j port   by   12   noon   at   the   Big
j Mountain run.
! *       *       *
i
'     Fifty entrants have  been  re-
1 received   for  touch   botball  and
Bol)   Hindinarch   lias   indicated
competition will be a five game
round robin affair, resulting in
; the  cancellation   of  softball.
i
I MEN'S INTRAMURAL
I STANDINGS
I
|     Betas   108,   Fort   Camp   87,
i Phys. Ed. 73, Forestry 69. Phi
'Delts 59, Fiji  56.  DU.  56, En-
! gineers 54, Zetes 51, Aggies 48.
! Alpha Delts 46, Zebcs 43.
O'Flanagan
To Argoes
By RAE R088
Football Editor
Jerry O'Flanagan, UBC Thun-j
derbird right guard and corner,
linebacker was selected by Toronto Argonauts of the Big Four j
Football Union in the recent]
Canadian college football play-]
er draft. i
I
The  only   other  UBC  player j
drafted wa^ Bill Pattimore,  an j
end who only played a part of
one exhibition season two years
ago and no longer attends college.
|
O'Flanagan  had been  picked
on the Evergreen Conference
all-star team in his second sea^
son with the Birds after trans-]
ferring from McGill where he',
served two years under V i c j
Obeck.
The 210 pound guard start-j
ed playing in Windsor, Ontario |
at Kennedy Collegiate (alma ma- j
ter of such stalwarts as Joe ]
Kroll and Tony Golab) where he I
was twice chosen on the all-'
city team. i
Graduating in Arts this year
and carrying an honors average, Jerry hopes to work in a
professional football career with
a Masters degree at Columbia
University in the radio and television branch of their school
of Dramatic Arts.
O'Flanagan is "quite satisfied" thai lie will get a chance
to play his pro ball with the
Argoes, and Frank Gnup thinks
Jerry has an excellent chance
of making the grade.
EYES EXAMINED
J. J. Abramson
I. F. Hollenberg
Optometrists
Vancouver Block
MA. M28 MA. 2148
DEAN'S
Fine  Foods
Mellow Whip
Ice Cream
10th and Sasamat
ALma 2596
EUROPEAN  BOOKS
Records and Magazines
Continental Book &
Music Centre
511 HOWE ST.
. (just off Pender)
PAciftc   4711
Skilled,   Polite   Service
Look!   Save!
Cut this ad out and present
it   to   Campus   Shoes.   You
will   receive   a  special   10"'
discount   cm   any   purchase.
Offer expires February 15th.
INTRAMURAL    SCHEDULES
MEN'S BASKETBALL
February 10. noon— Eng. "C"
vs. Kappa Sigma "B"; Fiji "A"
vs. Sigma Chi 'B"; D.U, "B"
vs. Pharmacy "B".
February 10. 4:30 — Acadia
"A" vs. VOC; Beta "A" vs.
Pre Med.; R.U.S. vs. Sigma Chi
"A".
February 10. 5:30 — Aggies
"A" vs. Acadia "B": Anglican
College vs. Beta "C"; Alpha
Delt "B"    vs. ATO. "A".
February 13, noon — Acadia
"A" vs. Sigma Chi "A"; R.U.S.
vs. Pre Med: Beta "A" vs. V.O.C.
February 14. noon—Eng. "B"
vs. Forestry "B"; Kappa Sigman
"A" vs. Ex-Kelowna; Forestry
"A" vs. Fort Camp.
February 15. noon— Beta "B"
vs, Eng. 2; P.E. "A" vs. Law:
Fiji "B" vs. Phil Delta "A".
February 15, 7:30— Med. A"
vs. Phi Knppa Sigma; Eng "D"
vs. Phi Delt "C": Newmen "B"
vs. P.E. "C";
February 15. 830—Med. "B"
vs. Fiji "C" Eng. 1 vs. Commerce "B"; Newman "A" vs.
Phi Kapp Pi.
February 17, noon—Eng. 'C"
vs. Pharmacy "B": D.U. *'B" vs.
Sigma Chi "B"; Fiji "A" vs.
Kappa Sigma "B\
February 17, 4:30 — Teacher
Training    vs.    Pharmacy    "A":
Sigma Phi Delta vs. Psi U; Eng.,
"A" vs. E. "B". I
February 17, 5:30 — Alpha j
Delt "A" vs. Ex-Magee Frosh; I
Phi Delt "B" vs. Eng. 3: Aggies j
"B" vs. Dekes. j
WOMEN'S   BASKETBALL      !
February   13.   12:35 — Wesbrook "A" vs. K. A. Theat; A1-'
pha Gams "A" vs. Phrateres 1.
February 14. 12.35 — Phrateres 2 vs. Nursing; A.D. Pi "B"
vs. P.E.
February 15, 12:35 — Phrateres 3 3vs. Acadia; Delta Gamma vs. Gamma Phi Beta.
February 16, 12:35 — Phrateres 5 vs. Alpha Gamma "B";
A. A. Pi "A" vs. Maclnnes.
February 16, 1:28 — Home
Economics vs. Phrateres 7.
February 16, 1:55 — Wesbrook "B" vs. Phrateres 2.
February 17. 12:35 — Phrateres 6 vs. VOC.
February 17, 12:55 — Commerce vs. K. K, Kamma.
WANTED
Your old Double Breasted
Suit to be made into a
Single Breasted  Model
UNITED TAILORS
549 Granville        PA. 4649
Ladies'
SPORT PALS
White  Bucks,   Low  Boys,
Black  Susans,  etc.
Sale   Prices
$4.88 to $7.88
Men's
OXFORDS and  LOAFERS
Sale Prices
$7.88 to $12.88
CAMPUS SHOES
4442 W. 10th Ave.      AL. 0408
Suppliers of UBC laboratory manuals, graph papers and
law case books.
BEST MIMEOGRAPHING CO. LTD.
151 W. Hastings TA. 3742
Free Parking
Si
NEW YORK LIFE
PROTECT YOUR
INSURABILITY
Commence   a   small   savngs
insurance plan
Please Contact
DAVE ANSLOW
KE.   :!940R
Ol'
MA. 7.164
SHAUGHNESSY CLEANERS
5766 University Boulevard
SAME DAY SERVICE AT
NO EXTRA CHARGE
A Complete Dry Cleaning, Launtlery and Shirt Service
FREE DELIVERY FROM THIS STORE ONLY
Phone ALma 0104
TUXEDOS
•   WHITE  DINNER  JACKETS
FOR RENT
LATEST STYLE
Singl
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Shirts and Shoes
SAN
FRANCISCO TAILORS
(Half Block East of Woodward's)
52 VV. Hastings
PA. 4955
FILMSOC PRESENTS
JAMES MASON AS ROMMEL
"THE DESERT FOX"
Today 12:30 - Auditorium
AUSTIN SALES AND SERVICE CENTRE
TINTH md ALMA ST.      <W» 1109

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