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The Ubyssey Jan 6, 1959

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 THE PEN IS
MIGHTIER
THE UBYSSEY
THAN THE
BOARD
VOL. XLI
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, JANUARY 6, 1959
No. 31
A CALL TO ARMS
(EDITORIAL)
It is time for the students of this campus to start on a third
Great Trek.
The students have twice before been up in arms.
Once to get the campus built.
A second time in 1957 to get needed buildings.
A third Trek is needed now to assure that students who
are deserving and able are not forced out of university by
high fees.
The A.M.S. has suggested that students write letters of
protest to their M.LJV-'s.
The Ubyssey heartily agrees.
A "Trek By Mail" is a good start. ^
If necessary it should be followed up by a physical Trek
to the parliament buildings.
Under no circumstances should the provincial government
be permitted to force this university to raise fees without knowing that students are vigorously opposed to the principle involved.
The principle involved is whether the entrance requirement of this university will be brains or bucks.
Administration Won't Push
Tuition Fee Increase Here
GEOFFREY O. B. DAVIES
. . . fee raise ''last resort"
Ubyssey  Phoio,  Michael  Sone
SNOW.     LOTS OF IT.     This chilly coed thinks Monday's flurry was bad, but wait till
today when she gets, te^iacUgS.   That wilibe some^ung.to talk about.
Whether UBC student, fees are raised "is up to the Provincial Government."
Geoffrey O. B. Davies, Administrative Assistant to the
President, said Monday, the University has submitted its request to the Provincial Government for an operating grant on
the assumption that fees will not be raised.
"If the B.C. government
doesn't meet the requested budget estimate, fees will have to
be raised," Prof. Davies said.
Prof. Davies said the administration feels that "any raising
of fees should be at a last resort."
"No financial difficulties
should be placed in the way of
deserving and able students,"
he said.
The provincial government's
decision on the university's budget request will be announced
when Premier Bennett brings
dowh the budget in the legislature later this month.
If the government turns
down the university's request
then the Board of Governors
will meet in February to decide
what action to take, Davies said.
Present basic fee for arts,
science, agriculture and education faculties is $246. Applied
science, law, pharmacy, forestry and commerce fee is $296.
Student fees make up 17.2
per cent of the UBC budget.
Ten years ago fees provided
47.91 per cent of the university's
revenue.
Last year the provincial government statutory grant was
$4,334,000. This represented an
increase of about $400,000. The
board of governors had asked
for an increase of $1,400,000.
Before the predicted $1,000,-
000 deficit" for 1958-59 developed, the federal government
increased its grant toy about
$1,000,000 to fill the gap. This
was a 50 per cent increase in
federal aid and no further increase  is  expected this year.
The University budgets for
expenditures of about $9,000,-
000.
It costs "at least" $1,000 a
year  to  attend  University.
Students say they can get
by comfortably on this when
living at home. But anout-of-
town student finds this a tight
budget for eight months, when
it must be stretched to cover
food, lodging, fees and books.
Students
Support
Campaign
U.B..C. students in a campus-
wide poll Monday called for a
barrage of letters to MLA's to
combat the impending raise in
fees.
AMS President Chuck Conna-
ghan urged student help in obtaining increased Government
support. He said that unless
Government grants are increased, either enrolment must be
restricted or teaching standards
lowered, in view of the rapid
expansion of UBC.
Most students feel that a flood
of letters from students and
their families would effectively
bring this critical situation to
the attention of the M.L.A.'s in
Victoria.
However others pointed out
that the Government is already
aware of the situation and that
any number of letters will be
ineffective.
T. Glen, a graduate student
in civil engineering, said that
in a similar situation at the
University of Galloway the fees
were raised despite the protests
of students.
In his opinion, the fee increase will only be a qoestion
of time unless at least one other
university is established in the
province. He added that the
proposed raise is actually far
less substantial than in most
other  Canadian universities.
See   STUDENTS SUPPORT
(Continued on Page 6)
INDEX
'Tween Classes Page 6
CUP Conference Page 3
Sport Page 7
Editorial Page Page 2 PAGE TWO
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 6, 1959
noru I figir irrfds carp^iSliurrT
ONE  MANS  OPINION:
THE UBYSSEY      Present Freshman English
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Authorized as second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa
Published three times a week throughout the University year
in Vancouver by the Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society,
University of B.C. Editorial opinions expressed are those of the
Editorial Board- of The Ubyssey and not necessarily those of the
Alma Mater Society or the University of B.C.
Telephones: Editorial offices, AL. 4404; Locals 12, 13 and 14;
Business offices, AL. 4404; Local 15.
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF,    DAVE  ROBERTSON
Managing Editor, Al Forrest        City Editor, Kerry Feltham
CUP Editor, Judy Frain Features Editor, Mary Wilkins
Chief Photographer,    Mike Sone
Editor, Special Editions,    Rosemary Kent-Barber.
SENIOR EDITOR,   MICHAEL SONE
Reporters and Desk: Paat McGregor,    Bob    Stirling,    Kerry
White, Flora McLeod, Irene Fraser, Judy Harker, and a couple of
new fellows.    We're friendly enough, chaps, why not introduce
yourselves?
Course "Useless. Harmful
n
Prejudice
(Reprinted from the McGill Daily, Winner of the Bracken Trophy
for excellence in editorial writing, 1958).
It is prejudice that closes our minds to the truth and
knowledge which would enable us to work together in
friendship, vote with intelligence, worship in understanding,
and avoid disputes.
One of Aesop's Fables tells how Jupiter, in a mischievous mood, made mankind a present of spectacles. Every
man had a pair, but they did not represent objects to all
mankind alike. Otte pair was purple, another blue; one
white and another black; some were red, green and yellow.
"However, notwithstanding this diversity," says Aesop,
"every man was charmed With his dwn, believing it the best,
and enjoyed in opinion all the satisfaction of truth."
Many civilizations in the world at different times and
paces have had widely clifferent patterns of behaviour.
;l " Aloiost, anything in social aad personal life which we deplore
was somewhere sometime acceptable. Out of those prac-
• tices,.which were right and proper in their age, have come
today's cultures. A respect for these traditions of others
will lead to the understanding and avoidance of prejudice.
It may be true tjhat the more ignorant a man is, the more
positive he is in his opinions, and thhe more belligerently
inclined to look upon one's doubt of his statements as a sin
against him.
Intelligently alive people have no such delusions. They
know that absolute certainty is regarded by scientists as an
impossibility, and scientists of all people, have the opportunity to check and re-check their findings.
Mistakes occur in the thoughts of all living people. In
the Redpaf,h Museum there are fossils who haven't made a
mistake for several thousand years, ever since they curled
up in their grass mats and went to sleep. The only people
who arp npver mistaken are dead.
I want to lament the fate of
thirteen hundred and fifty
frosh; all those who are flocked
in the sixty-three English 100-1
sections where they will be
given about one fifth of the
education they are going to get
this year.
It is apparently considered a
special fifth this Eng. 100-1, indispensable, the cornerstone of
education, the only course that
everybody has to take.
Would perhaps some looking
into the merits of the course
be justified? what is its purpose? and what does it accomplish?
I have asked members of the
department such questions
with result a flood of eloquent
generalizations, the light-motives of which sound something
like "Appreciation of Literature," "How to Write an Essay," "Development of the
Critical Faculty," etc., etc.
But apart from the testimony
of the members of the department, what objective evidence
is there that any such purpose
and not something quite different is accomplished in the
classroom?
The average instructor —
and, alas, so many of them are
so near the average — stands
behind the table and tells the
students what they (the students, must) see in each poem,
with what character they sympathize in this story, what is
the mam idea of that essay.
And they have better remember it at exam time, or else.
You see, every question and
the answer is krfown and settled by the department. And
for fhe benefit of the student,
is put down in simple and definite terms so that everybody
can memorize what fhe plot,
the conflict, the sympolism  is.
All this of course, by virtue
of the assumption that the instructor knows better than the
student. The fact that ones
own individual experiences,
emotional and cultural background, will in part determine
what one will see in, feel about
and get out of a piece of literature, is entirely unknown by
the English instructor.
When someone in the class
has a different opinion, the
instructor, if a meek lady, will
say with a chuckle "this is an
interesting point of view. As I
was saying . . ."; if he is a
forceful gentleman he will
have made it clear that differences of opinion are out of
place. As one instructor let
out in a moment of carelessness, "In Eng. 100-1 we don't
expect the student to think.
All we want them to do is to
know their stories, essays and
poems."
The poor frosh dazzled by
the authority they attribute to
the instructor, are lead to believe that if they don't see
what he tells them to, they are
dumb.
There are many questions to
be answered regarding the usefulness of the course.
Does the analysis of a piece
of literature lend to the "appreciation" of it? does it lend
to the "appreciation" of other
pieces of literature? does the
"appreciation" of a piece add
to the enjoyment derived from
reading? or is the enjoyment
of literature determined by
emotional rather than intellectual factors?
Does the study of an essay
teach one how Jo write better
essays? or is it perhaps that
one's correct thinking habits
will automatically lead to a
coherent and organized piece of
writing?
The answer to these questions is not so obviously yes.
I can already hear the reply
that those who follow the instructors'  rules  are benefitted
as indicated by better grades
at the end of the year. This
would be an instance of the
department's sloppy thinking
habits.
It is my opinion that, with
the present system, the English
courses and 100-1 in particular
is not only useless but positively harmful. Harmful because
it tries to install in the mind
of the student that the real
purpose of literature is to be
studied rather than enjoyed;
that the critic knows better
than the author.
Harmful because accustoms
the student to a blinding rationalization technique, the technique of interpreting every
piece of literature in terms of
the literary cliche the instructor gives, which may or may
not have some contact with
reality.
If the situation is to be improved, however, what we need
is not arguments but an objective, scientific study of the
. problem. It is not likely that
fhe department can or will do
such a thing. As one of them
told me, "If you don't like it
you don't have to come to the
University; lots of people get
along without."
Because the department consists entirely of "those who
having had a literary education can know nothing of the
modern world and having
throughout their youth been
taught to base belief upon
emotion, cannot divest themselves of that infantile desire
for safety and protection which
the world of science cannot
satisfy." Can you place the
quotation, by the way, Mr. English Instructor, Sir?
And they will endeavor to
find that safety and protection
in their Glass Menagerie —
(Buchanan) — until someone
takes the initiative to give
them a kick.
— THEMIS P.
McGill   Conference   On   World   Affairs
(SECOND INSTALLMENT)
By BRIAN SMITH
Persons have been asking
what took place at the 2nd
annual McGill Conference on
World Affairs held in Mont-
raal November 12-15 which I
attended as a U.B.C. delegate.
The topic under discussion at
the conference was "Canadian-
American Relations", and I
can tell you something of
what was achieved by describing what I can probably best
tell you something of what
was achieved by describing
what I thought was the most
valuable feature of the confer
ence.
The 100 delegates were split
up into small round table
groups of about 20 persons to
discuss the conference topic
in some detail. We held three
of these round tables and each
time managed to talk for over
three hours. The round table
I attended was an excellent
group. We had a diversity of
talent ranging from, a sober
Harvard Republican to a rapid
Tory from Antigonish. Our
chairman was a young law
instructor at McGill Who had
quite recently graduated from
U.B.C.
Our hottest debate centered
upon the question: "Is it possible for Canada to lessen its
economic dependence on the
United States?" All the traditional Canadian complaints
were trotted out—American
ownership of resources, American wheat dumping, and
Aimerican restrictions against
our lead and zinc. We paid
respect to the Pipe Line Debate. I had to state the Canadian case on the Columbia
River power proposition, while
assuring my American friends
that our planned diversions of
the Columbia would not cause
the lights of Seattle to go out.
No Canadian delegate was
prepared to hold that Canada
should develop its economic
nationalism at the expense of
losing much of its American
investment. My Tory friend
from Antigonish did take the
interesting view that 'what is
good for Antigonish is good
for  the Continent.'
Many times during the
round table the Canadians
tried to pin down the Americans by asking them- directly:
"If we do something you don't
like, would take a retaliatory
action against us?" I remember asking an eminently sensible lad from Dartmouth what
action the U.S. would take if
Canada decided now to recognize Red China. He thought
Americans would be upset. A
sharp young lady from Columbia had more than this to say;
she would damn well retaliate
and she told us how and when.
(I later learned that she was
a Mid westerner by birth). Because the American delegates
cam,e entirely from the Eastern Ivy League colleges, they
reflected little of the attitude
of the powerful regional lobbies of t h e Mid-West which
might be hostile to Canadian
economic interests. Generally,
I found the American delegates well informed about
Canada and of a very high
calibre.
Many aspects of Canadian-
American relations were
thrashed out. We generally-
agreed that we wanted American investment and that we
were bound to the U.S. in mi- -
clear defence. We didn't like
the  idea  of  becoming  a  neu
tral. We seemed to agree that
Canadian nationalism was suf
ficiently robust to stand the
shocks and misunderstandings.
We discussed the politics of
both countries and concluded
thai the Democratic tide in
the U.S. pleased Canadians in
some vague way. Not even the
staunches! Liberal seriously
contended that Canadian relations with Washington had
deteriorated under the Conservative regime!
You might say that our conclusions are rather unexciting
and compromised. Perhaps
they were just that: there is
a tendency for Canadians and
Americans to get together at
these conferences and to outdo each other expressing mutual undying love-—but I can
assure that our compromised
conclusions were arrived at in
no sweet way. They were
forged in the fire of debate in
which both sides heaped on
the hot coals.
The social side of the Conference was superb. (Unfortunately I don't have space to
go into this in detail.) All the
delegates were boarded at the
Berkeley Hotel (similar to the
Georgia in important respects).
Our meals were provided at
the fine, traditional woman's
residence known as Royal Victoria College. In the course of
the conference we were treated to a civic reception and
given a banquet where we
heard Rep. Frank Coffin of
Maine speak. As excellent as
the dry-martinis was the 'little
show' that the McGill committees had lined up for us
at a place called Cafe Andre's,
one of the local night clubs.
The McGill Committee and
the McGill students who looked after us were very considerate  and gracious.
Because of the value of this
conference, it is hoped that
McGill will receive the financial support it needs to establish M.C.W.A. as an annual
tradition. Students at U.B.C.
who will be studying here
next year and reading history,
economics, political science,
english, law, or related subjects—should plan to put in
an application next fall to attend the conference as one of
the delegates from U.B.C. Tuesday, January 6, 1959
THE      UBYSSEY
PAGE THREE
AT  NATIONAL CONFERENCE
CUP
Links
Votes
With
To   Expand
NFCUS
Canadian University Press will hire a full-time president
and move its base of operations to the national NFCUS office
in Ottawa in September.
These moves, intended to
strengthen and unify the CUP
organization, were approved by
delegates from 23 member universities at the 21st National
CUP Conference December 29
to 31 in Winnipeg.
In order to bring the changes
about, each university newspaper was mandated to attempt
to raise five cents per student
head from its Students' Council
for the 1959-60 operating year.
The Ubyssey's share amounts
to about $500.
If a majority of the universities fail to get the extra funds,
the moves will be doomed.
Elected CUP president for
1959 and tentative full-time
president September-December,
1959, was Doug Parkinson,
Chairman of the Board of Publications at McMaster University. He succeeds retiring president, John Gray, of the University of Toronto's The Varsity.
HEARD PLANS
* Delegates also heard plans for
a proposed national media rep-,
resentation firm for all Canadian'
university publications, outlined
by University of Western Ontario graduating year commerce!
student, David Graham.
Graham's proposed firm would
handle all national advertising
for university publications. It
would, he claimed, leave a guaranteed bond with each university hiring it for the amount of
advertising that publication sold
the preceding year.
Commissions would be paid
only on advertising sold above
that amount, he stated.
Graham said he will write to
students' councils and publications business offices at universities across Canada within two
weeks.
Whether The Ubyssey and
other UBC publications will employ the proposed firm will not
be known until after UBC students' council has considered
Graham's letter.
The national CUP conference
also voted a pledge of support
to those student editors of Quebec newspapers who have been
expelled for political reasons
within the last year.
Most recent firing was that of
Normand LaCharite, editor of
Le Carabin, Laval University,
Quebec City.
LaCharite printed a front page
attack on the Quebec provincial
government which he described
at the conference as "impolite
and quite violent ... but . . .
quite true." His expulsion followed this.
He received unanimous support of the conference delegates.
The vote was 18 in favor of supporting hijn, with McGill Daily
,and. Dalhciusie ,Gazette . abs^ain-
>ingi' ,
NEW CONSTITUTION
The conference passed a new
constitution in which most changes are procedural, with the
others facilitating the adoption
of the full-time president and
the link with NFCUS.
Winners    of    annual    trophy
The CUP, being an editorial
rather than an administrative
body, was not empowered to
rule on the proposal.
SHIRTS
Professionally Laundered
3 for 59 SB
ATTRACTIVE CAREERS
In The
METEOROLOGICAL   SERVICE
For
1959 Graduates In Arts or Science
A Federal Government Recruiting Team will be here
January  8,  9
To   interview—and   select   1959   graduates   for   careers   as
Meteorologists  and as Meteorogoligcal  Officers.
The starting salary for Meteorogolgists is $4560, for Meteorological Officers, $4380.
For consideration as Meteorologists, candidates must have
an honours degree in Physics, Physics and Mathematics or
Engineering Physics while a pass degree in Arts or Science
is sufficient for those competing for Meteorological Officer
provided they have several credits in physics and mathematics beyond the senior matriculation level.
Training in Meteorology
Provided
Numerous Opportunities
for Advancement
To arrange interviews, contact
UNIVERSITY PLACEMENT OFFICE
preferably before above dates.
The University Placement Office has
descriptive folders, posters and applicaiton forms.
competitions were also announced at the conference.
University of Western Ontario's Gazette took the Southam
Trophy for general excellence
among papers publishing twice
a week or more often.
The Bracken Trophy, for excellence in editorial writing,
went to Editor Gordon Wasser-
man of the McGill Daily. It was
won last year by Editor Patricia
Marchak of The Ubyssey.
The Silhouette of McMaster
University took the Jacques Bureau Trophy for general excellence among papers publishing
once a week or less often.
The Le Droit Trophy for general excellence waas won by Le
Quartier Latin of University of
Montreal.
The Ubyssey was represented
at the conference by Editor
Dave Robertson, City Editor
Kerry Feltham, and CUP Editor
Judy Frain.
PHOTOGRAPH Y STAFF
MEETING WEDNESDAY
FREEDOM from discord and
disease will be the message of
Christian Science lecturer, J.
Lingden Wood, noon today in
Buchanan 106.
PA YFEES BY JANUARY
16 0B OUT YOU GO
Students are reminded
that second term fees are
due and must be paid by the
16th of January. Failing
this, registrations will be
cancelled and tardy students
will be required to pay a
$10 re-registration fee —
along with the regular second term payment.
JEx-UBC
Man Gets
Fellowship
A 1956 UBC grad has been
awarded a Rotary Foundation
Fellowship for advanced study
abroad.
John K. Sandys-Wunsch of
Duncan, at present studying on
a Rhodes scholarship at Christ
Church College, Oxford, will
use his recent award to study
theology at one of the major
universities in Europe.
An ex-member of the Players
Club, the Camera Club, and
the Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship, he graduated with first
class honors in English and
French in his Bachelor of Arts
degree.
"Experienced typist desires
typing to do at home. Alma
040 5-M'.
There will be a meeting
of all Ubyssey Staff Photographers Wednesday noon
in the office of the Editor-
in-chief.    Very important.
For drawing of illustrations
(charts, graphs etc.) and all
photographic assignments,
phone John Worst, DI 3331
(or U.B.C, local 265).
49 Ways
To Blake Marriage
More Exciting
The ton of being together fading
a bit ? Want to know what to
do about it ? January Reader's
Digest reports 49 provocative
suggestions to make your
marriage more exciting. Should
be at least one idea h$re to put
spring into your spouse's spirit 1
Get January Reader's Digest
today : 40 helpful articles of
lasting interest.
IMPERIAL OIL LIMITED
HAS A LIMITED NUMBER OF VACANCIES IN 1959
IN THE FOLLOWING DEPARTMENTS:-
MANUFACTURING
(REFINING)
Students Graduating in 1959 in:
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
Students Graduating in 1960 in:
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
PRODUCING
(PRODUCTION and EXPLORATION)
Students Graduating in 1960 in:
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
ENGINEERING   PHYSICS
GEOLOGICAL  ENGINEERING
HONOURS GEOLOGY
^r
&
Our Representative, MR.   R.  G.   INGS, will be on the campus on
January 5th ot 6th
to make interviewing appointments for students enrolled in the
above courses who are interested in filling the advertised
vacancies.
MR. INGS will be located in the Personnel and   Placement   Office  — HUT   M  -  7. PAGE  FOUR
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 6, 1959
Ubyssey  Photo,  Michael  Sone
FEES GO UP, and marks come down,' but whenever it snows, UBC students forget all
their troubles and horse around like this in the white stuff. Combatants (left to right)
are Pam Jones, Joan Fitzpatrick and "Dredge" Driedger.    Well, hell, you're only young
EMPLOYMENT   OPPORTUNITIES
With
MOBIL OIL OF CANADA, LTD.
on    JANUARY  13 and  14
Mobil Oil Representatives Will Interview
Graduate, Senior and Junior Year Students
Interested In Careers In
GEOLOGY
GEOPHYSICAL    ENGINEERING
PETROLEUM    &    PRODUCTION    ENGINEERING
There are openings for both regular and summer
employment
Interviews are being scheduled through the Placement
Bureau of the University
UBYSSEY INTERVIEWING NEW
AND OLD REPORTERS TODA Y
The Ubyssey has resumed publication.
But nobody seems tjo care.
Not even Ubyssey staffers.
Staffers, old and new, will be received with great gusto
and much ado at noon today by Managing Editor, Al
Forrest, who will wish one and all A Happy New Year,
and teach you how to write news style, too.
Do come.
New  Dining  Hall,
Residences  Begun
Construction of two new
buildings, a Men's Residence
and a Dining Hall, will begin
immetiately in the north west
corner of the campus.
The total cost of the two
buildings is  970,900.
The residence unit will sleep
100 students. The central dining and recreational building,
which will serve the entire residence development now under
construction in the same area,
will be capable of feeding 800
students.
Funds for the development
have been made available from
the UBC Development Fund
and from provincial government
and  Canada   Cooncil  grants.
Contracts for these two most
recent additions have been
awarded to Boms and Dutton
Construction company, UBC officials announced Friday.
Mobil
FILMSOC     PRESENTS
ROMMEL
vs.
MONTGOMERY
in
DESERT VICTORY
Today,   12.30,   Auditorium
15c or by Pass Tuesday, January 6, 1959
THE      UBYSSEY
PAGE FIVE
Hamburg 'Refreshing  But Overwhelming'
This letter was written by
UBC sludenl John Dressier at
present on a World University
Service exchange scholarship
at the University of Hamburg,
Germany.
Of life in Hamburg, John
says "the academic freedom
is refreshing". He adds that
"the night life is rather overwhelming" and the weather is
"much like Vancouver's only
Worse, worse,  worse!"
Of John, the Adademische
Auslandstelle of Hamburg
says: "We want to tell you how
happy we are about your selection of Mr. John Dressier
as exchange scholar. He is a
very nice and intelligent fellow and succeeded in making
friends with his German fellow students easily."
__ John's articles, written exclusively for the Ubyssey follow. He says that if any UBC
students have questions to ask
about Hamburg, Germany of
the WUSC exchange program,
he will be pleased to answer
them.
Here is the text of letter:
- The     most     surprising     ac
tuality at Hamburg University is that about 95% of the
lecture halls are overcrowded.
With a higher education
system stressing academic
freedom, and the fact that students do not have to prepare
for immediate examinations as
at UBC, I expected to see the
lecture halls uncrowded. But
the outlook towards lectures
and the entire university education is much different here.
The competition for scholarships and bursaries is very
vigorous, and it is almost impossible for a student to work
his way through without miss-
Marks to be
Tabulated
By Friday
Registrar J. E. Parnall said
Monday that his department is
still receiving Christmas exam
results from the markers and
that it will not be until the end
of this week that all results are
Marks  are being released to
students by the respective deans
in the smaller faculties and by
' the instructors concerned in the
laarger faculties.
This year all freshmen who
fail in their Christmas exams
will be interviewed by the Counselling department in an attempt
to clear up any problems or misunderstandings of the Frosh.
Other students who failed at
Christmas will be interviewed
by the Deans and Instructors
concerned.
Parnall pointed out that no
student will be required to leave
— but "the facts of life" will be
clearly pointed out to those students whose marks are considered hopeless.
WUS '59
Seminars
Slated
World University Service
announced Monday that the
1959 WUS Seminar and Study
Tours will be held in the
newly-formed Federation of
the West Indies.
Theme of the Seminar is "The
West Indies in Transition: Implications of Self-overnment."
Two UBC students will be
among 45 Canadian students
and professors who will fly to
Jamaica in mid-June.
Applicants must be full-time
students who plan to return
next year. They will appear
before a professor-student board
who will select the winners on
January  24.
>■ WUSC Chairman Bill Montgomery, who attended the 1957
Seminar in Ghana, will welcome
all applications. He emphasized
the "excellent opportunity for
student to associate with people
from many other countries," and
urged the "best possible representation for UBC."
Winning students will attend
discussion groups for three
weeks at the University College
of the West Indies, Kingston.
Participants will then travel in
small groups to other parts of
the West Indies before re-assembling in Trinidad, the Federal
Capital, for a final session.
Students will be expected to
pay $250 of the total cost.
Applications may be obtained
from the WUSC office, oom 166
in the Brock Extension.
Deadline is January 15.
BEST WISHES FOR THE NEW YEAR
campus
barber
shops
Two Locations:
• North
Brock
Extension
•5734
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(psdstiv   Ua*L   (Di^hsL
Drop in and see us soon
ing every second semester,
(the semesters are Nov. 1-Feb.
28 and May 1-July 31). Therefore, the students who are at
the university are very eager
to learn and take lectures very
seriously.
This desire to learn, however, does not express itself
in narrow specialization. Students (and "guest hearers") attend a great number of lectures and even seminars which
are unrelated to their main
field of study. Their interests
include a broad range of subjects in which they can—and
do ■— discuss authoritatively
and intelligently.
Since there is no programme
of studies for any faculty except Law and Medicine (and
even in these there is a large
number of alternatives) the
student must select the courses
which are compatible with his
aims; and since in most faculties no examination is required until the student stands
before the committee for oral
examination for his doctor's
degree, he may acquire knowledge in a wide range of subjects while studying for his
degree at the university.
The lectures (in German-
Vorlesungen) of distinguished
professors are particularly
well attended—regardless of
the subject of the lecture.
A celebrated atomic physicist by the name of Prof. Dr.
Carl Friedrich von Weiz-
sacker lectures twice a week
on "Philosophy and Natural
Science in the 17th Century"
in the hall maxima of the uni-
versity^-capacity 700. The
room is filled one-half hour
before the lecture time; many
people reserve a seat with a
notebook or briefcase hours
before. Many people stand for
the two hours. The Friday lecture between six and eight
PM is just crowded.
This case is not an exception. It indicates the general
desire to gain knowledge in
all  fields.
The professors at Hamburg
University are generally older
and perhaps more noted than
those at Canadian universities.
Since a position on the faculty of a good university commands a great deal of prestige
in the city and state as well
as in the university, many distinguished research scientists,
statesmen and artists take up
professorships as a fitting conclusion to a noted career.
Students rap on their desks
enthusiastically (very hard on
the kuckles I find) when a
professor enters the room and
again at the end of the lecture, and no one naps while
he is speaking. However, students enter and leave when
they please during lectures.
I would say also that the
professors here spend more
time preparing, lectures than
most of those at UBC. Many
try to impart some of their
ardent love of learning, and
their lectures are enthusiastic
and often passionate discourses
accompanied by much arm-
waving and shouted emphasis.
Students pay a registration
fee of 2,50 DM (Deutsche
Marke) for each hour of lecture or seminar per week attended, as well as an entrance
fee into the university (for
Arts—Philosophiche Fakultat
—95 DM, about 22. dollars,
but about twice this much
when equalized for purchasing power—per semester), and
so are very discerning about
the seminars and lectures for
which they register. One registers for a professor's course
and not for the name of a
course. I have been asked several times in a room before
the lecture began: "Is this
Pretzel's?" or Frankenfeld's,
or some other professor's
name, but never the title of
a course.
Registration for courses does
not take place the same time
as entrance registration. Students are given a period in
which to "sample" various professors, and the registration
for lectures and seminars may
be, depending on the faculty
you are in, up to six weeks after entrance.
In general, I found a decided emphasis on academic
life in the university, although
there is also a great deal of
social activity such as clubs,
meetings, discussions and fraternity parties And there is
probably a dozen of those
friendly institutions, the espresso bar, within two blocks
of the main building of the
university. Social intercourse
is hindered by the fact that
the seminaries, institutions,
laboratories and libraries are
scattered over the whole city.
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GRADUATING IN   59 OR 60?
Shell Oil representatives will visit your   university
January 6, 7, 8
to interview students interested in Marketing, Refining, Petrochemical
Manufacturing, Exploration and Production, Chemical Sales, Treasury,
and Purchasing.
1959 and 1960 graduates in the following courses are
invited to discuss career opportunities:
Chemical Engineering
Civil Engineering
Electrical Engineering
Geological Engineering
Mechanical Engineering
Petroleum Engineering
Engineering Physics
Geology
Geophysics
Mathematics
Chemistry
Accounting
Commerce and Finance
Business Administration
Economics,
Arts
Visit your Placement Office to arrange an interview.   Ask for the booklet
"Opportunity with Shell in Canada" for details of
challenging careers in Shell.
SHELL OIL COMPANY OF CANADA, LIMITED \%)\im PAGE SIX
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 6, 1959
STUDENTS SUPPORT
A first year Arts student went
farther than Glen in stating
that "students in asking for a
greater grant are in fact shirking their responsibility". He
added   that   the   proDOsed   in-
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crease is "not so great as to be
inhibitive."
D. Feltham, a student in
Commerce remarked. "Letters
of this nature to the government
will surely bring harmful publicity. Therefore, they will force
the government to action. On
the other hand, it should be
remembered that the majority
of students at U.B.C. do not
vote."
Brenda Merrett, second year
Arts,   asserted   that   the  letters
"should    make    Bennett    wake
up!"
Opposition to Miss Merrett
and those who a^ree ""+h her
came from a freshman who felt
that a smaller group of students with a greater knowledge
of the problem would bring
more concrete results.
Second year Law student
Howie Thomas, suggested "Pressure should also be brought on
alumni to write to their M.L.A.
in support of ourcause."
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in to our main floor book department and browse to your heart's contentment. We have what you are looking for . . . Kerouac, Sartre,
Kierkegaard, Peanuts and many others. HBC has shelves and shelves
of up to date selections and "must" reading. Cost a cent? No siree —
and breathe all the free air you want.
HBC  Books,  Main Floor
J
Gunning Leaves UBC;
Takes Post In Industry
Dean Henry C. Gunning, Head of UBC's Engineering Department since 1953, has resigned to become a consulting
geologist.
Dr. Gunning will be working
with the Anglo-American Corporation in Salisbury, Southern
Rhodesia.
Dr. Gunning graduated from
UBC in geological engineering
in 1923 and did his post-graduate work at the Massachusetts
Institute of Technology. He
joined the Geological Survey of
Canada in 1928.
In 1939, Dr. Gunning was
appointed professor of economic
geology at UBC and ten years
later became head of the De
partment.
He has been Dean of Engin
eering since 1953 and is a past
president of the Faculty Association.
Dr. Gunning is also a past
president of the B.C. Association of Professional Engineers
and the geological section of
the Royal Society of Canada.
No successor of Dean Gun
ning has been' announced yet.
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SHIRTS
Profi;-j!cna?!y Laundered
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'tween classes
Pre-Med Society
Told of Trends
PRE-MED    SOCIETY — Dr.
Campbell, Assistant Dean of
Faculty of Medicine, will present a lecture "New Trends In
Medical Education" in Wesbrook
100 at 12.30 Wednesday, January 7. All members aare urged
to attend.
* *     *
PRE-MED    SOCIETY — All
members wishing to take part in
the Field-Trip programme for
the last half of this school term
are asked to attend Wednesday's
meeting, January 7, in Wesbrook
100. Membership cards will
also be available.
* *     *
NEWMAN CLUB —Mass will
be said in the lounge at St.
Mark's at 12.30 today, the Feast
of the Epiphany and a Holy
Day of Obligation.
*.    *     *
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Orga-
nization — Hear a lecture entitled "It's Practicality in Daily
Affairs" by J. Lingden Wood,
C.S., today at 12.30 in Buchanan
106.    All are welcome.
* *     *
UNIVERSITY   HUMANIST
Association — There will be a
meeting aat 12.30 today in Bu.
221.
WHAT IS
CHRISTIAN
SCIENCE?
The Christian Science Organization at
the University of British Columbia invites you to a lecture to learn for your
self what Christian Science is. The
lecture is entitled:
'CHRISTIAN SCIENCE    Its Practicality
In  Daily Affairs"
By
J. LINGEN WOOD, C.S.,
of Vancouver, British  Columbia
TUESDAY,   JANUARY   6TH
12.30  Noon
Buchanan   106
Mr. Wood is a member of The Christian Science Board of
Lectureship of The Mother Church, The First Church of
Christ,  Scientist,  in Boston, Massachusetts. Tuesday, January 6, 1959
T HE      UBYSSEY
PAGE SEVEN
SPORTS  EDITOR  —  MICHAEL  SONE
WOMEN'S REP.: Audrey Ede, Flora MacLeod.
REPORTERS: Ted Smith, Tony Morrison, Alan Dafoe, M. Sone.
DESK:  Irene Frazer and Elaine Spurrill,  Larry Fournier.
Women Win
In Volleyball
U.B.C. made an excellent showing at the Women's Volleyball Round Robin Tournament in Everett in December.
The tournament was sponsored by Everett Junior College
with the Junior Colleges of
Olympia, Centralia and Skagit,
two teams from Western Washington and  U.B.C.   competing.
The team was made up of six
players, Jan Elderkin, Ibby
Oglesby, Rosemarie Freuden-
stein, Marilyn Koehn, Vera
Klem>ens and Donna Clements.
Jean Waldie and Heather Muir
assisted in officiating. The team
travelled under the supervision
of coach Helen Eckert. Return
matches with both Olympia and
Western  are planned.
Swimmers
HeadSouth
The UBC Swim Team, last
year's Conference Champions,
leave Friday for a meet with
College of Puget Sound in Ta-
coma.
Coach Peter Lusztig hopes
for a repeat successful season,
with many of last year's stars
back to bolster the team.
Hockey   Birds  To
Begin Training
An organizational meeting for the Varsity hockey team
will be held in Memorial Gym on Monday, January 12 at noon.
All those interested are requested to turn out.
The team will be coached by
Dick Mitchell with all-time
hockey great Frank Frederick-
son acting as honorary coach.
The boys will practise once a
week in preparation for the
Hamber Cup series which will
be played in Edmonton this
year  sometime  in  March.
The hockey set-up this year
was different from the past.
Twenty intra-mural teams were
formed and the Varsity team
did not get organized in the first
term. Coach Mitchell, however,
hopes to get a few players from
the  intramural   teams.
WOMEN'S
SPORTS
NOTICES
TRACK AND FIELD: Applications are being accepted for
the position of Track and Field
Manager to sit on the Women's
Athletic Directorate. . Someone
who is interested in the sport
and who would like to organize
some competition is reauired.
Amplications should be addressed to WAD President. Theo
Carroll and left in the Women's
Gym.
If.      &      if,
ARCHERY, TENNIS, GOLF:
No practices this week. Managers of these three sports encourage new members to attend
practices starting next week.
*r*      v      v
SENIOR "A" BASKETBALL:
Play Eilers Senior "A" on Wednesday night at John Oliver.
Birds Even
InWonLost
Column
Coach Jack Pomfret's Basketball Thunderbirds, after racking up a five won and five lost
record in exhibitions, will be
playing most of their Evergreen
Conference games in the south
during the month of January.
In their latest exhibition series against the College of Puget Sound Loggers over the
week-end, the Birds split, winning Friday's game, then losing to the samje Loggers on Saturday night.
They will be expecting a lot
from lanky rookie, ex-Byng
Keith Hartley, who rebounded
beautifully on Friday night as
well as potting his share of
points.
Hartley showed to advantage
against CPS, grabbing rebounds
and blocking shots from a relatively short Logger crew.
PRESERVE DECORUM, m CHEERING ! NEBBISH IS HERE. His visit with us
— till Aprille showers doth shOote will feature wine, women and soul-searching messages.
Like you, he is psych, psych, psych, a lost soul, an egghead down to his toes. Watch
his posters, printed by the Booster Club.   He sees you sin.
THUNDERBIRDS FETED
AT GALA BANQUET
The Thunder bird Football team, after the conclusion o£ ]
one of the best years in UBC sports history, was honoured at
a banquet held at the Faculty Club.
In     the    post-dinner     award
ceremonies, tackle Roy Jokano-
vich, who received honourable
mention in the Little All-America selections, was presented the
Dr. Burke trophy as the Most
Inspirational  Player  of   1958.
Veteran halfback Jackie Hen-
wood was elected captain of
the team for the second successive year. Named as co-captair^
was another Bird backfielder,
Roy  Bianco.
The Birds' highly successful
season ended on a sombre note,
howfever, when it was learned
that brilliant halfback Don Vas-
sos, who broke all individual
offensive records has left UBC,
making him ineligible even if
he returns in the fall.
ROY   JOKANOVICH
. . . Dr. Burke Trophy
DON   VASSOS
. . . leaves   UBC
GRASS HOCKEY: Teams
practise Thursday at 12:45.
UBC girls' gym class of tumbling and apparatus work will
meet Monday and Wednesday
at 4:30 p.m. in the Apparatus
Room.
All those interested are welcome.
First class on  January  7.
COACH   JACK   POMFRET
. . . hoping
Puff after puff
of smooth
mild smoking
Sportsman
CIGARETTES
PLAIN   OR   FFLTER
The choice of sportsmen everywhere PAGE EIGHT
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 6, 1959
UBC  Professor Cited
By  Engineering Group
Professional recognition has again been accorded Professor
Frank Noakes, P.Eng., head of the University of British Columbia's department of electrical engineering. He was reelected a member of the Council of the Association of Professional Engineers of British Columbia at the year-end annual
meeting.
The Council is the governing
Ubyssey
Man Gets
CUP Post
Ubyssey City Editor Kerry
Feltham has been elected Western Regional President of Canadian University Press.
Feltham was chosen by acclamation at the national CUP
conference held December 29-31
in Winnipeg.
Other regional presidents are
Andy Olsen, Ontario region;
Pierre Martin, Quebec region;
and David Grant, Maritimes
region.
The four regional presidents
form a consulting committee
to the CUP national executive.
POLIO IMMUNIZATION
CLimS TO BE HELD
Polio Immunization Clinics
will be held soon at the
Health Service.
First, second and third
doses will be available FREE
to all students.
Appointments 'should be
made immediately in Room
114, Westbrook Building.
body of the 2200 registered professional engineers in the province.
Professor Noakes, -who joined
the UBC faculty in 1946, has
had extensive experience in
both academic and professional
fields. A B.Sc. from the University of Alberta, he received
his master's degree and doctorate at Iowa State College.
Professor Noakes is author of
reports and memoranda to the
National Research Council and.
of technical papers delivered to
engineering organizations.
Other UBC faculty members
who have served the Association of Professional Engineers
of B.C. are Dean H. C. Gunning, P. Eng., of the faculty of
applied science, and Professor
W. O. Richmond, P. Eng., head
of the department of mechanical engineering, both of whom
held the office of president.
Professor Richmond is currently the president of the National
ly the president of the Nation
Wide Canadian Council of Professional  Engineers.
PHRATERES —, All-Phi will
meet at 12.30 on January 9 in
Arts 100. Nominations for executive positions will be accepted
at this meeting and candidates
nominated by the Nominating
Committee will be introduced.
Protect Your Teeth
From PD
—and Keep Them!
More teeth are lost from the
disease Pyorrhea than all other
causes combined. January
Reader's Digest reports why
it's so easy to ignore until too
late . . . gives the symptoms to
look for . . . and how it can be
cured. Better still, the article
gives 4 simple steps that can
prevent this painless disease.
Get January Reader's Digest
today : 40 helpful articles of
lasting interest.	
RESEARCH OPPORTUNITIES
for
1959   Graduates and  Post-Graduates
Chemistry
Physics
Engineering Physics
Metallurgy
Mining  Engineering
Geological Engineering
Mechanical Engineering
Chemical Engineering
A Federal  Government Recruiting Team  will  be  here
JANUARY 8,  9
To interview—and  select—1959  Honours course  graudates
and post-graduates in the above fields for career positions
of a research nature in Canada's Civil Service.
Starting salaries will range from $4560 to $6780 depending
upon degrees obtained and undergraudate and post-graduate
experience.
Interesting Assignments — Promotion Opportunities
Numerous Benefits
To arrange interviews, contact
UNIVERSITY PLACEMENT OFFICE
preferably before above dates.
Application forms, information circulars and other descriptive literature available at the University Placement Office/
Dean   Soward   Visits   India
Dean F. H. SoWard, head of
the departments of History, International Studies, and Asian
Studies, will work in New Delhi,  India,  until April.
He is a visiting professor of
Commonwealth History and Institutions at the Indian School
of International Studies.
•He will return to Canada via
Europe, visiting other universities and attending conferences
en route.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB—
A meeting is to be held at 12.30
in Hut L-l on January 9th for
members who are interested in
helping in the Tri-City Basketball Game and Dance.
Matz and Wozny
548 Howe St.
MU.3-4715
Custom  Tailored   Suits
for   Ladies   and   Gentlemen
Gowns and Hoods
Uniforms
Double breasted suits
modernized in the new
single     breasted     styles.
Special   Student   Rates
CLUB  NOTES
By PATIENCE RYAN
On Tuesday, January 6, at
12.30 in Buchanan 106, the
Christian Science Club is presenting a lecture by J. Lingen
Wood.
Wood, a member of the Christian Science Board of Lectureship of the Mother Church in
Boston, Mass., is on an extended
lecture tour. For 13 years he
was a member of the Committee
for Publication of the Christian
Science Church in B.C.
*     *     *
FIVE FIELD TRIPS
Pre-Med Society has arranged
five field-trips for this term.
There will be visits to the
Vancouver Preventorium where
the members will see the Princess Margaret Children's Village
— the first group ever to be
conducted  through  this  institu
tion.
The executive also intends to
take a large number of members
to the Essondale and Crease
Clinic Field Trip which will be
held near the end of the term.
Tentative arrangements are
being made for field trips
through the Biochemistry, Physiology, Pharmacology, Neurological Research, Pathology, and
Preventive Medicine centres, as
well as the University Hospital.
PRE-MED  DANCE
Talks are under way in an attempt to determine an exact
date for the second pre-med
dance which will be held later
on in the season.
LIBERAL MEETING
The Liberal Club is sponsoring a general meeting on Friday,
January 9, at 12.30 in Buchanan
204, where the whole program
for the second term will be outlined.
This program will include five
discussion groups: two mock
parliaments; three speakers, one
of whom will be Mr. Arthur
Laing, and provincial leader of
the Liberals; and two cocktail
parties, one to be held on January 18, and the other to follow
the election of officers at the
end of the term.
NATIONAL CONVENTION
In November, the University
Liberal National Convention was
held in Ottawa, and, as a result,
there will be a yearly national
debate on a national political
question.
This year's topic is: "Has Social Security in Canada gone far
enough?" The contest is open
to any liberally minded Canadian University student.
Bell employment representatives
will be on campus to interview
STARTING   MONDAY
JANUARY   12th
Call in at your placement office NOW for an appointment—and be sure to ask for informative booklets
THE BELL TELEPHONE COMPANY OF CANADA
../W. Mo. RC-5etS2-3-col*-x 125 linM—Q

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