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The Ubyssey Sep 20, 1949

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BUI' YOUR
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VOL. XXXII
VANCOUVER, B. C, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 1949
No. 1
SLASHE
BUDG
if. u
—Courtesy Extension Department
rn*
Bird Grid Hopes Rest Largely on This Trio
BRAINS behind Thunderbird strategy this year is this trio of grid masterminds. Jack Pomfret,
assistant coach and head basketball coach for the past season, Orville Burke, new head coach,
and Hjelmar "Jelly" Anderson another new addition to UBC coaching ranks. Popular Burke is
famed as one of eastern Canada's finest passers.
'Birds Hope Rests With
New Coach, Orville Burke
Burke Hopes To Pass His Winning
Streak Of 10 Years To Gridders
UBC fans are hoping that Orville Burke will get Thunderbird gridders used to hi.s> winning ways.
The new head football coach comes to UBC on a two year
contract with a record of playing for winning teams for tho
past 10 years. •     ,        _■• --■■".,. ,    ,  . r,      ,.
r •> p ,.om 1942 t0 1946 he \c(\ Canadian
It's True
Along   with   Burke   the   'Birds  also ,
have more football brains in thc per- (
son of Hjelmar ''Jelly" Anderson and
! armv  aggregation.
Jack   Pomfret,    lone   holdover    from I     _, '        ° „        ,
.    . , , . L  .. heturmng  to Canada at the end  of
last year s coaching staff. , , ,    ,
„,     ,, „,-   ...... ,   the   war  he   turned  clown  a   post  at
The three man    brain trust   showed
,     , •    o ,      ,     • i Queens   University   and   after   taking
to good advantage in Saturdays game' . . _
.    .   „.    -,r    ..   ,        , .  ,    ,,„,-,  ,    . ■ coaching course at Notre Dame under
against St.  Martins  winch  UBC lost
21-0.   Although   they   had   had   little
practice time the 'Birds showed  that
what they had been taught had been
well taught.
They tackled like no UBC team ha.s
for the past few years and they
hustled all  the  way.
Burke's record of winning goes back
army   teams   overseas.   One  of   them
eked   out  a   win   over  an   American
Frank Leahy he came to the coast.
Since he came here he coached
VAC in 1946 to undefeated season and
the B.C. Cluanipionship.
His method i.s a combination of
toughness and encouragement. As far
as the players are concerned they
like their new coach and are willing
lo llVin when he was quarterback of, lo d" anything for him.
the Ottawa Rmighrirlcr.s. A very ac- Anderson, a native of Andennos,
curate passer, he led his team to the ' Norway anrl Seattle joins the physi-
Eastern championship every year from cal education department staff. A first
193!) lo I'.Ml. In KVIO Burke sparked string end with both Washington and
lioughriders captured the Dominion ' Washington State hc has also had
Championship Grey Cup. / coaching experience.    ,
Memorial Built
To People Who
I Built Memorials
By   HEATHER   CLARKE
Not  only do  we have people  who
build   Memorials,  but  now  we have
I Memorials     to     people    who    build
Memorials.
|    The   mysterious   looking   structure
i that has been sprouting for the past
i week  in  front of  the  Brock  Hall  is
dedicated    to   the   students   of   this
1 University   who  worked   toward  and
I contributed     to    Gymnasium   of   '29.
Playing Field  of  '31, Stadium of '37,
and Brock Hall of '40/
I    The monument, given by an anonymous donor, has for its base a large
boulder deposited at the retreat of: a
great glacier of thc last ice-age. It is
hoped  this symbolic fact will be appreciated by some, for many will miss
this   convenient  little   spot   that   was
rapidly becoming famous as a "kissing
rock."
Debt Load
May Drop
This Year
Ewing Budget
Slashed Grants
To Undergraduates
The Alma Mater Society is
still $10,000 "in the hole."
Student activity on the campus \yill be further curtailed
this ypar because of a debt
load passed on from Council
of 1947-'48.
Treasurer Walt Ewing announced yesterday that further
"austerity" measures will be
implemented this year to cover
a $10,000 deficiency in working capital.
The Alma Mater Society will spend
$10,000 less than last year on subsidizing activities, Ewing told student  leaders.
Tentative,   but  as   yet'  unapproved
budget for the 1949-50 term is $68,231.30.
Ewing   hoped   earlier   to   push   this
figure down to $65,000.
COMPENSATE
A slightly higher enrolment will
compensate.
Undergraduate societies will take
as much as a 52 per cent' cut in their
grants. If Ewing met all figures submitted to him, undergraduate societies would be granted $163,000.
Most reasonable budget submitted,
says Ewing, came from the Engineers
Undergraduate Society.
No political, religious or within-
faculty clubs will be granted any
money. This means that such organizations as the Arts Undergraduate
Society will be granted a budget, but
j there   will   be   none   for   Le   Cercle
! Francais or similar organizations,
NO SYMPHONIES
I This will eliminate such activities
as symphony concerts and entertainers, who regularly appeared here.
Cost' of administration and lower
registration will also take a bite out
of student revenue.
j H, B. Muunsell, new student business manager, approved at last spring's
AMS meeting, will.act as watchdog
for UBC's Alma Mater funds. Lower
registration will clip almost $10,000 off
student revenue.
Included in the $20,000 deficit which
burdened Student Council last year-
was $17,000 in merchandise held by
the Alma Mater Society which included a room full of faculty sweaters,
class  pins,  crests  and  $750  worth  of
j "Hail  UBC"   records.
i Nine thousand dollars worth of this
merchandise remains on hand at the
Campus Shop. Merchandise, according
to * officials, is moving slower this
year.
SLOW SELLERS
Popular sizes of sweaters have run
cut, und balloons and pennants are
perennial slow sellers. ,
Burden of debt began when AMS
officials did not put $5 compulsory
Gym fee into the War Memorial War
Gym coffers. When debt was discovered, Society was in the hole over
$42,000.
S Finances 'Damn' Tough
iTIiis slulemcnts ,'•!/ AMS Treasurer    factory, However, itedoes, of necessity,.     The    Publications    Board    and    the ligation will be met by the end of this
Walter   Eminy   reyardinii   tlie   lD49-.">)    put an additional load on our admini-    Men's   Athletic   Directorate   will   this school year and also thai the Society
binljiel   is   a   mute   testament    to   the    .-.trative charges, which cannot  he ox-    year   be   cut   to   a   figure   as  close   to wi|j  have  ,l(.  ()iat time fl  muc|1  mori,
no.sl-ii'iir babble llml  irns pricked lust    peeled   to   be   less   than   those  of   last' the   survival   point,   as   possible.   Tlie
,,  ,,                           .,  , ,        ... favorable  cash   position   at   the   bank
year.   It   aiso   contains   a   messaye   o|    year.                                                                     rest   ot   the   money  available   will   go
i n     .1 t ,       ,,,    r Jp'tiS t.'UMns; i„ n,,. ,,11,,,,. n.,mn,,c p-mmis : than it has has for the last three years.
hope,   liii   the   snmi'ier   o|    next   year . i<i.w> 1'Uimj.j io  me ouiu  campus gtoups.
Eiviiiii  hopes  the   AMS   u-ill   be  vl"<tr '     The result  is lhat the Society funds HEAVY SHARE                                         j     jn ot)ier  W0|.c|Si by  the Summer of
of its  burden of War Memorial Gym    lhat are available for the varinus act- Il   is   unforlunale   that   this   money   j^q    ^  Society  should  be   in   ve-v
debt.)                                                             I ivili.-s   on   the  campus   will   be  some; will   not  be as  high  a.s  it.  was  in {he   good shape, luit it is going to be damn
V>\    WALT   I'lWING                  j Sill.(11)11  less  I ban  last   year.                      j past.   However,   since   a   considerable;.    „|    jn  t|10  meantime
Treasurer,   Alma   Plater   Society       I     The  Daily Ubyssey   is covered by  a- portion  of  Ihe  Society's  debts   lo   the   p.y /\f\||) HAPPY
The bn.-ii: jpsip|>,Vm   ia"ing  lie   Smd-    printing   contract    which    determines War  Memorial  Gymnasium   were   in-
pnls'  Caumst   thi-,  way  is  to  produce   the  minimum  amount  of  money  Hi at. eluded through excessive expenditures j     T1,el'e   in'°   those   who   r°°l   thal   il
a  liupiap-   Xo.,:   v.:'!   balance  <>n  a  sum    can  he spent   an  it. in  these  remaining groups,   it  is  per-    might   be   wiser   to   plan   on   retiring
Shl.imil   Ic.-ss   than    was   budgeted    last       The   Men-.-,    \thlelic   Directorate   is haps    reasonably    fair    that    at    this    the debt over thenext  two years, thus
year.                                                                   , b.v can.stihH inn Ip. !■„   allocated a fixed I,me they .should lake lhe heavy share    making more money available for ex-
An addiii-".!  burd.-n ..n  Ihe hiulco!    :"in   of  monei    ■ 11, ls   is  necossarv   be- of a  repayment  scheme.                                penditures   ihis  year.
will  bp-  <\\ • a;.|,d  i-pi-i   ia  ibe admin-    r ae-a    ihe    MAP   cntiimitiii.'iils    have Those who doubled Mr.  Plant's ab-       I   think   we   should   remember   that
1 ,11 at !'in   ai ■■' ■■  ..1,11 a. I   \a.    llu-  app. an I-     I. ■    be   ma 11  i....   i     .    .
id-ill   1 -!'   I'm-   P,;i .dip's...   Manager   to   the    ,    .-hi   nmal1
VOTED BRIGHTEST UNDERGRADUATE by Ubyssey staff was this wandering Fido, spotted
by Ubyssey photographer Tommy Hatcher in the Armories last week. Granted a full first year
standing by UBC officials, Fido went through the registration lineup, bought a Totem, had his
compulsory X-ray taken and is shown here pondering a course that will leave him time to chase
a female canine undergraduate he followed in the registration lineup.
—Ubyssey photo  by Tommy  Hatcher
Orientation Starts Tobay
Broken Less Are Taboo
Frosh Will Wear
Traditional Regalia
Sp   ,
a    n   >, nn    oasis-,  seven   or ility   last   year   will   be  glad   lo  know I hose of  us who were here when  tli
h-   m  aavanee  aad   n  can- that    Iheir    doubts    were    unfounded, great   "splurge"   was   on   are   rapidly
;.-      n,,i   be   a;,| |, n|\   piii   off   ir.iiii   funds The Sociely now huts lh,- War Mem-' graduating   off   the   campus,   and    it
Without   lo-'-   -ie   to   oof.tah   .-chediileil nrial    ("1 \ iniM.sium    a    tew   cents    les.-. seems  lo  me  it.   is  only   fair  that  this
tin-     ■-,:■•      p'i.i   dai-'l.y   make  lb.' Society linn S10.mill as compared lo the $42,001) obligation  be met   within  the  time of
\ ,e\p.     1-abla  I'm   hue   Ins'.,   11 iii t   wniilil   i'omiIi dial    was   '' wi 11 >,\   this   lime   last   year, lho.se who  were on  lhe campus when
at!   -      I'l.iin   tie-   Im.iclm.   at'   ihi..   contract.     '      I   mu   slue   thai    tin-   remaining   oh-., times   were   gay   anil   happy.
Rclled-up pants and short skirls are
thc "New Look" for UBC Frosh next
week.
The traditional regalia was distributed by member of the Big Block
Club following Friday morning's,
welcoming ceremonies, and must be
wcrn September 20 to 22 inclusive.
Frosh must also doff their hats and
give up seats in the Library, Caf, and
on buses and street cars when Upperclassmen appear.
Observance of such rules 'has been
in practice every year since the University was started, But if any brave
Freshman or Freshette should get the
queer idea that he or she is excluded
Sciencemen are prepared.
REGISTRATION
DROPS  1500  FROM
LAST YEAR
Drop in registration at UBC is expected- to be approximately 1500 according to Charles B. Wood, university registrar.
Total registration to press time indicated ;i registration of a little over
7100 compared to 8G0O last year.
Late registrations are expected to
build registration figures to 7300.
Short Stalled
Mamooks
Artists Needed;
Mamooks have a sadly deficient
working staff this yeiir, "p|1(> milling
crowds which tilled their clubroom
to overflowing last year, have dwindled   to  almost   nil,
Officials announce lhat they must
have new members or else the club
will  have lo fold.
Prospective members are reminded
that there is no cosl unladed in joining the club, m fad, i[ j.< ,,ven hjnlcd
that there may be a substantial remuneration  lor those  who  work.
Any si tuh ni.. who haw a flare for
artislry of ew sort, are asked to come
down to th.' -VI iiiiooks eluhroom in tlie
south end of n^ck Hall. There will
he a meet in;.-, lopfiy and Thursday til
noon.
Engineers Organize To Enforce
Frosh Adherance To Regulation*
"We're leaving the form of persuasion to your discretion . .
but Dean Gage is anxious that no freshman comes out of orien
tation with a broken leg," Activities Co-ordinator George Cum
mings told a meeting of engineers yesterday.
What  was supposed  to   have  been '
"80 blood-thirsty engineers" mater
ialized into two dozen lunch-munching
redshirts, but with a promise cf enlisting many of their classmates, i'he
meeting offered full co-operation to
Cummings' schemes fo begin orientation today.
To "intensify' the usual week-long
frosh nightmare, Cummings this year-
has cut orientation to three days,
beginning today.
REDS ENFORCE
Official   participation' of   engineers
in   enforcing   orientation   rules   will
[consist of policing entrances to frosh
I lecture rooms today and tomorrow.     ,
I    Engineers will be on the prowl there , beachcomber   telling   the   tide   Vo  re-
!lo  sec  that  freshmen: ' ccde'
1.   have   rolled   their   pants   up   to
this morning.
OLD LOOK
Orientation rules call i'or fieshei'tea
to:
1.   wear  the  similar   hat,  placque
and   frosh   button.
2. roll  their skirts  to knee-length.
3. appear   with   no   makeup  whatsoever.
Under The Cummings Plan, engineers will use their own discretion
in dealing with offenders.
"There's no point in interfering with
the freshmen's freedom," Cummings
told lhe redshirts in a tone of sincerity   similar   lo   that   a;.plied   by   a
their  knees.
2.   are wearing mismatec! so*,
o.   have   paid   one   dollar   for,   and
are wearing the hat, plaque aru
In line with, dimming-,' gentle approach, engineers will "persuade" delinquent freshmen to buy their regalia     immediately,     and     encourage
nat, plaque ana , '   ,
.       them    to   attend    the    trosh    smoker,
button   being   supplied   in   the
uuluu - i tootball  game and reception.
AMS office, which opened at 9:30 '
Failing
UBYSSEY TO PUBLISH
THREE TIMES A WEEK
You'll only gel. a "Ubyssey" thrco limes a week ihis
year.
Owing to the financial straths of (ho Alma Mater
Saciclv, Ubyssey Editor Jim Banham gracioti.^Iv' look a
a cul from lour to three issues per week.
Publication dates for your favorite campus newspaper
will he Tuesday, Thursday and Friday. All news items and
classified ads must reach Ubyssey uffices in Umck Hall
nol  later than '.) p.m. the day prccedim..; publication.
Classified advertising, wilh Ihe excepiinn of lound
ilrni'- and club notices, will cost ten cenls per item per issue. Page 2
THE UBYSSEY
Tuesday,   September  20,   11)49
The Ubyssey
„ Member Canadian University Press
Authorized as Second Class Mail, Post Office Dept., Ottawa. Mail Subscriptions-$2.00 per year.
Published throughout the university year by the Student Publications Board of the Alma
''"'   ' Mater Society of the University of British Columbia.
Editorial opinions expressed herein are those of the editorial staff of The Ubyssey and net
necessarily those of the Alma Mater Society nor of the University.
Offices in Brock Hall. Phone ALma 1624 For display advertising phone ALma 3253
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF     JIM   BANHAM
MANAGING EDITOR CHUCK  MARSHALL
GENERAL STAFF: Copy Editor, Laura Haahti;  News Editor, 'Art Welsh;  Features Editor,
Vic Hay; Sports Editor, Ray Frost; Women's Editor, Shirley Finch.
Senior Editor This Issue —     HUGH CAMERON
Associate  —  Betty  Hortin
The Immortal Bard
UE|C will never be quite the same again
— Garnet Gladwin Sedgewick is no longer a
part o| ■"!!'.
For those who knew Pr. Sedgewick, both
as a scholar and a man, the news of his death
came as a great shock. The university will
no io^er ht»ve lhe benefit of his brilliant
mind find sharp wit which became as much
a par| oi $I|£l as its other time-honored
institutions.
Whenever it was announced that Dr.
Sedgewick was to speak or take part in any
affair it was a foregone conclusion that the
lecture room or meeting hall would be
packed. Wjien he spoke, his audience invariably ^yas Impressed by the alertness and
piercing insight of his mind.
E)r. Sedgewick liked to call a spade a
spade; *$he ishocjdy and incomplete was never
for h|m. To his mind, a late student wa.s
shoddy, anci accordingly, students stayed out
of his! |ec,iiir|s if ||iey came |ate.
B^i| fi)\tf fame fime, with a hitch of tjie
upper ^ or a quip from his agile tongue,
his closes could be sent into gales of laughter. |jqt for all his Kumor, Dr. Sedgewick
never made anyone feel small or inadequate
in the presence of his fellow students. Anyone with a particle of a sense of humor
laughed With the class and at himself.
Dr. Sedgewick worked tirelessly to promote the good name of the university and
increase its stature across Canada. From the
fjirstj when he joined the institution in 1918,
he labored constantly with his colleagues in
raising educational standards and promoting
liherai ideals. Under his guidance, UBC's
English department expanded until it i.s
respected and acknowledged to be one of
the finest on the continent.
Despite his liberal leanings and idealistic traits, the realism of the present never
escaped Dr. Sedgewick. He fought for n
liberal attitude in all phases of Canadian
life. When Gordon Martin was banned from
practicing law in P.C, Dr. Sedgewick spoke
in his defence. The Civil Liberties Union was
one of his primary interests.
Before he came to UBC, and while he
was a professor here, he found time lo write
a newspaper column for a downtown daily,
and take part in numerous cultural activities,
including the Vancouver Symphony Society,
riis books on the subject of dramatic irony
are standard texts for many scholars in
North America.
Anyone who came into contact with Dr.
Sedgewick coujd not help coming away without having the man's personality etched
firmly in his mind. Although many students
are disappointed it perhaps is a tribute to
his teaching that his course is not being
offered in the curriculum this year.
, For those who never had the benefit
of his brilliant mind, the memory of Dr.
Sedgewick is only one of a small, inconspicuous man about whom they had heard
a few eccentric tales, but for those whom
he reached and taught, the stamp of his
teaching and character can never be erased,
SIGNBOAff D
frt't faw Off The Limb
; Two displaced students from eastern
Europe will arrive on the campus this week
—brought to Canada with funds voted by
UBC students for the education of German
students in the principles of Democracy.
Under the original plan German students
were to«be brought to Canada to attend this
university, see democracy in action, then
return home to foster international goodwill
and assist in the permanent establishment
of a'German democracy. The"Department
of External Affairs ruled last spring, however, "that no German nationals would be
permitted to enter Canada at the present
time.
The fund—totalling $4,500 — was thus
left in trust with no immediate hope of its
being put to use.
Under the circumstances the trustees of
the fund felt that the money should be used
to bring other European students to Canada.
Accordingly, Juna Walter, a displaced person
from Latvia, and Fie Moroslov, an "escapee"
from Czechoslovakia were chosen from several hundred applicants and arrived in Halifax September 12.
Since the plan passed upon by students
required that the persons receiving the
scholarships be from a german university,
however, the fund could not be paid to the
students. A temporary grant, to cover their
immediate needs, was made meanwhile.
At the autumn AMS meeting students
will be asked to pass an amendment to allow
the funds to be granted to these persons.
Howevermuch such a request for ratification of the action may seem to be locking
the stable after the horse is out, il must be
granted that the trustees were forced to
take some action to make use of the fund.
It is doubtful, however, whether the
fund should have been used to bring displaced persons with no intention of returning home to foster international goodwill and
democracy. Clearly such was not the intention of the students who provided the fund.
There is also some suspicion as to whether
the persons chosen—both "escapees" from
behind the so-called Iron Curtain—are here
primarily for educational purposes. Political
refugees are not the logical candidates for
the task of spreading international goodwill.
If students refuse to ratify the action the
trustees will be far out on a limb. Two displaced persons who arrived here in good
faith can hardly be asked to return to Europe.
At the same time students have the right
to,refuse to allow the fund to be used for a
purpose for which it was not intended,
In the event students refuse to ratify the
agreement the trustees will probably have to
find some other means of support for the
displaced persons,
Whatever the objections to ratification
may be, students must face the fact that the
trustees acted in good faith and should be
backed up even if rebuked. In any case it is
to be hoped that, in future, plans will be
made for use of the fund in time for student
ratification before action i.s taken.
It's Rah, Rah Season Again
Rah, rah season is here again.
Every Saturday afternoon until the completion of the schedule, UBC's American
footballing Thunderbirds will take the field
against an American team in the Evergreen
Conference.
UBC students will have a better chance
to see the blue and gold boys this year
since they will play all their games on home
ground. The one exception was the game
played last Saturday, when they journeyed
south to Olympia.
For a mere pittance, UBC students can
become privileged persons and obtain a privilege pass which will admit them to the
games for a lower rate than non-UBC students. To put it in Huckster language, you
can't get a better bargain.
Three new coaches have been whipping
the muscle-lads into shape for the opening
game for some time now, The chances are
that UBC students will also get a better
spectator bargain for their money than last
year when we only garnered the laurels once.
There is always something thrilling anci
nostalgic about flying pennants, blaring bands
and cheering crowds, and that atmosphere
will become a reality in the first homo game
Saturday.
The undergraduate who miHses (hc t,x.
citement of a football game is missing a lot
of the fun of university.
The new Thunderbird coaches are convinced that with the experience of t|lCir older
players and the enthusiasm of t|u,u. ncWor
han.Js they can give the other Conference
teams a run for their mo nev
We wouldn't miss il jor anytl^g.
Rides
FROM   41st   AND   McDONALD   TO
UE'C   for   8:,30's   every   day   or   what
have you. Call  Kerr.  5409Y and  ask
for  Jack Dcvereaux.
A  RIDE FROM VICINITY OF 35th
and Angus for 8:30's Monday through
Friday. Mickey, Kerr. 6138R.
A RIDE FROM RENFREW HEIGHTS
for 8:30 lectures. 3255 Vimy Crescent
Mary,
RIDE TO 8:30's MONDAY THROUGH
Saturday   from   37th   and   MacKenzie
or vicinity. Phone Kay,  Kerr. 3307R
RIDES AVAILABLE 8:30 LECTURFS
Monday   through   Saturday   vicini'
41st'and Granville.  Kerr. 2709R.
CAR RIDE FROM 33rd AND GRAN-
ville or 33rd and Oak for 8:30 lecture,
Monday  through  Saturday.  Will  pa\
reasonable sum. Kerr. 2971.
FRESHETTE WOULD APPRECIATE
a ride from vicinity 70th and Granville in time for 8:30's, 6 days a week
Will   share   expenses. • Phone   Kei r
5720R   and   leave   name   and   phone
number.
WANTING TO START A CAR
chain from New Westminster. Interested parties please phone Jack at
New Westminster 2432Y,
RIDE WANTED FROM WEST END
8:30 lectures. Phone MA. 3400.
RIDE  WANTED  FROM  51   st  AND
Letter
To the Editor
DR. SEDGWICK
Editor, Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:
A few days ago we happened to
learn of the pleasant French custom
of honoring n man of letters on hi.s
seventieth birthday by thc presentation of a volume of essays written by
his students. It seemed a fitting way
to pay tribute to a great teacher, Dr.
Sedgwick, and we were thinking
about the possibility of such a project. We knew that Dr. Sedgwick
must be approaching seventy, and
thought that among the students hc
had taught there must be a number
whose unaccustomed pens could again
be turned to producing an essay
worthy of the "A" so sparingly given
and so gratefully received.
Now it is too late. With the utmost
shock, since Dr. Sedgwick was alive
in our thoughts, we read of his death
at 67.
Like most students we were terrified by 'Dr. Sedgwick in lectures.
We realized that we were in touch
with a great mind, a devastingly clear
thinker, a man with a passion for
accuracy, unable to put up with the
slipshod or superficial, but our main
concern was to clo our work well. Thai
was hi.s most striking gift to hi.s
students—that insistancc on extracting all possible meanings from a passage, that insistance on whole-hearted work, on integrity of approach, on
just plain simple work. That is what
has stayed with many of his students,
and some of them in their turn, perhaps teaching in our high schools,
have carried on this stern tradition—
so much at variance with the popular
attitude of "getting by"—that work
will not be accepted unless it i«
done with  thoroughness.
But Dr. Sedgwick lived in no iv ; ■•
tower. Some of his most effective
work was done in the cause of civil
liberties. Threatened today more than
they were even in the thirties, civil
liberties and academic freedom need
more than ever his reasonable and
moderating tones, his great wealth
of philosophical knowledge, and—
when deserved—-the sting of his biting tongue,
A living memorial surely would bc
for each of Dr. Sedgwick's students
to pledge himself or herself to carry
on the work of bringing back, not
only to the academic field, but to
every field tof life, that full freedom
of speech and thought to which wc
pay lip service. Since freedom perishes if it is not used, let us all
rouse ourselves to make the effort
of speaking and writing against the
evils of our time.
Yours Sincerely,
Dorothy   Fraser
Douglas Fraser
Arts '32
COMPLIMENTS
of
UNIVERSITY
TRANSFER
4217 W. 13th
AL.   1005
Arbutus, 8:30 lectures. P'none Kerr.
0109R.
RIDE WANTED FROM 2Gth AND
Dunbar, 8:30 lectures. Phone AL.
0232Y.
MJX Y    ""BEEAKFASTIMEE''
Bill Fox of "NW" greets you
every morning from G a.m. till
8. Send your "Breakfa.;time"
requests to Bill Fox, c'o
CKNW, New Westminster.
Congratulations
University of British Columbia
May the Year Ahead
Be a Year of Accomplishment
BOGARDUS, WICKENS LTD.
1000 Homer St. MA. 3248
VANCOUVER
.m\
1 WAYS
to get
MOBILE...
1. Phone PAcific 5936 and
have a Mercury or Meteor
U-Drive I'or thai special
date.
2. Buy a new low-cost English Ford . . . top trade in
allowance . . . low down
payment.
Phone PAcific 3231 today!
SEE OUR WINDOWS
FOR ALL YOUR SHOE NEEDS
4442 West 1 Oth Ave. ALma 0408
BEST  WISHES
from
lydia Margaret Lawrence
9*
7Wcr~l__.
$w#>
Canadian Dress Designer
805 DAVIE STREET
PAcific  1028
Gym Shorts - Gym Shoes - Socks
Basketball Shoes ~ $6.45 pair
George Sayce
SPORTING  GOODS
4451 West 10th ALma 1414
COMPLETE LINE OF SKI EQUIPMENT
IT NOW!
Start the Year Right With a Bank Account in
Canadian Bank of Commerce
UNIVERSITY   DISTRICT   BRANCH
4473 WEST Kith AVENUI'l
I'l. W, CORNWALL, Manager
THU'irilONE M,MA 3080
Conveniently  located  in  your  nearest  sintjipiii!',  centre
Two blocks East of the lumcrsi! v Catcs PUZZLED, QUERULOUS AND ANXIOU&ACES marked SIGNING UP lor a 1950 Totem, Ted is instructed by pretty Elizabeth Derry, 2nd year FINAL, STEP in'registration, a compulsory TB examinati|is
registration. Expectant first year Arts sfiint fed Searcy Arts student, recruited to help with registration administration. Wholesale buying of taken by Ted, who haa arrived in Vancouver from Berfyh,
stands with region book in hand w*hg to have his Totem* marked registration. Yearbook will bn on sale for next two weeks in the AMS Alberta just two hours before shots were mada A future |o-
course checked ^Dean Walter Gage     J °«'- * Brock Hall. , logtan, Ted is be.ng maneuvered by Bob Smith, Metropo|an
' fe -All Photos by Micky Jones Health employee. i>:  ■
FROSH  SUPPLEMENT
Busy Programme Pinned
For Frosh's First Wek
Today
12:30 p.m.    — Cairn Ceremony on Maimlall.
3:30 p.m.    — SCM Reception in Broclflall.
Wednesday, September 2
3:30 p.m.    —  VCF Reception in Brock fell
Thursday, September 25
Ml nay    _  LSE Club Registration.
12:30 p.m.    —   Meeting of Homo Ec. Fros'slles in
Double Com mi I toe Room, B'jck Hall
'r,''",) p.tii.        Big-Little Sister Supper in afeteria
7:30 p.m.    -      Frosh Smoker.
Friday, September 23
12:30 p.m.    —   pep mect and  foe
Stadium,
3:30 p.m.    —   Big Block Club Tea Dance i Brock Hall,   to     ||    ■ J ■
Saturday, September 24 ©6 TOill SO
2:00 p.m.    — _Whitman Football  Game  inStadium. II    II I T
B:30 p.m.    -■   Frosh Reception in Armoun.s. ' \\q\\ LOUfSQC  10
Sunday, September 25* |  All]U,,1 Stud„n, christian m.,v,-
Church Services arranged li; Interfaith     ;ni(,nt ,„<■,.;,t.ion will he ln-W! in T-'nek
'Council. Hall   today   at   .TIM   p.m.
Guest speaker at  the gathering will
Noon Cairn Ceremony Recalls
PI     "s     \    \J    M i  l\i N/Il
,,11,1,11  dri,  police  in . $£^ ^0gpf{0|f |q
Gigantic Student
SUPPLIES FOR 'CLUB DAY'  |
TO BE HANDLED BY LSE    I
Literary end Scientific Executive will supply a table
and peters i'or UBC organi'.'.ation.s on "Club Day" Thursday.
Club ox-'colives should make arrangements I'or tables
and posters wilh Margaret Lowbcer, president of LSE a.s
early as possible in her office in Brock Hall.
Club Day, an annual event on the campus, expects a
bumper crop of undorgradatcs to sign up lor extra-curricular
activities. Tables will be lined up on thc Arts lawn Thurs-
rlav a I, noon lor thc registration,
Of
Joe Brown Will Tell oi Early
ffort to Move University Site
Freshette Beauties
In Greek Crown Race
bo SCM member Dr. N. A. M. Mai-
Kenaio, president nf UBC In addition fin informal program will be
held.
'* SCM officials stress that ibis reception i.s not only I'm' Frosh but
fill students on (be campus. Program
for tho coming year will he officially
announced  fit   this nieetifiy' j
Refreshments will be served. I
rosh Smoker Features
Hollywood Entertainers
Twenty-five years ai>o, UBC student Joe Brown added a
sloiie to a "cairn"  on   a  Point Grey  meadow.
As a disthv.'.wi.shed UBC graduate, Joe Brown will come
back to the campus today to pass on the story to tho freshmen
of hi.s Alma Mater.
He will relate the story of the militant undergraduates
who united in 1922 in an effort to have their university moved
from the Fairview ''shacks" to its present site.
Dr.   N.   A'.   M.   McKenzie   will   also- — -■       --  	
address students aloe.:.; with Professor
F. C. C. Wood and Jim'Sutherland,
president of the Alma Mater Society.
Lambda Chi Alpha Again Looking
For Beauties Amongst Freshettes j rr  , .*
"A good-looking bean might make you «, queen M you're j   S^ISIlCCtTSQII lOVCf
dolled like a dahlia in frosh regalia."
 •    But   if you're  nut   in   f:6sh  regalia,)
Students That is
Shot At a Faster
Rate Than Before
Delayed Two Weeks
that pretty  head will nc\2r wear tht
crown of tbe Lambda Chi Alpha j ''Ho,- Scienceman Lover." annually j heard over CKWX, the Big Block
Freshette Queen, whose election this! presented" comedy by Jabez, will be Club has also arranged entertainment
week will turn the spotlijht on UBC's ' absent   from   tbe   frosh   week   enter- through   Gaylrrde   Enterprises.     The
J. Milligan
Elected Head
Of Freshman
Esplin Elected
Vice President
John Milligan, past president
of King Edward High, was
chosen head of the Freshman
class at a meeting ia.st Friday.
A drama enthusiast, Milligan will
leave University of British Columbia
after  Ins   first  ycai   to  attend   drama
„„,„,„  ,,.,- ,,v=i.......,H v,t  ,,„.,,,  „tla,  school.   Iu   the   past   he   was   director
•Vs    well    fis    foalinang    local    talent i                                           '                                  . ,.     ,           ,   , .     , .   ,        ,      ,         ,   .
.     .                  ,,      wiU be admitted  free to Vlie evenings' Inside    i.s    preserved    forever    the   "l   pht.vs  at  lus   high school  and  has
such   as  Fred   Bass,   pianist   currently                ,,
OLD STORY
It's an old story, this story of the
Cairn, the great campaign of 1922
but it's worth telling again. Student
Council members retell ■ it every year
lo the handful of students who ar.
interested enough to maintain tradition by keeping lhe Cairn's ceremony
! alive.
Exotic Dancers, Accordionist
Entertain Thursday Evening
Exotic   dancers,   accordionists   and   singers   highlight   an j
r       •        1        .     i   • .  ti i ■     tt       i    tt   ii   I    Todfiv at ii (jo ii students will assemble
evenini'- oi prolcssional entertainment lhursdav, m Brock Hall. I
The   Freshmen   siag   begins   af   7:30.',-- .      . .- ! ,mce    '»"re   ;"'"L"^    ""-'    '^morablc
,n  ,h, evening and   nans  through  till   ^-.  v\mm^.   m^'w-    Program ; pii,   0f  rocks   wlm.h   stil|   s,.11)(Ls   ,H,_
fore   the   Science   building   and   pay
i tribute to the pioneers of 1!>22.
11: .ill.    Sra nsored    by    the    Big    Block
Club, it wil! feature seven professional
■. acts.
will   close   with   a   community   sing-
Fre-hmen   chid   in   regalia   assigned
.hem at I'.'.e beginning of Frosh Week \ PRESERVED
proceedings.
fairest   first-year   flowers'
,.,■,.,, ,   ,■ Ioij   eiilertf.iners   on    tlie    one   and
..    , i        „.u    turned   in   tune   lor   Ihi'   presentation. ,    ,
•anion.   Who   will   . .me-h.df  hour  program  include:   June
Cl'ivier.   accordionist;   Sharlene,   exotic
•|     Frosh will be iniii;iU\l into lhe way.-
><^
lainment this year, laitei'   organ'r/ation   is   shipping   talent
Several  key  members of  last   year's j;rect   fr< in  Hollywood  and   Seattle.
The annual event  will mm  out the' Players  Club  east   will   net   have  re-
UBC students  were  passed through ! Ubyssey's   ace   earner
Metropolitan    Health   Service's   wrrl- I , ..      .       „       , . ...   ,
, ,     ' . ,    , ;pend Monday, Tuesday and Wednes   ,    ,, .   , ■      o       ,    „,
able  X-r;iv   er[iiipmont   at   the fastest i                                               '                              t nl    engineers    later   on    in    Ihe   term. __                   t           .
d'iv    I'op'inci-   tha   pp'iimiiis    onlhu-a   ',11  I     ,             ,,,■■  ■                            11   i              i daruvr   I r, 111  Seattle  and  OUiria   Mu-
rate   since    service    was    offered    to i                     "            'ampu.s,  ogling   ait, | v/|H,n   sli||,aiin|   ;KMors  \U|I   \,v  ;,Vai!-
students s.pvera!  vears fur,,                   j bul    snapping   only    th,.*    I'roshettes : able. l'lu4!'    S',;m sU    <:anL'l"l:    :."ul    Mv[W
More    than    fiODIl    stu.l-nls   pas„,,l ' who  are  bedecked  with  the  required^     it   is  expos'ssl  that  -Lover" will  be Uiiu-s, bloii.lc bambsliell a song,
tb.a.iieb    ihe    Iriiek   durin..   the   fnsl     eaiment.   Pholos   (.!'   Iho   four   finalists ' I ' "lhu'1"1  m :,!u>ul   Uv" mvks' flil    Johnson.   Hollywood   comedian
lour  and   a   half   davs   of   registration         .,,   ,        ,.,     ....     ,     ,„                       '                                               ^ „      . ..ml   .luiwcr.  will  emcc   the   imposing
""    '     uill   lieautih-   tridfos   Ubv.ssev. |<f| I 1      jf+i      I
aVtM'aging   about   three   cvwy  inini111-                                                                                     ;   1 rUSIfCoSCy   SC   I    il!Bn array  of  talent.
"f  i-1'Uisln.ti..'.i.                                             j     Th,-    lucky    lovely,    scleral    by    a \   > »U I JWO J   O  Va U SJ    - .\0er a  brief  iulroduci-ion by   mem-
X-ray ol'l'icals  rop,n-l   if i-:Uo of ,,._ ■ ,::t„0i   „,•   p0l)plo   Who   s|u)llld   Knew. ' IS                        lL        T                      - 1),'1':!   "''    tlu'   !,ll,ll'(it:    ,1''lv""lu'llt    "'*
::::":„:"■■ s-i, 'vr™^::; i - « ■»■«« - *- Day on the Campus ^..r^^z, r:::.rt.r
ve-ir   iniK-    'pi-,,   a, aa   ,,r    .pi;,,,   mr.    some ...ilver  Irophv  fit   the I' rush  Ke-       ,,.               ...     ?,     ..        ,   ...,., . ...
■v,'n    "nl>     .wo    ( p'.m's   oi    aeiive   Tit                                   '    ■                                              So-.r,   .a     J,an   :\ov      ,.uil      Iba.   is |,lrl;i   s^.hi   |„  up,amission.
were I'ppuial  ,,n  Ihe campier                       eeplion    in    tlie    Armori, >;,   Saturday.    ,|i;    l.pil|/-    u ;;     ,.,,,|    ,],,,    Arls   lav. n j.,,1!,,.., ■,,,,,■    i|„.   ivfreslumMil    pen
\\, ck    'I'p-ial    will    meel    in    tuuo-hoil- |
pa a. I    ;,      .. oil.    'Melld Oi S    ol'    the    Kit.'ill-   |
pis:,'    f.uailly   of   the    un'neisily    v. ill , {)\ VlHSl'lJ
omk^
5s
history of iheir (anions "Irak." The
granite monument contains a few "!'
the pennies and nickles which students eeiltribuled lo lhe tl;a\-e an.i
newspfipers of the day which carried the slory of ||u> ...indent campaign.
The students who par ked the Cairn
sione by stone from Fan view to
Point Grey hack in 1022 have lorn.;
since departed, and have been f< r-
gotlen.
Uut the cairn Ihey buhl slill stands
a   sv'.alppi!   ,.f   t'lU,    Alma    'Mater    soil   I
whieli    MiiouUlers    bemsilh    die    .„■,.-
domic   exterior  of   the   imdp'rgr.i.iualo
bodv.
been on numerous tours with Everyman Theatre.
New vice-president of thc Frosh
i.s Lfiuris Esplin, a future Physical
Fd student who has been active in
student government at Byng;
"Professors have a dry ,Sense* of
humor." remarked Miss Esplin in a
quick sumir.c'ry of her impressions
of her  first day fit  university.-
S'eiTp'tarial find financial responsi-
bilitii's were given lo John Eraser,
an   ex-Trine,■  of  Wales student.
Fre.sbMles elected E'eth Est'ey a,s
Women's Undergraduate Society Re-
i re.-eiil.-i' ive   Miss Fstey was formerly
Soplomhor i'l. at  Sa'ill nan.
VCF RECEPTION AT
WEEK TOMORROW
V.u a-.ii \ ( 'Ui- a. ian Foil.".' ■' 'up :a:
tppili ivall be lli'bi Wisll-p'sSi)., JSr
psol.aa  211   ,,,   [hael;   Hall   I   •' 'aaa
All    -indents   IWv.    I,p     h    pa. n;.,,
Hi* Ued    lo    al lend    lhe    -ee 1 ,,
la     club"    will    spol     llu'    Aria    lav. n
n    Thus .i| i',      '.', hi n    die    Umv.'r.-.i'y
Fi a'rrnil y o.l'ieials. Iiu|-//ing wilii 'S,..,■,.-,,t i a,- m, .re v. el I -1-aii.v. n .dub.-.
)pid\\:il to'A.,rds fill, \-i-sltcrila\' si,it- inelol, 'be Pl.i\a r. Club. \\ hieh is i'ae
>st    nompu-    "Id,    i    an    ih,     i-ampu..    ihe    K.d.oc
!'..    Mu-    ile-   Tarb i .'.a'-    !''■■:■■
n a.   in i'    I.i   im nl 'on   tile   P'lbaisa ■ p|i-
Pa.ad
I p.s.si.ient of Girl's Ili-Y at Magee and
The  University  of  f'ritisb  Columbia | ('xl I'essed    lhe   sentiments   of   all   of-
lia.,   ,e\.    ti'fidiiion.s;.   bm   no   miivor.d ■■ ' beta's   when   she   said   she   was   "very
.liliaii    dian    llip'l -""i'prisepl   .it   the   election."
Igyfp'    \'|    Cairn. )     Damn-i    York.-    w;is    chosen    Bov'.s
^^1 ,a.        .........     • , .   . .,, ,   Alhl.-li.'    Ken
**^ sO
^^sa ^       IS       ha..     0     a.'Oalar
.si,      U'e    feel    that    in    m
, e! ivii a s     I'l'osh      INUfdl.v
..'I'M I .on.   The    i    nnr  ,-f',',
I'l"   b      f,    d      '.h  o       lh,  \       a),
1 'al I      ■'    ssiag ", r-    ,a ' ivii-, ,"
gam     littl
to   mah.
I    defmii
A
^;;\wf        'I'im  bairn  i.,  ;!„,  nnn.araiis • .■MIil.-iu-   is-mv..aitative.   having   been
^X^?-^^^                              ' ' ' "''''ll   '"   nu":ilv    ''>'   '■'   ''lock   of  cx-
ft^« l!inVr" ,n':A,)s Tpsnsaies    ,v asnembered    Yorke'.s
,          ,*' *    ^            t              I'   "    a     Inui,    p  ,',.,.,    vide!,   ."s,.; s-en.-alaaial    pl,,\     in    basketball    and
v   in   I ro-a;   ,H'il\ ll ie ..   i         , a.   ,          '         .           .        i       ■ ,
a,.,I   . a  "iliiale     ,.,■■   ■     |„...      |,   .     |h. .,, olhp'r .-pal Is .
11     ^amou.-     is     C,„,e(;llu|lM.    ,M' ,„.,■,„,    l.e  can   e.,11   ania.p.ll'  .    '- f..-  .   .1. 1      F. I, u ■, ■ i.     v..re e..n,luele,l   l,v George
|«"'!1   ';iMl,v   "f   ;mv   mt,"':,'h,"V Socnil   Aid!\-i|i,e,  (;(,,rot,  (Cm,- p't  hi-  Ala,a  m„„.    |.   ,    ,;.,.,.„„■,■. d,,,,,,,.^   ol,..  h.,s  ladled  ;,   meeting
""■''■'■''              N .",VI'U,<.''   : miie;.   I!;irr;iss,.,|  (b nm n ue   !i;r. ''"'"'    "f    '»-■'    n-I ul,.u         ana,. ,,i    d,a    !•'.,, ■,    tiMvutive    i',,,-    \2-?A)
,!      -^     "^'i"""1-      '^'■'                        .,,                     ■       I           r         ",- "K'','''•     ■">■'■■■•'>".•     IP-ae-     O.     a-    ell ' \\,.e,a.,,a    .    Sa;,M„bai    21.
,      p  ,, i   i, i a (, Pinal iiuilial    in vriai I    i d    ,ud i\'i ■ ,,
                         I ,          ,.        ,        ,..,,'    ,   , ,        ,              , !'''i:-   Hl •'•"">    '     ' "■ i p.e.i   .„ ■           ■ b'a     p        ia  I ,i   i-ip.-a.ient.  were Jim
je   i us.   deaoai.  ,,,1  pinspi,.    ■ ;lies   b.r   111 ll-I I! led   J' ia .all   Week, ,;,.,o,l,-.l   I'.a.as lb.     ••,    n i Aidib On -I
H3SK!
A Hearty Welcome to the Class of '53
May Success Attend You All
OWL DRUG CO. \M *
YOUR FRIENDLY REXALL DRUGGISTS
ALma 1002
4421 W. 10th Ave.
•■(if  *
COMPLIMENTS OF ,
Mayor
CHARLES E. THOMPSON
*#*■
Your Savings
After Graduation
\ i \
"} >*
COMPLIMENTS OF
UNIVERSITY
Insurance and Real Estate
Agency 5
4464 West 10th
ALma 18(i6
gobbledeygook
si
. . . Safeguard ■
Your Future
■Vi-iiO:
If you spend all you earn, your future will depend
on circumstances beyond your control.
But if you save a-part of what you earn, .you can
shape your future as easily as you shape your present.
A Savings Account in this Bank will help you to
save regularly. You can watch your future taking
shape in your passbp^c i— and the habit of saving in
itself will contribute to the building of character and
independence.
THE DOMINION BANK
ESTABLISHED 1871
Col. The Honourable E. W. Hamber, C.M.G., LL.D.
Director, Vancouver
R. F. J. Ford, Manager, Vancouver
"Pardon me," I said hoarsely, "bul I
used to work here."
"Yeh, I know Shorty. But we got a
better janitor now."
That wasn't quite the reception I expected when I entered the Publications
Board office after an absence of nearly a
year. But after all, there were reasons why
Pubsters might not recognize me at a glance.
For one thing, I'd grown a mustache.
And, at the risk of being mistaken for a
woman, I'd got my hair cut fairly short.
I tried again.
"What I mean, I said, "is that I'm a
columnist."
WITH CLOTHES ON, EVEN
The editor tipped back in his chair,
poked is head through the window of his
private office.
"Hey," he yelled. "There's a guy here
claims he's Jack Scott, but he's got clothes
on."
"What's he wearin'?" a voice outside
asked. "His mail bag?"
"No, no," I said patiently. "I'm not Jack
Scott. I mean'I used to write a column here
for The Ubyssey, Maybe you remember me.
I'm ..."  '
"If you're Les Bewley, come back during
The Children's Hour. I got work to do."
I turned to leave, but just as I reached
U.v 11AI - TFNNANT
the door, a thought struck me. Why was^
leaving? I wasn't Les Bewley, ln fact-"
wasn't anybody's uncle. I decided to J5
straightforward about the whole thing. Any
way, it was my turn to ask questions.
CHOICE OF ONE DAY
"Would you like me to write a colunil
for you," I asked. "I think I could managi
one about once a week, and I undei'stand you:
paper's coming out on Tuesday, Thursday!
and Fridays. Which day would you like nit
to write for?"
"How about Wednesdays?" was all h<
said.
But I didn't like the way his motitj.
turned down at the corners.
"But I thought your publication day)
are going to be Tuesdays, Thursdays ani
Fridays."
"That's right," he said, curling down
his mouth again. "Just drop your copy in
the basket here every Wednesday. And toll
your mother she can drop down here ana!
read it any time she wants,"
"Anything else?" I asked, saluting. •
"Just one more thing. For your first
column, don't dare write a bunch of baloney
about coming back to the Pub not being
re membered by the rest of the staff. If you'd
worn your glasses when you came in, I'd
have known you were Les Armour right
from the start."
So You're A Freshman Now
This week hundreds of freshmen and
freshettes will undergo the difficult process
known as "orientation." They will tremble,
some of them, at the mock severity of burly
upper years engineers.'Those who neglect to
tremble will pick themselves out of the icy
slime of the lily ponds.
The week over they will settle down to
the routine of college life. Most will adhere
to the age old maxim that it is too early to
start work until the end of October and
after that it is too late to worry. On these
the terrible "Faculty Four Hundred" will
wreak its inevitable vengeance. Others, full
of drive and energy will study far into the
night. On these, optometrists will gloat.
But there is more to university life
than books and exams. The infectious ideal
ism of a political meeting, the fervor of a
football game as thousands of students become in spirit one with the struggling handful on the field, the bright gaiety of a dance,
all these leave there stamp on the college
man.
The wise freshman will seek the right
balance between activities academic and
extra-curricular. During orientation week
the freshman will have a chance to look
around, to see what's going on, to choose
his activities so he can get the most possible
out of and give the most possible to his
university.
The Ubyssey extends a hearty welcome
to all these freshman. On behalf of every
organization on the campus we invite them
to join with us in making their four years
here the most memorable in their lives.
WESTERN
School of Commerce
SECRETARIAL
ACCOUNTING
MACHINE TRAINING
Robson at Granville
MA. 8828
YOU MAY DO B^TER WITH
EYSTONE
BRAND
Looseleaf Sheets and Binders
Choose Keystone Brand for all your Class and Study Work
'ame wt. . .
:ind listen to your
favorite selections
in our
Model* ftecatd BUo-xl
THOMSON & PAGE LTD.
2!) 11 Granville South
CHerry 5144
With Best Wishes
for
Success in '49-'50
FRIEND
SMITH, DAVIDSON & WRIGHT
LIMITED
Vancouver - Victoria - Nanaimo - Edmonton - Calgary
Congratulations
I rom
A D I 0
E N T A L
E P A I R
443.'!  West   10th  Ave.
ALma 2211
)
JEST WIS!IKS T(W'S       . /
•I "%     /
STUDENT BOPY ~    /
FROM
}
Intzen Knitting
|        ol Canada LimUeo
$
lUlli Ave. KingswJiy
Vancouver, B.C.
Every Success To
The|niversity of British Columbia
I from ./
,    | The Home Of
S    Ws AS
I  HARLEY-DAVIOSON
f      MOTORCYCllS
Western Canada's
Motorcycle Headquarters
FRED DEELEY UNITED
901 West Broodway
BAy. 3544
BEST WISHES
for a happy
and successful
University Term
COLUMBIA PAPER
COMPANY LIMITED
9$ Homer St. MA. 6511
VANCOUVER, B.C.
SUCCESS
TO THE
CLASS OF '53
BLOEDEL, STEWART & WELCH LTD.
VANCOUVER, B.C. fucsday, September 2U,
Specialists in Catering to Public Functions
•■•
in our luxurious surroundings
THE  ALHAMBRA
(Just Across the Burrard  Bridge)
CH. 0618 Evenings CH. 3249
ACCOMMODATION FROM 25 to 150
(We Take Complete Charge nnd Responsibility Wlicncvcr Needed)
LUNCHEON  AND  DINNER  SERVED DAILY
First Glimpses Of Campus
B.VJANKTJABOUK
Mv    first    uY\m\*e   of   UE'C   as
COMPLIMENTS OF
DAN MacLEAN MOTOR CO. LTD.
1148 W. Georgia
MA. 2277
BEST  WISHES
to the
CLASS OF '53
CROSSMAN MACHINERY
CO. LTD.
806 Beach Ave.
Vancouver, B. C.
Sincere   Good   Wishes
For A Successful Year
To the Student Body
[ freshette c,mc .l.n.UJth 'he a>W «'i,rl-v
' inorninu   mists   of   the   first   day   of
riMiistration,
Aloni»!i.ioor«i-iinshivcriMBP«">ljle>
j their   faces   wearing   the   pained   o.x-
! prcssiou   of  those   who   wished   they
' were home in bed, extended from the
door of the Armories.
As we drew nearer I recognized
former classmates, former friends of
classmates, people I hadn't seen for
yen™, and also people I'd never even
seen, Almost everyone was running
around with a scrap of paper trying
to figure out a timetable (a totally
useless operation, since upon requesting a etrtain lecture you were told
you'd probably have to come out on
Saturday's anyway!*
Finally we entered the Armories and
proceeded to fill out forms which
asked nearly everything but the location of a mole on your second
cousin's clavicle
Having accomplished this, I wandered from one line to another and
somehow found myself signed up
for the proper number of courses—at
least I think they're proper; no one
has bothered to tell me if they aren't.
By this time I was so totally confused that even the prospect of a
chest X-ray did not faze me. (I've
just got to stop smoking—how long
could you hold your breath?)
pletely   exhausted   with   nothing   to
The end of the day found mo corn-
show for my trubles but a time-table
filled  with 8:30's. During the rest of
YOU Ll GIVE,
from
Clarence Wallace
BURRARD DRYDOCK
Company   Limited
MIRADO
|     WRITING    PENCIL
fmmm
COLORED   PENCIL
TURQUOISE
w  ORAWING   PENCIL
BUY ALL i
JCNbCH SUPPLY DEALER
EVERY SUCCESS
TO THE
University Of
British Columbia
SHARP and THOMPSON, BERWICK, PRATT
ARCHITECTS
the week I made several important
discoveries which I hope may be of
use to other confused frosh.
1, Don't buy books from last year's
freshmen, because as soon us you do
someone else will inform you the
course  has changed.
2, Don't ask other freshmen for
advice—they don't know anything
cither.
3. Just because a fellow i.s bald or
wears  a   beard   is  no   proof  he's   a
professor—he's probably a senior.    .
However, if it weren't for the fact
lhat  I  don't   usually   wear  my  skirl
above my knees, or green nail polish,
or no lipstick or men's socks—I think
that in time I could probably get used
to things around here!
. . . WITH THE COMPLIMENTS OF
O'NEIL COMPANY LIMITED
"* TILE  and TERRAZZO
CONTRACTORS
1043 West Pender        Vancouver, B.C.
Meetings from
Bowlill McDonald Motor
1   Co. Ltd.
CADILLAJ:
Dealers (or
BUICK
G15 Burrari
JJ
PONTIAC
Vancouver, B.C.
Compliments of
Hingley, Lea & Meagher Ltd,
1685 Vcnobles
HAstings 2422
Corsages at Reasonable Rates
Throughout the Year
DELLRAE FLORIST
2817 West Broadway
CHcrry 0622
ERNEST DANN LTD.
3285 Nanaimo
HA. 1944
Contractors for
Extensive Plastering at U.B.C.
Your Community Green Grocer
wishes
Success to the Student Body
Fresh Fruit and Vegetables brought in for You Daily
FREE DELIVERY
VARSITY PRODUCE
10th Ave. and Sasamat AL. 1141
BEST WISHES . . :
A YEAR OF SUCCESS
HL & MITCHELL LTD.
INSURANCE and REAL ESTATE
541 GEOBGIA ST.
VANCOUVER, B<C.
*******
COMPLIMENTS OF
SASAMAT CABS
10th and Sasamat
aJSouRlERyTcl
ALma 2400
GREETINGS TO UBC
To thc Men and Women who
Enroll This Year In Preparation For
Their Various Fields of Endeavour
WE EXTEND OUR BEST WISHES
FOR SUCCESS AND
"GOOD LUCK"
BRITISH  COLUMBIA  FOREST
PRODUCTS  LIMITED
Vancouver, B.C.
BARR
TYPEWRITER CO.
615 W.  Hastings
MA. 5445
All Makes of
TYPEWRITERS
Sold
Rented
Repaired
SPECIAL RATES TO
STUDENTS
ARMSTRONG &• MONTEITH
Construction Company
  LIMITED	
Extends Greetings
and Best Wishes to the Class of '53
•
ENGINEERS AND GENERAL
CONTRACTORS
1449 HORNBY ST, — VANCOUVER, B.C. Page P,
THE UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  September 20,  1949
GREETINGS FROM
ARMCO DRAINAGE APWSl
;l     "
PRODUCTS  OF  CANADA -TD.
WELCOME FROSH
wc wish you success and good luckl
Gampui  tylatim
"FASHION IN FLOWERS" ^'
at
4388 Wesf 10th Avaniiij
(ncrbss from (he v"si'.v Theatre)     ,r
We're toady to se've you with . .-.
• SMART!y STYLKD  CORSAGES
# .iCIaOivERS FOR ALL OCCASIONS
ll
FREE DELIVERY        Phone AL. 3351
1
•*.
BEST WISHES
TO THE STUDENT BODY
\\
Brunswick Balke, Collcnder Co.
of Canada Limited [
BILLIARD TABLES AND BOWLING AU&Y
SUPPLIES and REPAIRS      Jfl
^    I
"I
•*■
-P
Our Congratulations and Best Wishw
Utley Armstrong
MILLINERY SALON    I
Original Creations in Hats that are Different!
2806 Granville Street
CHcrty 2 J.'!:;
COMPLIMENTS
from    '
CITY  CONSTRUCTION
Company Limited
and
CAPILANO  CRUSHING
Company Limited
FAir. .'J202
107 E. 1st Ave.
Vancouver, B.C.
FAirftWtf
WE WISH ALL STUDENTS
Every Success in the Year Ahead
Pacific Lime
COMPANY   LIMITED
714 W. Hastings
Mixed Mortar Plant
Granville Island
MA. 0321
MA. 1022
MANUFACTITRI-IRR   OF   AI,i.   TYPES   OF  HIGH
CALCIUM   LIME   AND   LIMESTONE   PRODUCTS
ACTIVE
ETCHING/
B.v SHIRLEY FINCH
Tci-min;-, activity h.is ali'ra;ly Mulled llu.' now leaf (if most student's*
fresh .starts back at Varsiiy. fh-
Ciimpus' horizon is ablaze with fall
color and a new foliage of feather:-
has appeared with lhe brand new frosh
class.
WUS has provided plenty of activity
for the freshettes and their big sisters.
They all attended yesterday's general
WUS meeting (at least it's hoped
they did), and Ihe pcrenial Cairn
Ceremony i.s the order for today.
■ Thursday night at live will mark
the Big-Little sister supper. Frank
Underhill will he ehe! at tlv: Caf and
the girls will go from there to a
Pow Wow at the Brock.
This Tow Wow is an extra-: peeial
affair with superb entertainment planned. Erring freshettes are expected
lo provide a certain amount of entertainment too. President Eileen Moyls
and her hard-working executive are
responsible for all the arrangements
of freshette activities.
Don't buy your new fall wardrobes
yet girls, because Thelma Barer is all
set with a revealing column in Friday's issue all about the latest in the
fashion world.
Women's Page *
women's editor
shirley fine!
FREDERICK UOfiRTZ LTD.
Scientific Instrument Makers
SALES & REPAIRS
Student Supplies
Slide Rule:; - Wood - Plastic - Metal — Drnflitrj Sets
Fines! Swiss Made Microscopes - New and Used
Equipment fur All Types of
ENGINEERING  - SURVEYING  -  DRAFTING
5G4 IIORNUY ST. VANCOUVER, B. C.
Compliments of
SHANAHAN'S UNITED
CHEMICALS
Sponsors Of
Shanahan's Limited Scholarship
"n  West  Point  Grey for Distinctive  Gifts,  Greeting
Cards for Every Occasion i:ntl Clift Wrapping It's
GERALDINE'S GIFT SHOP
'Located in FIRST block  from  University Gate;)
im\t West KHli Avenue AL. 2424
OPEN  WEDNESDAYS
117 Sorority
Rushees Register
Sorority rushees flocked to A. P.
100 Wednesday, September 14 to
learn rules about rushing and to receive information about the rushing
schedule which commenced Friday at
noon,
Tlie rushees, numbering 117, attended a total of nine coke parties over
the weekend and must now choose
the four sororities which they prefer.
After making their choice, the girls,
the majority of which are in their
second year, will attend four preference teas, Then the sororities will
send out invitations or bids while
the rushees wait for the outcome of
the ordeal.
Anxiety will end for the rushees
on October 6, the last day of Silence
when  the  girls   will   become  pledges.
The number of Rushees is slightly
less than last year, when 124 girls
registered for the hecti three weeks.
New York Costume Salon
Costumes, Tuxedos Rented
4M1 West 10th Avenue ALma 1501)
U.B.C. SERVICE STATION
Complete Automobile Servicing
WE CATER TO U.B.C. STUDENTS
ROY HAND, PROPRIETOR
2180 Allison Road
'Just off University Boulevard)
Alma 0524
Best Wishes to the Class of '50
SINCERE GOOD WISHES
FOR A SUCCESSFUL YEAR
from
DOROTHY FLETCHER
IMPORTED SPORTSWEAR AND HATS
2572 Granville
CHdrry S440
(PRE-MED ADDITION
I Antonida Balabrins is a charming
girl whose softly-spoken English is
I tinged ever so slightly with a r!< -
, lightful lilt that flues not fit into tlie
Canadian's usual glib catalogue of
; accents,
The accent i.s Latvian, for Miss Bala-
; hrin's home is Daugalipils. a town
j situated on ihe Dvinsk River, verv
< near  the   White  Russian   border.
Late in 1944, just after the Allied
occupation, she went to Germany
lo study in thc famous University of
Giittingen, whore she remained until
the end of 19=18. Just ei^ht months
ago, she decided to come to Canada,
and recently she received special permission from the immigration authorities to continue her studies here at
UBC.
Even  after struggling through  sev- '
eral   long   and   involved   line-ups   in
order   to  gel   registered   in   her   first-'■
year   Pre-Med   course,   Antonida  still
loves both Canada and UBC. !
BLUE RIBBON  LIMITED
Extends-Greetings to you in another year of
Student Drive
Blue Ribbon Tea
"Perfectly Blended to Your Taste"
DIETHERS
Ltd.
SAND and GRAVEL
BUILDERS' SUPPLIES
COAL
Granville Island
Vancouver, B.C.
MA. G2:n
BEST WISHES
AT THE START OF ANOTHER YEAR
BRITISH   ROPES
(CANADIAN FACTORY) LTD.
1) I S T I N C T I V E     II A I R S T Y L I N G
Townhouse Beauty Solon
Proprietress
EDITH  M.  WALL
Tor Appointment Plione MA. !)(>,'!2
OI'I'OSITI, iio'i'ia vancouvkk
B. C.  DISTRIBUTORS  FOR
DODG
DESOTO
PASSENGER CARS
DODGE
'JOB  RATED" TRUCKS
BEST WISHES
AND   EVERY   SUCCESS
CAVE & COMPANY
LIMITED
ASSAY,   INDUSTRIAL  AND  EDUCATIONAL
LABORAXOItt   SUPPLIES   —   CHEMICALS
5(57 Hornby SI.
Vancouver, B.C.
LIMIT
J*
STODEBAKER
SALES & SERVICE
I)
MOTOR CO.  LTD.
Have you ever had the thrill of
Driving the New Champion?
] 190 W. Georgia St.
PAcific 5181
112H West Georgia St.
MA. :mi
i in* ii n* to-maHni Tuesday, September 20, liM'J
THE UBYSSEY
Payo 7
The Worlds Finest Teas
t^^wBtOSSOM
Selected
Imported
and
Blended
by.
DICKSON
Importing   Co.   Ltd*
VANCOUVER   ,
BYRNES TYPEWRITERS
LIMITED
592 Seymour St.
PAcific 7942
ROYAL      TYPEWRITERS
The Only Typewriter  with'MAGIC  MARGIN
STANDARD AND PORTABLE MODELS
STUDENT   RENTALS
i^w-™^.....,..*    ,*p*?i. 'S8F ii
-1^4.
# ti^ '^#w
Magnecord Is First
A   Professional   Magnetic   Tape   Recorder   Specially
Designed for Use in Education and Industry
Mognecord PT6-JA
• Easy to Operate
• Low Distortion
• Versatile
• Durable
• Low Noise
• High Quality
• Economical
• Smartly  Designed
DISTRIBUTED IN  B.  C.  BY
RADIO  SALES  SERVICE
781)  BtATTY   STREET
VANCOUVER, B.C.
MArine 4433
536  YATES  STREET
VICTORIA, B.C.
GAiden 5481
VAUXHALL
Best Wishes U.B.C.
in
The Year Ahead
Another
General  Motors
Product
Marshall Pontiac Buick Li
8377 Granville St.
Vancouver
JL      k it'll A ■ Stm Cha"ce To
ohn IViiiiman Aims jpioy For b^s
For Bieyde Crown
Present B. C. Champion Competes
Against Tough Field For Title
National fame is the mark at which a UBC student will be
aiming in the coming Dominion Bicycle Track Championships.
Second year Artsman John Millman,
•uri-enl B. C. Cycle Champ, will be
tiding in open competition against 50
si' the nation's best on September 22,
23 and 24 at Digney Speedway in an
attempt to sweep away with the Dominion Senior crown.
OLYMPIC CONTENDER
No easy field opposes Millman. Three
riders from Ihe Canadian Olympic
Cycling squad will be trying for individual honors at. the meet.
Lome Atkinson, rated top man for
points in the Olympic team and past
holder of the E'.C. Crown, figures to
come close to the top of the group.
Two-time Canadian mile champ
Jim Tetlamente, already out here
from Winnipeg to practice on the asphalt track, should be high in the
limning as well.
Millman,   who   has   been   in   cycle
competition for the past three yea,'
took   the   B.C.   Championships   ft--■
Lome Atkinson  when  the latN
turned from hi.s jaynt in thc 0'.. .i.iics.
TKAINED ALL SUMMFK
Not one to take lh- • matters of
training lightly, M" m h"s been
prntficing constant'• through the summer, travelling on the average of 35
miles per day, Usual practice is to
take a short run over to Horseshoe
Bay and back or to New Westminster
and back. Then at nights, a few short
) prints at t'he Di[liey Speedway
finis-hed a rigorous day.
Biggest problem to the competitors
i.s the hard asphalt surface on the
Digney track. Not for about thc last
15 years hay th > C.s:v.::.,(,a finals been
hold on such a roadway.
To add to the hazard, the turns are
not built to take the small cycles.
Banking on the bends are so slight
that the racers are liable to take off
a  tire at high speeds.
Spills will  undoubtedly be an  im-
Colored Football
Feqtured in '49
Football fans at UBC will' see
s.rnething new in the way of Footballs at UBC home Conference games.
Ai' t'Ve last Conference meeting Athletic Directors of member schools
adopted a ball with distinctive black
and white striped markings at each
end. This ball will be used for both
day and night games.
Froih_vs. Sophs
'Uball' Makes
Debut on Campus
UBC will have the first
"Fushball" contest in North
America this Saturday during
halftime of the UBC-Whitman
football game.
The game will be played with the
Frosh v.s Upper Classmen, with tho
Frosh defending one end, the Upper
Classmen the other.
The Fushball, as it is called, i.s a
football painted white. The game is a
combination of pushball and football.
Object of the game is to move the
fushball towards the opponents goal
line. -The game is won if the ball
crosses the goal line or at the end
of three minutes (length of total
game) the team that has advanced
the ball furthest will be declared the
winner.
To put the ball into play, the ball
is tossed up in the centre of thefield
with two men jumping, one from each
side, and then develops into a mild
portant part of the 3-day meet, making j Version of an Irish Donneybrook,
it anyone's championship. There is something at stake in this
HALF PRICE TO STUDENTS | contest.  If the Frwh  lose they  will
UBC students  get  a  break  at  the   have to wear their regalia for an ad-
ticket sales as well. On presentation , ditional week. If they win they can
of AMS cards, students will be able j take their regalia off as soon as the
to purchase tickets at half price, fifty [ contest is over,
cents to be exact, in the Quad ticket
office     Tuesday,     Wednesday      and
Thursday,
Confident of a victory, Millman has
entered everyone of the seven events.
Shining in the sprints, 1-4, 1-3, 1-2 and * declared,
1 mile events, Millman has signed up ! , - _ -	
for the distance matches a.s well. The ,
5  and   10   mile   runs   he   will   try   for NOTICE
ture, but will take part in thc 25-mile j     All   persons   interested   in   rowing,
route   only   if   he   needs   the   points   either  experienced  or  not,  are  asked
All Freshmen must attend to help
their side on to victory.
At the end of the three minutes
a gun will be fired. "God Save thc
King" played and  the winner will  be
drastically.
Support from the campus to urge
on John Millman in his Did I'or national supremacy on the racing track i.s
needed. Buy your tickets early.
to turn out at a meeting on Thursday,
September 22 at 12:30 in Hut M 8.
Anyone under 130 pounds who feels
he is too small for an oarsman may
ask  to  try out for coxwain  position.
ill
i.ii
'Everything in Art'
#    Drawing Materials       Q    Artists'   Supplies
621 I'ENDER WEST
PA. 4448
COMPLIMENTS
OF
COMMODORE CABARET
It's still not too late to turn out
for football.
Head coach Orville Burke will
still be happy lo see prospective
gridders out to practices this week.
With a long hard season ahead
UBC is still short of reserve
strength.
Fiaclices   are   irald   daily    from
4 to 6 p.m.
-
Privilege Pass
Price Perfect
This year the Mens' Athletic
Directorate is selling an athletic pass to cover admission to
all on-campus athletic events
during the term for the price
of $5.00.
Holder   of  thc   pn.rs   is   entitled   to
admission to all Thunderbird foolbuli.
basketball,   iu«by,   Senior   A   basketball,   track,   swim   meets   a.s   well   as
reduced    admission    v rices    at    UBC
hockey ' games   played   in   Kerrisdale!
Arena,   There   will   al.-'o   he   free   ad- :
mission to URC baseball gainis if they j
are  played   in   the  campus   but   there
will   be  a  slight   adt'ilional   charge   if j
the  games   are   played   downtown,        I
The basketball games include nil |
pre-season and 'Conference games a:: 1
well   as   (he   Washington-UHC   game. [
Tlie total value of the card, if you j
attend all games, is $.'!l.7f), which
means you save $26.75. If you attend
only football,, basketball and rugby
you will still save $ 15.25 under single
gnme ;.d:ni:;>;ion price total for thesis i
events.
There will he no student rates at
games. The Privilege Pass is the only
way to receive reduced admission
benefit.
Tickets will be on sale all thi.s week
at the office of the Graduate Manager of Athletics in Brock Hall South
ns well as from a booth at the Frosh
Smoker, football dress practice at the
stadium at 12:30 Friday, (nnd prior to
the game on Saturday.-
If you wish to be a privileged
person—buy a Privilege Pass.
THE ■■■■■■^ji
WORLDS
FASTEST
PORTABLE
TYPEWRITER
THE ALL-NEW 1950
Smith Corona
NOW AT
The Consolidated
s Ltd.
New Portables Priced front
$72.00
STUDENT RENTALS
NOW   AVAILABLE
416  Richards — MA.  8047
Special Student Rates
*~W~% $]&-
*«*}   *
\t&L/   ^Msy
Spoils Ctiitoi — RW  1ROS1
You are invited ..
watch for the opening of our new
auiomotive centre. It will be Vancouver's largest and finest — equipped to serve your every need.
Dunsmuii & Homer
Georgia at Richards
Always Delicious Foods
at
GOULD'S GRILL
WELCOME  BACK
to the all-time favorite
rendezvous for UBC students
4423 West 10th Avenue
FULL COURSE MEALS  SERVED
Vancouver's finest
auto repair, maintenance
and service facilities
are waiting for you
under Dueck tower.
Whatever your needs,
Dueck can fill them
quickly - completely -
on low budget terms
to suit your convenience.
OPEN 24 HOURS A DAY
......./
ANYWHERE    IN   CANADA
Commercial PaintftJS
INDUSTRIAL -  MARINE
RESIDENTIAL
mimt*t,ti*»*imj*im^i**\M
Keautii'ulh Laundered
1-DAY "SKRVICE
Ik Add.
• HOWARD   CLEVB^11  '^
#
• KRNIE     CI.JiVI»ANn     '42
eaboa-*
d Advertising Co. Lid,
.'MM Wesi ."ith Ave.
FAir. O0GS
■*Mim*iaMm»(;m n ■tdsariuw Page 8
THE UBYSSEY
Tuesday,   September   20,   19-19
Sports Editor - RAY $OST
Knowledge Also fs Power
ELECTRIC POWER
EQUIPMENT LID.
F. J. BARTHOLOMEW: Present
1285 Homer St., Vancouver, B. C. | MA. 4474
THE COED CLOTHEiCLOSET
LANSEA and GLENAYR SWEATERS
in Botany, Angora and Cwmere
WELL TAILORED WOOL #SUALS
in the very newest of ,jfhdes
CROYDON BURBERRY f>ATS
Navy Wool Gabarditf
MARTY'S  "
ALma 2360 I .4409 W. 10th
"First in Fashion, Foremost itt jtoHtj/"
FIRST GLIMPSE many an opponent will get o f UBC's galloping Thunderbird footballers in
action will be the above shot of the "stonewall" line which held St. Martin's Rangers so effectively last Saturday. Seven "rocks" forming the wall are Barker, Steer, Henniger, Murphy,
West, Dzendolet and Simpson.
STIFF TRAINING PREPS
'BIRD 11 FOR WHITMAN
GET YOUR:
B.£
I
(BETTER AUTOMOBllfS)
at |
JOHNSTON MOTOR CO. LTD.
EXAMPLES
41 Austin, 4-door Sedan ..I........ $695
39 Dodge Sedan 4 $885
35 Terra plane Convertible $375
Many Other High Grade New C|r Trade-Ins
7th Ave. and Mjin
Open Evenings f     (   FA. 0424
f**
Drop Opener to Ground-Wise
Rangers; Material Proves Good
UBC's football Thunderbirds are working at top speed
this week to master a complete set of plays for Saturday's game
against Whitman after absorbing a 21-0 drubbing from St.
Martin's Rangor.s in the season opener Saturday night in
Olympia.
It was the 'Birds lack of pre-season ?
training which was largely responsible
for their loss to the heretofore win-
less Rangers. The green Blue and
Gold squad took to the field with
only six rushing players and two
pass signals.
Working their few plays from a
single wing formation they never really got started. The 'Birds picked
up a mere 70 yards in their ground
attack and completed one pass for
30 yards.
STONEWALL DEFENSE
There were bright spots however.
The UBC defense proved to be a
stonewall for most of the game. After
St. Martin's scored their first tally
midway through the first quarter
they were blanked until the last
period.
A five-yard pass from quarter-back
John Oonahue to end Ted Hzeppa accounted for the Ranger's first score.
It came after a 45 yard downfield
march which made UBC fans wince
in remembrance of past drubbings.
5 DAY bELIVERY
on
CUSTOM-TAILORED
SUITS and TOPCOATS
$57-50
up
CHOOSE FROM ONE OF THE MOST
EXTERN RANGES OF FINE IMPORTED WOOLENS IN VANCOUVER
Arriving Daily
NEX SPORT COATS - SLACKS - TOPCOATS
RAINCOATS- ETC.
Convenient Credit Terms
snxsHQP
4444 West 10th Avenue
DOWNTOWN -301 VV. HASTINGS STREET
Ther the 'Birds dug in.
HOLDOVERS STARRY
Sparked by linemen Gil Steer, Don
West, Cec Taylor, Gene Dzendolet
and Howie Nixon, all holdovers from
last year, they repeatedly held oft
St. Martin's thrusts.
Big Bob Murphy, filling the centre
slot instead of his usual quarterback
spot played a standout game for 58
minutes until he was helped off the
field with an injured leg.
The let-down came in the final
quarter when the Thunderbirds allowed two touchdowns, one on a pass
and another on an off tackle smash
f^orn 10 yards out. Amy Fox kicked
all  three converts.
COACHES EXPECTANT
Coach Orville Burke and assistants
Helmar "Jelly" Anderson and Jack
Pomfret were elated by the team's
showing. They indicated that they had
expected far worse results in the first
game.
For E'urke and Anderson, both new
here, it was their firtft chance to see
their charges iii action. Practically
everyone of the 30 men stripped saw
action in order to give the coaching
staff an idea of what they could do.
Backfielders George Puil, Don Lord
and Dave MacFarlane showed up well
enough considering the lack of practice. In the week before the game
Burke was still walking them through
plays in order that they would have
some semblence of an attack.
WHITMAN NEXT TARGET
With reinforcements stiil turning nut
there is every possibility that the
'Birds will give Whitman a run for
its money Saturday.
Expected out this week are Dougie
Reid, Jim Breen and Phil Nixon.
Nixon i.s a centre and his presence
would leave 'Big Murph' free for
backfield  chores.
The 'Birds should win at least two
games this season and possibly three,
if last Saturday's game is any indication of what the team can really
do when they have a little experience
behind them.
, .—__  _        .
UBC Oarsmen Bow
To Yank Crews
For the first time in three
years UBC's oarsmen locked
horns with American college
competitors last spring when a
practically novice crew journeyed south to Washington and
Oregon State universities.
Although no wins were forthcoming
in their 2000 metre sprint endeavours,
the scullers from B.C. showed a
promise that looks well for the future
of Thunderbird oarmanship.
Pitted against Washington State's
frosh and their national champion
lightweights, UBC's eight broke away
on the start with a beat of 42 to capture the lead for one third of the
course, but were beaten by a more
experienced and huskier Washington
crew to lose by less than seven seconds.
At Oregon, the fast Willamette River
helped Oregon State to defeat the
local crew by almost 25 seconds.
GREETINGS!
Frosh, Sophs, ef a I
Start the Year Right
Have Your Next Party
at
PrinciPfs
• Delicious Food
• Restaurant Prices
• No Cover Charge on Weekdays
UPSTAIRS   AT
G4 East Hastings — MArine 302G
We Cater to Parties and Banquets
A   Special   0^e%
The Dominion Championship
BIKE RACES
DIGNEY   SPEEDWAY
September 22-23-24
Come and Support Your U.B.C. Rider8
TICKETS Special
Student
IN THE
QUAD
RATE
Vi price - 50c
How Time Flies
'Birds Half Thru
Football Games
UBC has already completed h:iH
its 1950 football schedule.
At the meeting of Athletic Directors
of the Evergreen Conference in Seattle
August 21 UBC has been tentatively
scheduled to play four Conference
games next year in the second year
of a two-year Conference agreement
which allows UE'C partial participation on a four game yearly basis.
St. Martin's, which met UBC at
Olympia on Saturday to open the
Thunderbirds'schedule this season,
are slated to play UBC in the opening game of the 1950 season on September 23. Other Conference games
arc against Western Washington on
October 14, Eastern Washington on
November 11 and Whitworth November 18.
In 1951, UBC has been committed to
a full Conference schedule of eight
games.
SUCCESS  FOR THE COMING  YEAR
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GREETINGS
TO THE CLASS OF '53
BEST WISHES FROM
Senator J. W. de B. Farris
Col. Hon. E. W. Hamber
I. J. Klein
Ivan Ackery
Frank Higgins
Campbell, Meredith and
Beckett
CampboSI, Murray & Co.
Alberta Lumber Co. Ltd.
Garvin Ice and Fuel Co. Ltd.
Con-sett Bros. Ltd.
Hobson Christie & Co. Ltd.
H. R. MacMillan, C.B.E.
Dal Grauer \,
Senator Stan S. McKcen
Gordon Farrell
Leon J. Ladner
MacKenzie, White and
Dunsmuir Ltd. x
Nelsons Launderies Ltd.
Godfrey W. Brown Ltd.   ^_
'Pacific Meot Co.
Victoria Tile & Brick Supply
Co. Ltd.
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