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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Mar 13, 1924

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 Issued Weekly by the Student Publications Board of the University of British Columbia
Volume VI.
VANCOUVER, B.C., MARCH 13th,    1924
No. 2 0
MUSICAL S'CTY
GIVES FINE
^CONCERT
Orchestra and Glee Club Display
Great Artistic Ability
The U. B. C. Musical Society, on the
occasion of its Eighth Annual
Spring. Concert, once more displayed
a wealth of artistic ability which is a
distinct credit to the University. The
recital, which was held in Wesley
Church last Friday evening, was enthusiastically received by a large audience of music-lovers.
The Women's Glee Club, and the soprano section in particular, distinguished themselves for artistic interpretation, effective shading and careful yet spirited enunciation in Mendelssohn's familiar "Spring Song." In
combination with the Men's Glee Club
they were also heard to advantage in
the melodious "Strike the Lyre," by
Cooke, and, later, Eaton Fanning's
"The Miller's Wooing," a number
which proved so popular as to necessitate repetition as an encore. Both
choral clubs showed an intelligent
mastery of contrasting tone and expression and a pleasing responsiveness to the conductor's baton in such
numbers as John West's "Love and
Summer" and the melodious "John
Peel." The latter number was sung
with admirable precision and co-ordi-
(Continued on  Page  5)
/
WYOMING DEBATE
1.NEXT WEDNESDAY
Next Wednesday evening the last
of Varsity's International Debates
will take place. This is the third one
this year but is no less important
than the other two. Mr. James Craig
of Arts '25 and Mr. S. Kobe of Arts
'26 will represent the U. B. C. against
Wyoming. The subject of the debate
will be:
"Resolved that the United States
should immediately enter the World
Court."
Wyoming is known to have a strong
team in the persons of Mr. Ralph
Conwell and Mr. Herbert Woodman,
so that Varsity will, to say the least,
experience   stiff   competition.
Nevertheless, Varsity has great
faith in its representatives. Mr.
Craig has shown himself to be an
able speaker on several occasions,
and Mr. Kobe distinguished himself
in his Freshman year by winning the
gold medal at the Oratorical Contest.
It is well known that everyone
about the University is very busy
on account of the Campaign and the
aproaching examinations. But for
those students who find it impossible
to study every night of the week it
might just be mentioned here that
one night of recreation could be
spent in no better way than by attending the Wyoming Debate. In
this way they will not only help to
raise the status of the University In
the eyes of those across the border,
but will also gain knowledge on subjects of vital  and universal  interest.
DAL GRAUER
JlS ELECTED
PRESIDENT
Substantial Majority Proves the
Popularity of Next Year's
Leader
By the vote of the Student Body,
Mr. Dal Grauer has been elected
president of the A. M. S. Mr. Grauer
has a brilliant athletic record ts <tn
All Star Varsity Lacrosse player and
as a Senior A basketball player. He
has twice taken part in International
Debates, and he is this year President of the Literary and Scientific
Department. In an interview, Mr.
Grauer stated that he was the winner
of the Horseshoe tournament, and
that he was once considered to have
a good chance for the Marble
Championship, but unfortunately in
the latter event he was eliminated
by  a  Freshette.
Mr. Grauer wishes to thank, his
supporters for his substantial majority in the recent election, stating that
the hearty support of the students
gives him confidence to face the
problems of next year. The president-elect spoke in confident terms
of the success of the campaign.
Mr. Jack Grant says, "I am particularly pleased by the decision of
the Student Body, because I feel
that Mr. Grauer is fully capable ot
filling the position of President, to
the satisfaction of the entire student
body."
The annual track meet, held yesterday afternoon was won by the
Aggies.
Although weather conditions were
unsuitable, several records were
broken. Full results will be published next week.
FAIRVIEW HUTS TO BE
TRANSFORMED AT CEILIDH
Habitual Gloom that Broods Over the Shingle-Stained Shacks Must
Yield for One Evening—Everybody Out
Everybody out for the "Ceilidh"! Put
a string around your finger and a circle around the date and come. The
Alumni Society promises the biggest
and most spectacular entertainment
in the history of the University. For
one, brief, glorious night the shacks
of Fairview will present a new and
changed appearance, and will become
the rendezvous of pleasure-seekers
from all parts of the city.
The University itself will be transformed. The basement, which is forbidden territory to all save the initiated, will become a shooting gallery.
Dry as dust labs, will become chambers of scientific wonders. The reading-room will be given over to bridge
and Mah Jongg under the sole authority of Lady Luck. Devotees of the
reading-room must for this evening
sacrifice their favorite haunt to the
Goddess of Chance. One class-room
will be honored by a visit from a celebrated fortune-teller who will doubtless practise her profession in an atmosphere more condusive to inspiration than the Cafeteria between 3 and
5. Rumor adds that the Cafeteria will
doff its business-like air and under the
title of Cabaret will cater to those who
desire entertainment with their refreshments. (Tables must be reserved in advance).
A minstrel show, one-act play, iaaio
concert, and dancing in the auditorium
Critics Praise
Spring Play at
Rehearsal
Success of Players' Club Production Is Assured—Attractive
Costumes for Cast
"A powerful play with the most sustained tension and dramatic interest
of any play seen in years." Such
was the comment of members of the
staff and one or two outside critics
invited in to witness the full rehearsal of "Tha-World and His Wife,"
last Saturday evening in the Auditorium. So favorable were the criticisms that the cast and director were
left in no doubt as to the success of
this most unusually effective play
when it is staged on Monday and
Tuesday, March 24th and 25th.
The scene is laid in aristocratic circles in Madrid. In the first act, Miss
Betty Somerset wears a beautiful Parisian model gown, procured by special arrangement from one of Vancouver's foremost ladies' shops. It is brocaded georgette in a robin's egg blue
shade with the latest accordian pleated skirt and a girdle of silver flowers. In the next act, she wears a blue
Canton crepe dress with applied ornaments in the form of tri-colored
(Continued on Page 2)    .
4^
complete the program. In connection
with die dancing a waltz competition
will be held, entries accepted only
from members' of the University and
the various Service Clubs downtown.
This, briefly, is the Outline of what
will doubtless be the crowning public
event of our stay in Fairview. That
it is a hitherto unparalled effort to
raise funds for the campaign, there
can be little doubt. The Alumni can
be depended upon to stage an entertainment in keeping with the high
standard of University public performances. It is essential that the
student body arouse itself to the
opportunities of the plan. The
"Ceilidh" if properly supported cannot fail to be a financial success
in a big way. There will be
abundant opportunity for the public
to part with its money as well as
abundant incentive to do so. But the
public must first be attracted there.
To many, the University is a name
which suggests anything but a "good
(Continued  on  Page  2)
B.C. CO-EDS
WILL MEET
^WILLAMETTE
Winnie    Cawthorne   and    Greta
Mather to Represent. Varsity
To-morrow evening will witness
a new departure in debating. In
King Edward Auditorium, at 8.15,
Varsity will have its first opportunity to hear a Women's International
Debate. Miss Winnie Cawthorne and
Miss Greta Mather, both well-known
members of the graduating class,
will match their wits and eloquence
against the representatives from Wil-
liamette   on  the   subject:
"Resolved that the French should
immediately evacuate the Ruhr Valley."
It is two years now since Varsity
took part in a Women's International
Debate, and at that time Miss Dorothy Walsh and Miss Sallee Murphy
journeyed to Willamette. To-morrow
evening will be the first time such
a debate has taken place here and
it should arouse great interest among
the students.
Knowing Willamette's high standards in debating, we feel assured
that her representatives, Miss Esther
Moyer and Miss Elaine Oberg, will
be debaters well worth hearing. But
there is every reason to be confident
that both the speakers for U. B. C.
will uphold the traditions of the college in a worthy manner, for both
are experienced speakers of no small
merit. Miss Cawthorne won first
place in last year's Oratorical Con-
(Continued   on   Page   6) THE     UBYSSEY
March 13th, 1924
Students Loose
Leaf Supplies
A full line of covers
and refills at reasonable
prices.
MURPHY & CHAPMAN
LIMITED
STATIONERS, PRINTERS
569 Seymour Street
The    VARSITY    SHOP
Thos. Foster & Co.
514  Granville St.
Only a few more days in our
present building. As time for
removal approaches, the reductions throughout the store become more' drastic.
Shop of FASHION CRAFT
EVANS & HASTINGS
Better Quality
PRINTERS
We make a specialty of:
College Annuals
Magazines
Ball Programmes
Etc., Etc.
Students would do well to give
us a call before going elsewhere
678 Seymour St.
PHONE SEY. 189
TREASORIAL
SWEEPSTAKES
They're off next Monday! For the
first time in years the treasorial
sweepstakes will attract universal attention. So far six horses are rumored as possible starters, but one of
these may be scratched. The Burt-
smith Stables are entering A. R. Fee,
a three-year-old of some racing reputation. This horse has been trained in
the C. Ampaign Field and.should give
all the others a run for their money.
The intrusion of the farmers into the
sporting end of politics is seen in the
fact that the U. F. O. are entering L.
A. Atkinson, their fastest horse in the
event, and if this horse does not finish in the money, all those who have
bet on him will be disappointed. The
third entry is that frisky young colt,
T. J. Keenan. The supporters of this
animal count on it giving the others
an exciting time of it, as it has much
experience with Bizz Nesmen, a fact
which will stand it in good stead. Gor-
die Abernethy, the scientific wonder,
will chase the others around the track,
and may surprise a lot of the wise
ones who think that they can ignore
him where their bankrolls are involved. The sixth wonder of the world,
the singing horse will be heard from
when J. Kania, the Musical Society
entry capers on to the track. Nobody
knows just what ability this creature
possesses, and the various jockeys
are much perturbed. Artie Laing another farm horse is reported as having entered, but well, the race track
touts all claim that he will be scratched at the last minute. His backers
all vehemently declare he will show
a clean pair of heels to the field, so
there you are. A curtain raiser may
be staged by the offering of a secretarial handicap, but as we go to press,
there has been only one entry. The
race starts at 10 a.m., continuing until 3 p.m. Helen Turpin will be in
the judge's stand, and will dole out
tihe pari-mutuel tickets, some twelve
hundred of which are on sale. Nobody
may bet on more than one horse, nor
are they allowed to be more than one,
unless they can get away with it.
A. X. M.
LIONEL WARD
& COMPANY., LTD.
Printers
of
Magazines
Papers
Annuals
and
All Business
and Society
Stationery
and Printino
Telephone Sey. 195
816-320  Homer  St.
Vancouver, B. C.
THE CEILIDH
(Continued from Page 1)
time." They must be disillusioned on
this occasion and no one can do this
better than the students themselves.
Already the advertising campaign has
started in the local press. (Backed
up by speaking of the "Ceilidh" to
your friends.) T'he students can
back it up by telling their friends all
about  it.
A special student ticket has been
printed which entitles a student to entrance into every event and includes
refreshments—all for fl.25, just half
the price charged the general public.
Just three hundred of these tickets
have been issued.
University students should cooperate in every way with the
Alumni and make this the crowning achievement of the campaign.
d
^PLAYERS' CLUB
(Continued from Page 1)
whorls embroidered on, with a cockade of ribbons to match at the waist.
This dress is modelled on one worn
by Alma Tell, the leading lady in Cyril Maude's latest New York success,
"Aren't We All?"
Miss Berkeley, who plays the more
matronly Mercedes, will wear in the
first act a dress of black sequins over
black satin, and with it a flame colored Spanish shawl. Later, she wears
a dress of purple crepe de chine with
a flower girdle.
If only for the sake of the fashion
display, it is quite safe to predict that
not a woman, at least of the University, could be tempted to miss the
play. As for the men, it is rumored
that, on occasions, they enjoy putting
into practice their critical faculties
quite as much as do the fairer sex.
Seniors !
Goodness knows you need
a Corona in college, but it's
in business the man with a
Corona really shines. Get
your Corona now and learn
to use it before you start
hunting that job.
Price $69.00
Graham Hirst
Company
THE CORONA PEOPLE
812  PENDER ST.  W.
Sey. 8194 Vancouver, B. C.
Kansas University has inaugurated
the radio-reunion. On December 10,
1923, from 8 to 10 p.m., when air
conditions were supposed to be. ideal
for transmission, thousands of graduates assembled in local meetings to
listen to the "ring of the world-
famous college yell, the 'Rock-
Chalk,' " and to join in singing the
elaborate program of college songs
broadcasted from the college gymnasium.
Tea Cup Readings
Free with Afternoon Teas,
3 o'clock to 6 p.m.;
Palm and Card Headings
to Dinner Patrons, Free, 6.30
to 8.30, by Madam  Verona.
Music and Dancing from
9.30 to 12 o'clock p.m.
Purdy's
675 Granville Street
The Florence
Confectionery
497   BROADWAY   W.
(Corner Cambie)
I.i^ht  Lunches Tobaccos
Confectionery
Hot Meat Pies a Specialty
A cosy spot on a cold day.
ERNEST   T.   TAYLOR,
Fair. 5697.
EL as\'i\
Spalding Sweaters
Are Warm Friends
Become Acquainted!
\ Of Canada. Umjted
424 Hastings St, W., Vancouver, B. C.
THE
CAMPING
SEASON
will soon be here.
That old Tent might last
another year if
DUCO TREATED
For light waterproof
TENTS
Canvas Goods
Camp  Equipment
Outings Limited
Tel.  Sey. 4886
817 PENDER ST. W. March 13th. 1924
THE     UBYSSEY
Ed. Da Motta
Hair Cutting a Specialty
Expert Attendant
□
2568 Heather St.
Speaking of Suits
The new Special Order Samples will surely make a decided
hit.
The  cloths  are  much  better
.and  prices  to  suit all.    When
you are  down  this  way let us
show you a few new models.
Thomas k McBain Limited
665 GRANVILLE STREET
Semi-ready  Shop
EMPR ESS
Phone Seymour 2492
Miss Verna Felton and the
Allen Flayers in
"Why
Wives GO Wrong"
Domestic Secrets Bared
Evenings,  8:30.-.25c,  55c,   60c,  75c
Weekday  Matinee    20c,   30c
Saturday Matinee  30c, 40c
Kiddies, any time   15c
500 Gallery  Seats  15c
McGill & Sparling Ltd.
formerly
"Shaw & McGill
wish to announce a change of address from 658 Robson Street  to
718 ROBSON STREET
We solicit your Sporting Goods
trade at our new store.
Phone Sey. 4653
rENUS
PENCILS
"[TOR the student or prof, the
*■ superb VENUS out-rivals
all for perfect pencil work.
17 black degrees—3 copying.
American Lead
Pencil Co.
22* Fifth Are.
New York
Write for
booklet on
Venus Pencils and
Vends Evekpointed
Mechanical Pencils
Varsity Soccerites
Do^nrme Nationals
The Varsity first soccer eleven
boosted their league average at Athletic Park last Saturday at the expense of the Nationals. The Collegians had the dl'OH on Iheir rivals, but
were unable to score more than two
goals, one in each period. The first
came from a well-placed free kick
taken by Tommy Wilkinson from away
out, which the National goalie apparently misjudged. The students had
completely re-arranged their team
since last Saturday. Phillips played
center forward during the first stanza
and Ternan at center half. The two
stars changed places at half time.
Baker played forward and maintained
a neat combination game, but was at
fault in his shooting. Tommy Wilkinson played left full back. Tanny Butler played left half in Ledingham's
place, as the latter had his knee
wrenched last Saturday. Arnold and
Reid played well for the losers.
In the second half the Nationals
tried to stage a come-back, but were
seldom in the picture, and Mosher had
an easy time of it. But it was not until well on in the game that Huestis
put things on ice for the Collegians
when he sent in a fast shot that had
the railwaymen's custodian beaten all
the way. Deans substituted for Lundie. Emery, Crute, Mosher and Buckley played in their usual positions.
The game ended with Varsity still
pressing, but unable to add to their
score.
VARSITY JUNIORS
VS. ST^JfflARJTS
The Vanity third t<iam n'r"""! broke
another team home record on Saturday, when they fought St. Mary's to
a one-all draw at Gordon School. Although both teams failed to produce
their best form, the game was close
and interesting, especially in the last
fifteen minutes, with both teams striving for an advantage.
Varsity scored on a penalty through
Black, but the Saints retaliated, and
Sutherland, in spite of a good effort,
was unable to keep out a close shot.
After half-time, Varsity was the more
dangerous, but no more goals resulted. Heaslip and Warden were in
great form for the Blue and Gold, and
the Saints' defence was the strength
of their team.
I Line-up: Sutherland; Warden and
Davies; Ledingham, Heaslip and Taylor; Smith, Verchere, Partridge, Dynes
and Black.
Science '24 Lose Point
To/Science '26 In
c/    Rowing
Science '26 wrested the extra point
from their senior brethren in the Interclass Rowing Finals, when they defeated the '24 crew by half a length
in the feature race of the Annual Regatta.
In the coach-boat race with lady
coxswains, Science '24 defeated Science '25 by three lengths, and in the
double sculls, Oliver and Bain took
the title from Seymour and Ellis by
two lengths. The strong V. R. C. senior four found Varsity a tough proposition, but succeeded by a length.
In the race between the junior crews
of the same organizations, the Rowing Club took the contest somewhat
easily, when one of the seats in Varsity's shell unfortunately stuck. Following the exhibition, the spectators
and participants enjoyed a tea-dance
in the Club quarters.
The Teams.
Science '26—Norman, Bain, Oliver^
Barton.
Science '24—Geigerich, McKee, Let-
son, and  Smitheringale.
Science '24—Letson, McKee, and
Grace Hilton.
Science '25—Demidoff, Callender,
and Myrtle Nixon.
V. R. C. Senior—Kazll, Hutch eson,
Hillman, and Roberts.
V. R. C. Junior—Finlayson, Angus,
Finlayson, and Roberts.
Varsity Senior—Jones, Bain, Oliver
and Zoond.
Varsity Junior—Mounce, Plummer,
Steede and Smitheringale.
BADMINTON  NOTES
On Saturday afternoon a match was
played against,l^irview_Ciub:—The
latter club worn by lb "sets to 9, but
the match was on the whole much
closer than previous ones. •
It is expected that a return match
against the West End Club will be
played on the home courts on Monday,
the 17th. The committee is now waiting a reply from the West Enders.
By courtesy of the Fairview Club,
members of the TJ. B. C. Badminton
Club may use the King Edward courts
on Saturdays from 3:30 to 7 p.m. Shuttles and netts, if not with the janitor
at King Edward, can be obtained from
O. Woodman at 1035 11th Avenue W.
The Importance of the
Invisible
THE ORIENTAL is the new
and beautiful undergarment
designed for la jeune fille who
does not wear a corset. It is
soft, but snug, and is expressly
fashioned to hold the lower part
of the figure firm, and is therefore a perfect foundation for the
costumes of a slender and boyish silhouette. The natural figure is enabled to achieve all the
grace and symmetry of the Eastern dancing girl or the Spanish
gypsy—hence the name Oriental
is applied. Made of suede, of
jersey silk, of satin or brocaded
silk and combinations of these
materials.—$3.50, $4.50 and $7.25.
Drysdale's Corset Shop, Second
Floor.
Midway
Pharmacy
Cor. Broadway and Heather St.
W. H. Caldwell, Prop.
Phase Fair. M«
DRUGS
STATIONERY
WATERMAN'S PENS
EVERSHAP PENCILS
KODAKS
WOMEN 'S|BASKETBALL
The Senior A Girls lost to the Adan-
acs at Westminster, 22-6. The victors
fiad—the edge all the way.
The Team: Doris Shorney, "Gay"
Swencisky, Isabel Russell, leabel McKinnon, Bea Pearaerand "Patsy" Robinson. U/
The Senior B Girls won an interesting game on Monday afternoon when
they defeated the Normals 12-8.
The teams were very evenly matched.
Varsity opened the score, Normal following a minute later. The score was
4-6 at half time. In the first part of
the second half, Varsity pulled ahead
and remained so, although Normal
picked up greatly near the end. Catherine Reid played a stellar game for
Varsity, scoring 10 of the 12 points.
The Team: Margery Bell, Alda Moffat, Catherine Reid, Irene Carnworth,
Margaret Ryan, Jean Gillie and Winona Straight.
Values Supreme!
Spring Overcoats
$15   $20   $25
Come and choose from the largest stock in Western Canada—
both light and dark shades in high-class tweeds—coats that are
style-right, shower-proof, wind-proof—coats you can wear at least
six months in the year. Step in and choose yours today—you'll
agree the values are unbeatable.
William DICK Limited
45-47-49 Hastings Street East
OUR GUARANTEE:
"YOUR   MONEY'S   WORTH   OR   YOUR   MONEY   BACK" THE     UBYSSEY
March 13th, J 924
5ty? IbjjHBpg
(Member  Pacific  Inter-Collegiate  Press
Association)
Issued   every   Thursday   by   the   Publications
Board of the University of British Columbia.
Extra   mural   subscriptions,   $2.00   per  session.
For advertising rates apply
Business   Manager.     Phone  Pair.   4485
EDXTOBXAXi   STAFF.
Editor-in-Chief  .' A.   L.  Wheeler
Senior Editor Cliff Dowling
Associate  Editors Miss  Grace  Smith
T. W. Brown
Mfss Sadie  Boyles
Feature  Editor   Ralph   Mathews
Literary  Editor W.  C.  Murphy
Exchange Editor Miss Gwen  Stirling
Sporting Editor J. Cowx
Chief Reporter  H.  C. MacCallum
BEFOBTOBIAL STAFF.
Laura S. Mowatt, John Grace, Dorothy Arkwright. A. Earle Birney. Florence Williams, Doris McKay, R. O. Norman, Dave Taylor, R .W. Ball. Marion
Smith, Les Buckley, Alan Hemingway.
H.   D.   Wallis,   Louis   Smith.
BUSINESS STAFF.
Business Manager  T. J. Keenan
Assist. Bus.  Mgrs W. H. Sparks
Eric  Dunn
Homer   A.   Thompson.
Circulation Manager  F. J.  Brand
Business   Assistants H.   C.   Etter
Miss Eloise Angell
Miss Isabel Macbeth
E. J. Eades
EDITOR   FOR   THE   WEEK
Sadie   Boyles
TEMPORA mutant.ur
It must be plainly evident to anyone in close touch with University
life that a change has been taking
place in the dominant intellectual
atmosphere of student life. Two
years ago letters and things literary
formed the great interest of those
who weie, if not the leaders, at least
ihe most influential thinkers, of the
University. These students by their
genuine appreciation of good literature, as well as their actual performance in that field, were responsible for making literature the great
object of thought : and discussion
here. Although as many students
are studying literature as ever ue-
fore, every student in the third and
fourth year Arts must realize that
at the present, .time interest in subjects economic and historical is
uppermost.
The transition is natural, as the
greater part of thinking people the
world over are Vitally interested in
questions of : economic welfare, and
university students in sharing the
interest in these problems are in
close touch with the spirit of the
times. Moreover, manifestation of
concern in literary matters is not
often likely to be so evident and
visible as that which the consideration of actual present-day problems
can arouse, and the phenomenon of
a literary influence prevailing in a
university will probably not recur
soon. This is not to say that tne
study of literature is in any sense
lessening; that surely is impossible.
It is rather our present purpose to
pay tribute to- a brilliant group of
students now passing out of college
who succeeded in doing this remarkable thing—making interest in the
arts a palpable and pervasive influence in the life of this young University.
THE   HONOUR   SYSTEM
Owing M the success which the
Honour System has attained in California and some of the other universities, there has been a certain
amount of agitation among the students in this University to install it
here. In spite of the fact that the
Californians consider, that they have
proven it a success, we do not believe that the system is sufficiently
effective and workable to warrant
its introduction into the University
of British  Columbia.
According to the Honour System
each student has it placed upon him
self to maintain order within the
college. More important still, perhaps, each student writes his or her
examinations in private, rather than
under the eye of an invigilator. Now
in order to maintain such a syt.mm
it can easily be seen that a great
amount of advertising is necessary.
Then too, in order to deal with the
various breaks of discipline that are
reported, a student court with all the
accessory officials that such an institution would require must be maintained. On the whole it has been
shown that the system is extremely
expensive, and it is very doubtful if
the results obtained have been
worthy of the work and time spent
upon it. Until such time as the
Honour System has more definitely
proven its effectiveness, we do not
believe that it should be placed upon
the shoulders of a Students' Council
which is already overburdened with
work.
\yrt\r\
ITIATIONS
As the term draws to its close, it
is only fitting that certain matters be
decided before examinations come to
prevent meetings and discussions. One
of these problems is the question of
initiations.
In spite of the current dislike of
"hazing," and dislike, too, of anything
verging on the barbarous and the vulgar, there is a widespread feeling that
the purely nominal initiations of last
year were hardly satisfactory. They
seemed to lack spirit, and, indeed, few
of those attending, either as victims
or spectators, were much impressed
by initiation as a means for creating
unity and college spirit.
We must find some method of recognizing the changes in our midst which
will provide an outlet for the high
spirits of youth without tolerating
anything in the nature of hooliganism,
but which will create in the newly-
admitted a sense that they, too, share
in the irghts and privileges of University   students.
ALUMNI   SOLIDLY   BEHIND
CAMPAIGN
Britannia Beach,  B.  C,
March  6th,  1924.
Mr. J. Brown.
Convener, '23 Alumni Committee.
Dear Joe:
Your letter to hand re assessment of
out-of-town members to finance the Cabaret. Please find enclosed ten dollars,
being contribution from myself and Mr.
C.  W.  Hooper.
Regretting that we are unable to be
present to offer any personal assistance, but with all good wishes for the
success of the Cabaret and the CAMPAIGN  in  general,  I am.
Yours very sincerely,
BERT   A.    PEARSE,
Science '23.
Htll
OMINATIONS
She   borfe^ upon  me  with  her  baleful
eye
And    thrust    her   pen    within   my
shrinking  hand.
Of course, I couldn't fail to understand
What  she  was  after.    I  could  only
sigh:
"But I don't know her, never heard
her name!
Get   other   signatures—why   ask   for
mine?"
She  hypnotized  me  with  her  eyes
aflame,
Saying in awful tones, "You have to
sign!"
I signed ... I wonder, will her candidate
Prove nice and tactful, kind to shy
Freshettes?
I wish I'd had the strength of mind
to wait
Until   more   certain   . . . Oh,   these
vain regrets!
What is the sense of all this speculation
Now  that  I've  been and  signed ifer
nomination? /
NANCY^EE.
The number of women students in
higher education in Germany has
greatly increased. In 1912 it was
2000; in 1914 it was 4000; last year
the enrollment reached 8179. Studies
are not limited as formerly to medicine and teaching, but include sub-
ieci s useful in social and industrial
careers. A number of women have
of late chosen jurisprudence, theology, pharmacy, and the natural
sciences.
by the
athletic
college,
building
Land   has   been   acquired
University of Vermont for an
field   for  the   women   of  the
with  plans  later  on for  the
of a gymnasium.
The University of Texas has a
thriving Women's Athletic Association of over two hundred active
Members.
"* AT THE ORPHEUM
An all-round bill of delight is presented this week at The Orpheum,
featuring Harry Green, as George
Washington Cohen, the Hebrew boy
who could not tell a lie, in Aaron Hoffman's "Cherry Tree" classic. Mary
Haynes, dynamic singer of exclusive
songs is another big attraction and
there are five other splendid acts.
Next week's bill features Sarah Pad-
den, who will be remembered here
for her wonderful dramatic art in
"The Clod." She brings a new one-
act comedy playlet "The Accusation,"
by Edwin Brown. Alyn Mann in "A
Whirl Of Dance," M'lle Ann Codee,
Farisian Comedienne and many other
features are also offered on this bill.
^       Where Beautij Unites
fhslenqer ?2*k Unusual Economy
SedClfl      '"pHE latest Reo five-passenger
-*■    Sedan,—with  a   straight-      /
lined body that is as stylish outside as it is comfortable inside—
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j
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and make the goodness lasting.
—With the famous Reo double-
framed chassis and the incomparable Reo 50 horsepower, 6-cylinder
engine to provide mechanical rug-
gedness and flexible power in generous measure.
REO MOTORS Limited
1301-03 Granville Street, Corner, of Drake
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Seymour 737.738
REO
jke Cjold Standard
of Values March 13th 1924
THE      UBYSSEY
Proof of a
Good School
7  Gold Medals.
3  Silver Medals.
2  Gold  Pencils.
Awarded by Typewriter Companies for Speed and Accuracy
in Typewriting.
INDIVIDUAL
COURSES
Day   and   Night.
B.C. Commercial
School
709 Georgia   H. C. Duffus S. 7564
Buy Today at Reduced
Prices
GENUINE
EVERSHARP
PENCILS
CLARKE & STUART
Co., Ltd.
..Educational Stationer* and Printer*.
530  SEYMOUR  ST.
Telephone Seymour 8000
NU-TOP SIX
$6.00 HATS $6.00
ARE JUST RIGHT
You'll Say So Yourself
LINFORTH'S  Ltd.
417  Granville   Street
Formerly Richardson & Potts
SPRING   SUITS
are  here.    See  our Special
Sports Model at
$27.50
Turpin Bfos. Ltd.
MEN'S  OUTFITTERS
629 Granville St.
CLASS AND CLUB
NOTES
V SCIENCE '24
• The members of the Mining and
Civil Engineering Classes of Science
'24, were the recipients of a very
delightful surprise, last Thursday
afternoon. The surprise took the
form of afternoon tea, served iu the
Mining Laboratory by Mrs. Thompson and Mrs. W. E. Duckering. Tasty
sandwiches and cakes were fully enjoyed by the students. The men appreciated the opportunity to meet and
become acquainted with Mrs. Thompson and Mrs. Duckering, and many
expressed the opinion that such
pleasant afternoon teas make any
course  of study  more interesting.
X ARTS '26 BRIDGE.
In aid of the CAMPAIGN Fund,
Arts '26 held a successful bridge last
Wednesday at the home of Miss Mary
MacKay, on Angus Ave. Those in
charge of arrangements were: Misses
Lenora Irwin, Freda Edgett, Ruth
Teeple, Agnes King, Kathleen Clark,
Margaret Jones, Doris MacKay, Sadie
Boyles, Honor Kidd, Eileen McDonald, Kenna McDonald, and Bea Mc-
Means. The prizes were drawn for
by Miss Bollert.
±
EXCHANGES
/, MATHEMATICS CLUB
The Mathematics Club will meet this
afternoon (Thursday) at 4:00 p.m. in
Room 34. The subject "Hyperbolic
Functions" will be treated by Mr. S.
B. Ingram. The historical development of these functions will be outlined, and a discussion of their application in physics will follow. Anyone
interested in the practical side of
mathematics is invited to be present.
7     OUTDOORS   CLUB   HIKE.
On Saturday, March 15th, the Outdoors Club is planning to hold a hike
to Hollyburn Ridge. This is not to
be one of the exclusive "for men
only" expeditions, but is open to
everyone. All are asked to catch the
West Vancouver ferry at 9 o'clock
sharp, and each one is to provide his
own lunch. So everybody out for a
good time and an all-day climb.
(e*!gin
GINEERING    DISCUSSION   CLUB
Mr. Fred Guernsey delivered a very
instructive lecture when he spoke to
the members of the Engineering Discussion Club on "Forestry in the
Dry Belt." Mr. Guernsey explained
the frequently used "strip system"
and other methods of mapping timber  lands.
In conclusion Mr. Wilkie gave a
short but helpful criticism.
A
ARTS   '26
On Saturday next Arts '26 will
hold a hike in North Vancouver. The
route will be from the Ferry to
Ambleside, where a hall has been
secured for dancing, and where refreshments, provided by the ladies,
will be served. At the hall music
will be provided by a student four
piece  orchestra.
^ / MUSICAL SOCIETY
/ (Continued from page 1)
nation between parts, but with a slight
diminution in that liveliness which
characterized other offerings, a fall-
ing-off due partly to the heavy strain
on a tenor section strong in tone but
weak in volume. The well-known "Soldier's Chorus" from Gounod's immortal "Faust" were also much appreciated. Miss Ida Kerr proved a careful
and sympathetic accompanist.
The offerings of the orchestra were,
on the whole, excellent and showed a
marked improvement over last year's
Oregon Agricultural College.—The
college military band will start on its
nineteenth annual concert tour.
We wonder if the Heinz Band is
thinking  of touring.
Oregon Daily Emerald.—A request
to gather gift books for Japanese libraries and important educational institutions which were destroyed by
the recent earthquake in Japan, is being made to several American colleges
and universities by Nicholas Murray
Butler, director of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.
"Books of all sorts and kinds will be
welcome," states Mr. Butler, "but
more particularly in the fields of law,
philosophy, political economy, sociology, fine arts, literature, and the natural sciences."
McGill Daily. — "The flower girl"
freshman was a source of comment in
a California school recently. She
planted, cultivated, and sold flowers
to pay her college expenses. Her biggest clean-ups were made on the occasion of college dances, when she
supplied special corsages in college
colours.
McGill Daily.—A volume known as
the quarto of Richard II. was found
some days ago in the Redpath library.
Only one other copy of this edition of
Shakespeare is known to exist. It is
one of the rarest, though it is not intrinsically the most valuable of
Shakespeare's- plays in this particular
form.
Whitman College.—The Whitman
College Y. W. C. A. is having marked
success selling five-cent candy bars
every morning immediately after the
conclusion of chapel services.
creditable performance. Pleasing, artistic effects were produced by high
tonal quality and technical neatness
in such numbers as the "Torch Dance"
from German's "Henry VIII," and
Arndt's "Nola." The delicate, plaintive appeal of MacBeth's "Love In
Idleness" was rendered in an appreciative manner, together with pleasing
renditions of German's "Morris Dance"
("Henry VIII"), MacBeth's "Forget-
me-not" and Allan's "Periscope
March." Errors in pitch on the part
of the brass and occasionally the wood
instruments marred, in Suppe's overture, "Light Cavalry," what would
otherwise have been one of the best
instrumental numbers of the evening.
Much credit is due Mr. Wilbur Grant,
A.T.C.M., the skilful and indefatigable
conductor of both Glee Clubs and Orchestra, who has spared neither time
nor energy throughout the college
year, in careful and intelligent instruction. His untiring efforts contributed
greatly to the elevated standard of
the evening's performance.
Excellent support was given by the
assisting artists, Miss Beth Abernethy,
violinist, and Miss Lillian Wilson, soprano, both of whom were enthusiastically applauded and encored. Miss
Abernethy displayed a warmth of tone
and expression and a fine command
of technique in Schubert's "L'Abeille"
with its difficult pizzicato, and in a
characteristic Spanish dance of de
Sarsate's, the "Romanza Andeluza,"
and other numbers. Miss Lillian Wilson revealed her wealth of vocal artistry in several well-chosen numbers,
such as the haunting "I've Been Roaming" (Home), Del Acqua's "Song of
Provence," and a pleasing Swedish
folk song. Mr. Ira Swartz accompanied the assisting artists.
It costs no more
to buy
a FORD
from DIXON'S
Dixon Motors Ltd.
1291  Granville Street
Phone Sey. 274
As illustrated
MEN'S SOUTH AFRICAN
FIELD BOOTS
Of genuine cowhide, calfskin
lined, two full double soles;
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Made in England in 5 and
6 fittings. <feC (\{\
Price, pair tyO.\J\J
Hudson's Bay
Company
The Palm Garden
Fruit, Confectionery
Ice Cream and
Tobacco
Hot Lunches Served,
Also Afternoon Tea
Phone Fair. 877
Cor. 10th and Heather St.
Pitman Shorthand
BUSINESS COLLEGE, Ltd.
422 RICHARDS  STREET
The business of a country Is
carried on by the men and women
who have been trained in th*
lines of commerce and industry.
We can give you all that is required to make you a successful
business man or woman.
The   PITMAN   COLLEGE,   during    25    years,    has    successfully
trained young peeple to  hold responsible  positions.
Oor. Hastings St.  Phone Sey. 9135 THE     UBYSSEY
March 13th, 1924
// anyone can teach
you to Dance
VAUGHN MOORE
Can
Vaughn Moore
PRIVATE   DAXTCIBTO   SOXOOX.
S18 Hastings West Sey. 707
B. C.   ELECTRIC
PRINTING
We giTC the very Best in Serriee
and Quality
Dance Programmes, Letterheads,
Envelopes, etc.
also      Personal   Stationery
COADE & DAUBNEY
028 Bsoadwat Wist
J. W. Foster Ltd.
345 Halting! St. West
All the Newest Models
in College Suits and Overcoats at Prices that are
right.
0
See us before Buying
The
Royal cleans
everywhere
thoroughly.
Patronize Canada's finest Barber Shop. We have 18 chairs and
specialize in Ladies' Hair Bobbing
as well as Manicuring.
The ROGERS BUILDING
WM. BRENNAN, Proprietor
404 Granville St.      Phone Sey. 7868-0
"Dovm the Marble Stairs"
POKER GAME?
Who wants to join the Arts '25
poker party session, like the one that
was thrown at the last class meeting?
Protection is assured, for the University marshal took part and the Arts
irarshall saw what was going on and
did not object. The president of the
class did not even turn his back
upon the wicked men indulging in
the game. What is the University
coming to? Protection for the students playing poker in Room X! What
will the council say? Will McLeod
be brought up for not doing his duty?
Will Wally Shore  be censured?
The scandal has commenced already. People are talking about this
gambling scene. An explanation is
demanded from these two men. The
true story of the affair was given to
the representatives of the Hades
Daily Howl last night.
It appears from reports that Arts
'25 held a class meeting to discuss
campaign money ideas and suddenly
while everything was running smoothly Len Gaddes raised his voice and
cried, "Its worth two dollars to me.
I will take the risk." At once cries
of pretest were raised. Was tnis a
poker session? Those in the remote
part of the room gazed upon Mr.
Gaddes and those about him.
Brick McLeod gazed down into his
hidden hands. Were there cards
tucked away in his palms, asked
those farther away? "I'll take a
chance and cover that two," he said.
Yes, it looks bad for the University
marshall.
Archie Fee convinced those in the
room when he nervously cried, "I'll
raise it to five."
"I'll call that five," said Kenny
Schell.
"Here is my cheque for five," said
T. J. Keenan, the multi-milliouaire.
It was for Gaddes to add three more
to his first amount and McLeod added a like amount.
The evidence seems convincing,
and those who saw the action stood
shocked at such bold poker playing
in the University.
Len Gaddes afterwards explained
that he was merely offering the
money to the Point Grey development campaign committee and tne
others have taken an oath that their
action was similar. Thus in a minute and a half Arts '25 had donated
25 hard earned dollars to the campaign. Others are digging down too.
Who wants to join the game?
v v WILLAMETTE DEBATE.
y (Continued from Page 1)
test by an exceedingly able speech.
She has also shown her capabilities
as a public speaker as this year's
president of the Women's Literary
Society. Miss Mather, too, has been
on the executive of the same society
and has had experience in inter-class
debates.
It is sincerely hoped that in view
of the time, trouble and expense involved that the debate will be witnessed by a large crowd. It should
be remembered that on this dubate
rests the fate of all future Women's
International Debates, so it is important that this one be strongly
supported.
LEAP YEAR  STUFF
 -ing solutions for marital troubles
are offered in "Why Wives Go Wrong"
the strange play that is neither comedy nor drama, which is drawing big
audiences to the ,Empress Theatre
this week.
For instance, here is one of many
outstanding scenes:
"What would you do if you found
that your wife was deceiving you?
Divorce her, or kill the man?" asks
the husband of the bachelor.
The bachelor thinks for a moment
intently and then replies: "My solution is to do both—it's the surest way
to get free publicity."
SEA   MYSTERY
(A Child's Song)
Adown the winding river,
Aside the pebbled shore,
Floating with whitest lilies
Who passes evermore?
She is the mermaid of my dreams,
Sighing with the breeze,
Whispering  to the  sea-shells
Among the watery weeds.
Far off at night I see her
Swaying on soft sea sands,
Twining her hair, to the moonlight
Lifting her lovely hands.
At morn I gather the frail pink shells
Let fall from her scaly tail,—
And the nectar sup from each cockle
cup
That she left when the moon grew
pale.
And I cry again as forever,
"Where lies the barnacled way
To her  palace  of  pearl  in  the  sea-
depths
Where  coral   lanterns  sway'/
±^T. H.
A PLEA FOR SUPPORT
Now that Varsity is out of the Mainland Cup and Provincial Championship, and also out of the running for
league honors, it looks as if very little silverware were coming through
our Soccer Club. Varsity has but two
chances, in her second team, for the
Brunswick Cup, and in her third team
for the Con Jones Cup. Neither of
these teams has a chance to win
its league championship, but they are
concentrating on the knock-out tournament. The second squad meets Central Park in a replay of the semi-final
and, as these teams fought to a 4—4
overtime draw, a little support ought
to just turn the balance.
The Juniors meet C.P.R. in the other
competition Saturday, and on present
form their chances of "copping the
cup" are good. Now that the first
team is insured against relegation, the
danger is over from that source. But
increased support for the other teams
need not detract from that team's following; it is the non-supporting element that should be aroused. Get out
Saturday and help to bring at least
one trophy to Varsity!
I
INTEREST IN GREEK.
A marked revival of interest in
the study of Greek is noted in New
England colleges. Colby has a beginning class of twenty-one. Bates
enrolls a hundred students of the
language. Dartmouth also reports a
marked   increase.
■Dancing
Scmment
556 Granville St.
Vancouver,  B.  C.
THE LATEST
UNDER-ARM
BAGS
are of tapir lamb with gilt engraving, and in patent or embossed leather, silk or brocade;
have inside pockets and mirror.
Some are finished with a large
tassel.
$6.75 to $13.50
"It Costs no More to Shop
at Sommer's"
Fancy Voiles at 75c. per yard
New patterns in very pretty color    combinations,    floral    designs,
for spring and  summer dresses.
38 inches wide, per yard 75c.
Palm  Beach Cloth for one-piece
dresses or two-piece summer suits
in  helio,  sand and coral.
36 inches wide, per yard 60c
Miss J. EMSLIE
695   BROADWAY  WEST
Phone Fairmont 724
Boost Canada's
National   Game
CHARLTON & RATHBUN
Photographers and Miniature Painters
2044   GRANVILLE   STREET
(Cos.  3th  Ave.)
PHONE   BAY.   176      -    VANCOUVER
Alexandra Dancing Academy
Wednesday and Saturday Evenings
Our   new   Augmented   Orchestra   playing   14
instruments features all the latest dance hits.
•804 Hornby St., Opposite Court House- March 13th, 1924
THE     UBYSSEY
MUCK-AMUCK
?&£}
TO   WAS   OR   NOT   TO   AM—THAT
IS   THE   TASK
Ladies' Novelty
Crepe Blouses
$2.98
This is a special buy and the
low price has only been made
possible by the quantity purchase of the surplus garments of a famous Eastern
manufacturer. These are
truly striking waists—picture them in your mind—
over-waist style with alltyme
crepe sleeves and sides of
plain color and front and
back panel of Oriental figured silk. Scores of different
styles and colors to choose
from. Sizes 36 to 44. A special offering at
$2.98
David Spencer
Ltd.
Phone:   Fairmont 3.
T. J. Kearney & Co.
Funeral Directors
Private  Ambulance  Service
802 Broadway W., VANCOUVER
Saturday Evening
Social Dance
LESTER COURT
GXS
Private Lessons by Appointment
Sey. 1689
The Lester Academy
TEMPESTUOUS
They were going on location.
"Tell the scout to locate a hydrant,"   directed  the   Director.
"Yes,   sir."
"And, Andy, you bring along a coil
ot garden hose."
"Yes, sir."
"James, you have the watering
pot?"
"Yes,  sir."
The boss happened to be passing
by  and  asked,  "What's   happening?"
"We are going to film the 'Tempest'."
MUCKLETS
Friday's election meeting brought
forth a tew of our future Politicians.
• * * *
The position of Treasurer of the
A. M. S. seems to be more popular
than  ever  this  year.
• •    *
Being very foolish, Mr. Muck advises all students that examinations
are   looming   up   thro'   the   mist   of
activity.
• •    •
The Cannibal's Coral society will
gather after the consumption of the
new missionary and sing, "Where is
That Dear Old Grad-u-ate?"
FRESH-O-LETS
Shall I go up to the Reading Room
And  hear the  Freshettes  gossip?
No   marbles   there,    or   horse-shoes
zbom.
Shall I go up to the Reading Room
Where   Latin   calls   with   voice   of
Doom?
It really is a toss-up.
Shall I go up to the Reading Room
And hear the Freshettes gossip?
Cub—Is   the   Editor   particular?
Star—Yes, he raves like the deuce
if he sees a period upside down.
Soph—I was over to see her last
night and some one threw a brick
and hit the poor girl in the ribs.
Frosh—Did  it  hurt her?
Soph—No, but it broke three of
my fingers.
Professor:    "What  is a  radical?"
Student:    "A radical is usually one
who   stretches   the   truth  to  fit   the
theory."
M-—K E—M (criticizing an essay).
"In these essays I want quality rather than quantity.
P—R—What's wrong with the quality  of   mine?
M—K E—M—There  isn't any.
"Father, I have decided to become
an  artist."
"I've no objections, provided you
don't draw on me."
WASHED OUT
Nelson. "What's the matter, Carroll?    You  look  sleepy."
Bullen: "Aw, I had to sit up all
night. The washwoman had my
pajamas."
\. I,, fj, I
her
Professor—Nature     provides
children with protective color.
"She certainly is good to the girls.'
Why did Chapman park out there?
He had a Miss in his car.
DATS
Starting
Wed. Bight,
41
MATINEES—THURSDAY—FRIDAY—SATURDAY =
BIG ELEVENTH ANNIVERSARY BILL I
SARAH PADDEN
In
"THE   ACCUSATION"
A DTew One-Act Comedy
Playlet by Edwin Burke
JOE E. BROWN     ■
AN   O.  HENRY   CLASSIC
"ARREST   ME"
THE FIVE FETLEYS: Aerial Comedy 8c Cleverness
M'LLE ANN CODEE
The
PARISIAN COMEDIENNE
SAM GREEN & MILDRED MYRA: Symphonic tc Slncopated Moments        55
ANOTHER  ORPHEUM  FEATURE   ACT =
ALYN MANN
In "A WHIRL  OF DANCE"
ATTRACTIVE  PICTURES
CONCERT ORCHESTRA =5
in
Featuring    Snappy
YOUNG MEN'S OXFORDS
priced   from
$5.00 to $8.00
Ladies' Sandal Patterns in
patent and log cabin,
at $6.85
10%  discount to students
on presentation of this ad.
□
WILSONS
Twin Shoe Stores
157-159 Hastings Street West
The Shirt for
Hard Wear
GENUINE ENGLISH
WHIPCORD SHIRT
$2.75
CHOICE PATTERNS
Wear a Mann's Shirt
Mann's Men's Wear
Specialty  Shops
411-474 Granville St
RADIO
SETS
PARTS
LOUD SPEAKERS
Drop in and ask for our
new price list.
RADIO CORPORATION OP
VANCOUVER, LIMITED
Sey. 3814    6C5 Dunsmuir ? -.. H-v
8V
THE     UBYSSEY
March 13th, 1924
GLUBB&STEWART
LIMITED
Big Shipment of the
Celebrated
20th Century
Clothing for
Young Men
Just opened up
at Special Prices
Clubb & Stewart
LIMITED
309-315 Hastings  Street
QUALITY
PRINTING
Invitations
Dance Programmes
Announcements
Printing (or ail
the Social Fundions
of the School
Term
The
Sun Publishing Co.,
Limited
Printing Department
137   PENDER   STREET,   WEST
Dancing
Private and  Class Lessons
Lady and Gentlemen
Teachers
W.E.Fenn's School
COTILLION HALL
SEY. 3058-O or SEY. 101
Appointed Editor-in-Chief
At the regular meeting ot the Students' Councilman Monday evening,
Thomas WT^fown of Arts '25 was
appointed editor-in-chief of the Publications Board to succeed A. Lloyd
Wheeler, who graduates this year.
Tommy is a well-known and popular member of the University. During the past year he has been one
of the Associate Editors on the
"Ubyssey," and has gained considerable, experience which will enable
him to adequately fill the position of
Editor-in-Chief. As Vice-President of
the Men's Literary Society this year,
and Secretary-Treasurer last year, he
has shown his executive ability.
Tommy is also a prominent member
of the Letters Club, a publicity man
for the Campaign, and a member of
ihe International Scholarships Committee.
It is expected that Mr. Brown will
be very successful as a representative of the Publications Board on
the  Council.
Xfriday mass meeting
A keen election meeting was held
last Friday noon in the Auditorium,
for the purpose • of placing before
the student body the two candidates
for the Presidency of the A. M. S.
The candidates, Mr. Grauer and Mr.
Kelly, delivered short speeches, in
which each placed before the students the policy which he would
pursue if elected. After speaking,
the candidates withdrew and an opportunity was given to any student
to advocate the, cause of either
speaker. Many students availed
themselves of this opportunity, to
praise the records held both by Mr.
Grauer and by Mr. Kelly. At the
close of the meeting, Yell King
Bishop leaped to the platform and
conducted   a   Varsity   yell.
Th& University of Wisconsin has
established a new four-year course
to be known as the Chemistry-Commerce Course, intended for men
who desire to fit themselves to hold
commercial positions in which a
thorough understanding of fundamental chemical principles would be an
asset.
"We are living in a chemical age,
and the business man who has neglected to acquire a knowledge of
fundamental chemical principles is
in the same boat with the farmer
who continues to use the methods
of fitfy years  ago."—Science.
LIONKL WARD  * COMPANY,   LTD.,<^
The Rev. N. L. Ward
"Speaks on Religion
"Mysticism and Comparative Religion" was the attractive title of a no
less attractive lecture delivered in the
Physics lecture room last Thursday
evening by Rev. N. Lascelles Ward.
The meeting, which wa^field under
the auspices of th^_J£a1icouver Institute, was well attended both by students and the general public.
The speaker gave a clear and extensive outline of the history and
growth of religion in its relation to
mysticism (the doctrine that truth
may be apprehended by the soul unaided by the senses or the intellect).
The attempt to follow this doctrine
represented, declared Rev. Ward, the
struggle of the human soul in the
search for diety and reality. The different phases of this struggle and the
mystic theories held in different religions were mentioned and explained, the lecturer dividing religions into groups according to their conception of a God.
The Christian religion -he declared
to be the merging point of the highest concept of mysticism reached in
all other doctrines.
Xf ELECTIONS
The following have been elected for
positions on the Students' Council.
Thomas W. Brown, Editor-in-Chief
of Publications Board. Miss Elsie
Rilance, Secretary (by acclamation).
Nominations for Treasurer, Lisle Atkinson, Joe Kania, T. J. Keenan,
Archie  Pee,   Gord   Abernethy.
\c-
WALTZ   COMPETITION
Entries for* the Waltz contest in
connection with the Ceilidh, should
be sent to Mr. Jack Grant as soon
as possible. Each class will enter
"teams" in this popular competition.
Aggies and Science men will be at
liberty to invite any partners they
may desire, whether Varsity students
or not. The fee for entering the
competition is $2.50.
The Week's Events
Thursday,   March   13th—
Mathematics Club — "Hyperbolic
Functions   by   Sidney   Ingram   in
Room  34  at 4.15  p.m.
Illustrated Lecture—Physics Building at  8  p.m.
La Canadienne—Meeting at the
home of Mr. Baird, 786 Gilford,
at 8 p.m.
League   of   Nations   Society—-"The
League    and    the    Church"—Dr.
Smith,  Principal  of  Westminster
Hall,   in  Auditorium  at  noon.
Friday,   March  14th—
Presentation   Day.
Williamette   Debate,   King   Edward
Auditorium  at  8  p.m.
Saturday,   March   15th—
Soccer—Varsity vs. Kitsilano at
3 p.m.
U.   B.   C.   vs.   Central   Park   at   3
p.m.
Brunswick Cup  Semi-final Mc-Bride
Park.
Varsity Juniors vs. C. P. R. Shops
at 3 p.m.
Arts '26 Hike at West Vancouver.
Arts   '27   Hike  to  Hollyburn,  West
Vancouver.
Monday,  March 17th—
Election of Treasurer of A.  M. S.
Tuesday,   March   18th—
Musical Society Meeting in Auditorium  at  noon.
Letters     Club—"Gilbert     Murray's
Translations   from   the   Greek"—
Magdalene Aske  (Dr. S. D. Scott,
395 14th Ave. W.)
Wednesday,   March   19th—
Debate—U. B. C. vs. University of
Wyoming, King Edward Auditorium at 8 p.m.
EVERY
SUIT
REDUCED
BUY
YOURS
NOW
C. D. BRUCE
Limited
Cor.  Homer and Hastings
EXTRA ATTRACTION
One Concert Only
Mark Hambourg
One of the World's Supreme
Pianists
ORPHEUM
WEDNESDAY,   MARCH    19
At  5.15   p.m.
Prices:   85c,  $1.10,  $1.65,
$2.20 and $2.50
(Tax included)
Seats now on sale at
WALTER P.  EVANS
limited
657   Granville  Street
Baseball
Days
Have
Come! The Spring
and Summer
1924 Catalogue,
just published,
contains  information
about all the
things required
in baseball.
Lisle Fraser
Sporting Goods
1020 Granville Street
Wholesale and Retail
^PRINTERS,  StS   HOMER  ST..  VANCOUVER.  B.  C.

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