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The Ubyssey Nov 16, 1951

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 ,_ ^SrV^ffl^rtSiS^"-'ifir"T
sRsiTf or
BRITISH
NOV 2 0 ^51
THE LIBRARY
The Ubyssey
VOLUME XXXIV
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1951
5 CENTS
NO. 23
Remember ...     |
Catholic Schools Deserve
Government Grant-Forum
Debaters Claim Parents
Forced To Pay Twice
SIX SPOTS NOW OPEN
ON UBYSSEY NEWS STAFF
" Positions are now open for two senior editors and four
reporters on The Ubyssey staff.
Managing Editor Doug Heal announced Thursday that
The Ubyssey now has room for six new staffers. Heal said
that several staff members have recently taken part-time
jobs with the downtown ppers and are unable to fulfil their
Ubyssey duties.
All those interested in learning the art of journalism
are asked to see Doug Heal in the Ubyssey offices. North
Brock basement today noon or Monday noon.
Applied Science student Armand Paris convinced members of the parlimentary forum yesterday that they should sup
port separate schools.
Paris gave the Catholic view-?"       	
point   in   discussing   whether   TWEEN  CLASSES
schools or religious denomina- ~"
tions should receive public help.
According to Paris the purpose of the state is tp ensure
REFLECTIONS of your moments at varsity permanently
recorded for you i n the 1952 TOTEM—On sale TODAY
only. Absolutely no spring sales of this outstanding yearbook.
Student Editor
Fired For Ideals
'^MONTREAL—(CUP)—At a meeting of the Student'Council Monday the editors of the Student newspaper Le Quartier
, "'■",,*.»,.„., .'a4,. V.".,..'7T~~'~"~—f LaUn were .dismissed.
The editor-in-chief, Oilles Dug-
nay .was not allowed to'speak ln
his own defense. No reasons were
given for the action.
It is generally understood, however, that the dismissal was due
ti) alleged left-wing leanings, and
a tendency to reflect the personal
opinions of the editor. A specific
issue of the paper was mentioned
at the meeting—one covering the
royal visit. It was said that several
of the articles were uncomplimentary and satirical.
Duguay said that he had been
the victim of a smear campaign. He
denied any left-wing tendencies in
hinislf or   his  staff.
He also charged that the proceedings had been undemocratic
as he had not heen allowed to
sneak In his own defence.
ii Gras
Hot As Hell
Say Chairmen
The Mardi (Iras committee is already sizzling* with plans for the
gayest Mardi Gras ever under co-
chairmen Susan James and Rod
Filer.
The committee went straight to
Hell for the theme of the 1952
Ball, and are calling it Mardi Oras
in Hades. Decorations and musk*
will carry out this hellish theme.
We can expect a line-up or red-hot
chorus girls, and devilishly beautiful Queen candidates.
Already dreaming up fiends, furies and spectres are the following
committee members: Betty Wilson,
Alan Hecket, Frank Moore, Dick
Archam/bault .Marylln McRae, Jan
Olsen, Carol Potter, Geoff Dewis,
Ron Kelly, Louane Kramer, Michael
P-age, Bob Falconer, and Hob Rush.
AMS To Hold
Auction  Friday
Lost and found articles will
again  go  on" auction  next   Friday.
Last Wednesday's Chinese auction sale got rid of less than 'half
of the lost gloves, scarfs, umbrellas
and books; so the AMS is doin;'
a repeat performance, in the Hrock
Lounge at noon Friday.
All proceeds from the auction go games proclaimed the winner to be
to  the  AMS general fund. Louise.
Ubyssey Blamed
For Pep Meet Loss
Kickapoos Ask  Council
To  Bill  Paper  For  Loss
Kickapoos are demanding $46 from the Ubyssey to cover
the loss on last Friday's pep meet. The club blamed lack of
UBC publicity for the poor turnout at the meet.
Kickapoo    officials    claimed'	
that    la»t    Friday    the    Ubyssey
ran the story about the nep meet
on page three and only 400 students
turned  out."
"The week before, when the pep
meet was page one news nearly
1000 enthusiasts attended."
Kickapoo president Bill St. John
brought up the matter at last Monday's council meeting. However, no
action was taken at that time.
T*h*e rules and regulations of the
AMS provide no basis for the
Kickapoos  demands.
However, AMS president Vaughn
Lyon states that If councillors
decide the $46 loss was the Uby
ssey's fault, they have the power
to move the money be taken from
the Publication Hoard Budget,
Councillors will talk about the
$46 again next Monday.
Athletic
Night Is
Successful
The annual highlight of women's intramurals took place last
week. "Athletic Nlgiht" was a big
success and was enjoyed by all
those who participated.
The aggregate win went to Arts
:i. closely follewed by ArtsGrey and
the combined team of Newman and
VOC.
Feutured in the big evening, was
the ping-pong final.
Three   hectic   and   hard   fought
UBC  BRASS TACKS' ON
THEATRE   PROGRAM
UBC Player's Club production of Eric Nicol's "Brass
Tacks'' will be included on the program of prize plays to
be presented in York Theatre, November 23 during the
Community Arts Council Theatre Night.
Also on the program will be a premier of prize plays by
B.C. writers Weldon Hanbtiry and Mrs. D. Y. Simpson.
The plays are directed, acted and produced by members
of the 26 groups making up the Drama Section of the Arts
Council. Nicols comedy "Brass Tacks" is directed by Joy
Coghill who plays the leading role as Kim Murray.
Tickets for Arts Council Theatre Night are on sale at
Modern Music Store. Reservations may be made by phoning TAtlow .°)(i22.
Head  Carpenter
Dies At  72
Tuesday noon the flag on the
staff overlooking Burrard Inlet was
lowered to half mast ln honour of
Mr, William Molr, foreman carpenter at UBC from  1919 to 1949.
Mr. Molr died Tuesday morning
November 13 at th age of 72. He
came originally from Dundee, Scotland to work at the University
when It was still housed in the
Fairview shacks.
"the good of all." He felt the
state should not be an end in
itself.
"Parents should determine the
child's type of educntion," Armond
claimed. "When the state dictates
what the child should be taught
you have totalitarianism," he continued. •
AMS Gets
Rolling
On Alleys
AiMS officials are going ahead
with Inquiries Into the construction of the War Memorial Gym
bowling alleys.
President Vaughn Ly«nr Thursday told the Ubyssey that, as a result   of   Wednesday's   referendum,
AM.S Is seeking offers from various! pointed out that private schools
firms interested In the construe-1 cememted together private groups
tion. j rather than uniting the society.
Although they have emphatic stu-j "These groups should pay for
dent support in this undertaking, the prlvledge of not accepting the
they still need the approval of the I education provided by the state,"
Administration, which legally owns ! she said. She also mentioned that
TAX INIQUITOUS
Paris complained thaf people
who sent their children to denominational schools pay a double tax.
"The schools these parents send
their children to preform the same
Sanctions yet these parents must
pay taxes for schools their children  dont  go  to."
He pointed out that children at
denominational schools here don't
receive governmental medical and
mental care. Catholic school supporters were forced to resort to
their own meagre funds for such
"necessities."
POOR   FACILITIES?
Speaking on the legal aspect of | ture
the  case,  law  student  Jane  Ban-
field said the secularization of the
state   guarenteed   the   civil   liberties of the people.
Miss Banfield felt that secular
schools protected the unity and
solidarity  of  the  community.  She
Speaking
Classes
To Start
The current milk controversy will be examined on
Monday at 12:30 in Arts 100
when the SCM presents Dr,
Robert Clark of the Economics
Dept.,    speaking    on    "Milk
Prices."
*      *       *
PARLIAMENTARY FORUM announces, that Dr. G. N. Tucker's
regular speaking class will be held
on Monday, at noon ln Arts 106.
Any club members and all thoso
interested in taking public speaking classes are invited to attend.
The classes give instruction in beginner speaking, elementary debato
and radio voice technique. Beginners and advanced speakers alike
will find them of Invaluable assistance in development of voice cul-
the building. However, there seems
to be no question that they will
get it.
LYON   DISAPPOINTED
Lyon admitted he was disappointed in the small turnout at tha
polls Wednesday. But he feels the
20 per cent of the student body
wiho voted "J"st about represents
those who are Interested in the
hqw'llng alley and constitutional
revision   questions."
Lyon also feols that "It Is too
bad students rejected revision of
council. The status quo means that
there are not enough people to
handle the work; larger council
could have carried on a much better  government.''
UBC Co-Ed May Be
$900,000 Heiress
UBC students may have a real, million dollar heiress in
their midst. ,
Lee Bloedel, 20-year-old UBC Arts student, and her sister
Virginia may each receive a gift of $900,000 f¥om their grandfather R. D. Merrill wealthy Seattle lumberman.
private schools can not afford the
facilities necessary for adequate
high school education.
She cited Newfoundland, where
four denominations are supported,
as an example of the chaos en-
volved in such a system.
HOW MANY SYSTEMS?
"If y>u support one seperatt**
school you must support all of
tnem," she continued. "Jewish
synaogriie schools and Chinese
language schools are held outside
the regular school and the parents pay for it,'* she stated.
Miss Banfield said that Catholics
■felt public schools did not treat
such subjects as sex and history
In a proper manner.
"If tliere is something missing
here, these parents must not be giving their children enough education at home and therefore should
pay the extra charge," she concluded.
A member of the audience ques-
Continued on Page 3
SEE SCHOOLS
Student directories are
now on sale at the AMS
office.
* *      *
'THE  IMPERATIVE OF FAITH'
will ba topic of Rev. Murdo Nlcol-
son when he speaks at a meeting
sponsored by VCF in Eng. 202 st
noon  today.
* *       *
BALLROOM   DEMONSTRATION
practice will start at G p.m. to
night in (14.
**       *        *
SPECIAL FILM SOC meeting will
be held in Arts 208 today. Film on
motion    picture    history    will be
held  in  Arts  208  today.   Film on
••notion picture history will ba
shown.
* *       *
THE CIVIL Liberties Union Is
sponsoring the visit of a well-
known European labor-leader to
the campus. Mr. Max Schactman,
who is both author and translator of others' books, will spe«k
on Friday, at 12:30, in Engineering 200 on the subject "The United States, 1951." In his speech he
will discuss the state of civil liberties in the United States.
* *        *
MAMOOKS — there will be a
general meeting of all members on
Monday at noon In the Men's Double Committee Room, Brook Hall.
* *        *
THE BOTANICAL Garden Society present slides on alpine
flora on Friday, November hi at
12:30 In Biology 100. Dr. Taylor
will  speak  on  the slides.
* *        *
THIS YEAR'S residence girls
are sponsoring an informal danco
in the Brock Hall on November
IH. Last year's girls are invited to
come and bring their escorts.
At  present  there  seems   to  be
<
some doubt whether the sisters will
get the money. Merrill Is trying
to give away a fortune of $12,500,-
000 which he received from the
will of the late Tommy Lee, radio
and automobile heir.
However, the existence of a second will has been claimed at the
Los Angeles court proceedings.
This will apparently did not name
Merrill as sole beneficiary of Lee's
will.
Lee appears to ho unconcerned
with news of her Imminent wind-!
fall. Her sorority sisters in Kappa
Alpha Theta reported that Lee
made no mention of the $000,000
\*«lien she saw them In the Caf
Thursday.
"Hee Just  Isn't   that sort of person," said one of them. "She could
■ gel   a  million  dollars one  day  and
not    say    anything   u limit    il    Hie
next,"
WILL NOT EASILY  FORGET'
Royal Couple
With Visit To
Pleased
Campus
Their Royal Highnesses The
Princess Ellaaheth and Duke
of Edinburgh "will not easily
forget" the welcome given
them at University of B.C.
when Ihey visited Hie ca.nipus
October 20.
In a letter addressed to The
Chancellor, UBC, The Princess'
private secretary expresses for
the royal couple the pleasure
il gave them to come lo the
I'niversily of Hellish Columbia
during   thulr   visit   to   Vancmi-
ver. Their Royal Highnesses
only regret, the letter stated,
was that their time tliere bad
to be so' short, and also that
they  were so  late  In coming,
Their Royal Highnesses asked especially that their thanks
be conveyed to all concerned.
and to the teams that gave the
demonstration   football  game.
Their Royal Highnesses have
also asked me lo thank you
must sincerely for Ihe heaull-
I'ull)    carved   Thuiulerl'ird   and
Ihe football for Princess Charles, the Princess' private secretary  Martin  Charters, wrote.
WHS President Mary Lett
presented the Princess with a
miniature totem pole of argilllto
enclosed iu a box of black walnut with a CBC crest on the
surface.
'Hirds' captain Dave MacFir
lane made the presentation of
lhe antogra.phed ball for Prince
Charlie following Ihe demon
si ration   football game. Page Two
THE UBYSSEY
Friday, November 16, 1951
THE UBYSSEY
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Authorised as second class mail by tbe Post Office Dept. Ottawa. Student subscriptions
11.00 per year (included in AMS fees). Mail subscription $2.00 pr year. Single copies
five cents. Published throughout the University year by the Student Publications Board
ot the Alma Mater Sooiety, University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions expressed
herein are those of the editorial staff of the Ubyssey, and not necessarly those ot tbe
Alma Mater Society or of the University.
Offices in Brock Hall, Phone ALma 1624          For display advertising, phone ALma 3253
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF LBS ARMOUR
EXECUTIVE EDITOR—ALLAN GOLDSMITH MANAGING EDlf OR—DOUG HEAL
Nawi Editor, Don Brown City Editor, Dennis Blake: CUP Editor, Sheila Kearns;
Women's Editor, Florence McNeil; Fine Arts Bdltor, John Brockington; Copy Editor,
Jean Smith.
Artsmen In Common
This campus will never have an Arts Undergraduate Society as long as the Engineers
■keep electing one.
Artsmen do not want to have an undergraduate society shoved down their throat.
Despite the good intentions of the Engineers, they will never get a rival as long as
they try to conconct one.
An Arts Undergraduate Society as an organization of Artsmen must come from the
Artsmen themselves. The Artsmen must, be
shown what benefits can ibe obtained from an
undergraduate society.
Fighting with Engineers offers no attraction.
Arts flourished when they had some purpose, such as sponsoring the fall ball and the
junior-senior prom. N
The fall ball disappeared after the fiasco
in the Armouries four years ago, when they
thought they would save money by having
it on the campus instead of at the Commodore.
.   The junior-senior prom just died a natural death.
(/(disappearance of the AUS actually
began ^ore this, however. The real murder
when the AUS lost its common room
to make room for administration offices.
Since then Artsmen are no longer concentrated around the arts building, but are
Spread all over the four corners of the campus.
Still, a common room exclusively
for Arts might do some good. Prof. Stephen Leacock said that if he were starting a
new university the first thing he would get
is a common room and next some professors.
Perhaps our administration has forgotten
the importance of common rooms, where stu-.
dents can relax, eat their lunch, discuss the
problems of the world and the university. .
The only place left is Brock Lounge
which is governed by rigid rules respecting
overcoats and the eating of lunches.
It would seem that the faculties with the
least need of common rooms have been given
them. For example, the law students spend
all their time together as one group, and in
addition have a common room.
Something more, however than a common room is needed. There must be a nucleus to start such a project.
At present the LSE has a number of member clubs that do not come to LSE meetings,
take no interest in LSE activities and get no
budget.
If these clubs followed the lead of the
Engineering clubs and got out of the LSE
and under the banner of an AUS, not only
might they get a budget, but would have an
organization that would look after Iheir in-
terets.
Clubs such as the Physics Society, the
language clubs, Geography Club, Psychology
Club would be far better under an AUS.
Because the AUS was suspended, these
clubs lost over 200 dollars, money that they
oould haye well used for themselves and for
the AUS.
If the Undergraduate Sooieties Committee could send some representatives to these
clubs, and put this proposition to them, pointing out the advantages, they could bring
them into the fold.
Eventually, the Engineers might find
their old whipping boy.
Orr Yo-Yo's And Culture
It was with considerable alarm that the
The Ubyssey noted a terse item from the
Toronto branch of Canadian Universtiy Press
which informed us that students at U of T's
Hart House will "no longer be allowed to
manipulate their yoyos while waiting in line
for meals."
As any yoyo manufacturer will tell you,
the art of maniuplating small wheels on strings
is one of the major achievments of our civilisation. * v
The fact that it has spread to an old-established institution of higher learning where
students are so enthused by it that they while
away the weary hours waiting in line for
their bowl of soup by perfecting the, art is surely evidence of a progressive attitude at Hart
House.
It is not so many years ago since universities were regarded as institutions devoted to
seeking truth.
Such an attitude, of course, must be re
garded as intolerable in present day.
The North American way of life, as all
devotees of that great social philosopher William Randolph Hearst are well aware, depends on Free Enterprise and its ultimate
end must be the Furtherance of Business and
Acquisition of Personal Security asv typified
by Individual Savings Properly Invested so
as to Ensure a Fair Return.
The university therefore must be geared to ensure the fulfillment of this end.
A university must prepare men for Field
of Commerce, it must produce Men with Adequate Skills of an Essentially Practical Nature to ensure their SUCCESS in our society.
We suspect that Hart House, in banning
yoyoing, is in grave danger of returning to
the intolerable medieval concept of a university.
All Right Thinking Men should arise at
once in protest.
—Les Armour
. . . For Those Who Died
On November 17, 1939 at dawn, nine
Czechoslovak college students were taken
to an airport outside Prague and, in presence
of hundreds of other students escorted there
to witness the "exemplary punishment," mowed down by bullets of the German Elite
Guards.
These executions, together with the shooting of many Czechs the next day, came as
the climax of the trouble that began on October 28. Thousands of students had gathered
in Prague to celebrate the Czechoslovak Independence Day and to protest thereby against the Nazi occupants.
Among them was the 22-year-old Medical student Jan Opletal who was brought
home with six revolver bullets in his body
and who later died. A huge crowd of students mourning his death, marched with
torchlights through the city. At this point
riot cars full of Hitler Guards took over, rolling up to the University. In dormitories,
where many who had not turned out for the
demonstration were still in their night clothes, some of the students hastily piled up
barricades of tables, beds and chairs. Others
fled into the night amid a spray of Nazi -machine gun bullets.
Soon Prague heard the crack of firing
squads. Hundreds of students of both sexes
were brutally beaten, over 2000 students and
professors were arrested and an undetermined number of wounded was sent to Prague
hospitals. About 1200 of the imprisoned were
sent to the Oranienburg - Sachsenhausen
concentration camp.
The decree of the jReichs Proctor K. H.
Frank closed down all the Universities in
the Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia
and the names of the nine executed students
who were the representatives of the different
faculties were printed on red posters all over
the city as a warning.
November 17 was declared throughout
the world as the International Students Day.
We remember today the sacrifice of the
young Czech students who were not afraid to
openly demonstrate their resistance against
the brutal Nazi occupants of their country.
—GEORGE ROHN.
COACHING
TWO 4TH YEAR CHEMISTRY
students will coach or hold classes in Chem 100, 200, 300 for students who require help ln these
subjects. Phone Al* /1296L between 7 and 8 p.m. 22—10
FRENCH STUDENTS. COACH-
Ing by specialist. M.A. (UBC) Phonetic School at Sorbonne, Paris.
Numerous successes with backward students. AL 2792Y.      22—3
LOST
YELLOW OORDUROY & GREEN
plaid drawstring bag containing
wallet, key case, bank book and
Identification cards. Reward.
LOST — BLACK FOUNTAIN PE-N
Eng. 406. Pleace contact Eddie at
OE 4284. 21—4.
,ROOM AND BOARD
SMALL   PRIVATE   ROOM   AND
bord, near bus. Fifty dollars  per
month. Ph. CH  8786, Mrs.  F. W.
James, 32M W 8th ve.
TWO STUDENTS, TWIN BEDS,
close to Varsity. Available AU
3174-M. 19-3
WANTED
FUND OF BACTERIOLOGY BY
LaSalle and Principles and Practices of Bacteriology by Bryan.
Hut 20, Acadia Camp, At 0026.
22—2
POR»tALE
SUPER ALLIS SKIS, 7 FT. PLAS-
tic base, hollow • ground edges,
cable harness, new last March. $60
value for $35. Call Oeorge, AL 0001.
23-2
ENGLISH LADIES BICYCLE FOR
sale, like new, $60.00. Phone CH.
4063. Evenings. Miss K. Elton.
FORD MODEL 'A* SEDAN. Phone
GE. 2537. After 6 p.m. 19-3
MOTORCYCLE, TRIUMPH B0OCC
In excellent condition, complete
with saddle bags, etc. Low mileage.
Phone AL 3442 L. -20—2
1947 BSA DANTUM MOTOR-
cycle." Excellent condition. Running like new, $135. Phone North
1266R3, Dick. 22—3
MIDNIGHT   BLUE,   SINOLE
breasted tOxedo and tails. Size 38-
40, tall. KE 2497
NOTICES
TEACHER TRAINING DANCE.
Orchid Hall, 2723 W. 4th, Nov. 16,
9 to 1 a.m.
WILL RAY PARKINSON PLEASE
call at AMS Office for his mall.
WILL TYPE NOTES OF STU-
dents of Art Department, band-
writing must be legible. No shorthand. Terms to be arranged. CE
382. Mrs. Moore. 16—8
TYPING DONE AT HOME. REAS
onable and accurate. CE 9778.
Mrs. MacLeod, 2496- West 8th Ave.
1G—10
TYPING, ESSAYS, Theses, manuscripts, card work, letters of application. Notes a specialty and
mimeographing. Eloise Street, Dalhousie Apts., University Area,
Campus rates. AL 0G5UR.
"TYPING DONE BY EXPERIBN-
ced typist ln English and German.
PA  1708 between  9 and  12 a.m.
17—6
TYPING OF ALL KINDS BY AN
experienced graduate. Accurate
ind reasonable. Half block from
UBC bus terminal. 4633 W. 8th.
AL 3242L. *
TRANSPORTATION
RIDE WANTED  —  TWO   GIRLS
would like ride from vicinity 41st
&<nd   Dunbar,   Mon.-Fri.   8:30.   lJh.
Sheila, KE 3374R,
POSITIVELY
Your Lost Chance
TODAY
SALES CLOSE THIS AFTERNOON
AStmmr You'll Always Chwkli
ON SALE IN THE AMS OffiCE  |
Wwr eRNO' vns
• • • • • t
and fl* 8 *f «l
WRIGHT
fOR expert advice on money
matters call on
lOiiiumamtun
Rank of Montreal
i'our Bank on the Campus . ..
In the Auditorium Building
MERLE C. KIRBY,
Manager
WORKINO  WITH   CANADIANS  IN  IVIRY WALK   OP IIP! SINCI 1117
UMI
Exciting! Full-fashioned
Cashmere-treated lambs wool.
Soft! Beautifully finished!
In many exciting new shades.
Now, at better stores.
Cardigan $8.95
Long Sleeve Pullover $7.95
Shore Sleeve Pullover $6.95
GlEN A YR.KNIT    LIMITED    TORONTO
'    (*? Friday, November 16, 1951
THE UBYSSEY
Page Three
mmmmm
John Brocklngton's
Critic On
The Hearth
This column is not usually given over to the reviewing of
records. I, for one, have always been dubious about the real
value of recorded sound, especially when that sound consists
of music. * "
HfRES Mud in-yqur eye
Sculptors Mess With Mud
Making aesthetic "mud, pies"
every Wednesday afternoon ls the
pleasant pastime of a handful of
Visual Arts students.
Under the expert Instruction of
Lionel Thomas in the library basement   workshop   the  various   stu*
 , 1	
To substitute the unreal
quality of proceed sound for
the reality of the "Concert hall
is something I try as often as
possible to avoid.
To me, the true value of the
gramaphone lies ln its ability
to let one bear musk otherwise
inaccessible. But once the recorded sound has assumed fam
iliarity, any value seems lost,
for one of the most treasured
experiences in music is spontaneity, a genuine urge to
make beautiful sounds which
performer's obeisance to prorated accuracy and an engineers
inability to produce anything
but a fair approximation of
live sound makes quite impossible.
Fry's Play Recorded
Which digression brings tiie
finally to the point of this discussion. I have recently heard
a practically complete recorded performance of Christopher
Fry's play "The Lady's Not For
Burning" spoken by tile original New York Company beaded
by John Glelgnd and Pamela
Brown.
In view of the promised production of this piny by tbe
Totem Theatre I have set down
a few impressions garnered
from first reading and then
hearing this work.
It is quite obvious that any
difficulties one might encounter in making sense of the play
disappears as . soon as it is«
heard. Like much great poetry
(some critics consider it necessary for any good poetry) the
appeal is primarily an aural
one. The brilliant, sometimes
gaudy flow of language can
only be fully appreciated
through the ear.
These actors give It a consistently excellent treatment.
Far from reverting to' empty
elocution such as I have heard
from Maurice Evans in his performance of Hamlet, the lines
are not only spoken with the
exquisite    colouring    but    are
*
uttered  so  that  the  sense   is
never obscured.
The breaths are all taken in
the rlghit place and none of the
speakers allows himself to become too entranced with either Mr. Frys poetry or the sound
of his own voice, And It would
be very easy to do the former,
for Frys method consists of piling one linage upon another,
each succeeding picture seeming more colorful than the previous. Without a breathing
space between his acts, one
would surely develop poetic
gout, were such an ailment
possible.
But I am wondering if this is
playable as theatre, if one
could .get any more out of seeing the play than Is possible
from its hearing.
As a play there is a distressing lack of many customary
ingredients such as suspense,
conflict, action and psychologically developed character to
quote a few textbook requirements. One actor might easily
speak another's lines without
fear of losing whatever character his Ingenuity has enabled
him  to develop.
About Burning Witches
The people seem to be either
stock types or vehicles for certain Romantic theories that the
playwright uses to build up his
flimsy plot of the soldier who
wants to be hanged and the
witch who would prefer not to
•be   burned.
Once the novelty of Ihe beguiling* sorceress and the
world-weary young man set
down In a Medieval English
hamlet has rubbed loose, where
are  wef
I am left charmed by the
beauty of the actors* diction,
enchanted by the senltlvity
and sensibility of the actors'
ipresentation, and mad about
the dazzling gleam of Mr', Fry's
language.
But where Is the theatre left?
Poetic drama Is usually both
poetic, and dramatic. Totem
Theatre must answer this question. We shall see.
Vancouver Branch Office — 402 W. Pender Street
ERIC V. CIIOWN, LLB., Branch Manager
TORONTO—(CUP)—New and
serious developments may be arising from the explosion set by Engineers under the School of Law
float at Homecoming week-end.
Gloria, Mrs. (age uncertain), one
of the "girls" on the float ia rumored to be ln critical condition as,
a result of internal injuries suffered from tbe disaster.
Continued from Page 1
tioned Miss Banfield as to whether
Catholics were fully represented ln
parliament "as good citizens should.
be."
WHO *«AYS NOW?
Miss Banfield considered the remark Irrelevant and refused to
comment.
Other speeches from the floor
included suggestion that children;
going to separate schools are indoctrinated in a particular theory
and are thus limited ln their outlooks.
Motion for separate schools was
carried with vote of C4 for to 55
dents In the class attempt to express themselves in the very satisfying medium of sculpture.
TOP  B.C. ARTIST
Mr. Thomas hlm^dlf ls a quail-
field instructor as well as one of
BjC.'s foremost artists. His paintings were recently the subject of a
one-man show at the Gallery downtown, ahd have been frequently
shown  ln   the  University Gallery.
The class has been organized by
the Visual Arts Club In order to
promote a general knowledge of
the methods and materials of artists among students on campus.
8ERVICE3   FREE
Mr. Thomas has generously donated both his time and services for
the benefit of students Interested.
For a nominal fee of $6.00 each
student  Is  supplied  with  subject,
mmmm
.DRAUGHTING
INSTRUMENTS
From $10.00
T-8UARE8,   PROTRACTORS
SET SQUARES
MECHANICAL   ENGINEERS
AND
POLYPHASE  SLIDE  RULES
AMES LETTERING
INSTRUMENTS
ZIPPER   RING   BOOKS
Complete with Sheets and Index
From I2.C9
FOUNTAIN  PENS
Co. Ltd.
STATIONERS  and   PRINTERS
550 Seymour St. Vancouver, B.C
!K!l99!*9!l!i!iffnB
tools, and all the clay he can possibly muddle with; besides 14 two-
hour periods of excellent Instruction.
There is an 'easy-going air about
this class, and from all reports, the
members find their "sculpting" extremely satisfying. Instead of getting mad at the boyfriend (or girlfriend), take it out on a blob of
wet clay—It's far less dangerous,
and really fun.
STUDENT
DIRECTORIES
ON SALE
AMS Offk*
EVER TRIED!
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*Cives your hair lustre — keeps it in
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Vaseline Cream Hnir'i
IH'U:
EATON'S
Modelled   by   Mary   Ross
Copy by Joan
Pork up your November wardrobe
with a bright blouse from EATON'S.
Pictured are three blouses for campus wear, chosen with an eye to the
budget.
Inexpensive and so right for classes—these Mi <o blouses.    Nolo llie small collars and clover
front detail,. Pale blue and soft, greyed green. 2«89
Wonderfully washable nylon tucked and buttoned to flatter.   A Streamlined blouse in palo
blue and white at an unbelieveable . 5.95
Well-cut batwing blouse with a soph is k*a led air.    Collar  may be  worn  open  or closed   at
the throat—as you wish.    Turquoise, black, Ivigo, gray, or burn! orange.   By Yadi.     10.95
Pictures by Eric Skipsey.
EATON'S—Blouses,  Second  Floor Pape 4
THE UBYSSEY
THE UBYSSEY SPORTS
ALEX MacGILLIVRAY, Sports Editor
Assistant Editors—Barry Drinkwater and Vic Edwards
SPORTS NOTEBOOK
ALEX
MacGillivray
The Ubyssey sports scene ... past and present	
Tomorrow afternoon in the stadium UBC Thunderbirds
will play their final game of the 1951 season. Which means
they will be completing their fifth season in American football competition.
And according to reports from Athletic* Director Robert H. (Bob)
Robinett this game which exemplles man's aged-old desire to hot
something and run. will finish in the back. Not by much, mind you.
but it will finish In the hack.
^ 9p fp
Thus It must appear that some progress, financially at least, has
been made since last year when students thought they'd like to keep
tootlbkll on the campus by voting for the Ostrob Plan.
But as Is to be exipected when the football season Is aibout finished, sincere, thinking, people ask questions about footiball and
athletic policies.
One of these, Ron Foxall, in yesterday's Hibyssey asked why so
much financial aid Is given foobbtall while soccer and rugby teams
are supposed to carry on their year's work on small budgets.
He would like to see Canadian sports become the major attraction
on this campus.
And on that point I give him my whole-hearted support.
•n v v
Unfortunately though, rugger and soccer will never appeal to
UBC students simply because the university teams play in commercial league. Thus Ir the stadium were open to soccer and rugger
every other Saturday you could count the number of spectators on
one hand.
You see names like Vindex Club, Collingwood, South Burnaby et
al. don't am>eul to the tj-tplcal university fans.
¥ ¥ *
Football ls starting tp pay its own way now. This year's budget
wasn't ^en touched because of successes at the gate.
While I'm far rrom being an American Football patron, I stilt
realise ihdt every Saturday 4,000 .people are crazy enough to go and
watch tllfe game.    '
And those 4,000 people represent many incoming dollars which
in turn helip not only football but other sports as well.
Football is a main source of income now. Don't you think, it
being the only paying sport on the campus, It should have a little
consideration.
¥ * ♦
P.i. RON-*lf you go and see Robinett he'll be alble to give you satisfactory answers to the rest of your questions.
Sally Rand Spread'
In Use Saturday
Come Saturday, about five thousand grid fans will watch
the Thunderbirds seek their third win this year at the expense
of the Whitman College Missionaries, in their final game of the
1951 season. , •• —	
Friday, November 16, 1951
Hoop Debut Set
Tonight, Sat.
Thunderbirds Tangle  With
Seattle  Pacific  Cage  Five
By CHARLIE WATT
TO-NIGHT at 8 o'clocks the doors of the New Memorial Gym
will be thrown open wide to greet the onrushing hords (?) of
eager hoop-fans.
UBC Thunderbirds will face a strong Seattle Pacific squad
in their formal debut for the 1951-52 season.
It may be a nip and tuck bottle*
for the 'Birds this week-end, thejr
ranks being somewhat depleted. Art
Philips*, .Jolnr Southcott. and Don
Hudson are the only lettermen who
have returned to the squad this
year. Starry forward Ron Blsset,
has been signed to play with the
RHers. In addition, four of last
year's starters have been sidelined
until Christmas, at least.
To add Insult to Injury only last
week, the powerful Seattle Pacific
steam-rolled to a mighty victory
over the once-glorious Clover Leafs.
• Kven Athletic Director R. H.
Robinett takes a slightly dim view
of the current hoop picture.
Sayn Robbie, "(The team) will be
stronger In depth this year, but
will be somewhat weak on hleght
and experience." A tentative start-
OUTSTANDING basketball player with visiting Seattle
Pacific hoopsters, who play UBC Thunderbirds in gym
tonight is Ezra Wheatcropt, Series resumes tomorrow night
in the War Memorial gym.
HOCKEY
Saturday will also be the last
time that Dave ".Moose'' MacFarlane will don Varsity regalia.
Dave, as captain of the UBC squad,
has been an insertion to his team
mates ,and an idol to the fans. For
these very reasons, every man on
the Thunderbirds will be playing a
little harder so as to make his
last game a win.
Quarterback Cal Murphy has had
Instructions to use the single wing,
and the "Sally Rand" spread, in addition to the usual T formation.
This willi enable UBC to make maximum use of Rs fast and light back-
*ield, that Includes Oeorge Plul,
Jerry Nestman and the latest find,
speedster Lou Murphy.
Tickets are now on sale In the
Memmorlal Gym.
Friday, Nov. 16. (Field Heu«e7
Newma'n, Nurses.
A 2, A 4 Pink.
VOC,  A  3  Blue.
Monday, Nov. 19
Aggie, A2.
Ilillel, Pharmacy.
Tuesday, Nov. 20
Home Be, A 4 Silver.
P. Med, PR 2.
C. Swanson
Wins Golf
For the first time ih history,
two brothers battled for supre
macy in the UBC Oolf Campion-
ships. Charlie Swanson captur-....
ed the honors for the second
time In three years, when he
edged brother Ma*} In the 6 hole
final over the University golf
course.
Max had advanced to the finals via a convincing 5-4 victory
over Oeorge McKinnon of Quilchena.
In the afternoon round, Charlie went 1 up at the 19th. hole
when Max 3 putted for a bogle
6, and at the 28th, he was still
one up. His 3 putts In 29 and
30 gave Max the lead.
With the pressure on, Charlies game started to click, and
he fired 2 bircU.es and 3 pairs
consecutively to finish out the
match on the 35th green.
Birds Dusted
Suds Off Pilseners
By BRIAN PRENTICE
THE UBC THUNDERBIRDS hockey victory on Wednesday night may be old news, but in the cleanest game to date
in any league this season, 'Birds blew the suds off the Pilsener
team by a 6-3 score. The game featured a great big hat-trick
and then some from young Steve Gryschuk, Bird's outstanding
rookie. '  —
Ing line-up for the 'Birds, will probably Include the following: Art
Philips, John Southcott, Scott
Fraser Don Hudson, and Brian Upson.
LEARN TO DANCE
•    QUICKLY
•    EASILY
•    PRIVATELY
3 Lessons 10.00-10 Lessons $18.00
Frances Murphy
Done* School
Alma Hall
CE. 6878
3979 W, Broidwi>
- BA 8421
STUDENTS
f.m 0 ■,.- jjs
You'll enjoy
the
commodious
DINING
and
DANCING
features  avail
able here
Specializing
in the best ot
Chinese
Foods and
American
Dishes
DE, SIM
t>RA0(W
Usui xnromrAT
Opp. SeUy 9tmfm%§
Portable Typewriter Headquarters
all makes       16 models to choose from
TYPEWRITER RENTALS
Special rates to students
Vancouver Brownlee Typewriters
611 West Pender PA. 6445
Throughout sixty minutes of fast.
clean hockey the referees did not
thumb one player to the Bin-bin.
Steve (iryschuk and Hass Young,
ran away with the scoring. Steve
scored three goals and assisted on
another two while Hass scored two
and picked up two assists.
Defence Mai Hughes and Lome
Irwin assisted on two goals and'
kept the opposing team from the
vicinity of the UBC goal effectively.
In fact the entire UHC defence
played a tight, well organized
game, and gave goalie Olsen plenty
of   protection.
Bill Olsen is a past master at this
art. In fact it took the Pilsener
team four shots at Bill, three he
stopped, and finally, flat on his
back, he missed the fourth.
'Birds win put them in the run
ner-up spot in league standings,
second to the I'NIO, with two wins
and one loss.
A good goalie should be able to ■ Next week, the Birds play the
do the splits in order to protect high-stepping Burnaby Heavers and
the   far   corner   of   the   goal,   and  they   wl„   ,)e   out  ^   the,p   tu,r(1
straight win.
Birds play the first game at 7:45,
and the PNE Indians line up against the B.C. Electric White Hawks
at 9:00.
RUGGER
Chiefs Meet lomas Sat
By BRIAN WHARF
The Varsity Chiefs meet the lowly Meraloma
squad on Saturday afternoon in their last Miller
Cup rugger game.
Thus far, the Chiefs have compiled a very
creditable record,, losing only one game, tying one,
and winning four. But a team t'omn South Burnaby, which was responsible for the Chief's lone
defeat, and whirl) has not booked any opposition
to It's winning plans and. the Vindex Club, which
lost its only point in holding Varsity to a tie,
art* the  top  ranking clubs in  the circuit.
The Miller Cup competition is, however, only
a warming-up period, preparatory to the ■McKechnie and World Cup series. MacKechnie Cup games
I'or tin* Chiefs Invgah on Boxing Hay in Victoria, where they will tussle with the Victoria Crim'
sou Tide. Outright wiuuora ol this Cup iu flvo of
the last six seasons (and in tlio sixth tying with
Victoria and Vancouver, Varsity will be straining
every sinew and putting forth all their rugger
skill In order to retain the Cup. emblematic of
Coast League Itugby supremacy, in downtown
Vancouver circles, however, a Vancouver Hep.
si'Uiid, that smashed a conuhined North Shore
unci West Vancouver team 'I:'-!) on Armistice Day,
is being touted as the perspective winner. And in
Victoria, there is excited talk ol' a Crimson Tide
team that should cany all before them.' Yet no
matter which XIV finally emerges on top. the UBC
stadium will be the scene of some terrific games
during next term.
With such an enviable record behind them,
the Chiefs will lind it difficult to emulate their
past successes, but if they don't you can lie sum
It won't be for the want of -trying.
UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE
Hrs.: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturdays 9 a.m. to noon
Loose Leaf Note Books, Exercise Books
And Scribblers
GRAPHIC ENGINEERING PAPER, BIOLOGY PAPER
LOOSE LEAF REFILLS, FOUNTAIN PENS AND INK
AND DRAWING INSTRUMENTS
Owned and Operated by the University of B.C.
Save Wisely TODAY.,
for TOMORROW
Consult any of thc following Sun Life Representatives who have had wide experience in budgeting
your income to meet essential insurance needs;
FRED McCOLL
JACK PEARSON
JOHN TENER
LARRY WRIGHT
J. J. CAPOZZI
J. R. BRANDON
ROYAL BANK BLDG., VANCOUVER
PACific 5321
SUN UFE OF-CANADA

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