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The Ubyssey Nov 1, 1949

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 A   REVIEW   OF   EARLE   BIRNEY'S
TURVEY
By George Robertson
Page 2
The Ubyssey
A   REVIEW   OF   EARLE   BIRNEY'S
TURVEY
By  George  Robertson
Page 2
vol. xxxn
VANCOUVER,  B.C.,  TUESDAY,  NOVEMBER  1,   1949
No. 18
—All pilot on by Voysscy   Photoyraplier   Tommy   Hatchet
Trek Leader, Grads Wax Nostalgic As 1922 Days Relived Saturday
HAPPILY GftlNNING after being presented
with an engraved silver tray during half-time
Homecoming ceremonies is A. E. 'Ab" Richards, leader of the famed 1922 trek.
AUTHENTIC DRESS helped lend an air of verisimilitude to reenactment of the 1922 trek
which was staged by members of Kappa Kap^ Gamma and Delta Gamma Sororities Saturday. Marchers paraded around oval and then m i.ched to the centre of the playing field where
I hey formed the letters UBC.
END TO A PERFECT DAY for A. E. Richards i.s shown here as he .signs the grad
register in the main lounge of Brock Hail after
the football game.
Con Educotion Sove Us?
MORE SOCIAL SCIENTISTS,
PHILOSOPHERS ARE NEEDED
(The major educational issue of the day centres around the proportion oj
our educational 1'fXdhies devoted to the physical sciences in relation io that
devoted to the social sciences and philosophy. Because The Ubyssey /eels this
issue of vital importance to mankind, it has assigned editor Les Armour to
prepare a series of six articles on the question. Today's article provides a general introduction lo the problem, ln succeeding articles Armour will discuss
the problems 0/ the philosopher, thc problems 0/ the social scientist, the
public's attitude towards the philosopher and the scientist, the attitude 0/
the philosopher and the social scientist to the public and, jinallu, some possible
solutions to the dilemma.)
By LES ARMOUR
With the atom bomb threatening to send mankind the
way of the dinosaur, civil war threatening the lives of a quarter
of a world's population, starvation threatening another quarter,
and the fear of depression and poverty hanging over the most
prosperous of nations, mankind is beginning to take stock of
itself.
Traditionally we have looked to education
and to our educational institutions for the
ultimate solutions to our problems. Since the
time of Plato men have harbored a hope that
knowledge could provide the key to their
troubles.
Probably such a hope is justified. At any
rate* without knowledge we can be certain of
failure.
BOMB BUILDERS DON'T MAKE PEACE
The question we must face is whether or not our present
educational system can offer us the solution.
In. almost every university today physical scientists far
outnumber social scientists and philosophers. The emphasis
is upon natural science and its application in "vocational
training." f
But can the man who made tho atom bomb make a peaceful world? Can the scientist who invents a new technological
process see that it is applied with the greatest benefit to humanity? Does the graduate in, say, applied science know what
sort of society he wants to apply his science to? Is he as good
at building a democracy as at building a bridge?
It seems reasonable to assume that the philosopher and
the social scientist are better qualified to undertake the finding
of a solution to social problems than is the physical scientist.
Any physical scientist will readily admit, I think, that
science provides means to an end, that those means must be
translated into social means by the social scientist and ultimately applied to ends provided by the philosopher.
Yet our physical scientists outnumber our philosophers
and our social scientists six to one in almost every university.
FALSE DICHOTOMY OF EDUCATION
The reasons for this situation are many and complex. The
public is much more willing to accept the findings of a physical
scientist than it is to accept those of sociologist, an economist
or a philosopher. The social scientist, and the philosopher, moreover, are often unwilling to accept thc social responsibility
which ought to go with their position. They tend to think in
terms of the long run rather than in terms of immediate and
pressing problems, Finally, a government will much more
readily grant funds to a physicist who can promise an atom
bomb in ten years than to a philosopher who may spend a
lifetime searching for a solution to the problem of the good,
or to a sociologist who wants to look for the force which holds
a family together. The physical scientist can promise a definite
answer in a definite time, the social scientist is unwilling to
guarantee the finding of anything anytime.
By some quirk of fate we have come to think in terms of
a dichotomy of education: vocational education on thc one hand
and a "liberal arts" education on the other. When wo think in
(Continued on Page )!)
Gage Blasts Engineers For
'Disgraceful1 Banquet Conduct
Singer To Conduct
First Fall Symphony
Concert to Be Last One If Not
Sufficient Students Present
First of two pre-Christmas campus concerts will commence
tomorrow under the conduction of Jacgue Singer's symphonic
baton *PANDID NEHRU TO
SPEAK ON CAMPUS
THIS THURSDAY
Prime Minister Pandid Nehru of
India will address University of
British Columbia students at 10:30
a.m. Thursday, November It in the
Field House.
Lectures scheduled for 10:110 a.m.
have been cancelled to allow India's Prime Minister to address
students.
It is probable that lecturers will
allow .students to leave class rooms
at 10:15 a.m. if they nre not in immediate vicinity of the Field House.
Streamlined ceremony will be
put Into effect since Prime Minister Nehru will not be able to'
speak longer than 15 minutes.
UBC students will have the privilege
of drinking in some magnificent symphonic music when the Vancouver
Symphony Orchestra, under the direction of Mr, Singer, play the first,
University concert in the auditorium,
tomorrow at 12:30,
UNIQUE PROGRAM
The unique program for the noon
hour "pops" concert has been specially arranged by Mr. Singer and the
Vancouver Orchestra to I'ie in with
International Week. It brings in Spanish, American, Latvian and Russian
strains.
The concert consists of:
Dvorak's   Symphony    No,    5    in    E
Minor, Op. 95 "From the New World"
I. Adagio —  allegro  molto
II. Largo
III. Scherzo — molto vivace
IV. Allegro con  fuoco
Bizet — ExeerpVs from "Carmen"
I. Prelude
II. Aragonalse
III. Intermesso
IV. Les  Dragons d'Alcala
V. Les  Toreadors
Kalnins   —   Two   Latvian   Peasant
Dances
Crliere — Russian Sailors Dance.
Commissionaires To Be Hired To
Maintain Order At Next Banquet
Conduct of engineers at their fall banquet was condemned
as "disgraceful," by Dean Walter S. Gage at a noon-hour meeting of EUS in the auditorium, Friday.
"For three years now," he said, "the
banquet   has   been   an   unorganized,
1100 GRADS HAVE
NOT PICKED UP
TOTEM PICTURES
1100 grads still have not seen their
proofs for Totem pictures.
Treasurer of the AMS Walt
Ewing said that they must be picked up by this Friday, in the AMS
office.
If they are not, the Totem editor
will choose thc picture most suitable for publication.
an
disgraceful, crude   brawl."
It was with a feeling of guilt, he
said, that he approached public spirited individuals for scholarship funds.
When asked: "What good will it do
when students don't know the value
of money and can't exercise privileges," he said he had no answer.
DANGEROUS
"This type of action is very dangerous because it makes it difficult
for deans to convince the public that
this i.s an institution of higher learning when all it sees is students destroying property and conducting themselves in a disorderly manner.''
He said that if the banquet had
taken place among ."savages or cannibals," then the action of narticipants
might have been understood.
A number of prominent men were
invited to speak but were treated
with disrespect, according to Dean
Gage.
"If I had been a speaker," he said,
"I would have gone away and had
nothing more to do with the university."
When visitors come to the campus,
he said he was sometimes ashamed to
show them around because the lawns
and classrooms were littered with
scrap paper and milk and pop bottles.
CONVINCE PUBLIC
"We must convince the public thai
we are no longer schoolboys, and act
like people who have had the advantages  of  higher  education."
Engineering students,  he said,  had
more chance to improve public opinion
of the university, because they are
more organized and homogenous than
other faculties. They can make a contribution of "convincing the public
that this is an institution worth supporting."
Don Urquart read a letter from the
Association of Professional Engineers,
saying the engineering students may
like to bo looked upon as "campus
roughnecks,'' but the scientific field
is "no place for roughnecks or toughs."
NO LIQUOR
A motion Was passed that disciplinary
talks be held before next year's banquet, that no liquor be permitted.
And   that   commissionaires   be   hired
to maintain order.
A speaker from thc floor said that
if liquor would not be permitted, the
banquet shouldn't bc held because
this was "just covering up the fact
that the engineers can't hold their
liquor."
Mussoc's Formal
in Brock Tonight
Annual Mussoc Formal tonight at
9 p.m. in the Brock will use Guy
Fawkes 'Day as its theme.
Patrons for the affair will be Dr. and
Mrs. N. A. M. MacKenzie, Dean W,
Gage. Dean D. Mawdsley, Doctor and
Mrs. L. W. MacDonald and Mr. and
Mrs. C. Haydn Williams. Mr. Williams
i.s celebrating his 25th year as musical
director of Mussoc.
Tickets are $2 per couple and can
be obtained from any member of the
executive  or  at   the  door.
'Tween Classes
Philpott Speaks At 1 welve-1 hirty Today
Elmore Philpott, defeated Independent candidate in the
federal by-election in New
Westminster, will speak on the
campus at 12:30 today in Arts
100.
He will speak under tho auspices
af the International Council sponsors
of International  Week  at  UBC.
Mr, Philpott is a prominent columnist on a leading downtown daily.
* * *
MODERN TREATMENT in TB will
he the topic of the address of Dr,
Elliot Harrison when he speaks to
UBC pre-meds at TE' Institute auditorium. The meeting will begin at
fi  p.in,
Dr.   Harrison    i.s   the   chief   .surgeon
of the TB Control for B.C. His lecture
will   be  illustrated  by  slides.
Arrangements have also been made
for a special film, Diagnostic Stand-"
aids in TB. The. film will proceed Dr.
Harrison's   lalk.
* •& A"
MRS.  DOROTHY  STEEVES,  ,i,.led
authority    on    economics    and    world
affairs,   will  speak   to   the  CCF  at   12
noon  tomorrow  in  Arts   100. Topic  of
the   address   will   be   "The   Effective
Solution   to   International    Problem.-.."
held tomorrow in the auditorium at
fi p.m. Regular and new members are
asked to turn out as concerts will
start on November 1.7,
* * *
GEORGE WEAVER will speak to
members of lhe CCF Club in a meeting at   12:,'i0 p.m.  iu  Arts 20-1.
VVeaer, well-known Marxist, will
give a series of speeches everv Tuesday   for some  weeks  lo  come.
"k "k "k
IT.C LITERARY and Cultural For-
EI.VlOKi'.    I'llll.l'OI
.  .  . columnist
■¥•¥■-¥■ I  urn   tomorrow   will   debate   the   topic.
DR. A. E. "ARE" RICHARDS, will' "Resolved  lhat   Vie   Hay   as The  Uby-
speak to tin- Aggie today at   12:HI1 p.m. , sse\ '.s one  good   writer,"  during  their
in   Eng.   201.   Subject   of   his   address    regular annual  meeting  in  Arts 200 al
will   be  "Opportunities  Open   to   I'ni-    1222\) p m.
I vei'sily    Graduates    in    Ihe    Field    .
I Agricultural  Economics,"
j ^ _y ., lure   club   u dl    be   held   al    L'alH   p in.
'      I'liC  SYMPHONY   rebeal ..,1   will   be    I new    m   ltd   V2
•Y Y -Y-
GENERAL   AIEETING   of   Arehitoe Page 2
THE UBYSSEY
Tuesday,   November   1,    1949
Ubyssey
'• .,  .Member Canadian  University Press
Authorized as Second Cl.a-s M.ul. Po.-l Oflice Dept., Otmwa, Mail Subscriptions—$2.00 per year,
Published  throughout  the  university   year  by   the  Student   Publications   Board  of   the  Alma
Mater Society  of  the University  of  British  Columbia.
Editorial opinions expressed  herein aro those of  the editorial staff of The- Ubyssey  and  not
necessarily those of tin.' Alma Mater Society nor of the University.
Offices in Brock Hall. Phone ALma IC2-1 For display advertising phono ALma 3253
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF MM    BAMlA.M
MANAGING  EDITOR CHUCK  MARSHALL
GENERAL STAFF: CUP Editor, Jerry Mcdonald; News Editor, Art Welsh; Features Editor,
Vic Hay; Sports Editor, Ray Frost; Women's Editor, Shirley Finch; Edftorial A.vat. Les Armour
Senior   Editor   This   Issue-Ill Gil   CAMERON
Associate Editor-HETTY I10RTIN
Speaking of Halos
With both myopic eyes closed and fists
flailing windmill-style, the Western Washington Collegian, ofiicial publicity organ of
the Western Washington College student
body at Bellingham, has lambasted UBC students for their conduct during the recent invasion of their "fair city."
Said the Collegian editorially, "Ev^ry
year, it seems, when we play the University
of British Columbia, part of their student
body shows up drunk. The conduct displayed
by this group is disgraceful and downright
annoying to those in the Viking bleachers,
and what's wo»'se, THEY GET AWAY WITH
IT."
Concludes the Collegian, "are we going
to allow our cheer leaders and majorettes to
be abused by drunks? NO! Are we going to
let our band director take the responsibility
of breaking up fights between inebriated
sailors? NO! ..."
For their irresponsible journalism, the
Collegian rates an A plus.
The Ubyssey suggests the Collegian start
a campaign to clean up its own back yard
»
International Week
This seems to be an age of special weeks.
"Fire Prevention," "Aid to Unemployed
Bookmakers," "Religion and Life" and now
"International Week." ,
After a while we become somewhat soured on the whole thing, or, at least, bored.
But, if we can, we ought to snap out of
our boredom and get behind "International
Week."
sAs we pointed out last week, it is neces-
1'ir.st of all before it starts yammering about
the condition of other people's.
The Invasion of Bellingham was this
year the best conducted affair ever staged.
UBC students caused no damage or inconvenience to Bellingham residents and went
about their business without bothering anyone.
Bellingham thugs, however, were anything but courteous to B. C. cars. Over 20
cars were broken into and valuable property
stolen.
The sailors referred to by the Collegian
happened to be of the American variety, the
an lies of whom are familiar to Vancouver's
citizens.
We're not so sure Bellingham merchants
don't welcome the increase in business that
Canadian money brings them.
Criticizing the slant of the halo worn by
other people i.s a pretty dangerous thing. We
suggest the Collegian look at the one they
wear. They'll probably find it has slipped
down over their own heads and is about to
choke them.
sary now and then to realize that we are
first of all citizens of the world. International
Wuek will give us a chance to sit back and
think about the idea.
International Student Council has provided some top ranking speakers for the
occasion and wc will have a first hand opportunity to sue what is being done to make
world citizenship a reality—and to examine
the difficulties involved.
In This Corner       by jim banham
Turvey Review    by g. robertson
While This Corner has no doubts about
the lure of gambling for some people, the
case for such types was made anything but.
clear or .sympathetic in "The Ltuly Gambles,"
previewed last week starring Barbara Stanwyck and Robert Preston.
As Mrs. Gordon Booth, the wife of a
magazine writer, Barbara Stanwyck creates
the impression that all she needs to bring
her out of her gambling mania is a lew good
swift paddy whacks across her posterior.
The dialogue writers have managed to
ham up the dialogue sufficiently to satisfy the
most sentimental and starry-eyed Hollywood
edicts.
Tied in with the main theme of Barbara's
gradual degeneration through dice is the unnatural attachment that her sister feels toward her. These I wo seemingly unconnected
themes are tied rather loosely together al the
end of the picture as Barbara attempts to
commit suicide by jumping out of a hospital
window.
At one point in' the picture, Barbara
and Robert Preston stand atop the Hoover
clam while he tries to tell her its more fun
to spit off the dam from the height of half
a mile than sit in a gambling den.
While we have no doubt its belter to be
in the outdoors, vo consider the aesthetic
experience of spilling a half mile to be of
rather dubious merits.
One or two scenes save the picture from
being a complete failure. Once or twice, Las
Vega.-, ,L;amblini; dens are pictured with genu-
i'la reali.-.m xnd the back-alley slugging of
Miss Stanwyck after a crooked dice game
ia an example of brutal realism,
tf tf tf
Some ol the bet lor movies now making
I lie suburban runs are: "Dark Past," the psychological study of a jail-bird who breaks
ciil. of stir and holes up in the summer cabin
of a police psychiatrist. The show features
,i ood pel forinances by Lee Cobb, currently
on Broadway in the hit "Death of a Ga'.cs-
m ni." Williem Holden as, the jailbird, and
Nina  Foch a.s his girl friend.
"Key Largo" brought up to date by John
1 melon, Hollywood's best director, is the
story ol a World War II veteran who regains
his courage on the Keys of Florida in the
I ice of a mob of Chicago gangsters.
tf tf tf
For corn in large doses you can catch
'>"'■■" "iul "The Last Days of Pompeii" also
cunenlly on the local beanory circuit.
, Rider Haggard's fantasy about a lost
'-"'hern continent whose dictatorial queen
.'■wails Ihe return of a long-lost lover, is an
ani'ien!, and somelimes creaking adventure
siory.
Cecil II Demille's extravaganza about
the last days of Pompeii has some startling
duel scenes in lhe arena and noisy building-
lumbhm; scene at the end.
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if   i'''i <:   r.i::iii.i: i.akiiy wi;u.;ht (Supervis.
loyal i:-\\k r;i,r«;„ yancouvek
*J\j\y iJi'L Ur
This is a review of Earle Birney's new
book, Turvey, published by Mt'Lellaiid and
Stewart, $3.25.
Thomas Leadbeater Turvey, an engaging
young man who has been living for some
time with professor Earle Birney, moved into
Vancouver bookstores Saturday to meet the
public. *
First reports indicate that both Turvey
•and his readers are highly satisfied with
Ihe arrangement.
"Turvey," poet Birney's first novel, is
-.'escribed by its author as a military picaresque, the story of a frequently bewildered
private in the Canadian army and his overwhelming desire to join the legendary Koot-
enay Highlanders in battle.
Unfortunately, Turvey never makes the
Kootenay Highlanders; and most of his battles
are fought with psychologists, hospital beds,
aud reluctant CWAC's.
Turvey has his war wounds, too. But
somehow, none of his wounds lends him the
dignity of heroism. Instead, he falls off a
training ramp and breaks an ankle; a careless
male nurse applies a solution of permanganate instead of prophylaxis; he contracts
diphtheria. In short, Turvey is the Man in
the Awkward Squad, rather than the Man
in the Recruiting Poster.
Dr. Birney will probably admit that a
lot of the material from which .'Turvey" i.s
made come-, from tlie lung penting-up of
personel resentments and frustrations ac-
rjuhed during hi.s own army career. But
"Turvey" was not written as a gripe; on the
contrary, it i.s an endlessly funny novel.
Birney is right in calling it a picaresque;
its humor is the humor of the old Spanish
tales, and its form is a loosely-knit narrative.
To us, the most important thing about
''Turvey" is that it is a Canadian novel from
coyer to cover, One of the author's prime
considerations was to recapture the idioms
and rhythms of the many kinds of Canadian
speech. Readers in this country, accustomed
fo think that "accents" belong only to Yanks
and Limeys, will bp surprised (and pleased)
to find, flowing from the pages of Dr. Birney's book, a truly Canadian accent.
"Turvey" is a book that proves that the
use of purely local events 'and places is no
longer a cause for self-consciousness, neither
for author, nor reader. In this respect, Earle
.Birney's novel is part of the maturing of
our culture.
Dr. Birney gives Ijfe itself a Canadian
flavor. His characters not only come from
Canadian cities and towns across the nation,
but act in accordance with their national
c ulture. The New Brunswick McQua, Wilcox
from the backwoods of Ontario; and the
French-Canadian Trucleau behave only as
Canadians .
Letters To The Editor
CLEAN UP!
EDITOR,
THE UBYSSEY;
After reading' voir editorial on-
titled "Citizens of th - World" I remembered hearing ; n ugly rumor
concerning religious and racial discrimination in tho fraternities.
Since the fraternities in-e par, even
if an unessential part of lh? university,
and since whatever the fraternities
clo reflects on the university I believe there should be r. wa ;h day when
all the dirty linen c mid be exposed
and the students find out just what
forms of prejudices, if any, are indulged in by the happy b jys with the
bottles.
Red,
1st Year Arts.
WHO'S T.H.S.?
EDITOR,
THE UBYSSEY
Who   is   thi.s  fefl X.\  T.'< S
It seems highly inni ah:   .1
a   person   having   . ].i  .'     i
hi.s earthly existent"
(supposedly  studyii :•'   ;     i
conjure  such   hog-,1.'. . !.
misfortune to grar.i -.i!i .      !
in the October 27 issue o    I i
As had already been sia'.cci. I am not
familiar with the "writer" of the article in question but from the view,1
stated by this "writer," I doubt very
much if he has ever attended a UBC
football game or any other spoctator-
rport on the campus for that matter
or lhat he ha$ ever been inviied lo
join a fraternity. Does this T.H.S.
infer by the statement he made concerning the Cafeteria and other lunch
rooms that we, the sludents, should
convert the Armories into a cafe
which would be a necessity in order
to cater to the demands of-the present
student body? After all, T.H.S., if Ihis
were done where would our UNTD
lads  and  COTC  chaps  practice   their
manoeuvres—or   whatever  it   i.s   they   many more issues of T.H.S.'s "boring"
practice?
I will admit that T.H.S. posessesses
a strong point in hi.s suggestion that
two papers should be published on the
campus. It is evident that two publi-i
cations, a morning English edition;
and an afternoon French edition,
would do much to further unity
amongst the students. j
Since I am a freshman who plans to
graduate in four years, I am looking
forward   with   eager   anticipation   to
Ubyssey.
Yours for prolonged good
writing,
"Freshy."
i
TYPEWRITING
Essays, Theses, Notes
Manuscripts
Mrs. A. O. Robinson
m<)  W. 11th Ave.       ALma 0915R
34
YEARS OF SERVICE
TO THE   UNIVERSITY  OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA,
ITS FRATERNITIES
AND SORORITIES.
THERE'S A REASON
STATIONERY AND
PRINTING CO. LTD.
TELEPHONE     PA fc I M C  OI71
5fi6 SEYMOUR  ST.    VANCOUVER    B   C
JUST   PUBLISHED
TURVEY
A   picturesque  Novel
hy   Earl   Hlniey.
Autographed Copies
available at
?Y»>p!e , Co-op Isoukstoi';'
Dili   West   IV-ider,   M.A.  .-.KUi
Price   S:i-.">
All English Penguin . nov.   reduced.
Nr\v   Oe:obi r   Tit It  .    in    Sloel;
k/tUA   "Why Slop? We've got
***"* plenty oj gas left"
Egbert may bc slow to take a hint, but
hc hits on all six where money management is concerned. He's not thc guy to
run short of anything either — not even
gas on a quiet country lane. His financial
reserve at "MY BANK" takes care of
that. *,
Thousands of students from coast to'
coast arc following kgbert's example.
They're finding how easy it is to lay aside
some of that cash from spare time jobs
in a savings account at the B of M.
They're finding, too, that a "fatality
fund" is a big help when an emergency
I  \v.i\v   ISank   on   lb..-   ('empt's  —-   h\   the   Aip.li'^riuiu   Bnihling
efiaUJ'l  (.',   KIROV,   Manager Tucsdiiv,    November   1,    1949
THE UBYSSEY
Page 3
UBC President Pleads For
International Cooperation
More Interest in World Affairs
May Stop Wars States President
In an International Week opening speech given in the
Auditorium at noon yesterday, Dr. N.A.M. MacKenzie begged
the students to take an interest in stimulating international cooperation, so that future wars may be avoided.
GRADS MUST HAVE
TOTEM PICTURES
TAKEN THIS WEEK
Have yon had your picture taken
for thc 1950 Totem?
Several hundred students still
haven't had their pictures taken
for the graduating class pictures in
this year's Totem. And Krass has
left thc campus.
Students who wish their pictures
taken have only four days left to
have their pictures taken. Students
will have to make arrangements
with Krass at his downtown studio
within thc next two days to have
their pictures taken by Friday.
Dr. MacKenzie, who was at one
time a lawyer in the International
Law Office at Geneva, is making a
strong attempt to convince the ordinary person that International rela-
tions concern him. ''Unless hc docs
his part when he has the opportunity,"
he stated simply "he will be called
upon later to play a part which he
doesn't like."
IN THEIR HANDS
"Most people think that it is a role
for prime minister, dictator, president,
or feurher, and it is. Our future is in
their hands, but only in a limited
sense. In a country where we have
freedom and rights there are many
things we could ask or force our
representatives to clo."
Jim Sutherland, who introduced the
honored speaker, later thanked him
wii'ii a line of literature which fits
the picture exactly: "Who stands in
the shadow of war, what can I do
lhat matters?"
Dr. MacKenzie made it clear to the
student body just what they could do.
"While ycu are here, there is opportunity to accumulate international
education. When you .go out into
various occupations, you can be if
se.vice to community and groups, as
well as to yourself."
TWO POSSIBILITIES
"We have two possibilities, one of"
which is war which will be infin'tely
more destructive than anything we've
known so far. hc other is to build
a world society in which human beings
work together with t'he assurance that
they won't be called upon to bo iha
viatiir.s   of   another   war."
"The alternative is forqe. History
has proved thai' force won't work,
1 eimanently."
Hi.s deepest assurance went to the
hard working international clubs, along with the assurance that anything
'.hay   can   do   will   be   a   ecntributif n
:  v.-  r Is  international  co-ope'sati: n.
Foreign Students
Spotlight Affairs
ISC Endeavors To
Awake Students of
World Problems'
International Week on the
campus is highlighted with
many speeches and social events
but there is ah underlying purpose in the minds of the club
members for presenting these
activities.
The club realizes that there are
many international problems prcv-
elent in the world today. It is endeavouring to create a growing awareness of these problems in the thoughts,
of the students on this campus and
throughout Canada. The members
hope that Ihis week's events will help
the students at UBC to understand
the situation, for this must happen
before peace and goodwill can prevail.
A second purpose of International
Week is to display, both to thc stud-
end body and to the general public,
some of the work being done by the
International Clubs on tho campus,
Continued from Page 1
 , TT rnniiT~'T-->iwiiriMMMiiii—— inwiwiiu wm
Sound Philosophy of Life Needed
If Life is to Be Worthwhile
these terms we tend to regard the humanities as something of
no practical significance.
, We forget, in lhe process, that education in the humanities
is very definite vocational education for those who intend 'to
enter the interpretive profession—teaching, government service
and politics, journalism, etc. An analysis will show, further, that
the persons engaged in these professions are those who exert
the greatest influence on society. There is little doubt that
our legislators would clo a better job if they had a thorough
grounding in the social sciences, philosophy, and the arts.
There is, however, a very definite and necessary place
for education in the art of Jiving, The process of living, if it is
to be worthwhile, must be faced with a sound philosophy of life
and many of the most worthwhile pleasures of life will be
passed by by those who lack some grounding in literature,
music and painling,
Our universities have, then, a three fold problem: thr-
provision of solutions to mankind's major problems, the vocational training of students, and training in the art of living.
ASSESSMENT IS DIFFICULT
It is, of course, obviously difficult to make an assessment
of the relative proportion of educational facilities which ought
to be assigned to each of the categories.
The state of lhe world i.s, however, sufficient testimony to
the fact that we are not solving our major problems. The provision of vocational education in the fields covered by the
physical sciences seems to be adequate, but there is some
doubt as to whether adequate provision is being made for
vocational education in the interpretive professions. The third
problem, that of providing some training in the art of living
is much more nebulous and defies immediate judgment.
The present proportion o| our edneational facilities devoted
to the humanities would seem, nevertheless, inadequate for
this purpose.
It is our intention in this series to discuss, in general terms,
the problems arising within the educational system in view
of the present distribution oi' I ic.ilittos. Since the first problem,
that of solving man's most immediate and pressing problems is
the most significant at the moment in the view of the fact tha!
failure to solve it will must probably result in the extinction of
man and, thus, lhe elimination of the other two problem-;, we
shall devote the major part of Ihe series to questions porlinoni
to it.
The series makes no pretense at being exlniislive. On"
hope is simply that it will firing' forth some worthwhile ideas.
No doubt we will raise more problems than we can solve. But to
progress we must first raise problems.
Foreign students at TJBC are
being spotlighted at International Week functions throughout this week.
Political, cultural and social activities
are included in the week's events.
Dr. N. A. M. MacKenzie, president
of the university opened the week
wilh an address to the student body
yesterday at noon. Last evening, Brock
Lounge was the scene of a United
Nations Model Assembly where topics
of paramount importance in world affairs  were discussed.
Language Clubs of the organization
will present a concert Thursday night
with music and dances from foreign
lands. They are attempting to emphasize worldwide cultural heritage.
A  climax   to   the  week's  activities
will be the International Masquerade
E'all Friday in the Brock. Students oj'
the club will wear national costcnu
and any outsiders are invited to at'..
in costumes of their choice.
Ubyssey Classified
Meetings
MEETING OF WOMENS TENNIS
Club Thursday in Arts 201 at 12:30
p.m. Those interested in joining please
turn out.
FISH AND GAME CLUB MEETING
Wednesday, 12:30 in Ap, Sc. 202.
PE MAJORS: THERE WILL EE A
general meeting of the Physical Education undergrad society on Tuesday,
November 1 at 12:30. Everyone out.
PRE-MED GIRLS; THERE WILL BE
a short meeting at noon on Thursday,
November 3 in Arts 102, Everyone
out. , J
PHILATELIC SOCIETY MEETS IN '
Hut L2 Wednesday noon. New member j
welcomed.
NEWMAN CLUB GENERAL MEET-
ing H L 5 Thursday 12:30
CHINESE   VARSITY   CLUB   MEET-
ing in Arts 10(i on Tuesday,. November
1 at 12:30.
AT THE JAZZ SC^IETY MEETING
next Wednesd; , Dick Nann and
Chuck Lew, .) prominent members,
will play .      e of their records.
leans " Wrdne-day. Novell:!.- -r 2 V2 :',<■■
in  Arts  100.
CCF CLUB PRESENTS GEORGE
Weaver on "Marxism" Tuesday, 12:30
Arts  20'!.
l'ILM "DUST OR DESTINY"--III!
in thc series of natural color sound
films, "Sermon from Science," produced by Dr. Irwin Moon, will he
shown hi Physics 200 at 12:30 on Tuesday, Novembci 1 under the auspices of
the Varsity Christian Fellowship.
Wanted
Notices
r i viii ■ * ■
The Files
.  THUJJE   YEARS   AGO
From Thc Ubyssey, November 2, 194C
More than 350 students jammed
Arts 100 Thursday noon and followir
a heated Parliamentary Forum debate
voted almost unanimously to permr
the Social Problems Club presentation of LPP National leader Tim Bucl
as a campus speaker.
FIVE YEARS AGO
From The l^ysscy, N°vc,mbcr 2   194.'
UBC's final registration figures show
total enrolment this year of 2905, an
increase of 3G3 students over last
year's total. Of this figure, thc faculty
of Arts and Science accounts for 279,
the faculty of Applied Science for 43,
and the faculty of Agriculture for 23.
TEN YEARS AGO
From The Ubyssey, October 31. !93!)
324  coeds register  for  war  service.
Although the response on the campus
was   not   as   great   as   was   hoped   it
compared    I'acorably   with   results   in
idler polling booths in Vancouver.
I.', YEARS AOO
Form a column "Whal People Are
Saying" of November 2, 1031.
G. G. Scd'»( wick: "It's better t
VT 1 FILM SOCIETY PRESENTS
j.nedy Film Revival, Tuesday, Nov-
amber 1 at 12:30 in Auditorium. "Bashful Buckaroo" with Charles Kemper
also "Hold It" with H. Timberg Jr.
and P. Rooney Jr.
UNIVERSITY SYMPHONY REHEAR-
sal in. UBC Audtiorhim every Wednesday at 6 p.m.
TENNIS CLUB: THE FIELD HOUSE
will be available on Wednesday and
Thursday 5:30 to 8 p.m. and Saturday
12:30 to 5 p.m.
INTERNATIONAL MASQUERADE
Ball, Friday, Nrvc.nber 4, Brock Hall,
1 to 12:50. Grand March floor draw.
Tickets on sale at AMS offices.
BADMINTON - QUEEN EL1ZA-
beth School, 16th and Camosan. Mon-
Jay or and Thursday nights, 7:30-10:30
p.m.    Applications    accepted    at   the
chool   on   these   nights.   ?8   for   one
light and ?12 for two.
CCF CLUB PRESENTS MRS. DOR-
othy Steeves speaking in "The Effective  Solution   to   International  Prob-
COACH FOR MATHS 100. PHONE
N.  2798R3.
TUTOR FOR PHYSICS 200. MUST
be good. No others need apply. CH.
(031.
"PSYCHOLOGY and LIFE" 3rd edition. Ruch. Phone Dave at W. lliS'SL.
WANTED TO BUY, RENT OR BOR-
I'ow one copy of "Tho College Omnibus", 0 edition. Call Clarence. HA,
10G3L.
ROOM FOR TWO PASSENGERS FOR
8:30's every morning, returning at
4:30 from Kerrisdale via 41s!, McKenzie
(or Dunbar). Call Grant, KE. 0024.
IIut 7 room
Lost
COTC to Show Films
Every Wednesday
An hour long program of films, open
to all students on thc campus, will be
offered once a week for the remainder of the winter term as a special
service of the UBC Contingent of the
COTC.
Beginning    a(    12:30    tomorrow    in
I Physics 200. the program will he made
iw   up of pictures drawn  from  the Army j
in   1G34   and   be   filthy  and   intelligent   Library in Ottawa and consist of bath-i
than  lo live in  1934 and be clean and; nig beauty contests and color travel-1
stupid." I ogues.
A Few Vacancies Left In
RCAF University Flight
RCAF Reset ve University Flight UBC has a few vacancies
Cor students in iirst year of Pure and Applied Sciences,
Men between the ages of 17'*. and ill
: nd who are Canadian citizens or
Eritirh subjects can qualify. These
men must b: able to complete i''.rej
years training with the Flight pricr
te Graduation and enrolled in a
course that is requisite ta the Branch
lor which I'iiey are applying.
STAY UN MARRIED
They must be unman"..-", anrl remain so threufihout training. Each
candidate must meet medical standards of  RCAF
Status   will
Cadet,  t'.'.o rani;  of Pilot Officer with
'.he   status   of   Commissioned   officers
for all purposes.
Upon graduatien and successful
completion of three years training
Flight Cadets may be appointed to
lhe RCAF Regular Reserve, or Supplementary Reserve in the rank (['Flying Officer,
The pay during summer training
will be $1:53,1)0 pea month with rations,
quartern, clothing and medical attention.
During winter training for Ihe first
ve ;r   IT)   hours,   5   days   pay   as   Pilot
Ofici, s<*.and ytKiv. 25 h. urs It days
pay  al' the same  rate and  third  year
the pay will be the same as the second
year.
AIRCREW TRAINING
A few applicants will receive Aircrew training over a three year period and achieve win;s standing on
graduation   frcm  University.
Ap;-ly   to  Officer   C innv-.nding  Receive   University   Flight     nr     RCAF
Rcs:denl Staff Officer in the Univer-
he   lhe   rank   cf   Flight j -sitV   Armouries.   Last   day   for   applications will  be November 30,  1940.
VCF Show Film in
Physics 200 Today
"Dust or Destiny", the fourth
in the series, "Sermons from Science,"
produced by Ihe Moods- Institute of
Science under Dr. Irwin Moon wiil
be shown in Phvsics 200 al 12:30 is.m
today. This technicolor sound film
depicts such amazing scientific phen-
omena as the radar of the bat, th.
gyroscopic wing of the bee and fly.
and thc mechanism of the human eye.
The film is presented hy the VCF.
UNCLE B'S BEEN PROMOTED;
NOW HE'S PRESIDENT
One clay he graduates. The next clay he is elected
president  of thc  B. C.  Young Progressive  Conservatives,
Les Bewley, ex-columnist of The Children's Hour fame
and UBC law student who received his degree last Wednesday has been laised to Ihe highest position Cor a young
Conservative he is their president.
Bowleg, who has heen prominent in political circles
since his roh\o-.c from Iho navy, was vice-prcsideiil ol lhe
group last year, lie is secretary and treasurer of two other
conservative clubs in Vancouver.
BLACK AND SILVER PARKER "51"
name engraved. Reward. Phone AL
0273L.
PLEASE' RETURN SMALL GREEN
Parker pen lost Wednesday October
26. Means great deal to Bernice Levitz. FA. 3011L.
GREEN BLANKET LEFT AT GAME
Saturday afternoon. Phone Ted, CE.
0533.
A SPANISH BOOK "LECTURAS
Amelias'' stolen from Caf table. Please
return to same table.
LOST SATURDAY A.M. RONSON
lighter in North parking lot or maybe
at 4th and Alma. Finder please leave
at AMS office.
WILL THE PERSON WHO STOLE
or found my wallet in the Gym Thursday at least return tho personal papers
etc. to the Lost and Found.
WILL THE FINDER OF EROWN
billfold please turn it in to Lost am!
Found. The papers contained in i1 are
a dire necessity to me and useless to
him.
PICKED UP WRONG KHAKI RAIN-
coat in Eng. 100, Phys 100 or Chem
90 in Friday a.m. October 28. Am
anxious to get mine back. Phone W.
208R1. reverse charges.
GREY, GOLr-TRTMMFD EVER-
sharp pen. Between Registrar's office and DVA. Reward. Phone N.
1291L.
For Sale
HERMES      BABY      TYPEWRITER,
weighs 6 pounds,  Standard  keyboard
Attractive  all   metal   case.   Practical'.,-,
new.  SlIO.   Call   At..  31101.   after  5.
SELL   SI0   CREDIT   SLIP   ON   "01.-
Il.v's    l.oa'la ,'   O.     ,!,    ,'lo'a     at    IV    a ■;  -
ce.il discount i S3?1. Ideal for we idit'.e.
or Xi.'as prey, nt--, Phone CH. 23;-'i
SHAFFER, "PSYCHOLOGY of AD-
justmenl." A.s new. S3. Phone Al.
3-I95L.   Sid.
FOR SALE OR RENT LARGE
Trailer situated in No. 2 Trade ■
Camp, Acadia. Immediate possession.
See   Mike   O.-well.
FTMDI.AY OIL HEATER. COMPLETE
with barrel, stanoj and piping'. In first
class .-hape, $S0. Phone AL. 13-l-IY or
contact Prof. R. A. Mahosuy, Department of Commerce.
SKI BOOTS. SIZE 8. PLEASE PHONE
West 27!)M after G p.m.
SPORTS JACKET SIZE 3(1. STUD-
ent's deak 3' by '22. Reasonable. CH.
OHIO.
1929 WHIPPET 4 - DOOR SEDAN.
New battery, seal beams, good tn'e-
and  body.  Motor just  had  new  rings
more fun
IN BED
FOR
EVERYONE
BED LAMP-RADIO
Here's the smartest bedtime
story ever told! Rend under
perfect light that's kind to
your eyes—while your favorite
radio program plays softly in
your ears. The Lullaby, styled
like a dream in gleaming plastic
combines a true-toned quality
radio with a scientifically
designed no-glare reading light.
Compact; fits any bed; for AC or
DC; lamp and radio operate separately or together as dosi rod. See
and buy the Lullaby today! Ad
better radio dealers everywhere.
Vahra,     .a,|.      « | |»,"    .    ,    a
33,   Foil   Camp.
AEROPLANE ■■19-1U-2 PLACE DE-
Ii'.x'a Taloic-,-,l,. Two-way radio. Very
reasonable, Phono G. C. Swanson,
Chilliwack   12222.
Room and  Board
ROOM AND BOARD FOR TWO
boys sharing. Near UEC gates. AL.
U'.'j'IM.
ACCOMMODATION FOR TWO
sludeals. Board if desired. Mrs. Cairns,
2!!G3 West 29th. CE. 7705.
NICE FRIGHT LEAN ROOM IN
private home lor 1 or 2 male students sharing. Mis. MacKenzie, 4443
We.-t 10th. Phone AL. 041GR.
COMFORTABLE ROOM AVAILABLE
at reasonable rates. In quiet home
within fen minutes walk of UBC.
Board anangul if desired. AL. 0333L
after G p.m.
FOR RENT -SLEEPING ROOM SUIT-
able for 2 boy .students. Twin beds.
Close to UBC bus. $12.50 each per
month.  AL.  1209R.
ONE LARGE SINGLE ROOM; TWO
meals and carry lunch. Male student
S55.   3794  West   22nd.   AL.   2839L.
COMFORTABLE WARM ROOM FOR
male  student.  Breakfast   and  dinner.
3 meals Saturday and Sunday.  Dunbar  and   15th.   AL.   2023R.
SINGLE ACCOMMODATION, ROOM
and  Board, Fori  and  Acadia  Camps,
now   available.   Married   accommodation,  four-room self-contained suites,
$25.50  up. Little Mountain  and Lulu
Island Camps. Apply Housing Office,
Room 205A, Physics building.
ROOM   AND   EOARD   FOR   MALE
sludents, §55 per month. BA. 1311.
LARGE FRONT BED-SITTING ROOM
twin beds with good board. 4422 West
13th. AL.  1004L.
J^i      «•*'»"
TWIN SET! Fancy cable stitch
In pullover, across shoulders ol
cardigan.   All wool, popularly
priced, everywhere.
Jrmf
The Right Smoke
at the Right Price
•for Young Men
M MANUFACTURING CO. ITD. o
• TORONTO 8, ONTARIO >j Page 4
THE UBYSSEY
Tuesday,   November   1,   1949
Display of Badger Power
Mars Homecoming Week
'Birds Not Up fo Usual Form
As Pacific Romps to 34-0 Win
By RAY  FROST
Disappointment showed on the faces of th^ Homecoming
crowd in the stadium Saturday afternoon as the UBC Thunderbirds were hopelessly outclassed by the still undefeated Pacific
University eleven, coming out not too honorably on the short
end of the 34-0 score. 3> ———
Aiiuli i.i' Thunderbird's ground gains
{"*»!
Sports Editor — RAY FROST
Associate Editor-HAROLD BERSON
if!
Overflowing crowd of returning
graduates and student fans who were
anticipating a elese game if nor a
Thunderbird win judging from reports on the 'Birds' style of play the
weekend  before,   felt   that   the  locals
were lhe result of fleet-footed Georgie
Puil and the ever-potent Dougie Reid,
wht) eo'a-.bined i'o make most of UBC's
first  downs.
Rest   of   the   backfield   men   tried
hard hut they just couldn't get far,
had slipped back into their old rut of      n t-    .        •.  i     i ,        i .1
11 Deleat cant  be blamed on  the  in-
previous years.
Partly that appeared to be true.
UBC did not have the same drive anil
enthusiasm Saturday that brought
them so close to victory over Central
Washington on October 15.
The boys were a little slow on their
feet in the backfield and the line
did not do a very good job of keeping
back the opposition,
ability of Vhe Thunderbird team to
go', started. Consideration must be
given to the fact that Pacific University had a high' class ball club thai
Hist wouldn't let the upstart UBC
o'.ovcn get away with anything.
First period, 'Birds opened up with
vicious drives, gaining six first downs
and forcing the ball clown to Pacifies
15 yard lino.
Settle Down to Stem Offensive
Settling down to play some real 1 a|jon wnji
football, Pacific gained control of the
ball on a pass interception just before the quarter whistle, then when
the next period got under way, they
proceeded to march toward the 'Bird
goal line and never stopped until
All-ConferOnce halfback Stan Russell
caught Pacific's touchdown pass for
the first major of the game. Convert
made  the score 7-0.
Until the fourth quarter, Pacific
took control of »be game, cashing in
on another forward pass for their
second touchdown. Russell to Jim
Sundcrlund  was the payoff combin-
Walt Buckiewicz, handling all the conversions, made the
s;oro 14-0, which remained that wa^y
until  half  time.
In the third quarter, drives led by
Sunderlund brought the ball down to
UBC's 1 yard line where quarterback Mike Leland carried it across
the goal line on a sneak. With the
conversion gcod, score wa.s 21-0.
Minutes later, Bob Clarke snagged
Buckiewicz' heavo for the fourth
touchdown. Convert was blocked so
the score was 27-0, remaining unchanged till the  fourth quarter.
Reid Packed Off Field for Good
Grass Hockey Men
Lose One, Win One
For Homecoming
UBC men's grass hockey
team dropped their Saturday
fixture to Indians 3-0 at the
university field, while their
campus brothers, Varsity, managed a tie with the faculty
:eam, Cardinals.
Still with only one win to their
'credit, UBC were outplayed by tho
revamped winners all the way.
New members on the Indian team,
men fresh out from India where field
hockey is the national sport added a
great deal of strength to the winners
who have two wins and a loss to
their credit,
Hard-fought contest was the feature
of the Varsity-Cjardinal game at
Brockton Point Oval Saturday when
the students  held   off  the faculty  to
a 1-1 tie. ... ,
Varsity, defeated last week by Bulldogs, strengthened their position wilh
the draw.
UEC travels to Vancouver Island
November 19, where they will play
against teams from Shawnigan Lake
School and thc Vancouver Island Star
,tcam at Duncan. Special cup for the
series could be brought home to university,
Opening up an offensive in the last
period, Doug Reid, smashing through
Pacific's line for 12 yards, hurt his
ankle and was packed off the field,
not returning to the game.
TheB«Euil started a one-man offensive. Running back PU's kick to the
'Bird 46 yard line, Puil ran the ball
down to Pacific's 37 yard line in
three plays and lateralled a pass to
Stan Clarke who made his way to the
28 marker.
But a pass interception by  Pacific
put cut the UBC fire, and started the
Badgers back toward the 'Bird goal
where Buckiewicz garnered the winner's last major on a line plunge.
With Buckiewicz taking his own convert, score ended up at 34-0.
Puil, playing an inspiring game,
looked much the worse for wear
afterwards, His left aye, barely opened, was surrounded by one large
bruise which he picked up on one
of his tackles.
FORCING HIS WAY THROUGH point of least resistance in gaining yardage for Pacific University, Walt Buckiewicz, is pictured using the same technique on UBC tackier George Puil,
stopping the mighty mite with a straight arm and a crooked thumb.        —Photo by Bruce Ja/jray
'Birds Nip Grad
First Season Tilt
s in
1
Old-Timers Show Real Spunk
Against Talented Youngsters
Thunderbird basketball made its initial appearance of the
season Saturday night at UBC as the Birds nipped to a close
48-46 win over the Grads in the classic annual Homecoming tilt,
From a slow and somewhat raggedy-
beginning that saw the Grads start a
team of 1925 vintage, the game moved
on to be a nip and tuck battle to the
wire.
LOTS OF TALENT
The first game for the 'Birds this
year showed lots of talent in the process of development. Of the five men
that started for the 'Birds, Louie,
Hudson, Hindmarch, Reid and Watt,
all men turned in fairly good performances, featuring speed as their
great advantage.
Surprise of the evening to some of
the fans at. the game was the activity
of one "Tony" Osborne, Phys Ed Department head who rolled up eight
points for the Grads to top his team
and tie with Bell and Watt of the
'Birds as top men for he eyening.
PROMISING QUINTET
The quintet that started for the
'Birds in the second half when the
players got down to serious business,
showed  a  lot  of  promise.
Wilh Bell, Phillips, and Southcott
at forward and Watt and Mitchell at
guard, facing the Grad quintet of
Haas, Webber, Scarr, Robertson and
Stillvvell, the 'Birds did very well in
the second  half.
November 5
Varsity Rowers
Meet Top Teams
Most trained team on the
campus, The Varsity Rower-,,
will compete against Oregon
State, Penticton, and Kelowna
at Coal Harbour at 2:30 p.m.,
Saturday, November 5.
Top competition is to be expected
from all opposing teams, but the Varsity Rowing Club is ready for this
stiff opposition. The boys on the
Varsity team have been training every
clay since the term started. They're
tough and ready and have a good
chance to win.
The two fours, the Varsity Four
and tho Second Four will be manned
by Coxwain's Peretz and Fung respectively. The Varsity Eight, the pride
and  joy of the Rowing  learn,  will  be
manne.'t
by  Coxwain  Peters.
CROSS-COUNTRY RACE
SET BACK ONE WEEK
Intramural cross-country race has been postponed one
week.
Dick Penn, intramural prexy, announced that the
2.(! mile run will not he held until November !), giving
entrants  further time  to  train.
All runners, who may enter a.s individuals or a.s teams,
must have made al least ene practice run over the course
to  be eliuiMe   lor  lhe  final   race,
Vindex Bows to
Chiefs in Close
Rugger Contest
UBC Chiefs swept through
to a 10 to 8 victory in an English Rugby game with Vindex
on Saturday.
Unscored upon in the last three
games, the Chiefs overcame questionable refereeing and the fact that Vindex is full of ex-UB'C greats to come
through with another win.
LATHAM, TAYLOR STAR
Russ Latham and Austin Taylor Jr.,
starred for UE'C, Latham scoring one
try and setting up another while
Taylor played a stand out game all
the way through. Taylor and Latham
each split the uprights for a convert.
The first scoring opportunity came
and went when Ernie Norman failed
to make good a penalty kick for Vindex.
Keith Turnbull opened up the scoring when he went over for a try on a
pass from Latham. Taylor converted
to send the Chiefs into a 5-0 lead.
After continuation of play, UBC's
Bill Sainas missed Bud Speirs kick
near the Chief's goal line. EX-Thun-
derbird Don Nesbit fell on the loose
ball and the referee called a try. Although after the players were untangled it was found that the ball had not
crtssed the goal-line, the score was
still allowed.
NORMAN CONVERTS
Ernie Norman kicked the extra two
points to tie the score.
Chiefs went ahead for the last time
when Latham -scored UBC's second
try. He made good his own convert
and the Chief's led 10-5.
Gordie  Sutherland   went   across   for
the final score of the game but Norman  ended Vindex's hopes to tie the
came   when   he   missed   the   convert
making the final score 10-8.
Homecoming Golf
Tournament Success
First annual UBC physical education Homecoming golf tournament with
competitors from among grads, fourth
year men and members of ihe phys
ed department was the Homecoming
feature Saturday inorning in the university   links.
Low gross prize was garnered by
fourth year man Doug Hamilton,
while grad Hon Sweeny took the low
net  prize,
Roy Siver look Ihirtl place laurels
wilh his long pulling, and Jelly An-
tlersoii anti Ole Ol.ifs.oii. won the two
ludden hole prize;;.
Under-Practiced Icemen
Lose Debut To Nanaimo
The UBC Thunderbird hockey squad dropped their season's opening contest 6-2 to Nanaimo Clippers in a surprisingly
good hockey game- on the winner's home ice Saturday,
The score presents only the res-*
pective finish displayed by the two
squads. The locals outshot and outplayed the hosts but were lacking in
finish, the one all-important department.
The game itself saw the 'Birds start
on the offensive with only the sensational goaltending of Stu Hendry
in the Clipper net keeping the locals
out. Tho initial canto ended 2-1 for
the home towners.
UBC HEMMED IN
The second period saw the vaunted
Clippers hem in the campus* dandies
throughout to extend their load to 3-1.
The period was featured by the
miraculous netminding of Don Adams
who was later injured necessitating
his removal from the game. He was
replaced by Mike Rivers, Nanaimo
spare goalie.
The   locals   goals   were   scored   by
Fred Andrew and Cal Oughton.
WAGNER MISSING
Wag Wagner was missing from tho
line-up clue to a leg injury. His return will further strengthen the team.
The showing of the boys gives promise
for a strong, well balanced unit.
The team plays in Nanaimo again
on Saturday night in what should be
an improved effort.
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OPTOMETRISTS
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ROSS E. ARMSTRONG
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IH22 W, BROADWAY
AT ORANVILLf
Vancouver, B.C.
-.»Mt# •'at fi

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