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The Ubyssey Feb 24, 1921

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Issued Weekly by the Publications Board of the University of British Columbia
Volume III.
VANCOUVER, B. C, FEBRUARY 24, 1921
Number 15
Science Prove
Successful Hosts
SECOND ANNUAL DANCE AT
LESTER COURT
:r;A dazzling success of course. Look
who did it! No need to ask who engineered THE dance of the season! We
praise them ungrudgingly. Profiting by
.titer experiences of the other faculties,
they won undying fame as perfect hosts.
The committee showed evident forethought in limiting the sale of tickets,
the hall barely missing being overcrowded.
"Only about fifteen tickets for the whole
of'Arts dashed the hopes of many an
Arts man who had already invited
bis lady fair; but Science, coming nobly
to the rescue, escorted Arts girls; hence,
in most cases, only the men missed the
fun. They've doubtless heard all the details long ago, though.
.'■; Weaver's orchestra furnished excellent
music, wisely refusing to yield too much
in the way of encores, so that it was not
necessary to shorten trie dances at the
end. Supper, after the eighth dance, had
the effect of making the evening seem
longer; in other respects, too, it was a
most satisfactory arrangement. The
caterer certainly surpassed himself, providing a most excellent supper, at which
the "stag" guests distinguished themselves by assisting in serving.
Mrs. Klinck, Mrs. Brock, Mrs. Mathe-
son, Mrs. Turnbull and Mrs. Davidson
acted as patronesses, while Mr. and Mrs.
Elliot, from Victoria, were also present.
The custom of being introduced to the
patronesses is becoming a regular one
with university people, and we feel that
there was little room for criticism on
that score on Friday evening.
It fell to the lot of the Science men
to return the hospitality shown us in
Victoria. The two basketball teams from
that city, being in town, were invited to
the dance, and a special committee told
off to ensure a good time for them. We
were not all fortunate enough to meet
them, but we hear they had a good time
and rather liked our brand of dances.
The announcement of the 'Varsity victory over the Elks, during the course of
the evening, gave the finishing touch to
the success of the dance, besides furnishing a pretext to make the walls of Lester
Court resound to the roar of "Kitsilano,
Capilano!"
U.B.C. Loses
Alberta Debate
DEBATERS RETURN FROM
EDMONTON TRIP
Charlie Sivertz, one of our representatives in the inter-collegiate debate at
Edmonton, has returned to U.B.C. This
morning he called at the "Ubyssey" office
to tell us all about it. It seems that the
trip was nothing "to write home about."
In the first place, it was four below zero
down there in Edmonton, and that rather
acted as a damper on the spirits of the
B. C. boys.
Our debaters, Charlie and A. A. Webster, arrived in Edmonton at 4.30 p.m.
on Friday and were met by representatives of the University of Alberta. They
were taken up to the college and shown
around, rooms in the men's college being
given to them during their stay. They
had their meals with the men, and were
entertained with the Alberta yells and
songs.
As to the debate, Charlie has little to
say. The turnout was none too good,
but the debate was close. The three
judges—a member of the School Board,
the City Librarian, and Judge Hyndman
—gave their decision for the negative,
represented by the University of Alberta.
The judges met in conference after the
debate and gave their decision, rather
than use the ballot system to which we
are accustomed.
Our debaters were entertained during
their very short stay in Edmonton, and
were invited to stay over till Saturday
evening to see the Alberta-Saskatchewan
hockey game; but the Coast, with its
warm sunshine, looked too good to them.
Webster, however, is still missing. He
must have been derailed at Agassiz.
STUDENT SERVICE
Under the auspices of the University
Y. M. and Y. W. C. A.'s, a special student
service will be held, at Mount Pleasant
Methodist Church, corner Tenth and
Ontario, this Sunday evening. Rev. O.
M. Sanford, pastor of the church, will
give the address on a subject suitable to
'Varsity students. A special section of
the gallery will be reserved for students,
and collegians are asked to find their way
to that section on Sunday, evening.
'Varsity Reaches
the Semi-Finals
EXCITING HOCKEY VICTORY
OVER ELKS
Those who neglected to put in an
appearance at the Arena on Friday night
missed the most exciting game of the
season. With the prospect of losing all
chances for the championship, both
teams battled fiercely to stave off defeat.
It is impossible to pick any one player
to whom credit for winning the game
may be given, for every man on the
'Varsity team played with all the energy
that was in him, and the combination
which was displayed throughout the
game was a great factor, in our victory.
As usual, the only disappointing feature
was the lack of support on the side-lines.
Only five hundred people can be squeezed
into Lester Court, even for so great a
function as the Science dance. Where
were the other four .hundred odd students ?
The first period opened with 'Varsity
on the attack. Play circled around the
Elks' net for several minutes, until one
of their players broke away, took the
puck down the ice, and scored on a short
shot. A few moments later Wilson tied
the score for 'Varsity. The Elks soon
retaliated, and before the period ended
they had scored two more, goals, making
the count three to one in their favor.
The 'Varsity team came on the ice for
the second period in a decidedly desperate frame of mind. At this stage of the
game they easily outplayed their- opponents, but :the Elks' goalkeeper stopped
shots from all directions.^. Time after
time the forward line evaded the Elks'
defence by superior combination, only to
have their, shots turned aside. At last
Lou succeeded in scoring on a pass'from
Pinkie, putting us only one goal behind.
The advantage thus gained was soon nullified when :the Elks scored again toward
the end of the, period.
'Varsity supporters had given up;hope
when the teams came on in the third.
However, we were stiH very much in the
running, and Pinkie scored when the
period was about half over. After a few
heart-breaking, moments he, repeated
this, thus tying- the score. The delight of
the dozen onlookers, who represented
the University, knew no bounds,' and
when the teams began the overtime we
knew: that we were going to win.. Six
minutes- later Shields performed the noble deed, and scored the winning: goal. THE   UBYSSEY
February 24, 1921
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We serve good Lunches, too; and
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THE HOME OF GOOD SHOES
LETTER MEN
The time has come when more recognition should be made of the men wearing the B. C. letters, issued by the Alma
Mater for honors won on the field of athletics. So, when a man has, the right to
wear these letters upon his sweater, let
us speak of him as a letter man, and
know him as a holder of the Large Block,
or Small Block, as the case may be. Let
us respect these letters and honor the
men wearing them, for they have all
done something for the Alma Mater and
helped to place the University in the position that she holds in athletic circles
to-day.        .
As a great many students are ignorant
as to how and to whom these letters are
issued, we will outline below a few of the
clauses from the constitution of the
Men's Athletic Association:
Badges and Distinctions: (1) Large
Block B. C, (2) Small Block B. C, (3)
Plain B. C, (4) University Shield.
The Large Block is awarded for major
sports, and may be won by members of
the senior Rugby team and by the senior
track champion. The Small Block is
awarded to students who play on any of
the senior teams of the remaining athletics, which come under the heading of
minor sports. The class of letters is also
awarded to the individual champions in
such athletics as boxing and tennis, and
to the yell-king. The Plain B. C. is
awarded to students playing on the intermediate teams, to the assistant yell leaders, and to those who score five points in
the inter-class meet.
The University Shield may be worn by
holders of the Small Block, and is given
for each subsequent qualification.
The following are the regulations regarding the wearing of distinctions:
Only one class of letters may be worn
on any one sweater.
No shield or shields may be worn with
the Large Block B. C.
No letter or shield shall be worn on
any playing sweater.
No B. C. letters of any description may
be worn on any sweater or coat by any
student, except those issued by the association, or by sanction of the Students'
Council.
No Freshman may wear any letters or
shield. A student must be registered for
his Sophomore year before he is entitled
to wear any of the above honors.
The reason for no distinctions being
worn with the Large Block is that the
athletic attainments of the holders of this
class of letters should be so well known
that they do not require to wear such
decorations to make the fact known.
CHEMISTRY SOCIETY
Have you ever wondered how the
Science Juniors and Seniors manage to
bear up under the great strain of their
work? The question was answered to
all those who had the foresight to obey
the signs of the Chemistry Society about
the meeting last Thursday night, when
Mr. H. N. Thomson spoke on the "Joys
and Sorrows of a Smelter Chemist."
'Varsity defeated the Monarchs hockey
team on Tuesday evening by a score of
1-0.
IRELAND    &    ALLAN
BOOKSELLERS AND
STATIONERS
Depot for
FOUNTAIN  PENS
and
LOOSE-LEAF  NOTE   BOOKS
Phone,  Seymour 602 '
649 GRANVILLE STREET
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Ask  for
V. TOUNG or FRED
Office:   725  Dunsmuir Street
Evans & Hastings
PRINTERS
— of-
"The Ubyssey"
for 1920-1921
WE MAKE A SPECIALTY  OF
College Annuals
Magazines
Ball Programmes
Etc., etc.
578 SEYMOUR STREET
VANCOUVER,  B. C.
High-Grade Work and Quick
Service characterize our up-to-date
establishment. February 24, 1921
THE   UBYSSEY
SPORT    NEWS
The 'Varsity soccer team came safely
through the second round of the Mainland
Cup, when, at McBride Park, theydefeated
the Royal Bank by the score 4-2. The
Royal Bank defense kept our boys from
scoring for some time; but at last Cameron sent over a beautiful cross to Jackson, who converted it into a goal. Shortly
after this Say, on a free kick from outside the penalty area, sent in a drive,
which found the upper right-hand corner
of the net. . Not satisfied with this, Jackson scored a third goal.
In the second period the team did not
start so well. Nevertheless, Jackson
managed to add another to the score,
giving us what proved to be a safe lead,
even though the Royal Bank scored twice
before the close of the game.
I Both periods, particularly the first,
were marked with better combination
than has been seen on our team for some
time. Both McLeod, at outside left, and
Cameron, at outside right, played an
effective game. Crute and Say deserve
special mention. Crow, in goal, was not
allowed to freeze, being given more work
to do than some goalies have in a dozen
games. Nothing need be said of Jackson, as his record of three goals was a
fit reward for his hard work and skill in
receiving the passes of the other forwards.
Without mentioning the others, individually, it can be said that all worked
hard and effectively, and the game was
won by the combined efforts of every
man on the team. It is team play that
counts, and, if 'Varsity keeps it up, we
stand a good chance of getting into the
finals of the Mainland Cup.
The, team: Crow, Wolverton, Gwyther, G. Cant, Crute, Gwyther, Cameron,
H. Cant, Jackson, Rushbury, McLeod.
PREPARE
for the world of
BUSINESS
by taking a short course in the
Sprott-Shaw School
of Commerce and Telegraphy
Day and  Evening  Classes
Phone, Seymour 1810
R.  J.  SPROTT,  B.A.,  Manager.
'Varsity intermediate basketballers are
now champions of their division of the
City League by virtue of their 53-8 win
over the Kitsilano Community Club
squad last Thursday. The college team
lost only one game during the season,
that being a game earlier in the season
against the K.C.C. at the Kitsilano gym.
The game on Thursday was fast and
interesting, at least from the 'Varsity
standpoint. The Kitsilano gym. is small,
and gives no chance for the fast passing
game that the intermediates are accustomed to use. In spite of this handicap,
however, our doughty five went right
after the honors, and at half time the
score stood 23-4.
Swede Johnston, the tall 'Varsity center, had his shooting eye with him on
Thursday evening, dropping eleven field
baskets. The fast-stepping forwards,
Arkley and Bickel, also got more than
their share. Heiley dropped five field
baskets and seven free shots, while
Bickel got six baskets. Elliott and Lewis
played an excellent game at guard, the
Kitsilano forwards being held powerless
at all times during the game.
LADIES' ICE HOCKEY
On Tuesday, at 1 p.m., experienced
lady hockey sharks from Seattle defeated
our team—only 3 to 1. Jessie MacBeth
scored the 'Varsity goal. Our girls
played well, considering their lack of
training.
Line-up: Forwards, Ruth Craig, Jean
Straus, Marion Lawrence; rover, Jessie
MacBeth (captain); defense, Helen
Clarke, Isabelle McKinnon; sub., Marjorie Coombs.
Next Wednesday, at 6.30 p.m., at the
Arena, the ladies of Arts '21 will play
against a team chosen from the other
three classes.
Come out and boost your year!
HARRY    CARTER
Bicycles and Accessories
General  Repairs
Cab,   Buggy  and  Invalid  Chairs
Re-tired
Charges Moderate
Agent for
C.C.M.   "RAMBLER"  BICYCLES
632 Broadway, West
Phone,   Fairmont   1386
FISHING TACKLE
We  are   daily  receiving  factory   shipments   of   Tackle   from   English   and
American makers.
Steelhead, Dollies and Spring Salmon fishing is real good at present.
Let us help you select your Outfit.
TISDALLS   LIMITED
The Complete Sporting Goods Store
618 HASTINGS STREET, WEST
Phone, Seymour 152
Revenge is sweet! The two Victoria
basketball teams which invaded our city
on Saturday night were decisively beaten
at the Normal gymnasium. Both .these
teams had been victorious when 'Varsity
played them during the Victoria trip, and
it was fully expected that they would win
again. However, the superior combination of the 'Varsity was the winning factor, and the games ended 16-3 for the
girls and 40-16 for the boys.
The girls' game was featured by close
checking, the visitors not being allowed
to get away once; whereas our forwards
had numerous chances to shoot. The
accurate passing of our team throughout
the game was also very noticeable.
The team: Miss I. McKinnon, Miss
G. Smith, Miss I. Russel, Miss N. Griffiths and Miss Lee.
The first period of the boys' game was
very close. The teams scored alternately, and when the period closed the count
stood at 8-8. Victoria failed to score in
the second period, while we added another eight points to our total. Our opponents failed to keep up the pace in the
third, and 'Varsity scored almost at will,
running up a score of forty points, while
Victoria managed to make only eight
more. The playing of Bickell was
especially conspicuous. On the whole, it
was a very good game, and merited a
better turn-out of rooters.
The senior basketball and the ice
hockey teams have packed their grips
and will leave to-night for Seattle, where
they will tackle the University of Washington squads. The basketballers will
play two games against the U. of W., one
on Friday evening and the second on Saturday evening; while the hockey team
will play only one game, that being on
Saturday evening, at the Seattle rink.
Here's wishing the teams success!
For any kind of Athletic
stuff for indoor or out-
of-doors   games,   talk   to
Lisle Fraser
Sporting Goods Dealer
Cor.  Robson and Granville Streets Wlf'T- ".'•"?""
TWT
THE   UBYSSEY
February 24, 1921
' i
DROP IN
PURDY'S
Next time you're down town
and want a pot of tea or hot
chocolate, with a little something to eat, drop in and order
Toasted English Tea Cakes.
They are served with lots of
butter.
purby's
Maker of Purdy's Chocolates
675       GRANVILLE       ST.
AVENUE THEATRE
Four Days, Com. Wednesday, March 2
Matinee Saturday
FORTUNE GALLO Presents
San Carlo Grand Opera Company
Ninth Triumphant Tour—Company of
100—20 World-Famous Stars
REPERTOIRE
Wednesday, Mar. 2, "Mme. Butterfly"; Thursday, Mar. 3, "Cavalleria
Rusticana," "I Pagliacci"; Friday,
Mar. 4, "Carmen"; Saturday, Mat.,
Mar. 5, "Faust"; Saturday Evening,
"II Travatore."
Musical Director,  Gaetano Merola.
Mail orders now. Seats on sale Monday, Feb. 28. Prices: Evg., $2.75, $2.20,
$1.65,  $1.10;. Mat., $2.20, $1.65, $1.10.
NEW LACES
&
Fine  Valenciennes  Laces,   \d   to  4  in.
wide; per yard, from 10c to 75c.
Maltese and Torchon Laces  'A  to 2 A
in. wide; per yard, from 15c to 75c.
Filet   Laces,   1   to   VA   in.   wide;   per
yard, from 15c to $1.00.
Lace Beadings,  A to 1A in. wide; per
yard, from 7^c to 50c.
Real Hand-made Laces,   'A  to 4%  in.
wide; from 35c to $1.65.
—Main Floor
LIMITED
575 GRANVILLE STREET
(Member Pacific Inter-Collegiate Press
Association)
Issued every Thursday by the Publications Board
of the University of British Columbia.
Extra  mural  subscriptions,  $2.00  per  session.
For advertising rates, apply Advertising Manager.
EDITORIAL STAFF:
Editor-in-Chief P.   N.   Whitley
Senior   Editor A.  A.  Webster
/-A. H. Imlah
Associate Editors \ S. M. Scott
I Miss R.  E.  Verchere
Chief Reporter A.   F.   Roberts
{Miss A. Anderson
J.  C.  Clyne
Bert Sweeting
Cliffe Mathers
Miss P. Stewart
Exchange  Editor Miss   P.   I.   Mackay
Literary Editors \A- £• Stevenson
I G.  G.  Coope
BUSINESS STAFF:
Business   Manager L.   T.   Fournier
Advertising  Manager H.   M.   Cassidy
I D.  A.  Wallace
Assistants -j H.  G.   Scott
( M. A.  Dyce
Circulation   Manager R.   C.   Palmer
Editor for the Week Miss R. E. Verchere
A   DEPARTMENT   OF  COMMERCE
The B. C. Boards of Trade and kindred
organizations are renewing their agitations for the establishment of a Department of Commerce in the University.
They propose that courses be given to
serve in business the same ends that the
faculties of Agriculture and Science serve
in their respective fields; that is, to give
students, particularly in the third and
fourth years, a technical and professional
training in the fundamental principles of
business, should they so desire.
This would be a further step toward
specialized training. It is one which many
universities in Great Britain, Eastern
Canada and the United States have already taken; and the movement has justified itself in every case.
There is certainly a great need for men
trained to fill higher executive positions
in business in this Province, and undoubtedly it is the duty of a modern university to supply them. But, unfortunately, our institution is hampered
again in its development by a lack of
funds. Present efficiency must not be
destroyed in any way.
There is barely enough in the budget
for the coming year to maintain efficiency
in the departments already established.
If, then, commercial courses are to be
offered, there are but two alternatives—
either business men must wholly, or partially, endow the new department, or the
Government must increase the grant.
THE "SUN"
Early last term the "Ubyssey" had
occasidn to refer to the attitude of the
"Sun'' newspaper towards the University
and the student body. It was pretty
generally felt at that time that the "Sun"
was not giving the University a square
deal in either its news or its editorial
columns. We expressed the hope and
conviction, however, that, when once this
fact  had  been  brought   to  the  "Sun's"
attention,  any  further  ground  for  criticism would be removed.
It is but fair to the "Sun" to say that
this expectation has been fully realized.
This year the morning newspaper has
shown, in a variety of ways, that its
deliberate policy in regard to University
affairs is far from unfriendly. Its editorial
columns have been thrown open to U. B.
C. students; it has gfven generously of
its news space, when requested by undergraduate organizations; it has published unbiased and accurate accounts of
University activities. In every way it
has served to increase public interest in
our present and in our future.
The "Ubyssey" is heartily glad that an
unnatural antagonism, which could only
have been harmful to both parties, has
given place to friendly co-operation, in
which the student body will not allow
itself to be less generous than is the
"Sun."
February 18th, 1921.   -
Editor-in-Chief, "Ubyssey,"
University of B. C.,  City.
Dear Sir:
If there is anything the "Sun" can do
for the University students, or your
magazine, do not hesitate to let me know.
It will take a great amount of publicity
to really awaken the people of Vancouver
to the fact that they have a University
city; that there are at the University now
close to one thousand students, and that
this number could be increased five or six
times if the people of .British Columbia
can only be made to get right behind
the University and put it across.
Physically, the University does not
to-day exist; but from the contact I have
had with some of the staff and students,
there is a determination and spirit which
will work wonders, if it is only given encouragement.
Publicity will be a tremendous factor
in helping out, and it was with this- in
mind that the "Sun" threw open its
editorial page to the University students;
The public are reading these editorials
with great interest, and they are having
the effect of creating talk about the
University, which is what is required.
Later on, this talk and interest could be
"cashed in" on, and moulded into form
in the shape of larger appropriations for
University work.
It was not the writer's opportunity to
have a university education; but, realizing what a tremendous factor such an
education will mean to the future boys
and girls of British Columbia, it will be
a pleasure and privilege for me to do
anything I can for you.
Yours very truly,
R. J. CROMIE,
Publisher.
U. of C. Disqualifies 521
By P.I.N.S.
University of California, Berkeley.—
Official figures on the number of disqualified students at the university for
the last semester, August to December,
1920, released Saturday by President
David P. Barrow, show that 521 students
were unable to return to the university
this semester because of failure to pass
in at least ten units of registered work,
or having a highly satisfactory standing
in at least eight points.
This means that approximately five per
cent, of the enrolled student body were
disqualified. February 24, 1921
THE   UBYSSEY
5     '
worrespo^de^ce
Editor "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir:—We men, who for a number of
years past have been wont to regard the
Women's Literary Society as a cumbersome,
declining organization, existing almost only
for the purpose of having meetings to elect
officers, uttered a variety of ejaculations
upon reading the editorial in last week's
issue! Why should a lady—who is always
supposed to be unassuming and decorous—
give vent to such boasting, gloating and
exultation, when her literary society, so long
supine, has at last given a feeble kick to
show that life is not wholly extinct?
We could forgive her braggadocio, had
that been all; but when she continues to
make odious comparisons, we feel that it is
time to call a halt. Truly enough, little has
been done during the past month, due to
the illness of the former president of the
Men's Literary Society; but surely the
writer must be very unobservant to state
that "once, and only once, has it notified
the world of its existence."
The writer proceeds to offer to adopt our
society, arrange its programme, and conduct its business. Indeed! we prefer to train
our members in public speaking, not in listening. Finally, she protests that this magnanimous offer is not made "in the insolence of superior strength." Ye gods! what
could be more insolent?
D. A. W., '21.
Editor "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir:—I have before me a letter from
"Ungry II.," who speaks sarcastically of
those who ate their lunches during a certain
address. This criticism is absurd. Any
speaker or lecturer who addresses the student body at noon must make allowances
for this. But in his other criticism—on our
lack of "common courtesy"—"Ungry II." is
fully Justified. How is it we have fallen into
such careless habits? Is it not because, in
our every-day discussions, etc., we adhere
too little to the essential formalities of a
properly conducted meeting?
Each class has only a faithful few who
enhance such assemblies by their beneficent
presence. We (these few) crowd in to "discuss certain matters," the import of which
we hold in ignorance until the chairman
manages to make himself heard and announces the "wherefore"—and sometimes
the "why." Some resolution is "railroaded
through"; someone raises an objection; discussion commences; an amendment is introduced; everyone talks at once. Finally, a
committee is elected from the usual favorite
few, and everything is left in their hands.
There is a wild scramble for the door, accompanied by the roars of the pugnacious.
Something beneficial may, of course, be
accomplished—but at what a cost!
Here, then, is something to think over, to
remedy. How many classes, clubs or societies in the University are now setting the
good example? All honor to that one which
gives its members a comprehensive training
on how to conduct properly or to assist with
due decorum formal, really worth-while
meetings.
S. O. S.
A  Breath of Air—Hot or Otherwise?
Editor "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir:—As a mere man, I would ask
the privilege of using your columns to refer
to a delightful and well-written editorial,
entitled  "A Chivalrous Offer."
The altruistic spirit manifest in that
editorial rivals in principle the heroic self-
sacrifice of the women during the war.
What need we fear, with such a spirit pervading our institutions of learning, in times
of peace? That it Was possible for one, who
had favored such a "particularly successful"
society with her "distinguished" presence,
to refrain from even slighting remarks concerning her weaker brothers in their "critical condition" and to confine her remarks
to just what was necessary "from a sense
of responsibility and of pure chivalry," is,
in itself,  truly commendable.
We would congratulate the Ladies' Literary Society on its success. The oratorical
contest was so successful that the Judges
emphatically declared it to be the worst
they had listened to and a disgrace to the
society. But, then, what is an oratorical
contest?     By   means   of   inter-class   debates
the society is developing the ladies of this
University to cope with all the problems of
the day, political and social. We may see
at a glance that it requires much study and
deep thought to decide on the momentous
question that the dress of the ancients is
superior to the modern; that it requires the
exercise of all the powers necessary in
politician, statesman or mother for the Ladies' Literary Society to decide that women
have had greater influence in the development of civilization than men. We are also
delighted to note that the women of the
University realize the inefficiency of classroom lectures and have rounded out their
programme with a few more.
I quote from the editorial: "Once, and
only once, this year has it notified the world
of its existence. Early in December it held
its annual ladles' night." The ladies have
advanced from the leading place in civilization—here they are the world.
I need go no further in my praise of either
the society or the editorial. Apart from the
minor points that it is untrue in the sense
that it would leave a false impression on
one who did not know the facts; that it was
uncalled for, considering the success of the
Ladies' Literary Society; and that it was
inappropriate, coming, as it does, from a
member of the executive of the Ladies' Literary Society. Apart from these few minor
points, it is a timely and altogether excellent
editorial. A. M. H.
P.S.—Might I suggest that the writer read
and consider a letter in last week's issue,
entitled "Swish!"
The sum of $86.00 was raised on Friday fast, when a tag-day for starving
European students was held by the Y. M.
C. A.
ARROW
SHIRTS and COLLARS
Follow the
ARROW
and you follow
the Style
E. SCOTT EATON, B.A.,
Principal
Success Business
College, Ltd.
The School of Certainties
Phone, Fairmont 2075
ON MAIN AT TENTH
VANCOUVER, B. C.
©RPHEUM
Monday,  February 21, 1921
Herman Becker and Herman Timberg
present
BOBBY O'NEILL
FOUR   QUEENS   AND  A  JOKER
Assisted by
Dorothy Godrey,   Mabel  Ferry,
Fay Tunis, Babette Busey
The  World-Renowned Violinist
FRADKIN
Former Concert Master of the Boston
Symphony Orchestra
and
MISS JEAN TELL
SOPRANO
ALFRED FARRELL
AND CHARLEY
The Picture Man and the Picture Girl
CHARLES IRWIN
THE MODERN COMEDIAN
~        CHAS. D. KEATING
as
HUCKLEBERRY FINN
~ JAMES McCLAY
as
TOM SAWYER
The Pyrotechnic Sensation
THE NAGYFYS
Mysterious,   Wonderful,   Defying
Nature's Laws
"MOONLIGHT
n
With  MARIE  HOLLY
A Bit of Play with a Lot of Music
A   Lawrence   Schwab   Production
British Weekly Concert Orchestra
EDUCATIONAL
STATIONERY
STUDENTS WILL FIND IT
INTERESTING TO VISIT
OUR UP-TO-DATE STORE.
,W,E ARE HEADQUARTERS
FOR EDUCATIONAL STATIONERY — CHAPMAN'S
LOOSE-LEAF    BOOKS,    Etc.
arijr.
(Mark* Sc Stuart (&a.
LIMITED
Wholesale and Commercial
Stationers
550 SEYMOUR STREET
VANCOUVER,  B.C.
Tel. Ex., Seymour 3 THE   UBYSSEY
February 24, 1921
Women's
$10.85
Brogues
$7.85
Women's and Growing Girls'
Brown Calf Brogue Oxfords, of
extra fine stock; medium, narrow
or round toes; leather lined quarters; Goodyear welted soles; medium or low, flat heels. Regular
$10.85.    Special $7.85
DAVID    SPENCER
LIMITED
Phone,  Fairmont 722
THE REX CAFE
TEA  ROOM   BAKERY        ICE CREAM
Confectionery Tobacco and Cigars
692 BROADWAY,  WEST
BLAME
KENNEDY
The advertising department of
the paper made a mistake and
sent the last batch of advertising copy to the wrong address.
And the Judge could not get
hold of them until too late to
announce the winner this week.
It's too bad, but blame your
publicity  department.
Robt. Sapp, Ltd.
Candymaker
814   ROBSON   STREET
ARTS '23 WOMEN WIN SHIELD
FOR DEBATING
The Women's Literary Society met in
the auditorium on the afternoon of February 16th. The occasion was the debate
between Arts '22 and Arts '23 for the
possession of the shield. Mr. Robertson,
Mr. Henderson and Mr. Larsen kindly
consented to act as judges. The affirmative: "Resolved that women have had
more influence on civilization than have
men,' was supported by Miss Dorothy
Walsh and Miss Annie Anderson, of Arts
'23; the negative by Miss Annie Watson
and Miss  Mary Munro, of Arts '22.
Miss Walsh denned civilization, after
the New Oxford dictionary, as the process of instructing in the arts of life, of
bringing out of a state of barbarism, of
refining and polishing. She contended
that the influence of women has been
private rather than public; that thus they
became the originators of the peaceful
arts, and made possible the advance of
civilization; that the status of women has
always been an indication of a nation's
standard of civilization. Miss Walsh has
an excellent delivery, and her speech
showed clear and consecutive thinking.
Miss Annie Watson,' leading the negative, treated with considerable emphasis
and conviction the part played by men in
legislative, t educational, and religious reforms.
Miss Annie Anderson, for the affirmative, pointed out that women, by reason
of the nature of their mental and spiritual characteristics, and by their position
in society, ancient and modern, have
necessarily been the chief agents in the
enlightening and refining of human nature. Her manner, though lacking in
force, was pleasing, and her material
well-ordered.
Miss Mary Munro, the second speaker
for the negative, recounted the services
of men to civilization in invention, discovery,  and art.
Mr. Henderson announced the decision
of the judges, and charmingly added that
the negative had made the best of a bad
case.
"SWEET LAVENDER"
Sale of fifty- and seventy-five-cent
tickets for "Sweet Lavender" will commence on Friday, at noon, in the Students' Council room. As most students
are aware, all dollar tickets for the spring
play have already been sold, and a large
number of seventy-five-cent tickets are
gone. All seventy-five-cent seats are reserved, and the first three rows of the
gallery will be reserved, though they will
cost only fifty cents. It is planned to
make Thursday the big 'Varsity night;
so all students are requested, when they
exchange their seats, to secure them for
Thursday  evening.
Rehearsals are occupying the attention
of all members of the cast, and it is reported that things are going along nicely.
Mr. Robert Hunter, Arts''23, is the business manager for the performance, and
the following heads of committees are his
assistants: Costumes, Miss Norah Willis;
properties, Miss Isobel Miller; press, Mr.
Lou Hunter; staging, Mr. G. H. Scott;
posters, Miss K. Duff Stuart; orchestra,
Mr. J. Dauphinee. A new set of scenery
has been ordered by the staging committee.
The
Students' Cafeteria
Is Going Strong
Join your friends at
Lunch-time
A.  WALTER.
Phone,  Sey. 2045
NEXT TIME
TRY THE BUNGALOW
For     Light    Refreshments
Ice  Cream and Candies at
774 GRANVILLE STREET
MIDWAY  PHARMACY
Phone,   Fair. 840
Cor. Broadway and Heather Street
VANCOUVER,  B. C.
WATERMAN'S PENS
EVERSHARP PENCILS
LOOSELEAF COVERS
AND REFILLS
NOTE BOOKS, Etc.
We deliver anywhere, at any time.
BARRON
HOTEL
Restaurant
Two  Blocks from  Vancouver  Hotel
When you compare quality, service
and price, and consider the high
standard of the food we serve, you
will realize wherein it is to your advantage to come here.
A welcome awaits you.
BARRON
Corner Granville  and  Nelson
Phone, Seymour 2011
Operated by W.  D.  Wood Limited
MAURICE  PERRIN,   Manager February 24, 1921
THE   UBYSSEY
SOCIETY BRAND
CLOTHES SHOP
Rogers Bldg., 450 Granville Street
CLOTHES  FOR YOUNG  MEN
Glad   to   show   the   new   models.
They are entirely different.
FIT-REFORM
WARDROBE
345 Hastings Street, West
J. W. Foster
Limited
WE SELL CLOTHES FOR YOUNG
MEN AND MEN WHO STAY YOUNG
MELUKMfflHGCa1
CUTS
For
Newspapers, Magazines, Catalogues
and  General Advertising  Purposes
DESIGNING
Original and Distinctive
518 HASTINGS STREET, WEST
THE GREAT-WEST
LIFE ASSURANCE CO.
Head   Office,   Winnipeg,   Manitoba
Result of a 20-year endowment
which  matured   October   1st,   1920.
Name, Gilbert Inkster, Lady-
smith. Premium, $102.30. Amount,
$2,000.
In 20 years he paid $2,004.60.
The cash value of his policy was
$3,070, being the face of the policy
$2,000 and a dividend of $1,070.
640 HASTINGS STREET, WEST
Vancouver Branch Office
A SAVINGS ACCOUNT
By carrying money around
in your pocket you will
never learn the habit of
THRIFT. Deposit your
spare funds with this Bank
in a Savings account; interest will be paid, and you
can withdraw both principal and interest at any
time.
We welcome small accounts.
The Canadian
Bank of Commerce
DEMAND
KEYSTONE
Keystone Loose-Leaf Books are,
as you know, very handy books
for students.
All the fillers are "Made in B. C."
You can obtain these fillers from
any dealer who handles School
Supplies.
Smith, Davidson & Wright
LIMITED
Manufacturers   and   Wholesale
Paper Dealers
VANCOUVER  AND  VICTORIA,   B.C.
HAGAR
SHOES
FOR
MEN
AND
WOMEN
As surely as there is a sun in the heavens, we can
satisfy any man or woman's Footwear desires in
"Hagar" Shoes.
We specialize in this brand and stand back of
every pair.
FOR QUALITY
FOR FIT
FOR STYLE
FOR VALUE
we earnestly commend the "Hagar" line.
INGLEDEW SHOE CO.
"Vancouver's Smartest Shoe Store"
666 GRANVILLE STREET
UNIVERSITY WINS AT
BADMINTON
The University was decidedly successful in the first badminton tournament in
which it has taken part. The annual
tournament, open to clubs all over British
Columbia, was held in the Drill Hall last
Friday and Saturday. Representatives of
the U.B.C. Club were winners in five
events, and runners-up in several others.
Mr. Mercer, our honorary president,
shared the honors of winning the men s
doubles in the open event by beating last
year's champions in a very spectacular
manner. In the men's double (handicap),
Findlay, of Science '24, and his partner
defeated Mr. Mercer and Frank Pum-
phrey, the president of the U.B.C. Club.
The latter pair had previously upset all
calculations by decisively winning from
Cowan and Oppenheimer. Jack Underbill, of Science '24, took part in winning
the mixed doubles (handicap). He also
won the cup for men's singles in the
"under twenty" class, \n addition to
this, he was a runner-up in the men's
singles (handicap), which event was won
by Findlay, of Science '24, in two hard
sets, 15-14, 15-14; Great satisfaction is
felt by members of the club concerning
these successes, and a large turn-out is
expected at the Drill Hall on Wednesday
night. The University has accepted a
challenge from the Fairview Club for a
match, to be held in a few weeks' time.
ARE YOU GOING TO-NIGHT?
The following orders have been issued
by Mr. P. D. I. Honeyman, president of
the Rooters' Club, in regard to this evenr
ing's performance for  the theatre party:
Be at the Drill Hall, corner of Beatty
and Dunsmuir Streets, at 7.15, sharp. On
the way to the theatre, have as much fun
as you like, but don't get rowdy. Remember the University name.
Help out all you can by going into the
theatre in an orderly manner. Help out
the ushers, and take your own seats; be
square, and don't take the other fellow's.
Don t interrupt the regular performance, but stage all your fun between acts
—and then "let 'er go!"
"Meek" will lead the yells, "Jimmy"
the songs, while "Mickey" will handle the
parade.
Women's undergrad., please be in your
places before 8.00, to avoid crowding
when the men get there.
Everybody come on, make it a big
night, and let's have lots of fun.
Wear your rooter's cap.
Remember, "Tuum  Est."
TURN YOUR IDEAS
INTO DOLLARS
LEARN   HOW   TO   WRITE
SHORT STORIES
Short-Story  Writing
Illustrating
Bookkeeping
Journalism
Cartooning
Accounting
Write for particulars
Shaw Correspondence
School
1401   Standard   Bank   Building
VANCOUVER,  B. C. :t-''"5P"
THE   UBYSSEY
;, February Ssij 1921
BASKETBALL
'Varsity    senior    basketballers    looked
f  like real champs on Wednesday evening
:   last,   when   they   defeated   the   Kitsilano
Community   Club   in   the   semi-finals   for
the   championship   of   the   City   League.
The college team was absolutely perfect,
* and such speed has not been seen on a
local floor" for some time.
'Varsity seniors are prime favorites
Jar th£ championship of the City Basketball League by virtue of their 24-20 win
.. over the Y.M.C.A. Towers on Saturday
. night. . The game was played in the
'. Y.M.C.A. gym., and was one of the best
of the season, although it was not quite
as fast as the 'Varsity-Kitsilano tilt in
the. semi-finals. There is one game yet
to be played in the finals, the total number of points in the two games deciding
the championship.
Our squad played an excellent combination game, and in this respect were
superior to the Towers' team at all times.
The team, with individual scores: Forwards, Mathers (8) and Anderson (2);
center, Buchanan (12); guards, Carlisle
and Gross (2).
Our    senior    ladies'    basketball    squad
• suffered a temporary setback on Monday
evening when they tied St. Mark s,
champions of the Sunday School Athletic
League, in a hard game. The final score
was 5-5, although at half-time our team
was leading 3^0. Miss Gladys Weld, our
star center, played only the first half,
Miss Isabel McKinnon substituting in the
final game. Gladys was laid up with a
cold, but got out of bed to go and play
the game.
STOP! LOOK! LISTEN!
The last meeting of the Women's
Literary Society will be held on Wednesday, March 2nd, at 3 o'clock, in' the
auditorium. Mr. Wood will deliver an
address on "The Development of Continental Drama." The Faculty and men
students are especially invited. Refreshments will be served.
Mr. Harry L. Kingham, a graduate of
Pomona College and the University of
California, will address a mass meeting
of students to-morrow, at noon, in the
auditorium, under the auspices of the
Student Y.M.C.A.
LOST—At   Science   dance,   a   black   fox
fur.    Please leave at office.
LOST—At   High   Jinks,   gold   and   blue
.. . enamel. bracelet;   heirloom.    Finder
please    return    to    Dorothy    Curtis,
Arts '24.
We read that the tag-day for European
students was very popular in some
American universities. We hate to think
that a newspaper could lie, but from the
reception accorded it by U. B. C. . . . !
Exactly.
Prof. Robinson i (talking heatedly to
the super-advanced algebra class)—Don't
listen to :what I am saying with one ear
and talk to- your neighbor with the ■other.
OTHER PLAYERS' CLUBS
Our Players' Club has been with us as
long as we have existed as a University;
McGill has had its Players' Club scarcely
a month. This may be rather surprising
to us, who thought McGill was years
ahead of U.B.C. in everything. McGill
would still have us believe that, no doubt;
but the announcement that only now has
a Players' Club been formed there has
quite disillusioned us. In such a large
student body there should be some excellent material for the club, and we may
confidently expect news of substantial
progress before long.
"The Man Who Married a Dumb
Wife" was last week presented at
Queen's University by the Faculty Players. The French atmosphere of this
play, a merry farce by Anatole France,
was well retained, and the play was adequately costumed, owing to the assistance
of Mr. Roy Mitchell, of the Hart House
Players, Toronto.
The English Club of the University of
California has just obtained permission
from the holders of the copyright to produce "Kismet," in which Otis Skinner
starred, as its spring play. The Greek
Theatre, that envied possession of the
Califprnians, will be used. The scenery
for "Kismet" promises to be wonderful.
It is to be worked out in Arabian designs;
and new lighting effects and elaborate
draperies will make the production unique
in the history of the theatre. Ten years
ago California attempted something quite
different. The Mask and Dagger Society
presented "Candida," a play in three acts
by George Bernard Shaw.
Eastern schools, in which interest in
the contemporary theatre is more mature,
have inspired some of the most successful playwrights and producers, as well as
actors. The establishment of the college
theatre from Harvard to Berkeley, in the
States, and from McGill to U. B. C, in
Canada, shows the vitality and scope of
this modern movement, and the desirability of academic contact with contemporary art and life.
NURSING GIRLS ENTERTAIN
The girls of the University Nursing
Class held an informal tea at Glencoe
Lodge last Friday afternoon, Miss Ethel
Johns, Director of Nursing, being the
guest of honor. Other guests were Mrs.
Klinck, Miss McKenzie, Mrs. Coleman,
Mrs. Brock, Mrs. Mullen, Miss Healy,
Miss Johnson and Miss Wilson. . The
time passed pleasantly in chatting over
the tea-cups.
ADDRESS ON BANKING
Mr. E. .H. Harrison, general manager
of the Union Bank of Canada, was the
speaker at the regular meeting of the
Junior Economics Club, which took place
at Chalmers Church on Monday evening.
He spoke on "Banking," and the discussion which followed showed that there
are a number of keen students of our
banking system.
"THE LATEST IN
PHOTOGRAPHY
ALL THE TIME"
<S
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413 GRANVILLE  ST.
When Wanting Nice
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c u SICK
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From the very finest Chocolates,
Home-made Candy, Ice Cream and
Soft Drinks, Pastries, and such like,
to the daintiest' little Dinner and
Light Lunch you ever ate.
Make sure you go to Cusick.
Cor. Heather and Broadway,-West
SPECIAL
$25.00
Rough Blue
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Norfolk Suits
REGULAR
$45.00
THE SHOP OF
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Thos. Fooler
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514 GRANVILLE ST.

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