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The Ubyssey Jan 7, 1941

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 Presenting - -
The Ubyssey,
1941 Model
• With the advent of 1941 The
Ubyssey dons a new dress — a
dress well in keeping with a
modern streamlined age. Your
campus paper has always been ln
the lead among Canadian University journals. Today The Ubyssey
takes another step forward to be
the first college newspaper ln the
Dominion to adopt modern streamlined makeup.
Although this new style has been
In vogue among leading college
dailies south of the border for some
time, it Is with us, frankly, an experiment. It is too early at present
to say whether or not this policy
can continue, but The Ubyssey is
confident that any progress lt can
make will meet with the approval
of its readers.
Tho Ubyssey will continue Its
policy of presenting new and Interesting features, columns and all
the news.
New Year's Resolutions Are Made To Be Broken
By EDNA WINBAM
•   Back   to   the   campus   yesterday    streamed   twenty-six
hundred students, two hundred faculty members and
assistants, and a huge assortment of Janitors, gardeners and
waitresses, all determined to do more work and have more
fun in 1941 than they ever had before. The air was crammed
with good intentions as beaming professors resolved to
make their 1941 exams easy and sunny-faced students swore
that this year they would cut no more lectures—no, not
even military ones.
"Go," said tho Tuesday Kditor to the cub reporter, "and
find what these people's New Year's Resolutions are, before
they've had time to break them."
So the reporter went to the greatest man of them all,
Harry D. Lumsden, president of the Alma Mater Society.
"Have you made any resolutions?" the scribe asked.
"Well, now," said Lumsden deprecatingly, "I have made
a few mental ones, but one doesn't like to show faults,
does one?    I don't think I want anything said about me."
What. No Blondes
Only slightly discouraged, the reporter sought L.S.E.
president Bob Bonner. "I'm not speaking to strange women
this year," declared this literary and scientific man.
"Not  even   blondes?"   asked  the reporter  unbelievingly,
"Well," hesitated Bonner, "I might make an exception
there."
Women's Undergrad president Dorothy Hlrd, engrossed
in plans for Hi-Jinx, said that she had resolved to make
this annual WUS celebration a huge success, and added
darkly that a horrible fate would befall any males who
crashed it.
Junior Member Charlie Nash, as usual, had had a
brilliant inspiration. Ho and his brother Sandy, president
of tho Arts Undergrad, had agreed to roller skate to Varsity
every fine day this spring. They leave the Nash family
residence at exactly 8:05 every morning, and whizz down
the Mall post the bus stand at precisely 8:24.
"We're hoping to start a fad for skating," beamed
Charlie, "it prevents spare tires at try waistline."
Leaving tho head of the Artsmen happily hugging his
roller skates, the reporter went to find the mighty scienco-
man, Rex Parker, the power behind SMUS. "I havo resolved," said he, "to spread the doctrine of El Stuffo for
and wide. This year two hundred more engineers will be
taught to manufacture It and Geezil's Goo, so that they
may teach posterity the art."
In the Book Exchange stood its manager, Lionel Fournler,  fondling a rare geometry.    "The Bqok Exchange will
be made more efficient this term," he decided, "and lt will
be open at regular hours."
Badminton star Jean Eckardt has sworn off bridge In
Brock Hall. "I shall get eight hours sleep every night and
dp six hours work every day," she promised.
"What about the other ten hours?" the reporter asked.
Jean laughed and said nothing.
Double Or Nothing
Tho Green Room Goddess, Ruth Heyer, said enigmatically that from now on she would do everything twice as
much—except eating, of course, and that the Players Club
was doing its best to make this week's performance of
"Pride and Prejudice" twice as successful as lt was lajrt
spring.
But the most Interesting resolution of all was made by
Pat Keatley, the sleek Captain Wlckham of "Pride and
Prejudice" fame. He resolved to do everything two houra
sooner than he would otherwise do it. Thus he saves two
hours each day, and fourteen hours a week.
By the end of the year he will have saved 730 hours, or
about 30 days, so he will be able to take a month's holiday.
"It doesn't pay to investigate the plan too thoroughly,"
Pat admitted, "but If you take lt at its face value it work*
out wonderfully and leads to a fuller life."
May Hold  14 Day
COTC Camp in May
^    Two weeks camp for military training will be held next
May,  probably immediately  after the  final  university
exams, Colonel G. M. Shrum announced.   No location for the
camp has been arranged yet.        ___________
This camp will be compulsory
for all male students who are 21
and over and who will have bsen
called out under the National
Mobilization   Resources   Act.
Younger cadets of the C.O.T.C.
who have written and passed their
exams may be allowed to attend
In order to complete their training with practical work. The results of the C.O.T.C. exams written last December will not be
available until th_ end of January.
Although all men taking training
have signed away their pay for
the local work taken at the university, it is expected that those
who go to camp will  receive pay.
As yet there has been no word
about younger members of th_
Basic Training group being allow-
behind
e news
PUBLISHED TWICE WEEKLY BY THE PUBLICATIONS BOARD OF THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
th
picrre   berton
ft To the Junior Class executive
goes the honor and distinction
of being tho first organization to
overcome the lure of downtown
cabarets, and hold the Junior
Prom, on-e of the year's main
formats,   in   Brock   Hall.
Significantly enough, the date of
the Prom will very nearly coincide
with the first anniversary of the
opening of Brock Hall. Significant indeed—for though a year ha3
flitted by, no major formal, outside of the opening ball, has yet
been held in the structure which
the students of this University
built  for  the  purpose.
Ex-ecutives of classes and undergraduate societies have preferred
to continue the practice of holding
Varsity formals off the campus.
The magnetic attraction of the
cabaret has been strong enough
to overcome the nebulous something which we tritely term College Spirit. And so, the University has continued its regular trek
to the glitter of a downtown
rendezvous.
There is a feeling prevalent,,
that you can't do without a
cabaret..
Less Expensive
Student leaders have turned a
blind eye and a deaf ear to the
startling fact that Brock Hall may
be obtained for a flat $16, while
the Commodore charges one dollar for every person attending the
function. The belief that cabarets
are  a  necessity  still   holds.
The Inter-Fraternity council is
zealously attempting to whip tip
funds for the Red Cross by holding a ball in a downtown cabaret
at the heretofor prohibitive figure
of four dollars a couple. The
council optimistically expects to
sell 1400 tickets, with the ladi-es
paying   for   themselves!
What tho council refuses to understand i.s this: Tho net profit
to the Red Cross could be increased to the point of doubling
It. if the affair were to be held
in Brock Hall. Oh, on the other
hand, the cost per couple could
be cut to three dollars and the
profit to the Rod Cross and enter-
ta'nment to those attending could
be just as great or possibly greater.
Cabarets in Brock Hall are not
feasible, but large .scale formal
balls are feasible in every way.
To hold expensive cabarets down
town during war-time is a blot
upon the Alma Mater. We have
(Please   turn  to  Page  3)
ed to attend the camp.
Th-e exact date for the exams
for the Basic group has not been
arranged. Colonel Shrum revealed that an effort is being made to
secure uniforms for members of
this   other   cadet   group.
VOL. XXIII.
VANCOUVER, B. C, TUESDAY, JANUARY 7th, 1941
No. 21
T
Brock Hall Open Till 10 p.m.
'The Curfew Shall
Not Ring Tonight*
S^    Permission to keep Brock Hall open until ten p.m. Monday to Friday inclusive and until five p.m. Saturday was
granted to the Student Council by the Board of Governors
at the close of last term.
Anxiously scanning all available year books from
the larger American colleges, are these members of
this year's Totem staff. Determined that last year's
book, which was given a First Class Honours rating
by tho National Scholastic Press Association wtll be
cast In the shadows of this year's opus, the staff, led
by Editor Betty Quick, are concentrating on modern
technique,   as   well   as   strengthening   those   places
wherein last year's book was declared to be weak.
From left to right In the above shot are Lionel
Salt, Harold Kent, hard working layout specialist,
Betty Quick, diminutive editor, while prostrate in his
efforts to discover new angles Is vetei-an photographer
Bill Grand. Students may ensure receipt of books by
depositing a dollar down In the Pub office now.
Since the provincial government
is providing the extra- 50 dollars
necessary to keep a proctor In
the building evenings, clubs which
formerly met at private homes
will now be able to meet in Brock
Hall.
L. S. E. President Bob Bonner
expresses tho opinion that this arrangement should prove an advantage not only to students but
also to professors, who, if they
belong to two or three clubs, may
sometimes find it inconvenient to
throw open their homes for meetings.
"After the trouble taken to have
the building opened, students
should take advantage of It and
make full use of it for club meetings," commented A. M. S. President Harry Lumsden. Expected to
find the opening of Brock Hall in
the evening3 a special boon are
the Parliamentary Forum, Letters
Club, Musical Society and Players'
Club.
Lumsden wished also to make it
clear that at no time had tho
Board of Governors turned down
the students' plea to have Brock
Hall open evenings. "Many students are under the impression that
the Board of Governors at first
refused to entertain the suggestion." Lumsden stated. "This
belief  Is  an entirely false   one."
Students Urged To Support Play Friday
BOB HAYWOOD
In the service of the King
•   The Players'  Club has a message for well over 1000 undergraduates.
"Pride and Perjudlce" ls being
produced this Friday evening on
the auditorium stage in aid of
the Canadian Red Cross, and tickets   MUST   BE   SOLD.
Proud of their record in the last
war, the green room hopes to raise
a substantial sum. In 1914-18 they
turned over several thousand dollars   to   the   Rod   Cross.
U.B.C. students may see tho performance at the Auditorium Friday night at 8:15. Tickets are
50   cents   each.
A sidelight of tho production is
the re-union which will take
place   backstage.     Members  of   th_
C1 On Tuesday second year Arts-
men ond third year Sciencemen
will bo able to get their results.
All others, with the exception of
Aggies who will learn their fate
from the Dean of Agriculture, will
receive their marks on Wednesday,
cast who have graduated have
come back to rehearse with undergraduates. One member Is
coming from Ontario to take part
in   the   production.
Anxious to produce a finished
performance, the players have
been meeting for rehearsals
throughout the Christmas holidays.
Sidney Risk has volunteered his
services to   direct   the   play   again.
Newcomers m the cast, replacing students who have left Vancouver are Arthur Hill, replacing
James Halcrow as Collins; Mary
Buck-erfield as Aunt Gardiner,
Phyllis Milligan as tho maid.
Archie Bain takes the role of
Charles Blngley, replacing Bob
Haywood,  now  in  the   air  force.
• TOTEM NOTICE — Desperate
need for candid camera shots of
campus life for this year's book.
All amateur photographers are
urged to contact the Totem staff,
and bring ln all available negatives. Credit for all snaps used
will be given  in the Totem.
JOHN GLEN
Pride.
Aid Red Gross Friday, SOc
Inter-Frat
Formal To
'Go Dutch'
0 Campus fraternities will
join together at the
Commodore on Friday, January 24, in sponsoring a
"Dutch Treat" ball in aid of
the Red Cross.
Mary Beale, member of tho
committee for the ball stressed the
fact that each person Is expected
to pay for himself, so that every
student attending will help the
Red   Cross.
Single tickets, fourteen hundred
of which are being printed, will
be sold at two dollars each. Non-
fraternity as well as fraternity
students may attend.
Each sorority and fraternity on
th-e campus will decorate a special
part of the ballroom, using the
emblem of their own society for
a motif. Ole Olsen will play
until   1:30.
The Idea of the Inter-Fraternity
ball had originally been to make
lt an all-Canadian affair, but because several universities have
final exams at that time they will
hold similar dances later in the
term.
• Freshman class elections will
be held January IS, It was announced Monday evening by the
Student Council. Nominations
should be In the Council's hands
on or before January 13.
Science Grads
Make History :
Say 'Thanks'
9 In a letter of "very deserving
thanks to a fine body of men''
a group of Mechanical Engineers,
class of 1940, showed their appreciation for th-e training they received at U.B.C. in a manner
which is without precedent in the
•memories of their long-suffering
professors. It is tho first time
graduating class lias, as a group,
"written such a history-making
document.
Two members of the class are
now doing defense work, while
the others are engaged in electrical, aircraft. pulp and paper
plants,   anil   drafting.
Tlie men of the class are Roy
T. Bogle, Aloe Coulson. Harvey
Curruthcrs, Keith Eadie, Fred
Johnson. Molton Kennedy, Alan
Laird. Harold Morris, G. F. (Bob)
Pearce,   and   Ronald   Stewart. Page Two
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 7th, 1941
•   From   The  Editor's  Pen  »  »  »
The New Year
It was one of the brightest and cheeriest Christmases and New Years this year
that British Columbia has ever seen. Everyone was spending a great deal of money,
determined to have a good time because "it
might be the last." For most British Columbians, the past month or two have been
ones of material prosperity, and the New
Year has opened not without hope.
But a period of self-sacrifice lies ahead.
If it is not voluntary now, it will no doubt
be compulsory later.
The students of this University held an
enthusiastic Alma Mater meeting last term,
and decided to sign waivers for the returnable caution money, and appointed a committee to find other means of aiding the Red
Cross.
A good beginning was made, but toward
the end of the term, the campaign fizzled
away into nothing. Whether the,disappearance of enthusiasm was due to the pressure
of exams or not remains to be seen.
In the coming term, the Players' Club's
revival of "Pride and Prejudice", and the
Inter-Fraternity Ball both require the
whole-nearted support of as many students
as possible. The Players' Club's contribution promises to be one of the largest to date.
The Executive in charge of the Inter-Fraternity Ball claim that^3rock Hall is not large
enough for the event. We hope that they
realize that the ball is 'not being held for
social purposes alone and that it should be
held wherever the gain for the Red Cross
will be the greatest.
There is no reason why other campaigns
for the Red Cross should not be enthusiastically supported here on the campus in the
coming term. Bdt if the campaign is going
to be a mere half-hearted affair and if the
students are not interested, it would be by
far the. best to call the whole thing off.
We should determine either to attain
our goal and pass it, or to drop the campaign now. Lukewarmness has never been
profitable to anyone.
Pass Features
The Pass Feature Fund has hardly been
touched to date, except for a few grants for
basketball,  Canadian football,  and hockey
games.   The value of the pass itself his been
cut  because   of the   suspension  of  various
activities on account of military training.   If
the pass system is to have any value at all,
there should be an increase in the cultural
and   educational   features   throughout   the
year.   So far this year, there have been very
few, if any, features of this type.
<
Concerts   in   the   Auditorium   at   noon
have always been popular as pass features.
Several concerts by outstanding local artists
are already being planned for the coming
term, as well as a series of lectures on music.
But pass features should not be confined to
a few concerts confined to one term.
It is too late now, of course, to do anything about last term, but it is not too late
to plan a series of events varied enough to
suit everyone's tastes. Everyone pays the
same sum into the Pass Feature Fund and
therefore everyone should obtain the same
benefits from it.
•  The  Mummery  . . . byjabe*.
Inevitably, the path of life is pockmarked with unhappy experiences that
leave us all somewhat sadder and wiser.
Little did I know, when I drop-kicked my
loose-leaf into a waste-basket three weeks
ago, that one of these gruesome episodes
was lying in wait for me during the holidays. The setting for the tragedy was the
main floor of Hudson's Bay Co. The time
remains hazy. I know it was Dec. 24. And
I know it was approximately 10:15 a.m.
when I was first caught in the revolving
door. The last time I saw the clock was
when I was sitting on it, at about 2:35 p.m.
It was soon after that that everything went
black.
In Disguise
I was still quite active, however, when
this particular act took place. Disguised as
a cellophane Christmas decoration, I had
been making good yardage, jumping from
pillar to pillar, and blinking my attractive
red, post-examination eyes to create a novel
coloured-light effect. At last I was able ttj
swoop down in front of the stocking counter.
"Don't be frightened, miss," I panted,
buckling myself to the counter. "Would you
mind waiting on me?"
The sales-girl folded her arms and
champed stolidly on a wad of gum.
"I don't see how I can get out of it,
sonny," she replied.
I looi-ed around stealthily, then quickly drew out a yard or so of an old silk stocking.
"Look!" I said, holding it out for her
to see.
She looked, and shifted the wad to the
other side of her face.
"If you want it filled, sonny, you'll have
to see Santa Claus.    5th floor."
"No, no!" I protested. "I want two more
like it."
"Don't tell me you've found a three-
legged woman," she whispered, leaning forward interestedly.
"Let's leave my private life out of this,
shall we?" I rasped indignantly.
"O.K., sonny," she laughed, "what d'ya
want?"
"What colour have you got?" I riposted
with   considerable  ingenuity.
"There's Robin Rose, Some Fawn,
Dusky, Rusty, Inconsequential Indigo, and
Beetled Beige."
"Haven't you got brown?" I queried,
wiping the sweat out of my eyes.
She seemed to think that was very
humorous.
"Hey, Mabel!" she hollered up the counter. "Tall, dark and incredible here says
he wants brown!"
Horse Laugh
This occasioned further merriment all
along the line. When she had finally regained control of the wad, a wicked glint
came into the eye of this devilish creature.
"Maybe you would like something like
this," she said, pointing down behind the
counter.
I peered over the top innocently, only to
be dazzled by an outstretched calf, potently
shapely. I lept back as though I had been
stung.
"Where's the nearest water fountain,
please?" I chocked, my face lighting up like
a Hawaiian sunset as I fumbled with my
counter buckles.
"There's one over in the lingerie department," she laughed.
"Where's the next nearest?" I gasped,
and fled as she collapsed in a hysterical fit
on the floor.
I was stuffing the old stocking into my
pocket, when I felt a heavy hand fall upon
my shoulder.    It was the store dick.
"Where do you think you're going with
that merchandise, sonny?" he snarled.
"Gimme that stocking!"
There commenced a fierce tug-of-war,
which was interrupted by a scienceman who,
after enjoying the spectacle for a time, stepped up to my ear to yell:
"Why don't you let the woman decide!"
"It's'my stocking, and I want it back!"
I cried grimly.
"If it's your stocking, why aren't you
wearing it, SISTER?" growled the dick
sarcastically.
"Because the garter is busted off my
girdle, IF YOU MUST KNOW!" I roared.
At that moment the stocking gave tip
the fight, and I tumbled backwards down
some stairs. When I came to, I was hanging on a hook in the meat department, and
a large, florid babe was fingering my gams
in an intimate sort of way.
"Ain't   much   meat   on   this   bird,"   she
muttered disgustedly, and went away.
That's all I remember.
(MEMBER C.U.P.)
Issued  twice  weekly  by the   Students'   Publication   Board   of   the
Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia.
Office: Brock Memorial Building
Phone ALma 1624
Campus Subscriptions—-$1.50
Mall Subscriptions—$2.00
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
JACK MARGESON
News Manager  Janet Walker
Senior  Editors
Tuesday Pierre Berton
Friday    Edna   Wlnram
Pub Secretary  Helga Jarvl
Circulation Manager,
Bob Menchions
Sports Editor  Archie Paton
Asst. Sports Editor Jack McKlnley
Associate Editors
Doris Filmer-Bennett, Bob Morris
Assistant Editors
Jack  McMillan,  Jack  Ferry,  Margaret Reid, Marian McDonald, Lucy
Berton.
For Advertising:
Standard Publishing Company Ltd.
2182 W. 41st Ave., Phone KErr. 1811
U.  B. Seeing
With Mac
Parashooter
• Best story of the exams ls that
of    Constable    Orchard's    wild
ride from the gates to the Auditorium at noon with a frantic
Aggie who had hurtled from on
outward-bound bus at 12:13,
screaming that he had forgotten
he had an exam that day. The
Aggie la tor moaned that if he had
known that they were going to
fly there, he would have demanded a parachute! However he is
one more admirer of Mr, Orchard,
who seems to make friends daily
on  the campus,
Cooked History
e Professor Cooke ls another
popular lecturer. His history
classes are attended by many just
for th. general knowledge received. A man who doesn't take himself too seriously, he lets students
express themselves, which is denied th-em in many classes. "History repeats itself, historians repeat each ather," he quips, and
strives to avoid this common fault.
Phil and Frails
e Phll. 0 has more pulchritude
per seat than any other class.
Betty Hobb, Nancy Martin, Jo
Wcldon and Eileen McDonnell vie
with Professor Irving for attention
from tho moles. Incidentally, ho
often wins, as his lectures are
among the most popular in the
curriculum, being provocative and
unbiased, with a liberal outlook
found  too seldom  thes-3 clays.
• JOTTINGS — We could use a
few more chairs In the common
room, councillors. Pearl Temoln
Insists on calling lt "cn.mystery".
A few still wander on the lawns
in spite of barriers . . . must be
the bovine instinct in them. Wc
picked up two books ridiculously
cheap yesterday at tre Varsity
Bookstore, while waiting for the
bus. From one locker to another:
"Hlya keyed!" Lucy Berton has
the darkest eyes. What a difference between rationalism and nationalism!
Folks Pass
• Professor   Irving   still   squirms
when he thinks of his faux pas
ln Physchology 1, in mentioning
Kirsten Flagstad as "the great
dancer". For a pl-.asant half hour,
visit the museum on the main
floor of the library. Mr. Tansey
the attendant is as interesting as
his exhibits. He knows a little
about everything, and a lot about
British history. If thu Kaf jars
you, sneak  in for a chat someday.
"I tur_ gave th* ben a plee* of my mind."
"You'd g«t further If yeu gav« him Sw««l Capt."
SWEET CAPORAL CIGARETTES
"Th* pur**i form in which tobmcco con be tmohmd."
♦
Heil "Hell"
C' Our Carrel has the word "hell"
written neatly on the wall just
at _ye level. In the last minute
cramming lt had an amazing tonic
effect when nerves began to
shimmy. Just the knowledge that
someone else got that feeling of
quiet desperation cleared the air
and brought a grin. Don't tell
Miss Lanning though.
Live and Love
• Hie    romantic     couples    who
studied    together    during    the
exams are now, many of them,
holding hands and looking back
on their college days, silently
damning each other as th. cause
of their failure. Really girls, at
Christmas, Biology and Boyology
don't  mix.
• PERSONALS—Paul  Muni tries
his best to look like John Olen.
The McPhee boys seem to maintain the family popularity . Maurice is likeable Immediately and,
although we haven't met Ted, his
, team mates vouch for him. Add
distinctive handwriting; Frances
McLean's round script. Denise
Darling could pass for Betty
Thomas in a fog. Tommy Williams seems to have abandoned
his academic dross for something
more plebeian. We suppose it is
hard on a sensitive nature, being
called   "Professor".
60 Students
Bounced:
Unofficial
Some sixty students received
the degree of B.A.C. —"Bounced
At Christmas" — it was estimated
Monday following release of
Christmas examination  results.
Although officials at the Registrar's ofice refused to mako any
statement, shrouding the matter in
secrecy, an unofficial estimate
placed the number in the neighborhood of last year's figure.
Little white slips of paper, signed by ths Registrar were received
by the delinquents during the
Christmas holidays, marring the
festive season with the news that
the recipients wer. no longer required at  the  University.
Vast majority of B.A.C.'s were
Sclencemen.
There is a bit of good, sound
Philosophy in the following sign
recently observed in a Chinese
laundry:
You want credit,
Me  no give.
You get sore.
You want credit,
Me  give,
You   no  pay,
Me   get   sore;
Better  you get sore.
UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE
Hrs.: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturdays 9 a.m. to noon
LOOSE LEAF NOTE BOOKS, EXERCISE BOOKS AND
SCRIBBLERS
AT REDUCED PRICES
Graphic   Engineering   Paper,   Biology   Paper,
Loose  Leaf  Refills,   Fountain   Pens  and  Ink
and Drawing Instruments,
Special Student Rate at
CAPITOL,   -   ORPHEUM   -   STRAND   -   DOMINION
By Presentation Of Your Student Pass
Alice Faye
and
Betty Grable
in
"TIN PAN AULEY"
CAPITOL
Alexander Korda
presents
"THE THIEF OF
BAGDAD"
STRAND
Marx Brothers in
"GO WEST"
also
Walter Pidgeon In
"SKY MURDER"
ORPHEUM
Gary Cooper in
"NORTH WEST
MOUNTED POLICE"
also "I'm Nobody's
Sweetheart Now"
DOMINION
sons
THE    BE
MILK   CH O C O LATE   MADE Presenting - -
The Ubyssey,
1941 Model
• With the advent of 194). The
Ubyssey dons a new dress — a
dress well In keeping with a
modern streamlined age. Your
campus paper has always been in
the lead among Canadian University journals. Today The Ubyssey
takes another step forward to be
the first college newspaper ln the
Dominion to adopt modern streamlined makeup.
Although this new style has been
in vogue among leading college
dailies south of the border for some
time, it is with us, frankly, an experiment. It Is too early at present
to say whether or not this policy
can continue, but The Ubyssey is
confident that any progress it can
make will meet with the approval
of its readers.
Tho Ubyssey will continue Its
policy of presenting new and interesting features, columns and all
the news.
New Year's Resolutions Are Made To Be Broken
By EDNA WINRAM
•   Back   to   the   campus   yesterday   streamed   twenty-six
hundred students, two hundred faculty members and
assistants, and a huge assortment of janitors, gardeners and
waitresses, all determined to do more work and have more
fun in 1941 than they ever had before. The air was crammed
with good intentions as beaming professors resolved to
make their 1941 exams easy and sunny-faced students swore
that this year they would cut no more lectures—no, not
oven military ones.
"Oo," said tho Tuesday Editor to the cub reporter, "and
find what these people's New Year's Resolutions are, before
they've had time to break them."
So the reporter went to the greatest man of them all,
Harry D. Lumsden, president of the Alma Mater Society.
"Havo you made any resolutions?" the scribe asked.
"Well, now," said Lumsden deprecatingly, "I have made
a few mental ones, but one doesn't like to show fault3,
does one?    I don't think I want anything said about me."
What, No Blondes
Only slightly discouraged, the reporter sought L.S.E.
president Bob Bonner. "I'm not speaking to strange women
this year," declared this literary and scientific man.
"Not  even  blondes?"  asked  the reporter  unbelievingly,
"Well," hesitated Bonner, "I might make an exception
there."
Women's Undergrad president Dorothy Hlrd, engrossed
in plans for Hi-Jinx, said that she had resolved to mako
this annual WUS celebration a huge success, and added
darkly that a horrible fate would befall any males who
crashed it.
Junior Member Charlie Nash, as usual, had had a
brilliant inspiration. He and his brother Sandy, president
of the Arts Undergrad, had agreed to roller skate to Varsity
every fine day this spring. They leave the Nash family
residence at exactly 8:05 every morning, and whizz down
the Mall past the bus stand at precisely 8:24.
"We're hoping to start a fad for skating," beamed
Charlie, "it prevents spare tires at try waistline."
Leaving the head of the Artsmen happily hugging his
roller skates, the reporter went to find the mighty scienco-
man, Rex Parker, the power behind SMUS. "I havo resolved," said he, "to spread the doctrine of El Stuffo for
and wide. This year two hundred more engineers will be
taught to manufacture It and Goezll's Goo, so that they
may teach posterity the art."
In tho Book Exchange stood its manager, Lionel Fournler,  fondling a rare geometry.    "The Bcjok Exchange will
bo made more efficient this term," he decided, "and it will
be open at regular hours."
Badminton star Jean Eckardt has sworn off bridge ln
Brock Hall. "I shall get eight hours sleep every night and
do six hours work every day," she promised.
"What about the other ten hours?" the reporter asked.
Jean laughed and said nothing.
Double Or Nothing
The Green Room Goddess, Ruth Heyer, said enigmatically that from now on she would do everything twice M
much—except eating, of course, and that the Players Club
was doing its best to make this week's performance of
"Pride and Prejudice" twice as successful as It was last
spring.
But the most interesting resolution of all was made by
Pat Keatley, the sleek Captain Wlckham of "Pride and
Prejudice" fame. He resolved to do everything two houra
sooner than ho would otherwise do it. Thus he saves two
hours each day, and fourteen hours a week.
By the end of the year he will have saved 730 hours, or
about 30 days, so he will be able to take a month's holiday.
"It doesn't pay to investigate the plan too thoroughly,"
Pat admitted, "but if you take it at its face value it works
out wonderfully and leads to a fuller life."
May Hold  14 Day
COTC Camp in May
%    Two weeks camp for military training will be held next
May,  probably immediately  after the  final  university
exams, Colonel G. M. Shrum announced.   No location for the
camp has been arranged yet.      	
This camp will be compulsory
for all male students who are 21
and over and who will have bsen
called out under the National
Mobilization   Resources  Act.
Younger cadets of the C.O.T.C.
who have written and passed their
exams may be allowed to attend
ln order to complete their training with practical work. The results of the C.O.T.C. exams written last December will not be
available until th. end of January.
Although all men taking training
have signed away their pay for
the local work taken at the university, it is expected that those
who go to  camp will  receive pay.
As yet there has been no word
about younger members of tho
Basic Training group being allow-
behind
PUBLISHED TWICE WEEKLY BY THE PUBLICATIONS BOARD OF THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
th
e news
pierre   burton
• To the Junior Class executive
goes tho honor and distinction
of being tho first organization to
overcome the lure of downtown
cabarets, and hold the Junior
Prom, ona of the year's main
formals,   in   Brock   Hall.
Significantly enough, the date of
the Prom will very nearly coincide
with the first anniversary of tho
opening of Brock Hall. Significant indeed—for though a year has
flitted by, no major formal, outside of the opening ball, has yet
been held in the structure which
the students of this University
built  for  the  purpose.
Executives of classes and undergraduate societies have preferred
to continue the practice of holding
Varsity formals off the campus.
The magnetic attraction of the
cabaret has been strong enough
to overcome the nebulous something which we tritely term College Spirit. And so, the University has continued Its regular trek
to the glitter of a downtown
rendezvous.
There ls a feeling prevalent,
that you can't do without a
cabaret..
Less Expensive
Student leaders have turned a
blind eye and a deaf ear to the
startling fact that Brock Hall may
be obtained for a flat $16, while
the Commodore charges one dollar for every person attending the
function. The belief that cabarets
are  a necessity  still  holds.
Tlie Inter-Fraternity council is
zealously attempting to whip up
funds for the R-.d Cross by holding a ball in a downtown cabaret
at the heretofor prohibitive figure
of four dollars a couple. The
council optimistically expects to
sell 1400 tickets, with the ladles
paying   for   themselves!
What tho council refuses to understand is this: Thc not profit
to tho Red Cross could bj increased to tho point of doubling
it, if the affair were to bo held
in Brock Hall. Oh, on the other
hand, tho cost per couple could
be cut to three dollars and tho
profit to the Rod Cross and enter-
ta'nmont to those attending could
be just as gr.-at or possibly greater.
Cabarets in Brock Hall are not
feasible, but largo scale formal
balls are feasible in every way.
To hold expensive cabarets down
town during war-time is a blot
upon the Alma Mater. We have
(Please  turn   to  Page   3)
ed  to attend the camp.
Th-3 exact date for the exams
for the Basic group has not been
arranged. Colonel Shrum revealed that an effort ls being made to
secure uniforms for members of
this   other   cadet   group.
VOL. XXIII.
VANCOUVER, B. C, TUESDAY, JANUARY 7th, 1941
No. 21
T
Brock Hall Open Till  10 p.m.
'The Curfew Shall
Not Ring Tonight'
^    Permission to keep Brock Hall open until ten p.m. Monday to Friday inclusive and until five p.m. Saturday was
granted to the Student Council by the Board of Governors
at the close of last term.
Anxiously scanning all available year books from
the larger American colleges, are these members of
this year's Totem staff. Determined that last year's
book, which was given a First Class Honours rating
by the National Scholastic Press Association will be
cast In the shadows of this year's opus, the staff, led
by Editor Betty Quick, are concentrating on modern
technique,   as   well   as   strengthening   those   places
wherein last year's book was declared to be weak.
From left to right ln the above shot are Lionel
Salt, Harold Kent, hard working layout specialist,
Betty Quick, diminutive editor, while prostrate In his
efforts to discover new angles Is veteran photographer
Bill Grand. Students may ensure receipt of books by
depositing a dollar down In the Pub office now.
Since the provincial government
is providing the extra" 50 dollars
necessary to keep a proctor In
the building evenings, clubs whicn
formerly met at private homes
will now be able to meet in Brock
Hall.
L. S. E. President Bob Bonner
expresses the opinion that this arrangement should prove an advantage not only to students but
also to professors, who, if they
belong to two or three clubs, may
sometimes find it inconvenient to
throw open their homes for meetings.
"After the trouble taken to have
tho building opened, students
should take advantage of it and
make full use of it for club meetings," commented A. M. S. President Harry Lumsden. Expected to
find the opening of Brock Hall ln
the evenings a special boon are
the Parliamentary Forum, Letters
Club, Musical Society and Players'
Club.
Lumsden wished also to make it
clear that at no time had tho
Board of Governors turned down
the students' plea to have Brock
Hall open evenings. "Many students are under the impression that
the Board of Governors at first
refused to entertain the suggestion." Lumsden stated. "This
belief  ls an entirely  false   one."
Students Urged To Support Play Friday
BOB HAYWOOD
In the service of thc King
•   The Players' Club has a message for well over 1000 undergraduates.
"Pride and Perjudlce" is being
produced this Friday evening on
the auditorium stage in aid of
the Canadian Red Cross, and tickets   MUST   BE   SOLD.
Proud of their record in the last
war, the green room hopes to raise
a substantial sum. In 1914-18 they
turned over several thousand dollars   to   the   Rod   Cross.
U.B.C. students may s-o the performance at the Auditorium Friday night at 8:15. Tickets are
50   cents   each.
A sidelight of the production is
the ro-unlon which will take
place   backstage.     Members  of  tlv-'
•> On Tuesday second year Arts-
men and third year Sciencemen
will bo able to get their results.
All others, with the exception of
Aggies who will learn their fate
from the Dean of Agriculture, will
receive their marks on Wednesday.
cast who have graduated have
come back to rehearse with undergraduates. One member is
coming from Ontario to take part
in   the   production.
Anxious to produce a finished
performance, the players have
been meeting for rehearsals
throughout the Christmas holidays.
Sidney Risk has volunteered his
services to   direct   the   play   again.
Newcomers in the cast, replacing students who have left Vancouver are Arthur Hill, replacing
James Halcrow as Collins; Mary
Buckerfield as Aunt Gardiner,
Phyllis Mllllgan as tho maid.
Archie Bain takes the role of
Charles Blngley, replacing Bob
Haywood,  now  in  the   air  force.
• TOTEM NOTICE — Desperate
need for candid camera shots of
campus life for this year's book.
All amateur photographers are
urged to contact tho Totem staff,
and bring in all available negatives. Credit for all snaps used
will be given In  the Totem.
JOHN  GLEN
Pride.
Aid Red Gross Friday, SOc
Inter-Frat
Formal To
'Go Dutch'
^ Campus fraternities will
join together at the
Commodore on Friday, January 24, in sponsoring a
"Dutch Treat" ball in aid of
the Red Cross.
Mary Beale, member of th.
committe. for the ball stressed the
fact that each person Is expected
to pay for himself, so that every
student attending will help the
Red  Cross,
Single tickets, fourteen hundred
of which are being printed, will
be sold at two dollars each. Non-
fraternity as well as fraternity
students may attend.
Each sorority and fraternity on
the campus will decorate a special
part of the ballroom, using the
emblem of their own society for
a motif. Ole Olsen will play
until   1:30.
The Idea of the Inter-Fraternity
ball had originally been to make
it an all-Canadian affair, but because several universities have
final exams at that time they -will
hold similar dances later in the
term.
• Freshman class elections will
be held January IS, It was announced Monday evening by the
Student Council. Nominations
should be in the Council's hands
on or before January 13.
Science Grads
Make History :
Say 'Thanks'
e In n letter of "very deserving
thanks to a fine body of men''
u group of Mechanical Engineers,
class of 1940, showed their appreciation for th-e training they received at U.B.C. in a manner
which is without precedent in tho
.memories of their long-suffering
professors. It is tho first time
graduating class has. as a group,
written such a history-making
docuiYr.-nt.
Two members of the class are
now doing defense work, while
the others aro engaged In electrical, aircraft. pulp antl paper
plants,   and   drafting.
Tlio men of the class are Roy
T. Bogle, Aloe Coulson. Harvey
Curruthcrs. Keith Eadie, Fred
Johnson, Molten Kennedy, Alan
Laird, Harold Morris, G. F. (Bob)
Pearce,   and   Ronald   Stewart. Page Two
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 7th, 1941
•  From   The  Editor's  Pen  »  »  »
The New Year
It was one of the brightest and cheeriest Christmases and New Years this year
that British Columbia has ever seen. Everyone was spending a great deal of money,
determined to have a good time because "it
might be the last." For most British Columbians, the past month or two have been
ones of material prosperity, and the New
Year has opened not without hope.
But a period of self-sacrifice lies ahead.
If it is not voluntary now, it will no doubt
be compulsory later.
The students of this University held an
enthusiastic Alma Mater meeting last term,
and decided to sign waivers for the returnable caution money, and appointed a committee to find other means of aiding the Red
Cross.
A good beginning was made, but toward
the end of the term, the campaign fizzled
away into nothing. Whether the,disappearance of enthusiasm was due to the pressure
of exams or not remains to be seen.
In the coming term, the Players' Club's
revival of "Pride and Prejudice", and the
Inter-Fraternity Ball both require the
whole-hearted support of as many students
as possible. The Players' Club's contribution promises to be one of the largest to date.
The Executive in charge of the Inter-Fraternity Ball claim that^Brock Hall is not large
enough for the event. We hope that they
realize that the ball is *not being held for
social purposes alone and that it should be
held wherever the gain for the Red Cross
will be the greatest.
There is no reason why other campaigns
for the Red Cross should not be enthusiastically supported here on the campus in the
coming term. BtSt if the campaign is going
to be a mere half-hearted affair and if the
students are not interested, it would be by
far the. best to call the whole thing off.
We should determine either to attain
our goal and pass it, or to drop the campaign now. Lukewarmness has never been
profitable to anyone.
Pass Features
The Pass Feature Fund has hardly been
touched to date, except for a few grants for
basketball, Canadian football, and hockey
games. The value of the pass itself has been
cut because of the suspension of various
activities on account of military training. If
the pass system is to have any value at all,
there should be an increase in the cultural
and educational features throughout the
year.   So far this year, there have been very
few, if any, features of this type.
*
Concerts in the Auditorium at noon
have always been popular as pass features.
Several concerts by outstanding local artists
are already being planned for the coming
term, as well as a series of lectures on music.
But pass features should not be confined to
a few concerts confined to one term.
It is too late now, of course, to do anything about last term, but it is not too late
to plan a series of events varied enough to
suit everyone's tastes. Everyone pays the
same sum into the Pass Feature Fund and
therefore everyone should obtain the same
benefits from it.
•  The  Mummery  . . . byjabex
Inevitably, the path of life is pockmarked with unhappy experiences that
leave us all somewhat sadder and wiser.
Little did I know, when I drop-kicked my
loose-leaf into a waste-basket three weeks
ago, that one of these gruesome episodes
was lying in wait for me during the holidays. The setting for the tragedy was the
main floor of Hudson's Bay Co. The time
remains hazy. I know it was Dec. 24. And
I know it was approximately 10:15 a.m.
when I was first caught in the revolving
door. The last time I saw the clock was
when I was sitting on it, at about 2:35 p.m.
It was soon after that that everything went
black.
In Disguise
I was still quite active, however, when
this particular act took place. Disguised as
a cellophane Christmas decoration, I had
been making good yardage, jumping from
pillar to pillar, and blinking my attractive
red, post-examination eyes to create a novel
coloured-light effect. At last I was able to^
swoop down in front of the stocking counter.
"Don't be frightened, miss," I panted,
buckling myself to the counter. "Would you
mind waiting on me?"
The sales-girl folded her arms and
champed stolidly on a wad of gum,
"I don't see how I can get out of it,
sonny," she replied.
I looked around stealthily, then quickly drew out a yard or so of an old silk stocking.
"Look!" I said, holding it out for her
to see.
She looked, and shifted the wad to the
other side of her face.
"If you want it filled, sonny, you'll have
to see Santa Claus.    5th floor."
"No, no!" I protested. "I want two more
like it."
"Don't tell me you've found a three-
legged woman," she whispered, leaning forward interestedly.
"Let's leave my private life out of this,
shall we?" I rasped indignantly.
"O.K., sonny," she laughed, "what d'ya
want?"
"What colour have you got?" I riposted
with  considerable  ingenuity.
"There's Robin Rose, Some Fawn,
Dusky, Rusty, Inconsequential Indigo, and
Beetled Beige."
"Haven't you got brown?" I queried,
wiping the sweat out of my eyes.
She seemed to think that was very
humorous.
"Hey, Mabel!" she hollered up the counter. "Tall, dark and incredible here says
he wants brown!"
Horse Laugh
This occasioned further merriment all
along the line. When she had finally regained control of the wad, a wicked glint
came into the eye of this devilish creature.
"Maybe you would like something like
this," she said, pointing down behind the
counter.
I peered over the top innocently, only to
be dazzled by an outstretched calf, potently
shapely. I lept back as though I had been
stung.
"Where's the nearest water fountain,
please?" I chocked, my face lighting up like
a Hawaiian sunset as I fumbled with my
counter buckles.
"There's one over in the lingerie department," she laughed.
"Where's the next nearest?" I gasped,
and fled as she collapsed in a hysterical fit
on the floor.
I was stuffing the old stocking into my
pocket, when I felt a heavy hand fall upon
my shoulder.   It was the store dick.
"Where do you think you're going with
that merchandise, sonny?" he snarled.
"Gimme that stocking!"
There commenced a fierce tug-of-war,
which was interrupted by a scienceman who,
after enjoying the spectacle for a time, stepped up to my ear to yell:
"Why don't you let the woman decide!"
"It's'my stocking, and I want it back!"
I cried grimly.
"If it's your stocking, why aren't you
wearing it, SISTER?" growled the dick
sarcastically.
"Because the garter is busted off my
girdle, IF YOU MUST KNOW!" I roared.
At that moment the stocking gave up
the fight, and I tumbled backwards down
some stairs. When I came to, I was hanging on a hook in the meat department, and
a large, florid babe was fingering my gams
in an intimate sort of way.
"Ain't much meat on this bird," she
muttered disgustedly, and went away.
That's all I remember.
(MEMBER C.U.P.)
Issued twice  weekly  by the  Students'   Publication   Board   of   the
Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia.
Office: Brock Memorial Building
Phone ALma 1624
Campus Subscriptions—91.50
Mall Subscriptions—-12.00
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
JACK MARGESON
News Manager  Janet Walker
Senior  Editors
Tuesday Pierre Berton
Friday    Edna   Wlnram
Pub Secretary  Helga Jarvl
Circulation Manager,
Bob Menchlons
Sports Editor  Archie Paton
Asst. Sports Editor. Jack McKinley
Associate Editors
Doris Fllmer-Bennett, Bob Morris
Assistant Editors
Jack  McMillan,  Jack  Ferry,  Margaret Reid, Marian McDonald, Lucy
Berton.
For Advertising:
Standard Publishing Company Ltd.
2183 W. 41st Ave., Phone KErr. 1811
*
U. Be Seeing
With Mac
Parashooter
• Best story of the exams is that
of    Constable   Orchard's    wild
ride from the gates to the Auditorium at noon with a frantic
Aggie who had hurtled from an
outward-bound bus at 12:15,
screaming that he had forgotten
he had an exam that day. The
Aggie later moaned that if he had
known that they were going to
fly there, he would have demanded a parachute! However ho is
one more admirer of Mr. Orchard,
who seems to make friends daily
on   the  campus.
Cooked History
e Professor Cooke is another
popular lecturer. His history
classes are attended by many just
for the general knowledge received. A man who doesn't take himself too seriously, he lets students
express themselves, which is denied them in many classes. "History repeats itself, historians repeat each ether," he quips, and
strives to avoid this common fault.
Phil and Frails
tt Phll. 9 has more pulchritude
per seat than any other class.
Betty Hebb. Nancy Martin, Jo
Welclon and F.ileen McDonnell vie
with Professor Irving for attention
from tho males. Incidentally, ho
often wins, as his lectures are
among the most popular in tho
curriculum, being provocative and
unbiased, with a liberal outlook
found  too seldom  these days.
• JOTTINGS — We could use a
few more chairs In the common
room, councillors. Pearl Temoln
insists on calling it "chemystery".
A few still wander on the lawns
In spite of barriers . . . must be
the bovine Instinct in them. Wc
picked up two books ridiculously
cheap yesterday at tre Varsity
Bookstore, while waiting for the
bus. From one locker to another:
"Hiya keyed!" Lucy Berton has
the darkest eyes. What a difference between rationalism and nationalism!
Folks Pass
• Professor   Irving   still   squirms
when he thinks of his faux pas
ln Physchology 1, in mentioning
Kirsten Flagstad as "the great
dancer". For a pleasant half hour,
visit tho museum on the main
floor of the library. Mr. Tansey
the attendant is as interesting as
his exhibits. He knows a little
about everything, and a lot about
British history. If the Kaf jars
you, sneak  in for a chat someday.
"I tore gave th* ben a piece ef my mind."
"You'd gel further If yev gave him Sweet Cap*."
SWEET CAPORAL CIGARETTE*
"The purest form in which tobacco can be smehtd."
♦
Heil "Hell"
C> Our Carrel has the word "hell"
written neatly on the wall just
at eye level. In the last minute
cramming it had an amazing tonic
effect when nerves began to
shimmy. Just the knowledge that
someone else got that feeling of
quiet desperation cleared the air
and brought a grin. Don't tell
Miss Lannlng though.
Live and Love
• Hie    romantic     couples    who
studied    together    during    the
exams are now, many of them,
holding hands and looking back
on their college days, silently
damning each other as th-3 cause
of their failure. Really girls, at
Christmas, Biology and Boyology
don't  mix.
• PERSONALS—Paul Muni tries
his best to look like John Glen.
The McPhee boys seem to maintain the family popularity . Maurice ls likeable immediately and,
although we haven't met Ted, his
team mates vouch for him. Add
distinctive handwriting; Frances
McLean's round script. Denise
Darling could pass for Betty
Thomas in a fog. Tommy Williams seems to have abandoned
his academic dress for something
more plebeian. We suppose It is
hard on a sensitive nature, being
called   "Professor".
60 Students
Bounced:
Unofficial
Some sixty students received
the degree of B.A.C. —"Bounced
At Christmas" — it was estimated
Monday following release of
Christmas examination  results.
Although officials at the Registrar's ofice refused to mak. any
statement, shrouding the matter ln
secrecy, an unofficial estimate
placed the number in the neighborhood  of last year's figure.
Little white slips of paper, signed by the Registrar were received
by the delinquents during the
Christmas holidays, marring the
festive season with the news that
the recipients were no longer required at  the  University.
Vast majority of B.A.C.'s were
Sciencemen.
There is a bit of good, sound
Philosophy in the following sign
recently observed in a Chinese
laundry:
You want credit,
Me   no give.
You get sore.
You want credit,
Me  give,
You   no  pay,
Me   get   sore;
Better  you get sore.
UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE
Hrs.: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturdays 9 a.m. to noon
LOOSE LEAF NOTE BOOKS, EXERCISE BOOKS AND
SCRIBBLERS
AT REDUCED PRICES
Graphic   Engineering   Paper,   Biology   Paper,
Loose  Leaf  Refills,   Fountain  Pens  and  Ink
and Drawing Instruments.
- - Special Student Rate at - -
CAPITOL   -   ORPHEUM   -   STRAND   -   DOMINION
By Presentation Of Your Student Pass
Alice Faye
and
Betty Grable
In
"TIN PAN ALLEY"
CAPITOL
Alexander Korda
presents
"THE THIEF OF
BAGDAD"
STRAND
Marx Brothers in
"GO WEST"
alao
Walter Pidgeon In
"SKY MURDER"
ORPHEUM
Gary Cooper in
"NORTH WEST
MOUNTED POLICE"
also "I'm Nobody's
Sweetheart Now"
DOMINION
m&^L^^Lmm***?-
suits
THE    QE
MILK   CH D CO LATE   MADE Tuesday, January 7th, 1941
THE
S___=^__I
UBYSSEY
Page Three
Joseph
Joseph
# Boy, what a new year's eve that
was . . . Josle was sort of sore,
too . . . Girls are funny things.
After all, a guy has to have some
relaxation. I think maybe I'd
better give some of the ether girls
a break and take them out. But
I apologized (again) with a box
of Purdy's fine chocolates, 673
Grunville Street, and they sure
did tho tiiek . . . the prices are
lower than you expect too. But
gesh, the way these women get
away with things. F'rinstanca look
at the cute llillc brunette soph
who wears u Zoic pin, out with
an A"--*:e, cf all things . . . imagine,
but come to think of it, if being
an Aggie helps any, maybe I'll
change my course and see if I
c;;n make any headway with her.
She wasn't wearing tho pin at
the time, by the way. Don'i(
forget, that tip about the chocolates at Purdy's, after your New
Year's   celebrutlon.
* *    *    #
• My family came across with the
slickest pair of new shoes from
Stacy's, 782 Granville. I feel like
a real Joe College with them,
they'ie really tops In shoes. Gosh
are these women fast workers! but
1 guess we gotta have them, in
spite of the nuisance they. are.
A cute little rosy-cheeked freshette ls sporting a nice new engagement ring, it seems that
everyone has been trying to de-
cld. which one of her many
Varsity boy friends lt is, but it
really belongs to a guy in tho
service of the King. Stacy's have
both men's and women's shoes, in
all styles. Josle has a friend, her
name is Sally, and is she a looker,
and fun ! anyway, she has the
trickiest pair of new campus
shoes — she's got nice  legs. too.
* *    *    •
# I   made   a   New  Year's   resolution    to   really   learn   how    to
dance this year, so I must hie me
down to Maynard Orpcn's Dance
Studio every Monday night, which
is specially reserved for Varsity
kids. Gosh the way the Zete pins
are popular, why maybe even our
boss, the ed., will have lost his
by the timo he gets back. He
Isn't back yet and you know how
dangerous these trains are, why
maybe he's even down buying her
a ring new, still waters run deep
yeu know. Tlio dance studio is
at, the Alma Academy, and they're-
only about two-bits a lesson, too.
One Players' Club Alpha D-jlt and
a friend were really going to jgo
to town on New Year's (I still
can't see why Josie kicked about
me. she oughta have ->-jeh some
of them) so they got a room in
a hotel, and also a car. However
they couldn't find anywhere down
town to park the car and so they
took it back to the garage they
rented it from. But the garage-
men thought they were drunk,
and so they wouldn't let them
take  the   car   out   again.
* *    *    *
• Josle tells me that if you want
to  see   the   nicest  selection   of
accessories in the city, go down
to Suzette's, 880 Howe Street.
They're really the thing to revive
you after that New Year's party,
you gotta have something, you
know. Sweaters .necklaces and
the cutest little lapel oranments
made of porcelain. They come
from California, and are they
cute? Why even I think so, and
usually I'm not fussy about all
those ornaments, they get in the
way .you know! I hear that the
New Year up the mountain waa
quite a party. Apparently one of
tho so called waiters was feeling
so good, all his formerly repressed
feelings were unleashed when he
dropped a plate of turkey on one
of   his   chem   prof's   head.     Think
OET  VALUE   IN
LOOSELEAF SUPPLIES
FOUNTAIN PENS
ZIPPER PORTFOLIOS
SLIDE RULES♦
SCALES
PROTRACTORS
T-SQUARES
Etc.
THE
CLARKE & STUART
CO. LIMITED
Stationers nnd   Printers
550 SEYMOUR STREET
VANCOUVER,   B.C.
Rhodes Scholar May
Journey To Oxford
To Do War Research
^    That he may do war research work in electricity at Oxford was the possibility voiced by James Brown, U.B.C.'s
1941 Rhodes Scholar, in an interview -with Ubyssey, Sat'rday.
Brown,       whose       selection       aa -_■_____■_________■______■_■■_■__■___■■■
Rhodes Scholar was announced on
the campus Tuesday, December 17,
Is the eldest son of Dr. J. G.
Brown, Principal of Union Theological  College.
A physics graduate, Brown has
won two university scholarships
during his undergraduate years.
Last May when he graduated with
first class honours in physics and
mathematics, he was accorded tho
Anne   Wesbrook   scholarship.
This year's Rhodes Scholar has
been actA-o in club work und In
sport both on and off the campus.
As president of thc Physical Society of U.B.C, he has carried on
researches in tho field of electron
detraction.
Sport Leader
In the field of sport, he has
shown Interest In boys' work, at
present as coach for a boys'
basketball team, and formerly as
a councillor at Elphinstone, the
Y.M.C.A.  camp.
Brown took part in the Olympic
Trials in 1936, the year in which
he captured the 100 and 220 yard
sprint titles ln the High School
Indoor Track Meet.   At that time,
hoi polloi
• Across  Canada
JAMES BROWN
... In the stops of Cecil Rhodes
he   was  the  B.C.  Junior  Olympic
220 Champion.
Born in Vancouver, Brown came
to U.B.C. from University Hill
School.
WEAKLY THOUGHTS
My Bonner kicks up a commotion,
My Bonner is out on a spree,
My   Bonner   has   drunk   his   hair
lotion,
For he's head of the L. S. E.
NURSERY CRIME
Hush   little   baby,
Hush   quite   a   lot
Bad   babies   get   rabies
And  have  to  be  shot.
RUTHLESS  RHYMES  FOR
HEARTLESS  HOMES
Into  the  well
Which the plumber built her
Aunt   Eliza   fell—
We   MUST   buy   a   filter.
DANNY THE DINER
"Walter, there's a hair in my soup."
"No sir, that is one of the cook's."
DEFINITION
A   sporran   is   a   leather   fig   leaf
worn   by   the   Scots.
ODE TO NEW YEAR'S MORNING
Science   is   red,
Arts   is   blue;
Did too many Stubbles
Make   you   sick   too?
Aggie   is   yellow,
Commerce  is  white;
It    wasn't   the   Stubby
That made .me Ught!
BIOGRAPHY
Alfred de Musset
Used to call his cat "Pusset".
His accent was affected;
That was to be expected.
Ban Conscientious Objector
From Lectures On Campus
#    William Donaldson, 3rd
Year Arts student, informed the Ubyssey Monday
that Colonel C. M. Shrum
has told him that he will not
be allowed to attend the University during the current
term.
The action was taken followinj-
Donaldson's failure to attend military lectures or parades during
thc Fall term. At present Donaldson is not attending classes, awaiting official confirmation of his expulsion from Registrar Stanley W.
Matthews.
Donaldson ls a third year
honour's student. He is only 20
years old and were he in any
ether position he would not be
required to take military training
till he was 21. He gave religious
grounds as the reason for his refusal   to   take   th-3   training.
WARNED
At the end of the last term he
was warned that he would not be
allowed to return unless he took
tlie training, though he was allowed to write  his Christmas exams.
He returned for one lecturo
yesterday morning. Then he went
to see Col. Shrum and was told
that there was no change in the
previous decision. He could not
come   back.
Col. Shrum said that he would
use his influence to try and get
Donaldson credit for his half year'i
work If he wished to attend university  when   the  war   was  over.
Beta: "Why is your tongue
black?"
Phi Delt: "I dropped a bottle
of Scotch on Sasamat Street, and
the   road   had  just  been  oiled."
.mm*
FOR HIRE — Public Address
System, Modern recorded music
for dances. Reasonable rates. Bill
McC'arter, Sc. '44.    BAyvlew 9145R.
WEDNESDAY — A meeting of
the Major L.S.E. will be held In
the Men's Executive Room tomorrow at 3:30 p.m. to consider the
nominees for the annual awards.
cf the satisfied feeling he must
have had! Boy! Josle has a birthday coming tip, I guess I'd better
lake to heart what I said about
those accessories at Suzette's,
cause Josle is fussy about having
things that are different, and she
can make sure they'he exclusive
if   she   goes   to   Suzette's.
Air Raid Motif For
Thursday's Hi-Jinx
%    Varsity men will be left to twiddle their thumbs Thursday evening while  co-eds frolic in  weird  costumes  at
Hi-Jinx, the annual party sponsored by the Women's Undergraduate Society. 	
An air raid is the motif of this
year's Hi-Jinx, and girls in evening clothes or in pyjamas, dressing
gowns and curlers will throng the
gym, dressed as they would be
nt the time of a two a.m. alarm.
Air Raid wardens and Red Cross
nurses will mingle in the crowd.
Two 1941 Totems will be given as
prizes—one for the best costume
and   one  for  the   funniest.
No mere men will be allowed
to enter the building, and If any
do manage to slip in they will
be torn limb from limb by the
Irate   co-eds.
The program for the evening includes a sing-song led by Frances
White, Varsity Orchestra vocalist,
skits by the Aggies and Arts '41,
'42. '43, and '44, a Grand March,
and dancing to the music of a
Wurlitzer. Doreen Ryan will be
Master of Ceremonies, and guests
of honour will be Dean Bollert,
Miss Moore, Dr. Joyce Hallamore,
and   Dr.   Isabel   Mclnnes.
The party begins at seven p.m.
and lasts until ten. Included in
the admission charge of ten cents
are the tradltloal refreshments of
cokes  and doughnuts.
Musical Appreciation Class
To Commence Tuesday
^    Musical  appreciation  classes  under  Dr.  Ida  Halpern,
graduate  of  the  University  of  Vienna,   will   begin  in
Brock Hall at noon Tuesday, January 14.
Dr.  Halpern  came to B.C.  about ________■_____■_________________________,
DINE
AND DANCE
AT
HOTEL VANCOUVER
a year ago after lecturing in
music for a short while at
Shanghai University. Previously
she had studied muslcology, or
music science as it is termed in
Europe, in Vienna, where she received   her   doctor's   degree.
Tire musical appreciation classes or musical understanding
classes, as Dr. Halpern prefers to
call them, will consist of several
courses of three lectures each, to
be held every Tuesday noon. Tho
first course will deal with the two
main forms of music, namely, the
polyphonic, referring to music of
several parts, and the homophonic,
referring to music consisting of
one melody and its accompaniment.
In her second course, Dr. Halpern plans to discuss the symphony—its structure and development from the seventeenth century when It originated to the
time of Beethoven's Fifth Symphony.
Dr. Halpern will Illustrate each
type of music by selecting records
from the Canegle collection here.
Possibly she may also arrange
programs of records for Friday
noon hours, in order that students
may have an opportunity to accustom themselves to the various
types.
L. S. E. President Bob Bonnet-
feels that these musical appreciation classes will meet a need
common to many U.B.C. studeijts.
"Since there is a keen desire on
the part of many students to learn
more about music, there is a real
need for someone to discuss and
explain     the     Carnegie     records,"
Name New-
Assistants
On Pub Staff
9 Stating that college newspapers
should be responsible for experimentation in the field of
jour-ullsm, Aubrey Roberts, managing editor of The Vancouver
Dally Province gave advice to
aspiring newspaper writers at the
annual Christmas tea of the Publications Board on December 4.
Mr. Roberts suggested that new
methods of newspaper writing
should be inaugurated, and that
it Is up to college university
papers to experiment with different   systems,
Christmas appointments on the
editorial staff of the Ubyssey
were announced by Jack Margeson, Editor in Chief. New associate editors are Doris Filmer-
Bennett, and Bob Morris, while
Margaret Reid, Marlon MacDonald, Lucy Berton, and Jack Ferry
were appointed assistant editors
and   H-elga  Jarvi,   pub  secretary.
Betty Quick, Totem Editor, announced Totem appointments as
follows: Tom Meredith, Business
Manager; Keith Porter .Advertising Manager; Lionel Salt, Associate Editor; Pierre Berton. Feature Editor; Gordon MacDonald,
Sports Editor; Maureen Evans,
Organizations and Honorce Young,
Class   Editor.
OTTAWA:
European Students
Tell of War Work
• La Rotonde,  of the  University
of Ottawa, tells of the immense
work that European students are
participating in while the horrors
of war are still upon them. In
most cases they are Roman Catholic students and are working for
a   great  Pax   Romana.
In Great Britain, in Spain, in
U.S.A., in Switzerland, and even
in those countries which are now
under tho control of the Nazis,
the Low Countries, France, and
Hungary they aro carrying on tho
■work for tho reconstruction of the
world, on the basis of Christian
principles.
TORONTO:
Males Donate'
Blood Serum
• Men of the University of Toronto are donating blood serum
to the Red Cross to be sent overseas. Over 900 students have signified their Intention of giving their
blood for the saving of those wounded in Europe.
The Injection of blood serum in
LONDON, ONT.
Fred Waring May
Write College Song
e Students of University of Western Ontario have been filling
out petitions to Fred Waring, famed leader of the seventy-five
Pennsylvanlans, to write a new
college song or hymn for them.
The Inauguration of the regular
Friday "College Smoker Nights"
started u movement in universities
all across America to get Fred
Waring to compose official college
songs.
It is obvious that songs cannot
bo written and played for every
college that sends a petition to
Waring. The fortunate colleges
are chosen ' on the following
bases: (1) expressed interest (2)
priority   (3)   geographic  location.
Before Fred Waring will write
a song for it each university must
prove its -enthusiasm and its own
particular   need.
the case of an emergency instead
of carrying out a transfusion ls an
advance in surgical technique. In
the case of serum the blood group
of the donor does not make any
difference; the serum can be used
directly for any person.
Grad Makes
Sacrifice
For China
Death   of   a   U.   B.   C.
science grad, Kenneth
Yip, was announced when
university authorities received a letter from Edward H.
Lockwood, secretary of the
Y.M.C.A. of Canton. Yip
left Vancouver to join the
China Industrial Co - operatives as a technician.
The Chinese people mourn the
loss of a man whose technical
knowledge and social vision combined would have made him a
perfect leader. To quote Mr.
Lockwood's letter: "When the
Japanese started the China incident they did not reckon with
men like Kenneth Yip. They
thought they could beat China into submission but thoy made a
wrong calculation. The attacks
tho Japanese have made on China
have given men like Ken Yip tho
opportunity of the leadership
needed In China's economic resistance  to Japan."
At the time of his death, Yip
was engaged as director of the
Kukong centre of the China Industrial Co-operatives. He was
stricken with typhoid fever but
delayed going to the hospital
rather  than neglect his work.
"When Japan pays the score, as
I feel sure Japan must," Lockwood
says, "the loss of Kenneth Yip
and others will stand against
her ... I have a conviction and
vision of Ken Yip and others
whose death Is a result of tho
ruthlessness of the military men
who  dominate  Japanese  affairs."
WEDNESDAY — A combined
meeting of the Women'a Undergraduate Society and the Women's
Athletic Association will be held at
12:30 ln Arts 100 to discuss plana
for Hi-Jlnx. All women students
are urged to attend.
behind thc news
(Continued from Page 1)
a building for the purpose on the
campus—a building which can be
put to use to aid Canada's war
effort.
Self Denial
Students at this University are
supposed to be denying themselves
luxuries. Yet, up to this time,
our self-denial amounted to exactly one and one-half cents per
person per week—for three weeks!
That is the meagre amount of our
individual  contribution.
Surely tho sacrifice of a formal
cabaret is not too much to ask of
n generation which is continually
viewing far greater sacrifices at
home and abroad. It con be the
answer to our pleas for something
to do in this wai-—it can be a
chance to show the public that
the University of British Columbia can drop the luxuries of a
by-gone era. It can be our first
real self  denial.
By switching from down town to
the campus we are not deleting
our social entertainment one whit.
The glamour of formal fuctions is
still ours. It is merely with us
In a different and less expensive
form.
Future student leaders would
do well to follow the example of
the Junior Class.
Brock Hall
Setting For
Junior Prom
• First organization to make use
of Brock Hall this session for
a major function will be the
Junior Class, when they hold the
Junior Prom on Thursday, February 6. Tlie visual cabaret stylo
was forsaken by the Prom Executive when they voted unanimously in favour of using Brock
Hall Instead of a down-town
cabaret.
Not only will the change to
Brock Hall prove less expensive
during war-time, when all social
functions are being cut to a minimum, but also the student building  will  be put  to use.
Further arrangements for the
Prom are being made by the Executive, and will be announced
later.
Just Like
Owning Your Own
MERCURY
U-DRIVE
Clean  and   Classy
Cheap and Convenient
*1.50 AU Day or AU Night
plus mileage
VANCOUVER
MOTORS --DRIVE
901 Seymour       MA. 3311
HEAD OFFICE
MONTREAL
UNIVERSITY PEOPLE . . . students
and faculty alike . . . will find a
friendly, helpful banking service at
Canada's Oldest  Bank.
BANK OF MONTREAL
'Established  1817
E.  J.   SCHE1DEL,  Mgr.
"A  Bank  where small Accounts are  welcome"
West  Point Grey  Branch:   SASAMAT AND TENTH HOOPERS   LOSE   THREE   MEN,   GET   LIVINGSTON
Page Four
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 7th, 1941
MAURY  PONDERS
• Coach Maury Van Vllet was dealt a dirty deal by the exams when he
lost three of his cagers through ineligibility, so he has to rustle some
new material to fill the vacant spots. One of the fellows likely to catch
a berth if he wants it is Al Menzies, star with the Senior B crew in the
Community league. Above Coach Van Vliet is explaining to Al an intricate play.
Varsity Icemen
Drop Two More;
Play Sunday
9 The luckless hockey team lost
two out of three games during
the holidays, besides two of their
player_, Bill Bell and George Murray.
The single win that the team obtained was over the Army, 4—2 on
Dec. 20, The pair of losses, to
Kirks and Models respectively,
wero suffered Dec. 27 and Jan. 3.
Manager Hugh Livingstone announces that the next game is set
for this Sunday against the Models.
AU games this month will be played on Sundays.
Livingston also sends out tlie
plea that if there are any hockey
McGoun Cup
At Stake
• Two U.B.C. students, Elspeth
Munro and Austen Delany will
crosss words with a university debating team from Saskatchewan at
tho Hotel Georgia on January 17th.
The McGoun Cup Debate topic
for this year is: Resolved: "That
the recognition of a system of international law, enjoying a primacy over national law, offers the
best hope for permanent world
peace."
Travelling east to Winnipeg will
be Arthur Fouks and Bob Bonner,
who   will   attack   the   resolution.
players   on  the  campus  willing  to
turn out, they will be welcomed.
The University
ot
British Columbia
Last day for payment of Second
Term Fees is
January 13th, 1941
All cheques must be certified and
made payable to The University of
British Columbia.
Mailing certified cheques to the
Bursar is recommended.
For regulations governing Fees —
see pages 39-42 inclusive of University
Calendar.
BURSAR,
THE  UNIVERSITY
OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
LATE Fee will be Strictly
enforced after Jan. 13tli
'Birds Break Even
On Trip South
% Despite the fact that examinations have eliminated
three players from the Thunderbird line-up for the remainder of the season, Maury Van Vliet took his full squad
south during the holidays and came back with a win and a loss
garnered from Centralia College and St. Martin's College,
Olympia, Washington.
The three players who failed to
make the grade at Christmas, Jack
Ryan, Doug Pedlow and Norm
Armstrong, went out ln a blaze of
glory. They sparked the team to
a thrilling 53-50 victory over Centralia last Friday night. Lefty Art
Barton was high scorer with 12
points, potting his hots when they
were needed most as the score
see-sawed   back  and   forth.
The night before the Thunderbirds dropped a nlp-and-tuck
battle to St. Martin's College 51-48.
The count was knotted numerous
times and th. game was won in
the last few seconds. Don Livingston, who has returned to the
Blue and Gold line-up, played a
great game in this contest to
celcbrat- his re-entrance into the
hoopla  wars.
Chatter
Tho boys report they had lots of
fun on the trip, but experienced
difficulty in financial matters. At
one spot the Yanks wouldn't
accept Canadian lucre, claiming it
was  almost   worthless   to   them.
The squad spent one night in
the dormitories at St. Martin's
College and nearly froze to death.
The temperature  was  10 below!
They witnessed  one  of  tho Uni-
Staeys Here
Wednesday
• Thunderbirds, just back from n
hurried tour in which they
broke even -with two Washington
college hoopla teams, are preparing to fulfil a very busy Intercity league schedule for the next
couple  of  weeks,
Wednesday night the weakened
collegians entertain the luckless
Stacy crew in the campus gym
and Saturday at V.A.C. they play
Tookes. Tho Wednesday following
tho 'Birds take on the champion
Maple  Leafs here.
Negotiations are underway to
bring several college teams from
the state of Washington here during tho next fow weeks, so it
looks as if the basketball lads will
be  plenty  busy.
versity of Washington Huskle
games and claim they could give
them   a   good   battle.
Coach Van Vliet, the lucky guy,
hit the jack-pot for $3.50 in American   nickles   In   one   eatery.
•   Paton's  Percolator
e^ Maury's hoop squad sure took a licking from the exam
axe, but there is one bright ray shining through the
gloom. Don Livingston, the tall centerman who starred on
Varsity's line-up in previous years, has returned to the fold
and will ably fill Doug Pedlow's shoes in the pivot spot.
Little Joe Ryan had two strikes on him before he started
writing. He was fighting the 'flu and then had to stay up all
night to study for three exams ln one day.
* *       *       *
0 That swell build-up we gave the Varsity hockey team
last term seems to have been all wrong. The pucksters
have won two games in the King Crest league, both against
the New Westminster regiment, but have been smothered by
the other squads. Rumours have persisted all year that the
ice-men are troubled by internal dlssention. It isn't our
policy to run down any team on the campus, but there seems
to be something definitely wrong. Maybe if students took
more interest and turned out to games it would help the boys
to hit the win-trail.
* 4< n< *
0 And now we must go to work and organize a rugby fifteen that will do justice to Varsity's record in the McKechnie Cup series. The one game played before Christmas
proves that the ruggers must improve greatly if they hope
to provide any kind of opposition for the strong Victoria
club on January 18.
* *       *       *
^    Didn't we hear the Mamooks make a New Year's resolution   to  start   leading  cheers   in   the   packed   stands   at
basketball games this year?    See you Wednesday in the gym.
IN  AND  OUT
9    Above   left   is   Don   Livingston,   six-foot   pivot   man   of   former   seasons,
who  returns  to  the   hoop  squad  at   a   time  when  he  is  needed  most.
One of the reasons for this need is the loss of Joe Ryan, right, fiery little
guardwho was considered the most improved player on the team last fall.
LUCKY LEFTY
C' Blonde Art. Barton, tbo lad with the shifty overhand shot who has
mad-- a name for himself in Senior A circles this fall, was one of the
fortunate men who wasn't clipped by thc elimination axe this Christmas.
On hir. shoulders: will fall much of the extra lead made by the los:, of two
forwards, Doug Pcdlcw and Norm Armstrong'. Art is right uo with the
leaders: in the Inter-city league scoring and led the' Thunderbirds to
victory down in Centralia, Washington,  last Friday with 12 points.
Inter-Collegiate   Golf Meet
Washington  vs.   U.B.C.
• The University golf club executive went into a huddle
yc-'tcrd.iy and can,'.- out with the
staitlin.; news: 1 lint thi.-y will hoi 1
a r.i.lf meet with tho University
of   Washington   in   the  near  futur...
Me." n while. Ormie Oall. repevt-
imj: swing'stcr of th-? club, states:
that members of th" club will havo
a chance to brus:h up on their
g.-.me in various matches to ba
hold   with  local   clubs.
Several matches with clubs in
Victoria nre also on tho schedule
cf tho rejuvenated golf club's Now
Year's   resolutions.
Kenny   McBride,   Gordy   Living-
.ton
and
Or
-.-ie    Hai
1    have
been
lvird
al
it     r
lurini*
:-.'■    ho
lidays
; nd.   '
l   u:
(.'   Ill
...   th-lr
.^a nv..   i
;  cer-
lainl.-
: b
ove
l.'.ir.
VACANCY — Boy's Co-operative
Residence, 3928 West 10th Ave.;
reasonable rates. Apply Tom Pepper, Arts Letter Rack, or phone
ALma 1268Y.
LOST—Green Waterman's fountain pen in the Applied Science
Building before Christmas. Please
return to George Campbell, Science
'43, or to the A.M.S. office.
TUESDAY — Colored film from
South Africa by Miss Marjorie
Leemlng, January 7th, Room 200
Science Building. Admislson 25
eenta.    Proceeds  for  war  work.        I
THE NEAREST BANK IS
The Canadian
BANK   OF
COMMERCE
Tenth and Sasamat Branch
A general bank business
is transacted and accounts
of the faculty and students
of the University of
British Columbia are welcomed.
BANKERS TO THE
ALMA MATER
SOCIETY
C. R. Myers, Manager
MOPR'5
Here's today's biggest Value in
pipe tobaccos. A fine quality
mixture—full of flavour—mild
and cool. Try a pipe today.
In pouches,  packages and V. lb. tlnr..
THERE IS NO MONEY
TO BE MADE OR SAVED
BY GOING ELSEWHERE
FOR
HARDWARE
But you can save plenty of TIME by buying at
Hewer's Hardware
4459 West 10th Avenue
ALma 1552

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