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The Ubyssey Jan 29, 1926

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/stiitd TWo* Nfflekly by the Students' Publications Board of The University of British Columbia.
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Volume VIII.
VANCOUVER, B. C, JANUARY 29th, 1926
No. 23*
te-.
I Council Revises
...   Vigilance System
* In pursuance of recent suggestions
taade, It was deolded at lent Mon-
, day's Council meeting that the sys-
i    tern of administering the vigilance
System be changed.
la future ten new members of the
,   Committee of Uw and Order will Us
appointed each month. The ten re-
J. tiring members will surrender their
»   batons of office, but will not be re>
%v|n?a of the duty of en,orc,n* dl»-
$, "under ths operation ot this plan a
t   large number of seniors will receive
special instruction in keeping order,
• ' and no particular ten men will hare
r;< to bear the "BussySdot" stigma of a
t   plain clothes polios force.
!??*•• Natlonsl Student Union.
f ,    With the suggestion that it would
lis * benefit to participants in the
<   approaching   Imperial   Debate,   ths
r   Ut sad 8oJentlflo Department reo-
otuaended that this University cot-
m with other Canadian waiver-
ii the ultimate object of this
, to be the tormntlon oi a Cana-
» National Union of students, aa-
ated by correspondence, and later
oottfersnces.     This organisation
be affiliated with the Interna-
_ Union ot Universities.     The
emmendatlon   was   approved   by
.moll and referred book to the Lit.
id Soientlflc for aotion.
Oym. Plant Oo Defers Soard.
Mr. John Oliver was appointed to
, Interview the Board Ot Governors In
, connection with plans which have
; been prepared for the projected gym*
.   Sasiom and Women's Union build-
frUjWtloard meets on tho 19th, and
it is expeoted that It will soon be
, , known just what steps are to be tak-
■■ en towards ratling the required
,, 1180,000.
Heepetere Forego Prairie Trip.
Owing to the time Involved In such
a trip no basketball team will be aent
to the prairies this year, although
some very attractive offers have been
received from towns in Alberta and
Montana.
Instead, the Senior B team very
likely will make a trip to the Okan-
agan, a district which has never before been penetrated by a Varsity
basketball team. The Senior B team
was also given permission to play a
game In Seattle on February 6.
Some Prospects of Hot Showers
Track men and boxers will be alad
to loam that there Is now soro • prospect of getting hot showers in their
dressing room. Until recently there
was no money available tor connecting up the gaB, but now it is only a
question of waiting until the gas company can be pursuaded to send some
men out in this direction to do the
Work. The men's dressing room has
gained an enviable reputation as an
ideal habitat for polar bears.
M.L.S. TO HOLD
NEWJTRY-OUTS
After bewailing the latest example
Of student apathy as demonstrated
by the scanty attendance at the
Oratorical try-outs, the Executive of
the M. L. S. have decided to try
again. Accordingly, a new preliminary try-out has been billed for 3.15
today (Friday) in Room A100.
Evory man undergraduate is offered another chance to enter the Men's
Oratorical Contest. A speech of five
minutes' duration on any subject Is
all that is required for the eliminations. There are suroly more than
six students In this Institution who
have enough interest In public-speaking to say a few words In this try-
out.
If a would-be competitor cannot get
in touch with the Executive, he may
hand in his name during the meeting
Itself. This Is the last opportunity
for entry Into this year's Oratorical
Contest.
The final round of the Men's Oratorical Contest will be held along
with the Women's Oratorical Contest
on the evening ot February 10th.
SOCCER TEAM
IN BIG GAME
Varsity's tar-famed first soccer
team will grapple on Saturday with
Vancouver Engineers, one of the leading teams In first division, This Is
a Mainland Cup fixture and the
team's chances of winning are, right
at present, excellent.
It Is of course the cuatom when requesting support tor » game, to corns
In an obsecratory attitude before the
Student Body's throne ot grace. "The
team will only win it you turn out:
this means you," howls the propagandist. And this is In part, true. None
ot the Varsity teams this year, how*
evw, are Indebted to the Student
Body In any way tor their victories.
This Is especially applicable to the
first aocoer team.
Four /Mrs ago. It will he remembered, Varsity's first soccer eleven
won Its way Into the finals tor the
Provincial championship, and Incidentally into the affections ot Vancouver soccer fens. The Student
Body also gave the game wonderful
support. Since that year, however,
Interest In the game has slowly dwindled until few U. & o. students know
even what the game is or who plays
oil the Varsity teem. A few members of the faculty have remained
its staunch supporters.
With s decline In students' Inter*
est .there has been a partially corresponding decline in the players' in*
terest. Evidence of this can be ssen
In the fact that the first team has
not had a good practice this yesr,
Lately, however, there have been
prognostications ot a revival. The
acquisition ot Queue Tip, who is at
present considered by city fans ss
the outstanding oentre forward la
B. 0., has been a factor not only In
bringing considerable publicity to
Varsity, but also in renewing the
hopes of the players. Stevenson and
Oray have been moved up from tbe
second team and have proved themselves deolded assets. Varsity now
has a good forward line and, with
their customary defence, have a
strong team generally. Their only
deficit Is lack of practice.
Last Saturday with about thirty
boys looking on, the team held Westminster United, league leaders, to a
draw, and only a counter revolution
of Fortune's dizzy wheel turned away
victory. The sportsmanship of the
Varsity, encouraged by their thirty
rooters, was the most pleasing feature of a rough game. On Saturday
at 2.30, at the same park (Athletic),
the team will again perform. Three
hundred rooters could lift the grandstand's rafters, and as Art Mercer
says, "We gotta win this game."
Annual Concert
To Be Held Soon
The Musical Society wishes to announce its annual spring concert
which will be presented in the University auditorium on the evening of
February 26th, at 8.15. Special bus
and street car service has been arranged, so that musio lovers will lu
no way be hindered from hearing this
unusually fine programme.
As has been announced before, the
programme this year is a distinct
departure from that of previous
years. Several operatic selections are
being pressnted in costume, with the
proper stage setting snd lighting effects. Besides some excellent solo
work thsre are a number of orchestral and choral selections ot merit.
Full details ot the programme will
be published later. Both oholr and orchestra are being oonduoted by the
concert master ot the Capitol Theatre,
Mr. O. Hadyn Williams, who needs
no introduction to University audi-
ences.
Tickets for the concert may be procured from members of the society-
All seats are reserved at prices of
11.00, 70 cents, and 60 cents, and must
bs exchanged for proper seat tickets
at rietcher Bros., 688 Granville St.,
on or after February Mud.
The Musloal Society is taking a distinct step forward in their production ot operatic selections snd the Innovation of proper costuming and
stage letting. The programme Is a
dietlnctly novel one, both for performers and audience, and should receive enthusiastic support from the
whole student body.
"McGILL NEWS" CRITIC
SLAMS U. S. FOOTBALL
*i
There is to be a page in the
Annual reserved tor each clan,
to be filled by a write-up about
■ix hundred word! in length; or
a collection of Jokes having
reference to the class. A drawing or photograph, half-page
slse (three by five Inches), or
quarter page else (two by three
inches) may be used If desired.
Please get the material for
these pages handed in at the
Publications Office at the earliest possible date.
Members of the following executives who have not yet been
photographed must make their
apolntments with Brldgman's
.Studio  at  once:
Women's Undergraduate Society.
Men's Cndergraduate Hoel-
etles.
Students' Council
Publications  Board.
Literary and   Scientific.
Men's  Athletic Society.
Women's Athletic Society.
PRO AND CON
LOVE /ME
L0V£  My
DOG-
Notice re W.U.B. Fund
There is an Impression abroad that
the money already collected for the
Women's Union Building Fund Is being turned over to the Oymnaslum
Fund. The executive committee of
the W.U.B. Fund wish to correct this
Impression  as   false.
SENIORS, PLEASE NOTE!
Seniors, do not forget the t»a In
the Cafeteria on Friday, January 29,
l to 5 p.m. This is a good opor-
tunity lo meet one's partner for the
Senior Hall. All Seniors should attend and help to promote the success
of the danc,«.
Most students realise the Importance
of considering all sides of such an
Important question as Introducing
American Rugby at this college, and
It Is for this reason that the attitude
ot a McOill University publication is
valuable at present. An editorial in
the Deoember Issue of the McGiil
News states that tbe game li very
much like English Rugby, from Which
it has evolved, "except that In the
American game the intermediate periods were not so long drawn out."
Expressing the attitude of the spectator, the editor says "it is neither
fait nor spectacular, and contains
little field running." Possession of
the ball Is of such vital importance
that "those fine passing runs" are by
no means encouraged. "The end
runs," states this paper, "are so
easily Seen and anticipated by the
opposing team that, they usually have
plenty of time to string out a sufficient number of wings to Speck the
run very quickly." Distant! gained
or lost is counted in feet and is so
important that "the pity develops
into a series of short, sharp Shocks.1'
Not only from the standpoint of
speed does the article snow aversion
Football President
Gives Views on
the U. S. Game
Editor Ubysiey.
Dear 8ir: t >■'■.
With the approach ot the day when
this University mast go down on record as favoring or disapproving of
the year of probation propoied for
American, or rather, inter-colleglate
football, some clear-cut statement of
the alms and objects of the newly-
formed American Football club may
be of interest to the students.
In the first years of the University,
building was the main object and student activities were necessarily secondary. Now, with final location on
the permanent site, expansion of student activities, particularly athletics,
is coming to the front. Basketball,
track, and rowing, aro already reaching out for Inter-colleglate competition. Football Is essentially one of
these sports and must be Included
among them.
When the Junior Northwest Conference was formed last fall In Tacoma, U. B. C. was invited to Join,
principally on account ot their participation in American football with
one of the schools involved. The
manager of our team received the
Invitation. This conference aims to
develop relations among Its members
In basketball, track, rowing, football,
and other sports.
We of the American Football club,
aim to foster inter-collegiate sport in
nil branches, together with the college spirit or bond of sympathy between students, that thia form of competition engenders.
The good resulting from Inter-colleglate football far outweighs the evil,
and those existing ovlls are being
eradicated In the American colleges.
We have no such evils here, and our
cluh plans to have constitutional safeguards against thetr occurrence.
All the club asks Is a year's probation In Inter-colleglate football to demonstrate conclusively whether or not
participation In this sport Is practicable, If the students turn It down
now, the quest ion will continue to
crop up from tlmo to time. On the
other hand, if It Is proven no' a success, It will he a long time before
the University Is again confronted
with the problem, With this In mind,
It would appear that the student body
would be Ill-advised to turn down the
proposition when It comes to a vote.
Sincerely yours,
II. J. SEED (Arts '28)
President, American Football Club.
DID YOU EVER TRY TO COM-
POSE A YELL? TRY IT AND 8END
YOUR CONTRIBUTION TO THE
ROOTERS' CLUB,
to the game, but also because of this
fact that It "requires the service ot
large and beefy individuals. . . The
youth of average build. . . . is precluded from becoming successful at
this type of football, and If he persist In the atempt, the hospital Will
sooner or later claim him for its
own. . . . The game, then, puts «
premium on the hard-boiled, husky
player, end a discount on younger
ana fester men," reads the article.
This results, in many oases, In in*
Juries, many of them severe snd ptD>
manent.
Furthermore, "The News" object!
to the sport for the same reason «s
some U.B.C. professors have given,
namely that, "college football Is not
a pastime or relaxation, but a career
In Itself, snd a career involving more
time and arduous labor than any one
who has other interests in life "'
sides football, should be called
to expend. . , . College sport
come to s very poor baas win
for the participation of s tint
(sts only." The professional
infused in the whole thint-
result "the whole duty of a T
star st an American college
play footbSil."
smsssasMNi
m
■Wi-S
t*«
Wasp-waisted Women
Wore Weighty Weeds
Stanford University—(P. t JRMt
Three decades ago the "wwp-jralstfc
ed and delicate girl" wore from
seven to etght petticoats sad TW-
toils other garments and her (Stool*
ing weighed from seven to twSlve
pounds declared Dr. Olelis Duel Mesh-
er, Medical Adviser of Women, ia
summary accompanied with statistical charts recently received by the
State Department of Phyiloal Education.
Statistics given in the charts show
that the fashionable length ot skirts
has been shortened twelve Inches during the last thirty years and twenty-
Inch skirts are common today. The
width of young women's skirts, in tho
past three decades has decreased
from fifty-six inches to about thirty
Inches.
Stanford women of thirty years ago
were about one Inch or two Inches
shorter In height, weighed three or
four pounds less, and on the
average were older In age when freshmen than the first-year women of
today, according to Dr. Mosher who
buses her statement on measurements
of 4,170 women who have attended
the University since that time.
'•'M
1
Senior 'B* Teams Win
Last Saturday night Varsity Olrls
Senior B team came out on top after
a tussel with ex-North Vancouver
High. Both teams played well, but
the girls from across the water were
not quite equal to the Blue and Gold,
as the final score of 11-8 showed.
Doris Wood captured 5 points, and
Doris Allen, Gerry Whltaker and
Marj. Lanulng 2 each.     ]
Badminton
On Wednesday, Varsity came out
on top in two matches against the
7th Battalion Club, B. Division, the
first team winning by 16—6, and the
second by 13 matches to 11. Dick
Davidson had the misfortune to
wound his ankle and had to stop
after playing three of his mixed
doubles. One of the 7th Battalion
players was also forced to quit, and
two of the men's doubles matches
hail to be dropped.
Teams:
First—-O. Woodman, O. Marrlon, D.
Davidson, J. Shakespeare and Misses
V. Mlllener, J. Creer, H. Matheson,
and M. Crlag.
Second—O. Carpenter, M. MoFar-
lane, I. Stevenson, J. Partington, D.
Porteous, and B. Matheson.
HAVE YOU SUOaiSTRD A NAME
FOR THE ANNUAL7 pw-J-llPW
J* «■*<!!
THE   UBYSSEY
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iAllUAAl    a**7*"'    A^aVV
OJljr IbysHry
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(Member of Paclflo Inter-Colleglate Press Association).
tssued every Tuesday and Friday by the Studeut Publications Board of the
Unlveralty of British Columbia, Weet Point Orey.
Phone: Vanity 1484
Mail Subscriptions rate: $8. per year.   Advertising rates on application.
Editorial Staff
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF—A. Barle Birney.
Senior Editors—Misi SadieJ&ylsj and W. Murphy.
Associate Editors—David Warden, Mils Marlon Smith, Don Calvert and
Miss Kathleen Baird.
Feature Editors—Eric Dunn, E. Morrison and 0. Vincent.
Assistant Editors—Miss Florence Cassidy, Miss Alice Weaver.
P. I. P. A. Editor—George Davidson.
■uelness Staff
Business Manager—Harold 0. MoWUllams.
Advertising Manager—J. Stanley Allen.
Circulation Manager—Dlgby Leigh
tdltors-for-thi-liiuei
Associate, Marlon Smith; Assistant, Florence Cassidy;
^^^^^^ Proofs, Dorothy Arkwrlght.	
TRADITIONS IN SPORT
Tradition, it is often said, plays a large part in university life.
sad it is the relation between tradition and sport that wo wish to
discuss here. It has become an established custom for all lectures to
stop after three o'clock on Wednesday afternoon in favor of sport
practices. This is a concession to University athletes from the Faculty j but, with the exception of the annual sports' day afternoon,
it is their only official privilege granted sport. It is true that many
ineinbers of the Faculty encourage athletics in other ways, by attending games and otherwise assisting clubs. In fact, somo of our most
enthusiastic "fans" are members of Faculty. Still, however, this
Wednesday afternoon custom is the only official recognition which
sport receives.
, That this tradition has been established is an excellent thing
?| from the athletic's point of view. A serious departure has been made
1» frfto it, however, in the first year science class. About half of the
*■ members of this particular class were supposed to take an additional
h subject this term, but found that the only time at which this could
' Vaone was on Wednesday after three o'clock. Since many of them
longed to teams they asked permission to drop the subject and take
next term, basing their claim, not only on the fact that it was an
tra, but also, that their Wednesday afternoons were for sport
aotloes. The Dean evidently did not see the matter this way, for
lie made the course) compulsory. And although the class as a whole
Objeoted, the course, so far remains compulsory.
*k This is an example of the sport tradition in conflict with studies.
iti the Arts men and the Aggies have this afternoon free, surely the
Science men, who have a heavy enough course as it is, aro justified in
demanding the same exemption. Moreover, in fairness to both athletics
attd athlete this tradition should continue. We know, of course, that
tra difficulty can easily be removed, the course, as an extra, can be
dropped.
TO THE FACULTY
That we should have the temerity to criticize our professors in
fejffty w»y W*H» doubtless, be regarded as rude, disrespectful and in-
'   ! tjsoent, but the fact that our remarks are called for as another tribute
to the omnipotent god of Discipline, may justify them.
Whatever the case, it is not our intention to make excuses for
members of the Faculty who are in the habit of smoking in the halls,
0tr- • practice forbidden to undergraduates, and for which many have
been fined. A student, on receipt of the white insignia of the Vigilance Committee, is not likely to regard discipline any the more
favorably if one of his professors happens along, carelessly enjoying
a privilege which the unfortunate student has been denied.
It will be argued, of course, that the Faculty should have privileges and should not be subjected to the discipline which governs the
undergraduate body. The case in point, however, rules out this
consideration, inasmuch as smoking in the halls is forbidden, not
because of any malicious intent on the part of the disciplinary committee, but because of the necessity of complying with lire regulations. A good, practical reason this, and one which students ought
to respect, if only out of respect for University property.
Unfortunately, however, this aspect of the question seldom, if
ever, occurs to them, and the old method of encouraging discipline
by the virtuous example of those older and wiser is still, of necessity,
in vogue. For this reason seniors, who have endeavoured to refrain
from breaking rules, and from enjoying a cigarette in the halls, cannot but resent, and justly so, tho thoughtless and ill-considered practice of many members of the Faculty, who in breaking this essential
regulation, create greater animosity towards a system of discipline,
admittedly expedient, but, nevertheless, unpopular. We might add,
were we not original, that a word to the wise is sufficient.
FROM A FRESHMAN
January 26, 1926.
Editor The Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:—The recently held pep
meetings have shown the student
body at large, especially the Freshman Class, to be ignorant of many
of the Varsity songs. An Important
factor In btl:rln up trie U.B.C. spirit
and enthusiasm is the singing of Varsity songs. It is, therefore, in the interests of the student body that one
should learn them. To ensure a
greater familiarity with the songs aud
consequently a better Varsity spirit,
I would suggest that the Freshman
Class at least, be required to know
these songs. Each member of the
Freshman Class would be tested by a
written examination set by the Students' Council. Any delinquents could
be summarily treated.
If this suggestion were carried out,
It would mean greater enthusiasm at
all Varsity functions which are enlivened by songs and yells. At least
the Pop meetings would be more successful.    Respectfully,
JIM DUNN, Arts '29.
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I'
I:
Seniors Hold Draw
At the Senior Class meeting on
Tuesday, it was decided to hold a
Senior Tea In the cafeteria on Fri-
dya, January 29, at 3 o'clock, treat
a la Dutch. This will be the first social event in which members ot the
fourth year in all faculties have taken
part, in this matter '26 has created
a precedent for graduating students
which it is hoped will be continued
by other years tn their turn.
The first co-operative class draw
took place at the same meeting on
Tuesday.
The Aggies drew six blanks among
the twelve In their class. The mem
bers of the two he-man classes expect to come faou to face with their
unknown Arts partner* al tho tea on
Friday.
WANTED—SOMEONE TO WRITE
A PARODY ON "HI, HI, THE VARSITY" FOR THE UNIVER8ITY
80NQ BOOK BEING COMPILED BY
THE  ROOTERS' CLUB.
REV. WILLIAMS J. OGDEN
TO ADDRESS S. C. M.
According to the syllabus drawn up
by the S.C.M. executive, tho next
Monday noon address will be delivered by a noted artist and speaker
of this city, the Rev. Williams J.
Ogden, In Room Asrlculture 100, Monday, at 12.15.
The subject, "Emotional and Rational in Religious Thinking," Is ono
which should be or great interest to
the student body. That the average
attendance at these noon meetings Is
Increasing Is evidence of the popularity of the subjocts discussed, Inter-
ostod students are Invited to attend
AIho, on this Sunday evening at the
Canadian Memorial United Church
» H|.erlal service will be conducted
at which two Varsity students will
speak on subjects relative to the
work of the Student Christian Movement   In Canada.
LOST.—Qold Eversharp pencil at Aggie Danse. Finder please leave at
Publications office.
THE REBUTTAL OF THE
REBUTTAL
Editor Ubyssey,
In the issue of 22nd lnst. I presented at length some views on Varsity athletics in general, and American football in particular. I had hoped my presentation would be clear,
but unfortunately I failed—at least
so far as two fellow-students are concerned. These gentlemen were able,
together, to compile a delightful
epistle to the misguided; "delightful," because while abounding In references personal to myself, It does
permit material relevaut to the gen-
ral discussion to creep in.
In my previous letter, I agreed that
esprit   de   corps   was   a   "sleeping
beauty" at this University, hut disagreed that American football was
the  "Prince  Charming"  who  could
wake her.   I pointed out defects in
Mr.   Thomson's  arguments  which  I
had not heard in common room talk;
and consequently thought might add
to the effectiveness of the general
discussion.     I   suggested   that   we
make a success im the sports we
now have,  before embarking on a
battle-cruiser which can only be manned by a submarine's crew; In other
words, before American football can
provide for all the advantages claimed for it by its staunch and admirable supporters, it must be not only
a major sport, but THE major sport.
I pointed out that we have no definite
source of new players.   It is argued
that the Varsity Is showing the way,
is stimulating tbe American code in
this city; that we have the Canadian
code which can provide good material.     Granted U. B. C.'s service in
providing an example to our talr city
and  thus stimulating new  players;
would It not be far better for Varsity to make a serious effort to raise
the standard of the Canadian game,
since  it  is   definitely   established   in
the city?   Would It not be better to
continue on our present path, and as
Canadian   rugby   developes    let   our
first team Indulge In tho outside com
petition desired, Just as they did this
year?   I suggested basketball as one
of the sports we might well work to
improve;  the score run up by Puget
Sound    against    our    championship
team  (41—16)  supports rather than
defeats my argument.
There was no question of my "relishing" playing smaller colleges than
our own. The argument had been
put forward that Intercollegiate competition would invigorate our flagging
esprit de corps. It was my point that
this argument was useless unless we
play large Institutions; or at least
institutions prominent in the athletic
world. What are our prese.it
chances? Washington 86, Puget
Sound 0; Puget. Sound 64, U. B. C. 0.
Judge for yourself. I would like my
upbralders to understand that nowhere in my previous letter did I
make any condemnation of the American game; (I leave that to others.)
I fall to see that I was either unfair
or prejudiced. My arguments were
directed against the supposed advantages that would accrue to U. B. C;
I endeavoured to point out disadvantages of bringing the game into U.
B. C, at the present time. Aa the
professors say, "Read the paper."
The co-authors of this latest effusion Inform me that 1 have railed to
understand the Issue; they have endeavoured "to straighten out some
of my misguided thoughts as to Just
what the Issue demands." May I
point out to these self-appointed disciplinarians and correctors of misguided thought that "the issue demands" more courtesy In open letters, fewer personal references, and
more material contributing to discussion of the current topic.
H. LESLIE BROWN,
Arts '28.
CAPITOL THEATRE
Next week's picture at the CAPITOL is a Paramount Special entitled
"THE VANISHING AMERICAN,"
a story by that famous writer, "ZANE
OREY." It Is a picture that will
live in one's memory after hundreds
of others have faded away, and alio
brings to the fore the wonderful acting ability of RICHARD D1X In the
title role.
"THE VANISHING AMERICAN"
deals wRh the vanishing Redskin,
and takes you back 2,000 years to the
time when the Redskins were the
predominant race of the American
Continent. The picture then shows
you the subjection of the Redskin by
the White Race, tho Government isolating them on reservations where
they were supposed to live in peace
and security, but the greed of Government Agents and otbors robbed
them and at times murdered them.
Among the Indian remnants wai
".NAPHAIB" (RICHARD DIX), ion
of a chief of a once ruling proud race
who loved his people and who vainly
tried to protect them. He hai great
faith in the White People, especially
the school teacher (LOIS WILSON),
who teaches the Indian   children.
When war Is declared NAPHAIB
with other Indians Join the colors
and proceed to France where they
acquit themselves nobly, and when
all is over return to their native soil
a sadly depleted band. On their return they find their homes and land
in tbe hands ot a crooked Government Agent (NOAH BEERY), this
state of affairs causing them to revolt. A fight occurs and NAPHAIB
Is struck down by a stray bullet, and
he dies, bidding his people obey the
Government. There are many wonderful scenes In this picture and a
high standing of acting throughout.
The usual concert of 40 pieces
Thursday night .and Regular prloes
prevail all week.
asm
LOST
Lost! Some good original
Varsity yells. These yells are
known to be lost among the
student bddy and a reward ot
five dollars will be paid to the
finder when returned to the R
section of the letter racks. U.
B. C. possesses only one or possibly two original yells. The
time has arrived when it. is
deemed necessary that we
should have some real British
Columbia yellB ot the calibre ot
"Kitsiianq." Washington have
any number of yells that are
distinctly their own. The same
applies to Queen.i, California
and Toronto. It is up to the
student body to decide the ones
they want. Get busy and think
out one or two and hand them
in—-you may win the prize. So
far none of our yells have emphasised the fact that our colors
are Blue and Gold. A great yell
could be made using the term
"B. 0. Varsity." Remember the
five dollar prize and turn contributions in at once.
SEE CHARLIE FIRST
For Style and Quality
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and FURNISHINGS
DOUBLE-BREASTED
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made with wide pants.
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00MMIR0I and TIUQRAPHY
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WANTED—SOMEONE TO WRITE
A PARODY ON "JOHN BROWN'S
BODY, ETC.," FOR THE UNIVERSITY SONG BOOK BEING COM-
PILED   BY   THE   ROOTERS'  CLUB.
FOR SALE—POEM8 OF KEATS,
complete—In one volume—full notes.
Apply Thomas   8. Byrne,   Arts   '26.
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In another column appears a
letter, the writer of which
blithely calls attention to the
fact that we don't know our
college songs and, likewise,
don't alng them. He goes on
to say that ths Freshman class
should sit a written examination from the Studenti' Council, as a test ot their choral
knowledge. Delinquents could
be summarily dealt with.
The writer, who Is young,
will learn that organised song
practices and yell meetlngi are
not predecessors to an Inevitable
and likewise artificial burst of
college spirit, whatever that is,
It anything. We cannot be carried oft our feet by any deliberate instillation of enthusiasm;
that has been proved In the
past many times. On the other
hand we will refuse to submit
to the reduction of college
songs to the status of side-show
bally-hoos. College songs are
the distillation of four years of
college life, and It he takes
any part in that life, tho Freshman will learn them. But if
he is to sit a written examination in college songs, glees,
catches, staves, roundelays I,
he will not prepare for it, and
will not have any better success with it than he does and
has in Math. I or French I.
HAMLET IN HOLEPROOF
HOSE
The Players' Club is to be
congratulated upon the excellent work of several ot its members in a wonderfully anachronistic presentation of Shakespeare's "Hamlet." The only
reason that modern dress is regarded as successful In the
staging of this play Is that it
really has no effect, one way or
the other. "The play's the
thing," to quote Shakespeare,
though not In the way he maaut
to be understood; and for that
reason one forgets the dress ot
the players In dividing attention between the action of the
play and the lines of the verses.
In other respects, there was
much in the performance to
criticize. Actors, if those we
saw last night be anyway typical, have still a lot of work to
do before they approach even
verl-slmllltude in the presentation of a play.
THE TRUTH AT LAST
While we are on this subject
ot criticism, we wish to thank
the numerous students who
have frankly and fearlessly
confessed (and that voluntarily) that our last two numbers
have been the "rottenest" they
ever saw. It Is decidedly encouraging to learn that the
truth can be told in this connection, and we are fair to remark that we have done a
great and valuable service to
this University in reviving honest criticism, though at the
sacrifice of our position in the
Fourth Estate.
A DYING RACE
Don't forget that the Arts '20
relay will positively not be seen
next month. The Arts '20 relay Is cold in its grave while
an unworthy usurper takes its
place in the world. We ahiver
at the audacity of the Track
Club and the Men's Athletic In
thus lopping a lusty young
branch, in Mill green loaf, from
our delicate tree ot Tradition.
That audacity would be magnificent If It were not Ignorant.
When the new course Is run,
a few of us will reverently attend the obsequies of a splendid race, rather than welcome
the arrival of the unworthy.
A   Piece   of   Professional   Wit—Contributed to  Latin 2.
The bottle of perfume that Billy sent
Was far from pleasing to Mtlllcent.
Her thanks were so cold
They quarrelled, Im told,
Over the silly scent Billy sent Mini-
cent.
SALMON AND
SAUTERNE
CRITICAL NOTE
"Life," aald I to the sweetest odltor the last time we had
tea together, "Is a cheap table
d'hote in a rather dirty restaurant; and time changes the
plates before we have had
enough of anything." The
sweetest editor is never Imposed upon by remarks which are
■o obviously quoted. "Where
did you get such an alimentary
view ot human existence?" ihe
siked. "Appropriately enough,"
was my rejoinder, " the man
responsible for Its original utterance answers to the culinary
name of Kettle." I forbore to
add that she really should drop
Ethel M. Dell in favour of more
purposeful reading. "But," I
continued, "Life is not alimentary; it Is, rather, essentially
alphabetic." The advantage
was now to me; she was clearly pusaled. "Prove it," She
challenged. "I shall with B's."
I wittily retorted, "you live,
therefore U. R.; and moreover,"
I went on, as I dropped a lump
of  sugar  Into   my  cup,
soem to be making life a thing
of B's and also T's."
We have now dissolved the
sugar-coating from this mental
pill, and may expect, in further
remarks, a pleasant bitterness
to pucker the mind. Firstly, I
want to say that carping critics
who look only for defects, are
at this university denounced as
destructive in Intention. Let it
be understood that such critics
are solely constructive; they
call attention to unsuspected
weaknesses, which aro consequently remedied in such manner that, with the points of
merit already present, they become pillars of support, On
the other hand, the present tacit conspiracy to utter no criticism of weakness, has the effect of reducing all projected
criticism to a valuless adulation of things as they are. Let
us all seek out detects and indicate thorn, rather than mouth
empty support of the existing
order. Then criticism will fulfil its proper function; the excision of error from life.
MURRAY HUNTER'S ADVICE
BUREAU
Copyright 1926 by Nobody
Dear  Mr.  Hunter:
I have long been In love with
a beautiful co-ed,, but now a
rival has appeared. What'll I
do?
—Jack Pons.
Answer: As I have good
reason to believe your rival Is
a better man than, yourself, I
would strongly advise you to
drop out. Let me warn you
also that advise In this column
Is for the benefit only of the
sincere.
Dear Mr. Hunter:
Kenny Noble, who failed
three Math, courses, has been
seen in the Library, helping my
Freshette with her Trig.
What'll I do?
—Perplexed.
Answer.  Take Math I. again.
Men's Inter-Class Debates
The socond rounds of the Men's
lnter-class Debating League are being
arranged. The teams surviving tho
first series are, Education 28, Arts
'2(1, Arts '28 and Arts '29. Arts '27,
which drew a bye tn the first eliminations, will now enter the lists.
The contests will bo arranged as
follows: Arts '20 vs. Arts '211; Ed.
'2ti vs. Arts '27,
The Sophomores and Freshmen
will Join Issue on Monday. February
1st. The subject undergoing dissection on this occasion Is, "Resolved
that one hour a week should be compulsory In each course In Arts."
Messrs. Leslie Brown and W. M.
Brown will take the negativo for
Arts '28, and Messrs, McLean and
1). Murphy the affirmative for Arts
'29.
I am a crusader! I have, in the
short space ot ten minutes decided
to sell my text hooka, say goodbye
to Bill Tansloy, slese my trenchant pen
and fight for the write. The pen is
mightier than the sword, as I was
told on Monday night; therefore, I
will wield that mighty weapon, and
not resort to physical violence, To
proceed. Walking into the Arts
building the other day, I suddenly
checked my manly and dignified
stride ,and bent low my proud head,
for there, before my eyes, neglected,
twisted, broken, and forlorn, lay the
crushed emblem of a lost cause, I
gazed at the wretched thing, humbled
In the dust, and my thoughts flew
back to tho good old days when It
flaunted proudly in the chambers of
kings and queens. When it was an
indespensable and noble aid to beauty
and feminine charm. When fair women clamored for It and brave men
grovelled for it. Golden it was, and
black, and sometimes even gleamed
with a gorgeous coppery tinge. But
now, there it lay, its back broken,
and Its fair colors fled. To arms I I
cry. To inkl Sitting in the funny
man's lecture a little later, I gazed
about me in vain, striving to find one
who would help me In my great crusade. Alas! There were none. .None
wore the sacred sign. Not one head
In the room flaunted the noble hairpin. I stand alone. Who will help
me hoist the hairpin back to his hereditary home? .... And who the
deuce did that hairpin on the steps
belong to?
—'G.'
THE SHINE OF WESTERN
MOONS
Chapter I.   The Bully
"So's yer old man," sneered Rattlesnake Ike, as he pulled tho nose of
the tenderfoot. The crowd of cowboys In the saloon shrieked with delight, slapping the humorist on the
back, offered him another drink ot
Coca Cola.
The quiet young stranger turned
white, but he had listened to pacifists In his Alma Mater. So this was
the Wild West for which he had left
the hall of the U. B. C. last Christmas!
Rattlesnake ike leered at him again.
"You— you little Freshman," he
sueered, reaching out again.
This Insult was too much for mortal man to bear. Rodolph Speedy bit
his lip in anger, then leapt upon
the bully with the famous tackle that
had dragged Varsity's fifteenth team
from victory to victory.
Crash! Rattlesnake Ike sailed
through the plate glas window ot the
"Hijackers' Haven" saloon as Rodolph Speedy, tendorfoot, began pulling down his sleeves.
"Drinks for the house," shouted
tho cowboys, as they crowded around
the conquerer of their tyrant,
But no one heeded Ratlesnake
Ike, as he picked himself up two
blocks from the saloon, "Galloping
gllas!" hn snarled, "I swear that I
shall have revenge for this." You
shall die, Rodolph Speedy, and die
the mlaerable death of n Freshman
at an Initiation."
—To be continued.
St Valentine's Day
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BADMINTON
TOURNAMENT
The men's lnter-class badminton
tournament took place In King Edward High 8chool gymnasium on
Tuesday, January 26th. Keen Interest was shown, and some fine playing was - displayed by the shuttle
chasers.
The title was won by Science '28-
'39, represented by O. Woodman and
0. Marrlon, after a brisk match with
Art! '28. The results were as follows:
First Round—Arts '28 beat Agriculture by default; Science '28-29 beat
Arts '29; Arts '27 beat Science '2«-'27
Arts '26 bye.
Second Round—Arte '18 beat Arts
'26; Science '28-'l9 beat Arts '27.
Finals—Science '28-'39 beat Arts
'98.
The singles were won by the same
class.
First Round—Arts '28 beat Agriculture by default; Science '28-'29
beat Arts '29; Arts '27 beat Science
•26-'97;   Arts  '26 bye.
Second Round—Arts '28 beat Arts
'26;  Science '28-'29 beat Arts  '2'.
Finals—Science '28-'29 beat Arte
'28.
, The women's lnter-class tournament
will take place on Saturday, January
30th, In the Drill Hall. Some good
playing Is anticipated.
The Club's annual open tournament
will take place Immediately after the
B. C. Provincial tournament, at the
end of February, and so It is advisable for all those who anticipate
entering to chose their partners for
the doubles events.
 *•_—
Outdoors Club Shows
How Not to Ski
Pour members made their way up
to the cabin on Grouse on Saturday
evening, accompanied by two young
ladles. These were foil and then escorted up to ihe Muiuly's for the
night. The .snow was rather soft
and snowshoes were necessary anywhere off the main trail. Moonlight
snowshoelug was enjoyed by the
males till about eleven o'clock.
About fifteen members came up on
Sunday and after lunch at the cabin
went up to the Plateau where they
demonstrated how not to ski. As
the going waa bumpy and this was
the first snow deep enough to ski on
this year the spills that delighted the
onlookers were to be expected. From
the look of things we are going to
have a woman star among our skiers
this year, though Oil D'Aoust has a
dark horse that lie Is coaching. At
least she refused to ski on the
plateau where we could see her. Supper at the cabin and a leisurely trip
down  ended the day.
Championship Basketball
Normal Gym., Saturday,
9 p.m.
Admission Fre*.
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January,
|i>ii.ii.i.ni inn ii i j i ii iiiniii
Sportorial   j
The question of the introduction
of American Football Is rapidly coming to a head, And Just at this time
ll Is pertinent to nay a word or two
on tho matter. As Knurls Editor, 1
have frequently been asked for my
opinion In the common room and
around the campus, Bo fur 1 have
avoided the Issue, largely because I
was expecting the appearance of an
article In a city paper lu which 1 had
stated my views, written before
Christmas. Tho said article was
"held over," and I presume It has
"gone under." What I say now Is
largely a repetition of my statement
then.
In the first place I Bald that the
movement was sure to come to a
head soon, and I hoped it would. In
fact, with the introduction of Canadian Rugby Into our .sports curriculum last year I regarded It only as
a matter of time before the present
issue would be a burning question
at U.B.C. I am not trying to pose
as an "I told you so" artist. As far
as I em concerned It doesn't matter
a hoot who says it as long as somebody lays the right thing, and says It
quickly.
Professionalism Upheld
So far it seems to me that nobody
has Mid anything. There has been
only one argument, and that has
been played on every key in the octave. American Rugby will make
us a professional athletio organisation or It won't. That, I say. Is the
gist of the scuffle and to my way of
thinking, li merely scraping the varnish off the surface.
Now, there is nothing wrong with
professionalism. Let those who make
the scurrilous remarks about our old
friend "Red" go out and repeat his
performance It they can. I don't say
1 agree with it, but I do say that professionalism tends to bring out the
cream of athletic talent. And to aim
at excellence, as far as I can see Is
in no way a disgrace. We don't
call the man a criminal who cleans
up a 97% average merely because he
works and lives for his work. We
may not emulate his example, and
we do not suggest that our University should be Judged on his standard alone, but we have to give him
credit for making a success of what
he has set out to do, and we have
to admire him too. Then why
should we pass eternal condemnation
on the one who wishes to excel at
sport?    Well,  that's  how I  see  it.
Now, the second part of the point.
Because I admit that the way some
colleges have put themselves heart
and soul Into the game Is really
worthy of our admiration as far as
achievement sees., I do not for u moment suggest that I arn In favor of
following In their footsteps. Professionalism Is an admirable thing,
I entirely disregard the many evil
connotations that have so unfortunately attached themselves to the
game. Professionalism can In no way
be held responsible for them. But
whether professionalism In university athletics is so laudable Is entirely another matter. If our college
•hlnks It Is, very well; If not, likewise, very well.
Play Equally, If at All
But then there is the assumption
that the Introduction of the southern
code positively means professionalism. A pure assumption, I admit.
But the team that beat U.B.C. 55-0
two weeks later lost to the Huskies
S5-0, and that same team, according
to a press report, "left for Alabama
with twenty players and fifteen
coachen." (My figures may not be
quite right, but If anything the proportion of conches was greater).
Well, if that doesn't sound mighty
like professionalism, I again ask enlightenment. If this be so, there Id
only one story, if we are going to
play the American game, we are going to do It right. THAT'S THAT!
There Is no use undertaking to meet
the American* al their own game
unless we meet them on equal terms
On the other hand, there may bo no
need to steer for the bright lights.
Wn may be able to meet American
colleges on a basis aa purely amateur as we compete locally at present. But no one can deny that
professionalism has started across
the border, and the usual development In such a case Is an Increasingly great degree of professionalism.
Such being the case, I only repeat
my former remark. We want the
best,  or  none at all.
SENIOR 'B' IN
CRUCIAL GAME
Say, do you want to see a good
basketball team In action? Yes!
Well, here's your chance. Varsity
Senior II men play Rowing Club C
Saturday night at the Normal (lym In
(lie vital game of the season. Row
Ing Club have eight victories to their
credit and have not yet suffered a
defeat. Varsity have seven wins and
one defeat—this to the Rowing Club
In u close battle last fall.
This year's Senior B team Is without doubt the strongest that has ever
represented the college In this division. With Saturday's game with
Rowing Club in view the team has
been training diligently since the
opining of tbe term and are now at
their best.
Bill Oray, forward captain of the
team, starred with Burnaby High
School last year. This year he has
set the pace in indlvldutl scoring.
Rusa Robinson and Johnnie Swanson
are the other two forwards. Last season Rusa starred with the Blue and
Gold Senior B team and Johnnie was
skipper of the intermediate B »r.uad.
Hrly Gibson and Harold Mahon alternate at centre and forward. Both
were members of the K.E.H.S. provincial championship team last year.
The guard-end, composed ot Norm
McDonald, Ornulf Auno, Hubert King
and Bill Thomson, all worked together on last year's intermediate A
squad. Hub and Bill were on U.B.C.'s
first provincial championship team.
This team has won 9 league games
since last Saturday and are out to
do their darnedest to lower the colors ot the club. How about helping
them along?
I dealt then with the geographical
necessity, pro and con, but this uoes
not seem to interest our students,
so I will not repeat I also said that
if we thought fit to adopt the American game, I did not doubt that we
would show that we had as much
skill in our manhood, as muoh energy in our institution, as they, and
I believe that even if U.B.C. did turn
pro, she would not disgrace herself.
I waived away patriotic objections,
which, happily, do not bother our
more open-minded audience.
The gist of the matter, then, is a
simple "to be or not to be." It Is
a question that must be faced fairly,
honorably, without bias, and with a
clear eye for the future. The eyes
of many classes yet unborn are on
us It Is up to us NOW to settle the
mutter, and   settle   It   wisely.
Mudsllnglng Regretted
It was, therefore, with regret, that
I observed the first of the mud slinging through the columns of our
paper. The young man who replied
to his antagonist'!! opinions showed
me the letter before he sent it in.
I told him to think carefully of
what he was doing. For his opinions
I am finding no fault with htm. But
If personal feeling Is going to obscure our vision of the real Issue, the
sooner we admit we are no sportsmen, and therefore not fit to play or
discuss any game, the better.
In conclusion, let me say that although both the signers of the letter
were members of our sporting rep-
ortorlal staff, they were not talking
In this capacity: neither am I giving
the policy of the paper. Lastly, I
would urge the student body to face
the matter fairly. Exams will be on
us before we know It. If we can settle the matter before the term ends,
we Khali have done our successors at
least one truly great service In our
first year at our permanent home.
What I suggest Ir, that we drop the
mud, and face the thing as students
of a University should. I think a
full student meeting, If Ihe students
can be convinced ihat their atend-
ance Is a point of honor and a service to their Alma Mater or a debate on proper parliamentary lines,
or a special lsu" of the Ubyssey,
would be the best way to prepare the
student body for the Intelligent and
fully representative vote that I earnestly  hope to see   before   April.
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PRIVATE DANCE STUDIO
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in i a m m mil.ui i|ni i. i.ii.n. i niniii iii i
^♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»oeeeeeo»»»e+e»e
AMY J. ROetRSON
conns • UNeaut
Phone. Kerr. IOCS
2135 41st Ave., W., Kerrisdale, I.C
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The University
Book Store
Open from 9:80 a. m. to 12 noon.
1 p. m. to 4 p. m.
Saturdays, 9:30 a. m. to 12 noon.
Loose-Leaf Nate Books,
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Also, flrepMo snd Engineering Piper*
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