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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Jan 5, 1951

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 Order Your
Totem
Now
The Ubyssey
Order Your
Totem
Now
VOL. XXXIII
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, JANUARY 5, 1951
NO. 32
Student Fee Raise Asked
By LSE In Special Brief
"How were your marks, son
Construction Delays
Postpone Gym Debute
A three weeks dalay in building construction has resulted
in the postponement of the War Memorial Gymnasium's un
official opening. '
The   dat»-   for   the   basketball
games which will mark the open-
deeide*  la thtt-tftoaU
week of January.
Delay In building resulted from
the extra time Involved In process
of topping the concrete seats with
cement. The cement topping process, installation of seats, numbering and painting, must be done
step by step, each step taking anywhere from three days to a week.
The official opening ceremonies
will not take place until next fall
at which time a plaque will be un
veled Inscribed with the names of
British Columbia's sons and (laugh
tors who gave their lives during
the two  world  wars.
Brock  Extension
Plans  Ready For
Administration
Detailed plans of Brock Hall
will be submitted to UBC authorities at the next Board of Governors meeting in the hopes that
they will consider the possibility
of allocating money for its completion in the future.
Submission of the plans is in
accordance with a request from
Dr. N. A. M. MacKenzie, UBCs
president, who asked that details
of the building be submitted before the Board made any decision.
Council made a similar request
to have Brock Hall placed on ths
university building list last term.
At that time no plans were submitted.
'Tween Classes
Opens FilmSoc
Spring Season
UBC Film Society opens the
new year with a film specially
for campus music lovers. Feature production at their regular Tuesday show will be "Song
of My Heart", the movie based
upon the life of Tchaikovsky.
The film has the entire score
of the composer's greatest works.
* *       *
Application   for   Oregon   Dental
Schools 1952 class should be made
as soon as possible.
Notice from the UBC registrar
states that selections for the 1951
fall class are now being made and
a tentative list for the fall class
of 1952 is also being compiled.
Information for Interested students may be obtained at the Registrar's office, or at the personnel
office on the campus.
* *       *
UBC delegates to the Western
Student Teachers' Conference in
Victoria Jan. 22 will be feted at
UBC by their fellow student teachers before leaving for the conference.
Campus delegates will be chosen
at the next general meeting of tho
student teachers at UBC.
1951  TOTEMS  STILL  ON
SALE  IN  AMS  OFFICE
Sales of the 1951 Totem have not closed, Editor Hugh
Cameron announced today.
His announcement refuted rumours that sales were to
close shortly after Christmas exams.
Students may continue to order their copies of the
yearbook through the AMS office.
Committee Studies
AMS Representation
Undergraduate societies who feel they are not being represented properly will have an opportunity to air their grievances
January 20 when they meet with a special committee struck
off from Student Council to consider representation in the
Alma Mater Society.
Two   student   councillors,   Jim
Midwinter and Ivan Feltham, were
named to the investigating committee In the fall term and two
other students, Poster Isherwood
and George Cumming of the law
faculty have since Joined them.
Committee heads have dialled the mid • January meeting
to get the revision ball rolling. "By that time, we will have
the committee on a sound, working basis," Feltham told The Ubyssey.
LSE Clubs Asked to Endorse
Alma Mater Fee Hike of $1        '
More than 50 UBC clubs willbe asked to approve a Literary
and Scientific Executive brief next week which calls for a fee
increase of $1,00; fifty per cent of which would go into L§E
REPLIES
Four replies have been received
from Canadian Universities in response to the committees requests
for information regarding their
student government. Replica have
fome from Aftmita; 8as1w$c1ie$an,
New Brunswick and Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario.
Suggestions received from these
universties  include:
(1) Establishment of a two house
system with an executive and
large council as at the University
of Alberta,
(2) Establishment of a small executive council and a larger representative council.
(3) Increase the size of the present UBC council to provide for
an increase in the number of representative positions.
"The committee" Feltham said,
"also feels that some degree of decentralization is in order."
STRENGTH ARTS
The committee also ravors strengthening the Arts faculty by one
of three methods. First, a larger
degree of control would be Invested ln them over finances. Sec
ond, a greater measure of repre-
sentaton could be given the body
by having their president sit on
some governing body.
Thirdly, the committee broached the idea of re-organlzing the
Literary and Scientific Executive
structure so that faculty clubs
would be placed under their proper undergraduate societies.
The committee has also request
ed that any interested parties or
briers prior to the Jan. 20 meeting outlying their suggestions or
theories.
"We are ready at all times to accept any suggestions," Feltham
said, "and we hope that a large
number of students will take an
Interest in this important aspect
of student affairs."
Recognition
Of Red China
Inevitable
"Canada wglhayi to gQpjeJrojtnd
to recognition of Red China. Firmness and compromise would be
ideal but that is difficult to achieve," stated Dr. F. Soward of the
history department at a press conference on Thursday,
Dr. Soward has just returned
from a tour of the Commonwealth countries and France. A
delegate from Canada to the Luck-
now Conference he was assigned
to study the external policy of
each Commonwealth country.
Speaking of Korea he said that
the British are not so emotionally
alarmed as the Americans. The
feeling ln Britain and France is
that the real danger is not in
Asia but In Europe. "Therefore the
feeling In London is that rearmament of Germany has to come but
lt must not be forced.'
Turning to South Africa he said,
"although there were Internal divisions in the country It would
be better prepared for a third
world war than It was for the second one." He went on to say that
although the material conditions
of the natives are being greatly improved they are being kept down
politically.
In conclusion he said that Canada Is lucky In comparison to
other commonwealth countries for
her resources, administration, capabilities and her high standard of
living.
coffers.
If this proposal Is not accepted
by the student body, the brief states "LSE will be forced to defend
Itself by uniting and opposing the
Ostrom Plan when It Is discussed
as a change ln the constitution."
Brief has been in preparation
since Nov. 20 when a committee
wos struck at a major LSE meeting following the AMS meeting
at which the Ostrom Plan was approved by the student body.
*
The brief was designed to give
a strong statement of policy on
the part of LSE, Ed. Pedersen,
president of the body said. It was
completed in less than 10 days and
tabled on November 30 for further
consideration.
Pedersen said today that the LSE
would meet next week to reconsider the brief and ask the approval of campus clubs.
Pedersen claims a number of
club presidents have already expressed their approval of the brief.
Brief In part states that with tho
advent of the Ostrom Plan, "all
clubs are facing financial privation
and action must be taken jointly
through the LSE in order to pre
vent IC*"1  ' ■   "   "
Brief hits the Ostrom Plan at>
"an encroachment on club activities insofar as it forces LSE to
continue subsisting on an austerity
level . . ."
lt states that under the Ostrom
Flan, 20 percent of the present
AMS fee would automatically go
to MAD. Thus, with the one dollar
fee raise, MAD will get 20 per
cent of lt.
Brief requests that of the remaining 80 per cent, 50 per cent
be given to the LSE and the remainder be divided between Publications and the Women's Athletic Directorate.
In addition to this, Pederseu
said, a revitalizatlon of all clubs
at UBC will be asked in order that
they may realize their joint responsibility to the university of
maintaining and expanding student initiative in all activities headed by LSE.
Students' Land in
Dog House Via BCE
UUo students have earned another complaint from Vancouver
traffic police. This time just trying Ho do some other student a
good turn.
A Vancouver police department
official told the Ubyssey that B.C.
Electric officials had registered a
complaint against UBC students
who are picking up hitch-hikers.
Students are picking up riders
in BCE bus zones, and seriously
impeding flow of traffic from Tenth and Alma to the university
gates, the official said.
Most dangerous area is at Alma
where the traffic is sufficiently
heavy to cause snarl-ups even without this added difficulty, he said.
Police officials request that students pick up their extra riders
outside any bus zone.
"This item has been published
as a warning to the student bpdy,"
a police officer stated, "and any
further infractions will be liable
for summons."
Competition Open
For Product Design
Pre-1 six prizes toUllttt IIQ.000 ^ijl
The awarded* to WflMMf of a contest sponsored by the National Industrial Design Committee of Canada.
Competitors are to submit designs of equipment for normal living conditions, either in aluminum
or ln wood. Products must be of
Canadian materials, produced in
Canada and mtist have a ready appeal to the average Canadian.
A first prize of $2,600 will be
awarded in both the aluminum and
the wood classification. Second
prize will be $1,500 and third $1,000
in each group. 	
Design entries should be sub*
mitted to the National Industrial
Design Committee, National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, by March
15,  1951.
Competition is open to any Canadian citizen except for employees of the Aluminum Company of
Canada Ltd. and the Canadian
Lumberman's Association. Designs
should be original and must conform to the basic principles of good
product design.
CONVETED POSITION GOES TO CO-ORDINATOR
Interest Created By
Latest Publication
"Korea and the United Nations" by Mike Goldie, is one
of the many articles of topical interest appearing in the fall
edition of Legal Notes, the official publication of the campus
Law Undergraduate Society.
Luck Plays Part In Deciding Rhodes Scholar
By ANN LANGBEIN
A little more persuasion on the
night of Aug. 18, 1050, and an entirely different story might have
been written when the winner of
UBC's Rhodes Scholar Award was
announced this year.
On that night, at the COTC summer training camp lu Ontario, ,11m
Midwinter, thin year's winner ol*
the coveted scholarship, debated
whelher to return to UHC for his
fourth and final term, or whether
lo follow the general trend in the
camp and join the special Canadian  force  for service  ill  Korea.
"I decided lo return lo lhe cam-
pay because, I fell al thai time lhal
there was a good chance the world
situation might he cleared up very
quickly," he said.
"Student council had already
lost one member," he added, "and
that Influenced my decision to
some  extent."
Dark-haired, brown-eyed and 1*1
Jim is a native-horn British Colum
bian. Me took his pre-universit}
schooling in Vancouver, at Langni.i
and Kitchener schools, and in
Lndysmlth and Comox on Vancouver  Island.
llis interests have included debating, public speaking, soccer and
track and field events. He is enrolled   in   a   double   honors   course
In economics and geography this
year, and lectures to economics
200 discussion classes.
Rhodes Scholar honors are not
the first academic recognition Jim
has won. He was held Dominion-
Provincial bursaries, YMCA bursaries, and won the Alaska Pine
scholarship last year for highest
standing In third-year economics.
UBC students know Jim for his
position on student council this
year as co-ordlnator ol activities.
He was elected to the position last
year after campaigning against
Hob Annable and Tint Hollick-Kenyon.
Jim held executive positions ou
llie   University  1'arllaiue.ntary   For
um In his first two years on campus, and has been a member of the
Geography and Chess clubs, At present, he is an active member of
Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity, am1
the UHC Economics Society.
He will study al Oxford for two
years on a becpiest of live hundred
pounds per yenr, and hopes to enter
the Foreign Trade Service of the
Department of Trade tic- Commerce
upon  his  graduation.
A Lieutenant in the student
COTC, Jim says all his future plans
depend upon the outcome of lhe
present, world situation. If Canada goes to war, U UC's lihodes
Scholar  will c,o to  war,  loo. j
The magazine, under the editorship of third year law student Hugh
Legg, is designed to bring recognition to the UHC law school, and
to afford practice in writing techniques to future lawyers.
Mainly of interest to law students, its campus circulation Is
'150. It Is also distributed to lawyers throughout the province and
to libraries across the countries.
Copies are sent, to the Hnrvard
Law School, the University of
London and the University of
Washington.
Last year edilor Harney Ross,
was given an honorary activities
award by the AMS.
Other articles include a discussion of the 15 per cent income tax
on corporations, and an analysis
of the Kuzcyh Case, of possible Interest  I,, ihe Civil  Liberties Union.
Copies are now available for '.'5
cents  ill   the  bonk  store. Page 2
THE UBYSSEY
Friday, January 5, 1951
The Ubyssey
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Authorized as Second Class Mail Post Office Dept. Ottawa. Student Subscriptions fl per
year (Included In AMS Fees). Mall Subscriptions—$2.00 per year. Published throughout
the university year by the Student Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society of the
University of British Columbia. '    '
Kdltorial opinions expressed herein arc those of the editorial staff of The Ubyssey and not
necessarily those of the Alma Mater Society nor of the University.
Offices In Brock Hall, Phone ALma i02i For display advertising phone ALma B2W
r;i)ITOH-IN-CHIEF     MY IHQST
8ENIOR EDITORS—MARI STAINSBY and ANN LANGBEIN *
STONE WORK BY CAMERON
This Is Called Culture ?
The latest move by leaders of the Literary and Scientific Executive should fill all
fair-minded campus club leaders with dismay
and disgust.
The brief issued this week by Ed Pedersen and Co. was motivated by justifiable aims.
Il is aimed at preserving and encouraging
all the cultural activities which come under
LSE jurisdiction.
But surely culture can be maintained and
encouraged at UBC without anyone resorting to back-stabbing. And a stab in the back
is the only way to describe the LSE brief.
It is a stab in the back* of Brock Ostrom,
author of the plan for stabilized financial aid
for UBC athletics.
What possible justification can Pedersen
offer for opposing the Ostrom plan at this
time?
The issue is not, as some forgetful students might imagine, a clear-cut issue of "culture versus athletics."
Who supported the Ostrom Plan when it
was passed by a majority of students last
term?
Pedersen did. Pedersen was the one who
stood up before the entire student body with
an amendment to the Ostrom Plan that was
designed to provide a sliding scale of athletic 4
grants to MAD.
Pedersen is the person who said later he
was perfectly satisfied with the Ostrom Plan
now that his amendment has been included
in it.
But Pedersen's brief says:
"The 'Ostrom' plan, contrary to many
statements, is an encroachment upon club
activities insofar as it forces LSE to continue
subsisting on an austerity level...."
Contrary to what statements? Among
others, Pedersen's!
Austerity level? Pedersen's brief fails to
point out the major reason for club austerity:
Clubs went nearly $42,000 into the red during
previous years, and are still trying to catch
up. That happened in days when clubs were
going hog wild, without due regard for their
bank accounts.
Pedersen is not to blame for LSE austerity. But neither is Brock Ostrom.
Perhaps we have been too naive in the
past, for when Pedersen said he had cleared
up his differences with Brock Ostrom, we believed him.
Our only consolation now is that we are
sure club leaders throughout the campus are
too honest and too intelligent to allow Pedersen find his little circle of supporters to hoodwink them in the name of culture.
Of injustices committed in the name of
justice, the LSE brief is one of the most
appalling and misleading we have seen.
Good Work Mr. Lee
This newspaper has always approved
highly of the contemplative life. And the contemplative life, we are told, finds its most congenial home in a rustic atmosphere.
We take pleasure in noting that the
the administration and Mr. Lee and his
grounds staff share our delight in retaining
the rustic ruggedness of Point Grey.
Outstanding example of their determination to preserve this atmosphere is the series
of deep pits which dot the East Mall.
How may times have all of us been delightfully brought back to reality and nature
by failing flat on our faces while strolling
along the mall?
And almost everyone must take great de
light in the permanent crippling of the that
aberration of modern society, the automobile.
Few, if any, student cars will be able to stand
for long the strain of Mr. Lee's cunning obstacle race.
We might suggest, however, that Mr. Lee
carry his plan to its logical conclusion. Cost of
installing darge holes in the Main Mali and
University Boulevard would be small. The
COTC'S commando equipment could probably be utilized quite cheaply.
*t* *t* n*
We are willing to bet that the Registrar
here is probably the only person in Vancouver who hasn't got his Christmas chopping
all done.
Critic on the Hearth By john brockington
YehudI Meuuhln is one of those
embarassing musical phenomonan,
the child prodigy whose maturity
is physical but not musical. Technically Mr. Menuhln has few peers
as he proved so stunningly ln the
Viextemps fourth Violin Concerto.
Musically Mr. Menuhln displayed
qu,ch aa insensitlvlty and callousness in the Bach A minor Sonata
and the Kreutzer Sonata by Beethoven that listening to it was an
unpleasant experience.
The fault is not that the violinist lacks warmth; and certainly
his playing is not without a certain
continental savoir faire and sophistication but the music seems to
mean bo little to him. To have
Bach played as if good tone and
smooth bowing are the only things
that are Important reveals an approach to the musical art that is
reprensible in one whose gifts
are so abundant.
Yehunll Menuhln at the age of
nine appeared before an orchestra
playing violin concertos by Beethoven, Brahms, and Bach, a feat
unprecedented in the musical mediocrity and, what is worse, opportunism, for the Menuhln name
[,to the general public still Is replete with the glamor and success
of the violinist's youth.
Yet the concert was made almost
worthwhile by the superb work of
the accompanist of the evening,
Adolph Bailer. Mr. Bailer is an ensemble player ot the first-rank and
in addition a sensitive musician.
Mlkt, Mare and Jack get me to
singing wry morning 6:30 to 7:30
a.m.
The Bird Cage       By Hyfen
"Gawd," says my mama, jumping clean
out of her four way directional control girdle,
"turn out the lights but quick. It's the
Sponges.
"Whom," I smile with becoming naivety,
"Are the Sponges?"
"They are second cousins," replies my
mama, "twice removed, only they didn't take
the hint either time. Now shut up and hide
the liquor."
"Quick," says my pap, who is making
like he is just about to be going out somewhere, give me a sharp stick to poke their
eyes out, and maybe they won't follow us."
Meanwhile my sister is locking everything portable into a cupboard.
"Tell them we've gone big game hunting
in Flatbush," yells mama, as I answer the
door,"
"Yukkle yuk," chortles a "pin-striped
character, slapping mc smartly about the
small of the stomach, "I'll bet you're Cousin
Siphon."
"Close enough," I wheeze, pulling myself
off the planks, "and you're Cousin Sponge."
"Sponge of the Vitamush Cereal Co,,
makers of Sop-Uups, the scintellating sensation in sogginess." He grasps both my hands
warmly, while two little people assiduously
frisk me.
"Have a cigar, Cuz," he bellows, shoving
a lighted hemp into my face, "you'll get a big
bang out of this brand."
I did.
Cousin Sponge, who seems by way of
being a humorous individual, laught himself
silly while yours truly picks bits of face off
the surrounding furniture.
Meanwhile some rodent-faced wench, apparently Sponge's femme, is silently appraising the silver-ware.  Sponge has discovered
the liquid assets, and is quietly decanting
them into a cocktail shaker.he just, happens
to have in his back pocket. The little people
are busily accomplishing a coup d'etat in the
larder.
"We're most aw-fully sorry," says
mother, grinning sickeningly, "we were just
starting supper. I do hope you'll drop in and
see us next year."
"We will, and that's all right about supper. No trouble at all."
The rodent face woman is commencing
to carve the turkey.
"Say, I got some presents for you kids,"
roars Sponge, "for the little girl in the family
a most realistic doll which will simulate all
the natural functions of a baby in the most
disgustingly realistic manner. Diapers need
changing three times a day, and it starts
screaming at three o'clock in the morning.
For father a widget grinder for the hydrocar-
bulator of your car. Cuts the octane input in
half. For mother a three year correspondence
course in home management. For—"
"Mama," I interrupt, "what became of
that bottle of Astingsol Mouth Wash we were
going to give Cousin Sponge?"
Sponge is now serving the food, but it
doesn't seem to get past his next of kin.
Father makes a pass at a remaining pickle,
but his hand is neatly forked by a younger
Sponge.
"Say," says femme Sponge, who just
brightened up after five minutes feverish
winking from her husband, "did you hear
about the stiff who kept a hen in his coffin?"
"Because he like an egg in his bier,"
chirps Sponge.
"Well," says Papa, "a box of Sop-Ups
to that gentleman."
DRAUGHTING
INSTRUMENTS
From $10.00
T-SQl'ABES, PIUHTIUCTimS,
SET SQUARES
MECHANICAL ENGINEERS
AND
POLYPHASE SLIDE HULKS
ZIPPEn RING BOOKS
AMES LETTERING
INSTRUMENTS
Complete with Sheets and Indc;
From $2.00
FOUNTAIN PENS
Clarke & Stmt
Co. Ltd.
STATIONERS and PRINTERS
550 Seymour SI.   Vancouver, B.C.
What he can do with the ridiculous amm-papas of a Paganinl accompaniment puts to shame the violinist who would play pieces so
iiJBVttatlP as to iBfiHlre suph tawdry support. His performance In
the Bach apd  Beethoven  Sonatas
was exemplory.
Lovers of violin playing that is
also muslclanly will not want to
miss the fprtlicoipipg rec|tgl by
Joseph Szigeti on January 12.
UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE
Hrs.: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturdays 9 a.m. to noon
Loose Leof Note Books, Exercise Books
And Scribblers
GRAPHIC ENGINEERING PAPER, BIOLOGY PAPER
LOOSE LEAF REFILLS, FOUNTAIN PENS AND INK
AND DRAWING INSTRUMENTS
Owned and Operated by the University of B.C.
-mmm,
mmmimm
mmmm.
Pefence Roseorch Boord
REQUIRES
Applicants for both summer and full-time enjoyment in tha
following fields:—
Apvotmutjcpl jtinglneerlng
AprophysJCB
ftecterfqjQgy
Biochemistry
Biology
Chertistry
Chemical Engineering
Oivll Engineering
Economics and Political Science   fJS?||0^Rf.
Electrical Engineering
Electronics
Engineering Physics
Geography
Geology
Hydrodynamics
Mathematics
Maths and Physics
Mechanical Engineering
Metallurgy
Meteorology
Physics
Physiology
Radio Physics
Servo-Mechanisms
Slavonic Languages
(Particularly Russian)
Statistics
These positions are distributed throughout the various establishments of the Defence Research Board, which are located at
Halifax, N.S.j Valtartier, P.Q.; Ottawa and Kingston, Ont; Fort
Churchill. Man.; Suffield, Alberta;  Esquimau, B.C.
All applicants should be registered in Honour Courses and
have First or High Second Class standing.
Summer (1 May—30 Sept.) _ „ _.
Applications will be accepted FU" Time
until   16th  January,  1951   from     Applications will be accepted
undergraduates in their Junior xmttt   ir,th   February,   1W1   for
and    final    years    and    from „„,_,„„„,_„» „♦„,,♦««„ i« m««
graduates. employment starting in May.
Application forms may be obtained from the Registrar, or
from the University Placement Officer.
Apply to: Director  of  Research   Personnel,
Defence Research Board,
Department of National Defence,
Ottawa, Ontario.
EUROPEAN
STUDENT TOURS
Soilings May 23 ond June 4
8TUDBNT TOUR NO. 1: sail tourist class on S.S. Ascanla from
Montreal May 2.1. Scotland, English Lakes, Chester, Shakespeare
Country, North and South Devon, London, Holland, Belgium,
Germany (the Rhine and Black Forest), Switzerland, Italian Lakes,
Venice, Rome, Hill Towns, Florence, Italian and French Rlvieras,
Paris.
07 DAYS        <of w'l'°h  I2 l'a>'s — second  visit — to be
41119 spent independently In England on completion
$1151 of t0U1, |)efore Balling for home.)
STUDENT TOUR NO. 2: sail tourist class on S.S. Columbia from
Montreal June 4. Same itinerary as above.
(sail directly for home on completion of tour).
76 DAYS
$1152
Ask For Detailed Itinerary
UNIVERSITY   TRAVEL  CLUB
57 Qloor St. West, Toronto — Kingsdalc 6984
MANAGEMENT:   J.   F.  and  O.   II.   LUCAS
Tht coach is using the electric rabbit ide*>
with a package oj Player's'^ Friday, January 5,  1951
THE UBYSSEY
Page 3
LETS SEE NOW
Sororities Name
Queen   Candidates
By JOAN FRASER
Well, here we go again, everybody seems to be saying as
the new term starts. You can tell how to greet your friends
by watching the expressions on their faces just after their get
exam marks. Around the caf most people have dampened "grin
and bear it" smiles on their faces. Occasionally there is the
pleased person—like the girl I know who made 140 out of 150
on one of her exams. 'Nuff said
1 wish there had been no 8:30
exams. There is something grim
about 8:30—most people haven't
had time for a good breakfast or
a cup of coffee. An aversion ^o
8:30's ls strictly psychological,
some will say. (Everything is explained, in terms of psychology
these days.) But If only early
exams could start at the civilized
hour of 9:00—!
6DIE HAWKINS DAY
ON CAMPUS
Oals have a good chance ^o start
the new year the right way—there's
going to be a Sadie Hawkins Dance
on Saturday, January 13. It comes
after the basketball game scheduled for that night.
Dancing will start at 9:00 in the
Brock Hall Lounge—and there will
be a quartet to provide the music.
Cost is small, compared to what
you've probably spent in the last
two weeks—it's only $1.26 a coup'le.
Tickets will be on sale Wednesday.
WUS is sponsoring this big do—
and Deni Pierce is heading the
Dance committee. Bev Nelson and
Connie Blssett are assisting her.
Good hunting!
MARI ORAS
Mardi Oras time again—and it's
only two weeks away. In fact, two
weeks from tonight one of the
nine lively candidates will be
crowned Queen of the Mardi Gras.
Candidates are Gustine Lletzc,
for Alpha Gamma Delta; Dorothy
Mosher for Alpha Delah Pi; Marianne Weldon, for Alpha Omlcron
Pi; Margaret Pauls for Alpha Phi;
Dodie Gould for Delta Phi Epsilon;
Beverly Glasgow for Delta Gamma;
Jan NcColl for Gamma Phi; Jane
Gratham, for Kappa Alpha Theta,
and Jay Davies for Kappa Kappa
Gamma.
Soon the Caf will look brighter
—with gay Mardi Gras decorations.
Campaigning for the Queen Candidates will start. 1 wonder if there
will be another King of the Mardi
Gras? Some of us remember last
year's campaign pretty well—It
was a panic.
1 hear that th.< girl's chorus has
started practising—and I understand their costumes are quite
something.
Student Bounced
CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. — (Exchange) — A student convicted
for the second time for violation
of the Honor Code has been suspended by the Student Honor
Council,
The violations occurred in two
successive semesters, in the history department and the accounting department.
Cheating ln the final examination in economics resulted in a
grading of "P" in the course and
prevented the student's graduation with his class.
The Honor Council has investigated 11 cases involving some 18
persons during the past year. Cases
reported from the chemistry, biology, history, music and Spanish
departments resulted in severe
reprimands and' warnings for those
involved.
MAD TO LOAN SCHOOLS
FOOTBALL  EQUIPMENT
Sixty full sets of football equipment will be loaned to
Vancouver High schools by MAD during the 1950-51 football season.
The university policy of lending equipment was set in
1948 in an effort to encourage and foster the healthy promotion of football in high schools.
But his Savings Account defies
Newton's Law. // just goes up and up
at   '
Wt'mittciiiMuiii
Bank of Montreal
Canada,'* 'pitat Satt4
/our Bank on the Campus . . .
In the Auditorium Building
MERLE C.  KIRBY,
Manager
WOPKING WITH CANADIANS IM EVERY WAtK OF UFE  SINCE   1817
imuirn—ul— n——w*i 1—-"—*—"~ 1—r-'~
Ubyssey
Classified
L08T
MANS GOLD SIGNET ring, initials H.H. lpst in Library before
Xmas exams. Phone AL 1233L.
POUND
WOMEN'S SHOES may he Identified at Lost & Found.
ZIPPER LOOSE • LEAF may be
identified at Lost & Found.
WOMEN'S SHORT COAT may be
identified at Lost & Found.
TRANSPORTATION
PASSENGERS WANTED for 9:30s
leaving vicinity of Blenheim and
23rd. Phone Pete, CH 6080.
PASSENGERS WANTED from
West End for 8:30 lectures. Phone
Norm at TA 1960.
RIDE WANTED from Kingsway &
Rupert, Mon., Tues. and Wed. for
9:30s. Phone Bonnie at DE 4789fy
RIDE WANTED BY TWO for
8:30s Mon. to Sat. 25th and Dunbar. AL 2552R.
ROOM A iOARD
ROOM & BOARD for four male
students, near university gates,
comfortable room and good food.
$53 dollars a month. AL 0724R evg.
TWO ROOM FURNISHED SUITE,
housekeeping If desired. Suitable
for 1 or 2 students (male.) Reasonable rent. Redecorated. AL 2006.
ROOM & BOARD for girl student.
$46 per month. 4164 W. 12th. AL
1054Y.
ROOM FOR MALE STUDENT
near Acadia Road. Use of kitchen
for breakfast If desired. Phone AL
3228Y, evenings.
DOUBLE ROOM with breakfast,
would suit 2 male students. $20 per
month each. Also small SINGLE
room with breakfast, $20 per
month. 4000 W. 10th. AL 1697R.
ACCOMMODATION available Immediately for single students at
Acadia and Fort Camps. Also married accommodation available at
University Camp, Little Mountain
Camp. Apply Housing Administration, Room 205A, Physics,
In This Corner
Lovers of the great outdoor have a fine
treat in store for them in "King Solomon's
Mines", currently making its first run rounds
in downtown Vancouver. Despite the big
names on the marquee, the real heroes of
this picture are the jungle animals and African tribesman who have at long last got a
technicolor break from Hollywood.
The movie stars Deborah Kerr as a wife
with a guilt complex who hires African guide
Stewart Granger to take her deep into unexplored territory in search of her husband
who plunged into the tropics after being treated badly by his wife. The object of hubby's
trek are the fabulous, legendary mines of
King Solomon.
Around this simple situation, the directors of the film have woven a multi-colored
panorama of scenery and wild life that has
never been equalled before in detail and
beauty. Few other movies have ever filmed
an animal stampede so well as do the cameramen in this picture. A giraffe becomes
beauty in motion and the panic stricken
charging of a zebra herd is enough to make
any pack of race horse in the home stretch
look like novices.
The startling lunge and ominous hiss of
a purple cobra is enough to make the sweat
break out on any movie goer's brow and a
tent in the jungle will seem a pretty risky
place after seeing the ease with which a mottled leopard can claw its way through the
walls.
Even more exciting to watch are the
faces and dances of the African natives who
have summoned up their fiercest expressions
and most exciting art forms for the camera.
Don't get the idea that abstract are is something new — the natives of Africa thought it
up a long time ago in their makeup, clothing
and utensils of war, as this picture amply
demonstrates.
Best performance of the film is rendered
by the seven feet tall Watutsi tribesmen who
stage a ceremonial dance for their king. Their
magnificent movements, coupled with excit-
By Jim Bpnham
ing music and drum accompaniement make
this scene alone worth the price of admission.
To top it all off, there is a fight tp the
death between two Watutsi tribesmen. During the safari, love blooms between Miss
Kerr and Mr. Granger, but'these sequences
are inoffensively handled and take second
place to the scenery and animals.
*        *        *
"The Milkman", an amiable little farce
which ascribes the motives of the president
of the United States to these early morning
tradesmen, has just finished here and is
worth seeing for the antics of Jimmy Durante
and the talent of Donald O'Connor, who might
turn into a first rate visual comedian.
The plot is too complicated to outline
here and it takes a back seat to Durante's
songs and O'Connors dancing and acting.
Durante does perhaps his best screen song
ever in a number about his attractiveness for
the ladies and there is vitality and verve in
a song and dance duet that he and O'Connor
indulge in.
The picture also features tho assets of
one Piper Laurie, a new female ingenue, another in the long line of Hollywood starlets
who, it has been found, can make man's
heads turn and eyes pop simply by standing
erect and breathing deeply. She and Mr.
O'Connor, as you have probably guessed by
now, hit it off quite well in the course of lhe
picture.
The virtues of the picture lie in the singing and dancing and, to some extent, in ttl*
comic situation sequences which are left almost entirely to Mr. O'Conner. He is mildly
amusing as a clumsy oaf of a delivery man
who does everything wrong the first time
out and there are a few guffaws in another
sequence involving a smouldering milk bottle
full of lubricating fluid in an apartment
house.
But for all his antics, Mr. O'Connor never
quite accomplishes the end of visual movie
comedy.
sm^m
mmm
YOUR SHIRTS FROM THE BAY ARE
HANDSOMELY TAILORED BV TOOKE
COMFORT PLUS QUALITY
is yours in these famous cotton broadcloth shirts. Designed to keep
you looking fresh and well groomed! See the Bay's wide assortment
then choose yours! White plain colored and striped in sizes 14 to 17.
3.95
—HBC Men's Furnishings, Main Floor
sons yoyi ^ompanufl
!NCO«*ORAT£Q    Z»,9   MAY    I67G jS^^ES
Store Hours: 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. • Closed Wednesday — Telephones: PA 6211, West 1808 Page 4
THE UBYSSEY
Friday, January 5, 1951
»
Bird Puckmen Meet East End
All Stars At Arena Monday
Team Plans Trip
To U of A in
Cup Defense
By HERM FRYDENLUND
The U3C Thunderbird hockey squad makes its first start
of the new year on Monday
night when they tackle a vastly-improved Commercial League all-star sextet.
The rrosstown outfit are out
for revenge following their
humiliating 12-5 defeat at the
hands of the locals last tetm.
When the two squads take to
the ice Monday at Kerrisdale
Arena, puck fans will he assured
ot a ively contest.
Since the last meeting of the
two teams, the East-End outfit
have practiced consistently as a
team and should show some improvement in team play.
INACTIVE
. 'Birds have been inactive since
early December. Since practices
resumed this week, the locals have
rounded into top shape and should
give their rivals a very interesting evening.
Monday's game will serve as a
prep for the Campus pucksters
who are tentatively slated to travel to Alberta latwr this month to
defend the Hamber Cup against tho
U of Alberta Oolden Bears.
TMt» PLANNID
lt is possible that the powerful
U of North Dakota will host thr,
Thunderbirds ln an International
intercollegiate series.
The locals are rated as one of
the top college teams on the continent this year. Best evidence of
this Is seen by the fact that Color-
ada College, last year's U.S. champs
want no pa^f of the 'Birds this
season.
Last year, the Colorado squad
lost only two games, both to the
Thunderbirds by loh-slded scores.
Monday's game at Kerrisdale
Arena is slated to start at 8:30
p.m. Tickets are available at the
door at a special student rate of
50 cents.
SDADT
ruiii
Photo by Doug Barnett
CLARKE DRAKE
. . . team oaptaln
TOPS
IN SPORT COVERAGE
TOTEM
ACTION SHOTS
• TEAM STANDINGS
• INTRAMURALS
• TEAM PICTURES
•  BIG BLOCK AWARDS
Save Wisely TODAY..
for TOMORROW
Consult any of the following Sun Ufa Representatives who have had wide experience In budgeting
your income to meet essential Insurance needs:
HARVEY STRANG
PETER MATHEWSON
JOHN TENER
LARRY WRIGHT
J. J. CAPOZZI
J. R. BRANDON
ROYAL BANK BLDG., VANCOUVER
PACific 5321
SUN UFE ©FCANADA
SHORT SPORT
Campus organizations wishing to
enter teams in the university
bowling league are requested to
file application forms, and return
them to the Intramural office by
January 12.
1951 Thunderbird
BASKETBALL SCHEDULE
January 12  Central Washington
January 13   Pacific Lutheran
February 2   College of Puget Sound
February 3   St. Martin's
February 10   Clover Leafs
February 17   Western Washington
February 23 Eastern Washington
February 24 Whitworth
SHIRTS and CLIANING
1-DAY SERVICE
MIIW. ink At*.
34
YEARS OF SERVICE
TO THE UNIVERSITY OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
ITS FRATERNITIES   *
AND SORORITIES.
Witt'S A REASON
»«™/$TATIOHIHYAHD
PRINTING CO. LTD.
•MONt        PA(
566 SiTMOUR ST.   VANCOUVER. IC.
IT'S WOODWARD'S
SKI  CENTRE
FOR ALL THE BEST IN SKI EQUIPMENT
Our Panoramic Picture view maps give you all the latest
snow conditions on local and Mt. Baker slopes. Pick up a
handy size pocket guide of all the ski trails . . . Free.
ALPINER SKI SETS
Particularly suited to our local conditions . . . The skis
are of first grade hickory and are fitted with strong
"Ski Rite" binding. Strong yet light aluminum
ski poles fitted with a six-thong basket.
A Woodward Special, set 12.00
//
V7
CHALET" SKIS
Top quality maple . .
Pair 	
lacquered and smoothly finished.
10.95
TYPING....
ESSAYS, THESES, MANUSCRIPTS, NOTES, ETC
MODERATE RATIOS — PROMPT SERVICE
4180 W. 11th Ave.
MRS. A. O. ROBINSON
ALma 0915R
CASTLE  JEWELERS
i.-.im \\. IIMh Ave, (Also ul 7:
Sim- Our \VVT( IHIS  hy
llnloui, r.lfliu. ('men, llolrx, Or.
i:\PK.JlT WATllll HKPAIIIS
SPECIAL 10% DISCOUNT
FOR STUDENTS
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ALma '.ill'lll
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SKI GOGGLES
Protect your eyes from wind, sun
and snow glare. All-rubber frame
with three adjustable lenses.
Set     1J5
MEN'S GABARDINE SKI SLACKS
Lots of freedom for fast action, yet smart in appearance . . . Tailored for style and comfort.
Pair         8.49
ALPINE SKI  PACK
Waterproof blue canvos duck, light metal frame,
wide leather shoulder strap, extra outside pocket.
10.50
SAMSON SKI BOOTS
Made from top grain leather with ankle strap, felt lined,
insole and tongue. Pair    11*95
ALPINE SKI BINDING
Spring steel cable with adjustable toe clamp, leather
straps and sole plate. Made by experts. Set     4.95
SKI CAPS
Blue or brown waterproof Grenfel cloth with warm
felt lining, ear flap and ribbon ties. 2.19
WE HAVE A COMPLETE LINE OF WAXES
AND LACQUERS.
Phone and Mail Orders Promptly Filled
• SPORTING GOODS,
• SECOND FLOOR

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