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The Ubyssey Nov 14, 1950

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 AMS
'Meet
Today
The Ubyssey
AMS
Meet
Today
VOL. XXXIII
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 1950
NO. 22
FIFTEENTH CENTURY MORALITY PLAY, "Everyman"
will be one of three Player's Club presentations starting Wed-
nesday. Norm Young as Fellowship, Assia Steele (centre), as
a Woman of Easy Virtue, and Mary Butters as Good Deeds,
here rehearse "Everyman."
Ostrom Presents His Plan
For Student Approval Today
FILMSOC GIVES GYM FUND
PROFITS FROM QUARTET
UBC's drive to accumulate enough funds to finish the
War Memorial Gym will get an added boost today with the
proceeds from a special Film Society showing in the auditorium.
The celluloid society will present the famous English
film, "Quartet," with all proceeds being turned over the
Bill Haggert's gym fund drive.
The show will commence at 3:15 p.m. and there will
be two other showings at 6 and 8 p.m. Admission is the usual
25 cents.
IT'S BELLINGHAM NOW
Students Wind Up
ere, Like It
By ANN LANQBEIN
.Forty surprised students found themselves in Bellingham,
Washington Saturday  night  at  the  destination  of  the first
mystery "Bus to Nowhere."
Football, Spit Contest
For March Of Dimes
Engineers CholUngt Artsmtn
To Crude• Football Gamt
Chariot races, spitting contests and grudge football games,
will highlight the annual engineer-sponsored "March of Dimes,"
next Thursday.
— <!-   EUS   executive   has   challenged
Arts   Undergrad   executive   to
Goes to Vote After Discussion
Clears Points at Meeting
Future of UBC athletics will be placed squarely in the
hands of the students again today when the Athletic Aid plan
is presented before the Special General AMS meeting in the
Armory at 12:30 p.m.
The   plan,   which   has   become^'
Trip to the American city was
full of tricks and suspense. Pacific
Stttge Lines bus driver pulled up at
Tim Supper--Club, just this «lde
of White Rock, parked the bus,
switched on the lights, and opened
the door.
"Oh, Tara!'", and "Hoy, that's
swell!" wero hoard in all parts of
the bus. Passengers gal bored up
their belongings and started toward the door	
FALSE ALARM
Suddenly, tlio motor roared. tl.o
doov closed, and wo wore off again.
Just a false alarm.
Hillel Sponsors
Campus UJA Drive
Binal B'rith Hillel Foundation at
UBG Is sponsoring a campus appeal to raise funds for the United
Jewish  Appeal.
Most of .the monoy will go towards helping Displaced Persons
to reach Israel or ot|ier friendly
countries.
Harold Chetkow, chairing the
UJA drive on campus, will aceep*
any  voluntary  contributions.
Drive on the campus is part of
a continent-wide campaign to help
out distressed persons, as well as
local  welfare institutions.
"Many Jewish people'still live
in ■ tent camps under deplorable
conditions," said Chetkow. "They
must' be rehabilitated to normal
lives."
no"gloomy cells
Approaching the customs, the
bus stopped again and passengers
were offered their choice of a danco
in White Rock or at Peace Portal
Some brave soul said "Peace Portal,' so the driver turned toward
White   Rock.
A few minutes later we pulled up
at the customs and, after the usual
Hurry over lack of identification.
the litis turned its uose firmly iu
the direction of Bellingham.
We reached Bellingham about
ten o'clock, and, like Cinderella,
had to return to our bus promptly
on the stroke of twelve.
DANCED  IN  LEOPOLD
'•'or two hours, UBC students
danced in the ballroom or the Hotel
Leopold, and explored tho many
cafes and restaurants of the city.
There's something about Washington cal'oa that draws Canadian students.
The bus returned to the Vancouver   depot   "shortly   after   twelve"
and disgorged a load of very satisfied   customers,
COMPLIMENT
UHC students received a compliment from the driver of the bus
to nowhere when he said, "they
(the students) are the finest crowd
I've ever driven for."
Al Westcott, Legion president,
said the Legion considered the trip
a great success. Buses to nowhere
are sponsored by the Legion with
profits going to the War Memorial
Gym.
Next trip will be in approximately two weeks, and again—Destination Unknown!
Democracy Weak
In West Germany
Hind-Smith Says
t"he powers in western Germany must choose between a
weak democratic system vulnerable to eastern attack and a
strong undemocratic system,
UN club president Mike Hind-
Smith told a Civil Liberties
Uni6n meeting Friday.
"Germany today holds the la I
nnr.o. of power In Europe," he said,
Hind-Smith gave a personal description of the state of 'iermany
under the four-power division, as*
he had seen it during a three-week
visit this summer.
The American method of educating Germans to democracy is exemplified by Western Berlin's Am-
erika Haus, he said. This building
is full of American flags, pamph'
lets, and literature on the democratic way of life.
In its eastern zone counterpart,
the Haus der Kultur, there are no
Red flags and few references to
Stalin. Rather, there Is rocarrlng
reference to heroes of the German
communist party, and repetition of
the red, black and gold flag of
Germany, he said.
Hind-Smith described as "powerful and terrifying'' a rally of the
East Berlin "Frel Deutsche Jugend"
he had seen. This youth group is
organized in close co-operation
with the German Communist party.
"We can't impose our way of
life on the Germans, but we can
channel their energies, as is being
done ln the eastern zone," he said.
Dormitories Bright, Modern
"grudge' game of American football Wednesday in the south field
at 12:30 p.m.
"Contest should determine once
and for all which faculty is tops,"
Don Duguid, EUS prexy, said
Thursday.
Redshirts will hold forth on the
main mall Thursday at 12:30 p.m.
when they challenge all other faculties to enter the first annual
chariot race at UBC.
EUS  JUDQE8
Chariots must be two-wheeled
and pulled by no more than 25
men. All judges will be chosen
from tho Engineers Undergrad
Society, and the starter will be
Dean MacLeod, head o| the engineering faculty.
Course will be one lap around
the main mall, and all-course records will be set this year.
EngineeiH have demeil that a
fitting prize for the winner would
be a furlined chamber pot, and it
Is hoped that this, too, will become an annual tradition.
SPITTING   PLANNED
Other contests planned for the
day include a spitting contest,
greasepole contest, cigarette rolling contest, cigar smoking contest, and a tug-of-war. Participants
will be members of each undergraduate society.
UBC's student nurses have gone
on record against the spitting contest. They have denounced it as
being  "extremely  unsanitary.'
Collections for the march- of
dimes will be made during the
events from spectators, and engineers will canvass the campus
and classrooms during the morning.
8HOW  SUPERIORITY
"Objective this year ls $2000,"
Duguid said, "and the contests
should show, once and for all, the
engineers superiority over all other
faculties on the campus.'
Special engineer's contest will
be a beard-growing competition.
Redshirts have four days to grow
long bushy, beards. Engiueer with
the longest beard will be awarded
a prize on Thursday.
By JOHN INAPIER-HEMY
Featuring rooms painted in different shades of pastel with floor
tiles in matching colors, the ultramodern women's dormitories being
constructed on Ihe campus are a
far cry from the gloomy residences
that have become traditional with
older   universities.
Tlio bright, new residences are
located on Marine Drive adjacent
to the Fort Camp huts and overlooking the North Shore. The first
unit, which university officials expect to open on Dec. 1 will house
,r)0 girls now staying al I'UC's
Youth Training ('num. The second
unit should he ready for occupancy
in  January.
Final   plans   call   for   four,   two-
storey reinforced concrete buildings with a central lounge and recreation hall. Double and single
rooms will he equipped with built-
in furniture and closets finished
In bleached hardwood veneer.
Dr. Dorothy Mawdsley, Dean of
Women, ha.s long planned for pleasant, friendly quarters near the university vJiere nut-'pf-town girls
(ould  find  accommodations.
"It started with Miss Mary Boiler!,'' she explained. "As first Dean
of Women at Cite. Miss liollert
put women's resiliences at the top
of her priority list. Lack of money
prevented her from fulfilling her
wish and the money she was
to collect went into a women's-
lounge in the Hrock '.Memorial Building."
The first three new residences
will be named after Mary Bollert,
Mrs. Anne Wesbrook, wife of the
first president of the university
and Dr. Isobel Machines, recently
retired from the department of
German and the first woman to be
appointed lo the faculty of UHC.
In addition to a grant of $560.-
000 from the provincial government, Dean Mawdsley lias received donations amounting to neaily
$7,000 from private individuals
and groups throughout the province. As a mark of gratitude ?)r-<an
Mawdsley plans to have plaques
elected to acknowledge gll'H, and
able I has notified some of the donors
that their gifts will he used to
lurnlsh and decorate a single
room, a double room, or a lounge.
Grad Class
Elections
Graduating class of 1931 will
elect their class officers at a meeting In the Auditorium Tuesday, November 21 at 12:110 p.m.
Officers to be elected are president, secretary, treasurer and social convenor.
Nominations for these offices
must be submitted by Monday,
November 20 to the AMS offices
or to co-ordinator of activities Jim
Midwinter.
Information relating to the graduation ceremonies, congregation,
graduating fees, purchase of the
Totem yearbook, aud other business will l>e brought up at the
meeting.
known as the Ostrom Plan, was
tabled at the previous special general meeting November 2 to allow
students to think it over.
POINT BY POINT
President of the AMS Nonie
Donaldson who will chair the special meeting, will lift the plan from
the table and Ostrom will go over
each point again in turn.
When the plan has been reviewed and each point discussed, Miss
Donaldson will call for a'vote en
the whole plan.
Possible recommendation to the
plan will be put to the meeting
by councillor, Ed Pederson, LSE
president.
Under the Ostrom Plan, a set
$18,000 would go to athletics each
year for the next four years regardless of the enrollment.
PROPOSED CHANGE
The proposed amendment ls
this:
"That the AMS grant the MAA
a percentage grant on a sliding
scale, such that the MAA receives.
(1) 20.94 per cent, of all AMS
fees paid for all enrollment of
5501 and over full fee-paying students.
(2) 20.13 per cent, of all AMS
fees paid for all enrollment between 5001 and 5500 full fee-paying students.
(The percentages in 1, 2 and 3
correspond to per capita grants" of
*3.35, $3.25, and $3.15 respectively
on.'thc present $16.00 AMS fee)'.
"With the stipulation that all
expenses of MAA including salaries of secretaries, etc., |>(> paid from
this budget.
Ajid that the MAA be granted an
additional loan of $2000.(10 for the
Winter Session 1951-52, the said
loan to be used to provide a training table for American football,
and such loan to be repaid from
the first profits of American football, or, failing those to be deducted from the 1955-56 budget of
MAA."
RECOMMENDATION
One addition to the plan will bo
proposed by AMS treasurer John
MacKinnon.
Recommendation 13 will be pu*
up by MacKinnon and this again is
a  protective  measure.
Recommendation reads:
"That the budget of MAA be
subject to the approval of Stu«
dents Council, and that the financial books of the MAA be open
to inspection by the treasurer and
the auditors of the Alma Mater
Society at any time.'
Other amendments will bo allowed from the floor. The plan will
be voted ou by show of hands unless the decision Is close.
UBC TIMES
PROVES TIMELY
BUT COSTLY
Speelal flyer, "Th* Uifc
Timet," may have been timely,
but it le going te be eoatly for
the  LSE.
Ed Pedoraon, LSE prexy, wet
given e etudent council grant
of W0 for the page. (
Now a bill for $98 la burning
a hole in AMS booke, and council will pay |60 of It, but no
more. LSE muat fork out tha
remaining $38 for the Impromptu paper* whioh objected to the
athletic plan.
'Tw-ttn Clouts
George Weaver
Feature Speaker
For CCF Club
CCF stalwart George Weaver
will be featured speaker at a
meeting of the CCF club Wednesday.
"Nationalization    vs.    .Socialisation"  will  be  Mr.  Weaver's topic
when he speaks to students at 18:80 '
p.m. In Arts 100.
"T* *r *TT
COLORED SLIDES will illustrate
a lecture by Mr. R. McMinn in
Applied Science 101 at 7:30 p.)ra.
Wednesday before the Biology Club.
The lecture is entitled "A Classification of Vegetation in Eastern
Washington and Northern Idaho."
MARDI QRAS CHORUS LINE
tryouts will be staged Wednesday
at 12:30 p.m. in the Stage Room
of Brock Hall. Chorus line will ba
under the direction of Diane Cox
and all Greeks, freshettes and independents are welcome. Olrle are
asked to bring shorts.
BROCK HALL will be the scene
of a concert Sunday by Harry
Adaskin, head of the UBC Department of music. He will be assisted
at the piano by Francis Marr. Concert includes works by. Bach, Mozart and Beethoven. Concert begins
at 8:30 p.m.
Night Club Performers
Presented On Campus
HERMAN   RISBY
• . . vocalist
Two Canadian night club stai'B,
Herman Risby, song stylist, and
Lennie Gibson, dancer, will appear in the LSR noon-hour series
Wednesday in  the Auditorium.
Both young men were recently
winners in the Horace Ifeldt contest, sponsored by the Orpheum
Theatre.
Risby came to Vancouver first
several seasons ago as one of the
featured players lu the Theatre
I'nder the Stars production of
Bloomer Girl. Since that time he
has made frequent appearances at
the I'alomar and the Cave Supper
Clubs.
Lennie Gibson has just recently
i returned   from  study   witli   the  fa-
; moiis    Nogm    dancer,    "Catherine
Dunham.
They will lie assisted in their appearance here by Agnes Harrod,
ono of Canadas loading Hammond
organ   specialists. Page 2
THIS tnJTSSEY
Tuesday, November 14, 1950
The Ubyssey
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRES9
Authorized as Second Class Mail Pest Office Dept. Ottawa. Student Subscriptions *1 per
year (included In AMS Fees). Mall Subscriptions—$2.00 Tier year. Published throughout
the university by the Student Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society of the
University of British Columbia.
Editorial opinions expressed herein arc tlic-so of tho editorial staff of The Ubyssey and not
necessarily those of tho Alma Mater Society nor of the University.
Offices in Brock Hall, Phono ALma KW
for display advertising phone ALma 3-511
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF      BAY FROST
OENERAL STAFF: Copy Editor, Jim Banham; CUP Editor, Joan Churchill; Women's
Editor, Joan Fraser; Sport* Editor, Ron Pinchin; Fine Arts Editor, John Brockingtotf.
Senior Editor—ANN LANQBEIN
A STAINSBY NEWSPAPER
Smarten Up, McGuire
It's time Cy McGuire and his Undergraduate Societies Committee gave students
an account of what USC has and has not been
doing in regard to enforcing rules and regulations around the campus.
The Ubyssey's editors are no more sticklers for the letter of the law than the average
student is likely to be.
But what McGuire & Co. are allowing
offenders to get away with in Brock Hall
lounge is it plain and simple disgrace,
Outdoor clothing is being strewn over
chesterfields, muddy boots and shoes are
tricking and marking up the newly-sanded
floor, and loungers are otherwise showing a
general disgregard for standing regulations.
Hired employees, including the Brock
HaU proctor, can scarcely be held respnosible
for the damage that is being done. They have
too much work to do to start playing cops
and robbers with negligent students.
.Building engineers and sweepers might
be able to pick up the odd offender or two,
but to suggest that they begin is the equivalent of suggesting the type of "token raids"
that has made a mockery oi liquor control
in downtown night spots.
No, the onus is definitely on USC. If
undergraduate representatives were unable
to forsee that they would have to install and
enforce a system to preserve student property, then they never should have run for
office last spring.
It's your problem, Mr. McGuire. What
xare you going to do about it?
Staff Is More Important
The Ubyssey would like to aknowledge
the cogency of Dr. MacKenzie's arguments in
Justification of the university's overall building program. It is quite true, as he pointed
out in his letter to the editor last Thursday,
that the humanities do not require the same
amount of building space as the sciences-
ana it is even more true that they can far
more conveniently be housed in temporary
quarters in a time of congestion.
We are also fully appreciative of the fact
that the university has already built a now
library Wing and that a new arts building is
high on the priority list.
But we must insist that a building program is not the sum totality of an expansion
program. Far more important than the masses
of concrete and steel which dot the campus is
the staff which is responsible for peopling the
buildings.
In the words of Cardinal Newman,
familiar to every freshman, the significant
factor in university education is the meeting
of mind with mind.
What, then, has the trend in staff expansion been? If, as Dr. MacKenzie maintains,
the humanities are "the very core" of a uni
versity, how is it possible to justify the present alignment of our faculty?
A superficial glance at the calendar
would indicate that we have three and a half
philosophers (this is not to disparage the
fourth member of the department, he is simply a part-time lecturer), one sociologist, one
anthropologist, and only a mere sprinkling of
historians, economists, and psychologists.
In short, it would appear that the only
really adequately staffed departments in what
would be broadly classified as "the humanities" are those of English and Slavonic
Studies. f
In contrast to this, we discover the university employs a score of physicists and almost as many chemists and biologists. If the
staff in applied science, agriculture, forestry
and other fields which fall under the held
of the "non-humanities" (if we may use the
term) is added to the total, the disproportion
becomes staggering.
Perhaps it has always been staggering.
But, if so, the "expansion program" should
have, as one of its aims, the rectification of
the situation.
In This Corner
"Love Happy," the latest offering by the
Marx Brothers, is probably the worst picture they have ever made, but it is still a
cut above all the other comedy being produced by Hollywood today.
Only the extraordinary talents of mute
Harpo are allowed full sway in this offering,
which concerns itself alternately with an
embryo musical comedy and the love affairs
of the principals, and the recovery of a valuable necklace encased in a can of sardines.
The most disappointing aspect of the film
is the lack of material accorded Groucho, one
of the great living visual comedians. His leering walk and libidinous face are seen for only
a few fleeting moments, Chico fares little
better, being relegated to his usual piano-
playing antics. , ,,
The picture is also characterized by some
implausible sequences involving a rooftop
chase in which Harpo is pursued by the vil-
lians. Comic inventiveness—at which Harpo
is a master—is sacrificed for a few impossible
shots showing the mute riding the skyline on
electric signs.
Three neatly packaged Somerset Maugham short stories have- been put together by
the British and viewing them is a couple of
hours of sheer enjoyment. "Trio," which was
preceeded by "Quartet," will be followed, I
understand, by "Duo" and finally one enlarged short story.
Of the three stories in the last offering,
"Mr. Know-all" is probably the best. It concerns an obnoxious ship board party man who
earns the hate of his ship mates and the everlasting gratitude of a lonely lady. Though the
by Jim Banham
film version of the story tends to be slightly
stagy, it has lost none of the Maugham flav-
ous. The first sequence, "The Verger" tells
write. The tale boils down to a one-sentence
the tale of a sacked churchman who make** a
fortune in the tobacco business after being
discharged for not knowing how to read or
anecdote which ends the story.
"Sanitorium," the final story, details the
sufferings and struggles of a dozen or so inmates of a tuberculosis hospital in Scotland.
One struggle, involving two aged patients
who fight constantly but won't let each other
out of their sights, is beautifully handled but
the other actions tend to be a little too pat.
The story shows that Maugham handles plot
better than characters.
"Kind Hearts and Coronets," another
British offering of high calibre, will begin
a suburban run at the Varsity theatre Wednesday. This conglomeration of pre-meditated
murder has a light touch and a comic verve
seldom equalled, up to this point, by the
movie industry.
To get himself a peerage, the story's hero
is forced to murder eight far and near relatives who stand in his way. All eight obstacles are portrayed with amazing versatility by Alec Guiness, one of the most accomplished character artists in movie history.
Guiness' best jobs are done on an ailing i
vicar, a hell-fire suffragette, a young camera
fiend, and an elderly bank president. The
here's cleft use of understatement and his
final betrayal at his own hand are only reinforcements of the obvious fact that British
movies are better than any.
Letters to The Editor
RENOVATION
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
We note with suitable interest
the budget of $62 granted to UBC's
honorary sorority, Delta Sigma Pi.
We understand that these funds
are to be used to introduce women
to each other at a variety show,
to Introduce students to their professors, and to introduce everyone
to American football.
We now realise the folly of such
projects as the Garnet Sedgewick
Award for civil liberties work,
cash prizes for student essays on
civil liberties and other piddling
undertakings such as a campaign
for Indian rights.
The CLU is giving serious consideration to re-organizing as the
Congress of Laudable Undertakings. We plan to request an addition to pur present 935 budget for
the following Laudable Undertakings:
1. To introduce Brock Ostrom
to Ed Pedersen on some convenient fence.
2. To introduce professors to
those students who may not know
what  they've  been  missing.
3. Tp introduce the art of bundling on the campus.
Provided our budget ls increased
to a reasonable extent, we also
Intend to study the Misplaced
Comma In Prehistoric Writings,
which we believe was the cause
of the rise of Nasi Germany and
Athletic Lethargy.
Yours more in sorrow than
in anger,
Civil Liberties Union.
THANKS
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dea,r Sir:
To the following organizations
of the Alma Mater Society who
made the last Oeneral AMS meeting, Nov. 2, the largest ln the annals of UBC, the V-Day committee
extends sincere thanks: the Undergraduate Societies, Kickapoos, Man
ooks, Radsoc, Cheerleaders, Drum
Majorettes, Brass Band, Pipe Band,
LSE, WUS, Phrateres, Glee Club,
Men's Chorus, Ubyssey, Big Block
Club, COTC, UNTD, Aero Club,
Legion and Terry Lynch's P.A.
System.
Thanks are alson in order for the
fraternities and sororities, the
RCMP, Fire Department, Mr.
Lee's office and M. Muunsell and
his staff lu the AMS office.
I would like to take this opportunity to express my sincere
appreciation to the V-Day committee—Austin Taylor, Jr., Chuck
Marshall, Peter Bentley, George
Cumming and J. P. Graham, who
spent hours putting the two-week
plan into effect and who deserves
a tremendous amount of credit for
a job well done.
Here's hoping for Just as large
a turnout today.
Sincerely,
W. F. Sparling.
PENFRIEND
To Any Canada Penfrlend!
I am a young man who would
like to get a penfrlend in Canada
qnd most of all a girlfriend I will
tell you some about myself and I
am beginning with my name which
is Ewald this I am called everywhere at home and on the office.
Office—I am working In an office
in a slaughterhouse at a little
town called TJerrltslu ih the northern part of Denmark. I have a lot
of work in the office. I shall take
care of the telephone we have
three and then I shall speak to the
farmers and the slaughters when
they are calling us. Sometimes I
have a dreadful headache when it
is evening and I have been speaking most of the day ln the telephone.
I am 20 years old, have grey
eyes and am fair-haired.
This 1b a little about myself
and now I hope that you will be
a good friend to me and will write
a lot of letters .so we can learn
each other to know through the
letters.
If I have done any mistakes
please correct me and send me
the corrections in your following
letter.
Your affectionately,
Ewald.
My address is:
Ewald flrrsby Fensen,
Lejmarken,  TJerrltslu,
Fylland, Denmark,
Europe.
COVIRAGt
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
On behalf of Mr. J6hn M. Buchanan, who became Immediate Past-
President of our Association on
Wednesday night at our annual
dinner mej&ting, and all the members of our association, I should
like to thank you for your excellent coverage of recent alumni activities.
Your accurate and full report
pf the disposition of this year's
proceeds from our annual giving
program—the Alumnl-UBC Development Fund—was particularly
appreciated. Without this type of
fine co-operation from the Ubyssey,
few students would realize the tremendous and continuous financial
assistance being given voluntarily
by alumni, nor the many other
ways In which Association members are helping the one and only
UBC.
Yours sincerely,
Frank J. E. Turner.
MR. ARMOUR
Dear Les:
We, the undersigned, found
your column in last Thursday's
Ubyssey quite intriguing. In It,
you said that half the UBC Thunderbird basketball team receive
alumni aid. -   ,
We of the other half would like
to find out how to obtain this aid
because we feel left out.
And we thought that since you
know so much about UBC athletics,
you would be the logical man to-
contact.
Expectantly yours,
Art Phillips
Willis Louie
John Southcott
Don Hudson
Dennis Yorke
Brian Upson
*'   Ron Blssett
Ron  Stewart
Dave Mitchell
Maury Mulhern
Nell Desnaulnler
N.B.  The  Thunderbird  basketball
team this year ia composed of only
11 playtrs.—Editor.
*«
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WEDNESDAY     THURSDAY     FRIDAY
Saturday, Continuous from 2 p.m.
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DENNIS PRICE    VALERIE HOBSON
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LARRY WRIGHT
J. J. CAPOZZI
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UFE ©PCANADA Tuesday, November 14, 1950
SURMISES PURPOSES
Law Student Finds
'Aspects Of Plan
(This criticism of the Ostrom Plan is being printed by
the Ubyssey in an attempt to aqualnt students with both
sides of the question. The opinions expressed herein are
those of the writer only and not necessarily those oi the  |
Publications Board.)
THE UBYSSEY
■y DON MOIR
Last Friday, Brock Ostrom and
Stan Clark "answered" a series
of questions put to them by the Engineering Undergraduate Society.
On the basis of these answers it is
at last possible to at least surmise the real purposes and aims
of the Ostrom Plan. The answers
were superficial, but they do indicate what is intended if the purposely value recommendations
are adopted.
The Plan appears to resolve Into
three main aspects. First there ls
to be a complete re-organization
of the administrative machinery
of the MAA. Effective control Is to
be placed ln the hands of a five-
man board of which two will be
students. One of these men is to
be the newly created Athletic Director who will be responsible for
day to day administration. The
Athletic Director will be an employee of the University, not of the
MAA. In effect, then, the proposers of the Plan have come to the
conclusion that students are Incapable of administering tbeir inter-collegiate athletic programme.
This may be a perfectly valid conclusion. But those who will vote
for the Plan must realize that they
are voting to abdicate* a elgnlfacant
part of student autonomy which
UBC has In greater measure tfcan
any university of wni(5h we know.
In the second place the Plan proposes that the proportion of AMS
funds allotted to inter-collegiate
athletics be fixed, For enrollments
of 5,500 and above this is to be
$8.35 per capita. Last year the per
capita grant was $2.40 or thereabouts.
Every other club, society and
activity has taken a cut in its budget while Inter-collegiate athletics Jifts been allotted'something
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et
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rel
Dij
199
b;
Rl
Rl
RI
tUtJ
till
like half as much again per student. (It must be borne in mind
that the MAD has no responsibility for the intramural programme.)
The Plan proposes that this proportion be fixed. In addition there ls
to be a $2,000 loan repayable in
1955 which must be paid out of
current revenue. The loan cannot
be repaid sooner unless football
becomes profitable. Last year the
deficit  was  $4,000.
In the third place the Plan proposes that machinery by which
student athleteB may be subsidized be set up. We are told that there
is a sum of money available for
this purpose should the Plan be
adopted. The implications of this
proposal may perhaps be surmised from two statements. At the
EUS general meeting Stan Clark
said that unless the Plan was
adopted the money would not be
forthcoming and would instead be
used to help cover the cost of a
professional team. If this Is true
then It would appear that the primary Interest of the donors is not
the welfare of the university.
Following the EUS debate It
was suggested to Brock Ostrom
that a proviso be added to the effect that only native born students be eligible for the grants.
He said that at present this was
not possible but that perhaps 50
per cent natives could be considered. In other words UBC is going
to enter the American market for
suitable  football  players.
Nothing that we can say will
now change any opinions as to
the merits of football subsidization.
It does seem rather callous, however, to say to the majority of those
who are now playing for UBC
under the most miserable conditions! "You are not good enough,
we want nomeone we can pay.'
CLASSIFIED
LOST
3 STRAND PEARL NECKLACE
on Thurs. Keepsake. Please contact AL 2033L. .
PARKER '61 PEN, bla.ck with gold
top ahd name "John flurr" inscribed. REWARD of $2 will be
paid by John Burr at AL 2023R.
BROWN wallet containing money
and, pictures. REWARD. AL 0870L.
BROWN OyERCOAT, with light
grey lining. Rhone CE 1253 and ask
for Mohendar Singh.
WILL PERSON WHO BORROWED GREY DOUBLE BREASTED
OVERCOAT from the new Biology
Bldg., Wed., between 1:30 and 2:30
please return it to the Janitor.
GLASSES in brown case. Lost on
Mon., Nov. 6th. Phone Alan at KE
1081Y.
BLUE-GREEN AND GOLP PARKER '51 PEN. Please return to
Lost & Found or ptione GL 1752L.
SEAGRAM'S BAG containing red
wool sock and needles. AL 8681.
POUND
PURS® red. May be identified at
Lost & Found.
KEY CASE may be identified at
Lost ft Found.
PEN, Waterman, may be identified at Lost 6 Found.
SLIDE  RULE may be identified
at Lost ft Found.
COMPACT may  be identified at
Lost & Found. t
KEYS, a number ot keys awaiting
Identification at Lost ft Found.
PENS, a number of pens awaiting
identification at Lost ft Found.
FOR SAL!
1935 GRAHAM SEDAN, 6 cylinder,
heater, spare tire and wheel. Upholstery and tires in good condition. Phone KE 5412L or MA 0928.
'81 CHEV ROADSTER, motor perfect, good rubber, new roof, fine
paint Job. Must sell in a hurry.
$185. Phone AL 0678R.
ATTENTION STUDENTS: You
can now puchase fine-quality jackets for your record collection, by
contacting Mej-v Chertkow at RADSOC, South basement Brock. Don't
miss this opportunity to keep your
record collection in perfect shape
for  very   little   cost.
ROOM A BOARD. ETC.
FRONT COSY bOUBLE robm with
breakfast. Outside UBC gate, AL
0884Y.
WANTED
LOGAN  ft  INMAN  ECONOMICS
200 text. AL 0315L.
MEETINGS ft ANNOUNCEMENTS
PHILATELIC SOCIETY Club meeting Wednesday noon ln Arts 201.
TAILORING, Dressmaking, alterations. Dorothy Curtis. Phone AL
1608M, anytime.
VOC GENERAL MEETING, Wed.
2:30 at Eng. 200. Meeting of old
members only on thurs. Climbing
lecture on Fri. noon at Arts 204.
SING WITH UNION COLLEGE
male choir every Thurs. at 6:30
p.m. in the college chapel. Singers
In all voice ranges are urgently
needed.
TYPING. Essays, theses, notes, etc.
Will pick up and deliver. Very reasonable rates. Phone Mrs. Moerman
at KE 12671*.
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA rehearsal Wed. ln Hut No. 3 behind
Brock. Concert only three rehearsals away!
TYPING, essays, etc. Phone Miss
Feme Ryles at KB 4178Y, UH
Yew St.
TYPING, essays, etc. Phone MJss
Nancy Whitney, ,AL 0168L. 4536
W. 13th.
LOST
MAROR BIOLOGY TEXT, brand
new. Phone collect New Westminster 247BR.
MAN'S BROWN check woollen
scarf, last Tues. afternoon at 8
o'clock between Legion canteen
and Hut Al. Please return to Of-
'flee No. 5 Hut Al.
FOUND
3 KEYS ln parking lot. May be
identified at Lost ft Found.
UMBRELLA, plastic w^th check
design. Apply to Lost ft Found.
PEN, Waterman's maroon and
pojd. May be Identified at Lost &
Found.
SCARF, crepe, tiiay be identified
at Lost & Found.
GLOVES, greyish brown with fur.
May be identified at I>ost ft Found.
PHYSICS   300   NOTES,   in   black
wire   binder.   Apply   at   Lost and
Found.
PEN, Eversharp, may be Identified
at Lost and Found.
ROOM,  BOARD  ETC. >
COSY,   BRIGHT   ROOM   in   quiet
home close to UBC bus; hot plate,
breakfast   if   desired.   Reasonable.
AL 1291L.
ROOM AND BOARD for girl student. Excellent meals and study
facilities on busline. Reasonable.
Dlscourft for light duty if desired.
KE 3307R.
LARGE BRIGHT HOUSEKEEP-
ing and bed-sitting room, linen
and dishes supplied for 1 or 2
students. Available now. Rent $30.
AL 3449L after 6 p.m.
Page 3
PROSPECTIVE members of the
UBC Flying Club are offered opportunity to purchase shares and
flying time at 15 per cent discount.
AL 0P38.
SSESS3S3&
Specializing In
pfelNtlMO
FOft
Fraternities
and
Sororities
GEHRKE
STATIONERY AND
PRINTING CO.
566 Seymour St.
THANK YOU
For the splendid co-operation on
the taking of your graduation
pictures. :  ■',
CHRISTMAS PORTRAITS
The Gift That Only You Can Give
Campus Prices
YOUR  NEGATIVES NOW ON FILE
At OUR DOWNTOWN STUDIO
Campbell studio.
PHOTOGRAPHERS
. VANCOUVER
581 GRANVILLE 8REET . .
MArine 3626
SHOW
GLAMOUROUS CLOTHES .... COMPLETELY
ACCESSORIZED .... FOR THE SOCIAL WHIRL
OF WINTER AND THE HOLIDAY SEASON	
Sponsored by:
University of British Cdlumbia's
Women's Undergroduote Society
to bi presented
In the
BROCK HALL
THURSDAY NOV.
At
12:30
Music . . . Frankie McPhalen
Commentator. . . Jan Olsen
VANCOUVER'S FASHION CENTRE Page)
IHE UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 14, 1950
'Bird—Savage Tilt
Repeats Same Story
Slim Half Lead
Held As Champs
Score 3 in Finale
Saturday's football game
against Eastern Washington
College of Education was but
repetition of all other grid
fixtures UBC Thunderbirds
have contested this season.
CfcC held ln the first half, but
lack of replacements proved the
home team's downfall in the second.
Savages, co-title holders of the
Evergreen Conference crown for
the past three years, held a slim
6-0 margin at the half way mark.
flTS then only as the result of a
46-yard breakaway, courtesy Howard Glacier.
INCMAII  LKAD
At 9:45 of the third stanza, Savages' Doug Bailey broke loose to
^ make the score 12-0. Attempted con-
«   version was successful.
Three touchdowns In the final
quarter served only to increase the
visitors' margin. Anton Rasmussen,
oil ft pass from Glazier, collected GO
yards to paydirt early In the quar-
uer.
Mariel Mlchelson, star fullback
with the Washington crew, escaped
through right tackle for 54 yards
with but 49 seconds remaining in
the game.
Twenty-three seconds la ter,
Enos Underwood added the final
•core Intercepting a desperation
pass from Gord Flemons.
LITTLE MORI
Although Birds were never within Savages' thirty yard line, little
more can be Bald for the visiting
gtoup. All Washington scores were
tallied from runs outside the home
thirty.
UBCs falthruls were outmanned
•and out-roughed us Eastern changed their line again and again during the last two quarters.
Loss of Dave MucFurlane and
Oeorge Puil, via the injury route.
was little help. MucKarlaue, vho
picked up plenty of yardage in the
early quarters of the game, wus cut
late in the third.
Fifteen yards was all the Thunderbird squad realized when Sav-
agoes were charged with clipping
Pull.
A painful thigh Injury kept
George out of the remainder of the
game.
Short Sport
Doom for Curlers
Says Club Prexy
"We still> hate room for a few
curlers on Tuesdays and Wednesdays," president of the curling club
said  yesterday.
"Girls," lie added, "are welcome."
Oeneral meeting of the club will
be held Wednesday in Hut B-4 at
12:30 p.m.
Finances are chief topic of discussion.
*r *P V
FIR8T Intramural Table Tennis
play will be held Wednesday at
8 p.m. In the gymnasium.
"Bqth doubles and singles will
be run off," Dick Penn, Intramural
boss, said.
Participants must wear running
shoes.
* *        *
A   NUMBER   of   groups   taking
part  in  intramurals   have  not  yet
paid  their fees.  Delinquent groups ]
are  asked   to  do  so   at   once,   the]
Ubyssey   was   advised   today !
"Failure to do so," said Penn, j
"will result. In their being dropped '
from   Intramural   activity."
* *        *
GOLF SCORE CARDS arc to lie
turned in to the Intramural ol'l'ii e,
Mut ti-5, room 11. at once.
* * *
ROWING CLUB in.'.'ting will he
held Wednesday at !2:"() p.m. in
Arts 200. i
DATE
November 18
November 23
1950 Football Schedule
THUNDERBIRDS
UNIVERSITY
Whitworth College
Western Washington College
PLACE
Vancouver
Bellingham
SPORT
Sports Editor—RON PINCHIN
Touch  Football
t   .Games to be played in Field behind  Field  House.
Game time 12:30 p.m.
Rules—copies may be picked up
in Gymnasium office.
Wednesday. Nov. 15
1 Kappa Sig vs P.E.
Thursday, Nov. 16
1 Zebes vs Kits
Friday, Nov. 17
1 Pharmacy vs ATO
TOO POWERFUL
Leafs Outcome UBC Chiefs
Playing against the powerful
and undefeated Clover Leafs, UBC
Chlgfs were outclassed to the
score of 68-42 In a senior men's
inter-city basketball game Saturday.
Playing very smart ball in the
first half, Chiefs held the accurate scorers of the Leafs in check,
and at the end of-the period, Scoreboard registered 29-27 for the Bird-
men.
Sparked by Jim Carter and Roy
Durante, the Chiefs were never be
hind, and appeared capable of pulling a big upset.
IMPRESSIVE
In the third quarter, however,
Leafs started to move and, led by
Bobby Haas and Sandy Roberton,
quickly outpaced the inexperienced
and  somewhat dazzled  Chiefs.
Very Impressive in his first
game was left-handed forward Dave
Brockington, whose continued hustle and spirit boosted the locals
considerably. Another standout
player was centre Jeff Craig.
bright for the swiftly-moving
Future prospects look very
Chiefs, and coach Dick Penn should
not have to wait long before he
has a championship team to look
after.
BOX 8CORE3
UBC Chiefs—Seymour, 3;,Zah-
arko, 4; McLeod, 6; Hamilton, 7;
Craig, 4;  Carter, 6;  Durante, 8.
Leafs—Campbell, C; Burtwell, 8;
Haas, 12; Pickel. 5; McLeod, 2; Robert* ton, 12; Bakken, 5; McKinnon,
15; Olsen, 3.
UBC Girls Garner
Second Hoop Win
UBC Thunderettes dereated Majorettes 36-27 in a city league
Senior B game Friday night.
The closeVy-checked game featured team work and short.snappy
passes.
*
Perennial star Miml Wright hit
the hoop for 11 points, while peppy
high Jumper Eleanor Cave tallied
nine counters.
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