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The Ubyssey Feb 2, 1955

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 THE UBYSSEY
VOLUME
VANCOUVER, B.C., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 1955
Price 5c;
No. 44
Socreds Silent On Land Request
LOOKING EAST the aerial photo shows University Building plans-jpotrKProposed and certain: (1) New Arts Building (2) fiffifffippol (3) Women's residences (4) Men's
residencesClTf Medical sciences building (6) International
House (7) Administration Building'extension (8) Library
extension (9) Brock extension (10) Home Management
House (11) New bookstore (12) Union College addition
(13) New Preibyterian College (14) New Catholic College.
—Ubyssey Aerial Photo by Vancouver U-Fly
Building Plans, Like Spring, Are Busting
Out All Over—But Wait For Sommers
the building outlook for UBC
is brighter this week than it has
been for years. The Ubyssey
today reviewed all plans for
university buildings in the near
future—none of them absolutely
finalized—and found several
near-definltes, a few probables—
and a number of pleasant
dreams'.     ■*■' ""'
The Provincial Government's
$10,000,000 building grant allows faculty merobers to plan
much further ahead than previously, but ignorance as to
exactly what form the grant
will take has kept all planning
at the tentative level.
Supplementing the.University building program, several student's building schemes
not affected by the grant are in
Acclamation   Likely
Student   Interest   In
Elections    Lousy'
Ron Bray looked like the winner by acclamation for the
post of AMS president Wednesday when only 24 hours remained for candidate nominations.
 5 §■    Deadline   for   nominations' is
Thursday afternoon at 4:00 p.m.
Sorority
Decamps
Campus
UBC's nine sororities may
have their number reduced to
eight.
UBC Information officer Dorothy Coryell stated Wednesday
that Kappa Alpha Theta will
probably withdraw from Pan-
Hellenic Society and retire "off
campus'' before next fall.
Mrs. Coryell, a Theta Alumnus, gave reason for the withdrawal as a steady decline in
membership.
"The sorority is quite small
now," Mrs. Coryell said. "And
eleven of our twelve active members will be graduating this
spring."
Sorority president Jean Taylor refused to confirm tiie report, however.
"We're not sure of anything
at this point," she stated.
BL0T1 BASH NIXED
BY FEARFUL FROSH
Tiie Joe Blotz Dance, scheduled for Saturday, February
5 in the Women's Gym, has
been   cancelled.
Frosh Undergraduate Society, sponsors of the bash,
Rave as the reason for cancellation Thursday the multiple activities planned for tiie
same evening by other campus
organizations.
No nominations had been submitted for the positions of Secretary, and for Chairman of the
Undergraduate Societies committee.
Public Relations Officer Danny Goldsmith described the lack
of interest shown so far as
"pretty lousy." Students do not
realize that they're passing up a
chance for a free blazer and
dinner every Monday," he said.
This year's election is a far
cry from last year's campaigning. Four candidates, Dick Underhill, Wendy Sutton, Al Plant
and Clyve "Baru" Nylander ran
tor president.
"BARU BECAUSE"
Miss Sutton and Baru led the
campaigners, although Underhill
came out on top of the ballot.
Baru particularly had students
in stitches with campaign slogans  like  "Baru   because."
Hints of machine politics returned to the campus when
Ubyssey columnist Pat Carney
predicted a "Ron Bray slate"
would be put up this year. Those
who she claimed would be on
the slate included Jacques Bar-
beau, present Open House chairman, for vice-president; Geoff
Conway, Ubyssey executive editor, for treasurer; Bob Hutchinson, MAA secretary, for
president of the MAC; and AMS
treasurer Ron Bray for president.
These charges, however, failed
to arouse public comment, and
they were neither confirmed or
denied.
I     Voting for president, secretary
land    USC   chairman   will   take
i place   Wednesday,   Feb.   9.   Students  will  vote on  the Western
Athletic   Union    referendum   at
the same time.
various stages of completion.
NEW ART! BUILDING
High on the list of buildings
contemplated as a result of the
Government grant is a new Arts
Building to replace the temporary structure erected •SO years
ago.
The badly^eeded building,
would be erected on the present
site of the tennis courts near the
women's gymnasium. Dean Geoffrey Andrew, a member of the
University Planning Committee
states that the University hopes
to spend not less than $1,500,000
for the structure.
"But," he stressed, "we haven't got the money yet, so no
plans or estimates can be obtained, and we can make no final
decisions."
ANOTHER "MUST"
The new Medical Sciences
Building, another "must" on the
University's priority list, is no
closer—or further—from reality
than is the Arts Building.
Again, officials hope to spend
$2,000,000 on the structure, but
must await definite action by
the Provincial Government before plans can go ahead.
Two alternative sites are proposed: Either between the Wesbrook Building and the Biological Sicences Building, or on the
parking lot across from the War
Memorial Gymnasium on University Boulevard.
THIRD  CONTENDER
Student Housing, the third
contender for priority on the
Administration's building list, is
also in the "Wait for the Socreds" stage. Plans are well advanced, however.
At present, it is proposed to
build women's residences at Fort
Camp, near Mary Bollert Hall.
Men's residences would be care-
fuly segrated in the area behind
the Engineering Building.
Housing Administrator Gordon Mr. Shrum hopes to create
accommodation for about 200
students for $1,000,000. The residences would be "sound and
fireproof, and completely adequate, although not lavish."
DEPENDENT ON GRANT
Another building, planned by
the Home Economics School, is
not  directly  dependent  on   the
(Continued on Page 3)
See BUILDING PLANS
Dean Andrew Confirms
Campus Bank Addition
An addition will be made to the Administration building
housing the £ank of Montreal, Registrar's and administration
offices, Dean G. C, Andrews announced yesterday, confirming Student Council reports of a new campus bank building.
He said that no final decision $> ________
had been made as yet on a pro
posed new bookstore, but that if
it is built the site will be in the
area of the bus stop.
The bank addition will be
financed through present university funds, and has no connection with the recent $10
million government grant.
Building cost and construction
dates have not yet been determined, said Dean Andrews.
"There is no truth to the rumor
that a completely new Administration building is being planned
for the parking lot," he added.
"The administration building
is very low on the priority list,
and we will be using this one for
many years to come."
A proposal to include a bookstore in an addition to Brock
hall has definitely been abandoned.
One of nature's unsolved mysteries is how the buzzard received his name. He has never
been known to buzz.
IFC   Report
Delayed
Another week will elapse before Inter-Fraternity Council's
long awaited discrimination committee   report   is   revealed.
IFC public relations officer
Bruce McWilliams pleaded Wednesday that the committee needed more time to gather additional information.
"There is no delay," he stated.
"The committee presented an interim report Tuesday but we
felt that it was not ready for
release at that time."
It is expected the main
body of the report will be composed of replies to questionnaires
sent to UBC's sixteen fraternities
asking if they practised "gentlemen's agreement'' discrimination.
The replies received to date
have all been returned unsigned.
1  A _____
No Reply To Plea
For   462   Acres
The university will not know the government's decision
on President N. A. M. Mackenzie's request for an increase in
campus acreage until the University Development Bill is bought
down in the House. ♦-
It is not known as yet, when
the Bill will be introduced.
President Mackenzie has ask
ed that campus area be increased
from 938 to 1000 acres, the extra
acreage being added from university endowment lands.
Deputy lands minister E. W.
Bassett yesterday would give no
indication as to the government's
intentions.
He could not say whether the
government would guarantee the
university ten million dollars in
the event that development of
the endowment lands failed to
yield the expected revenue.
Nor did he know when the
two million dollars would be
made available for initial campus construction.
Lands minister R. E. Sommers
was not available for comment.
DUBIOUS
University officials are dubious about the feasability of the
endowment development plan,
not feeling that revenue would
be sufficient to finance a satisfactory campus expansion programme.
Construction of a Home Management building, an addition lo
the Home Economics department, has been delayed until the
government's intentions are revealed.
Th proposed building site is
located on Endowment lands
which would revert to the university campus if President Mackenzie's request is granted.
The building is financed by
private contributions and is not
connected with the ten million
dollar grant.
No date has been set for the
bringing down of the bill, as the
date is at the Premier's pleasure.
Though it is felt there will be
little opposition to the size and
intention of the grant itself,
there is a feeling among political
circles the method of financing
the grant will be fought by the
opposition.
'twttn dossil
UN Club Presents
Law Symposium
UNITED    NATIONS    CLUB
will present the annual International Law Symposium, this
year on "National Sovereignty
and International Organization"
and featuring President N. A. M.
MacKenzie, Dean Angus, Pean
Curtis and Professor Bourne, Friday at noon in Arts 100.
ep ep ep
MATH CLUB announces its
annual competition, open to all
undergraduates. Problem sheets
may be obtained from, the AMS
office or any member of the
club executive. Competition
closes March 21st, prizes will
be awarded. A club executive
member will be in Hut 13 today
1:30 to 2:30 p.m. to answer
questions.
*P mp mp
VISUAL   ARTS   CLUB   presents a Sarrinen lecture today at
1:30   in   Physics   200.
)/*      If,      sf
WEST INDIAN AND CARRI-
bean Students will hold • meeting today at 1 p.m. ih Arts TdT.
if.     if     tf,
HIGH SCHOOL CONFER.
ence Committee will hold a meet'!
ing  tomorrow  at noon in the
CHINESE   VARSITY   CLUB
will hold a meeting tomorrow at
noon in H.L.2.
tf,     if,     if,
WUS TRYOUTS for the fashion show will be held tomorrow
at 3:30 in Home Ec 100.
ip ep ep
PARLIAMENTARY    REFORM,
Legion Cup Debates. Any campus group wishing to enter
please send names, and phone
numbers to John Spencer, Parliamentary Forum, Box 7 AMS
office, by February 12.
Yanks   Read   Poetry
Of   Dylan   Thomas
"Under Milkwood" the finest poetic radio drama to be
written by the late Welsh poet, Dylan Thomas is the feature
presentation by the University of Washington Reader's Workshop noon today in the Auditorium.
In the opinion of Dr.  Earle'$—~ ~~— ■■r-
Birney, a member of UBC's
English Department and a foremost Canadian poet, who knew
him well, Thomas is the most
outstanding lyric poet of our
generation. He was well-known
not only as a poet and BBC
broadcaster, but also for his
public poetry readings acclaimed through Britain and North
America.
The Reader's Workshop has
made "Under Milkwood" its major and finest work to date. This
presentation will feature eleven
actors and four musicians; a soprano, cellist, bassoonist and percussion player.
The performance is under the
direction of Bernard J. Goldstein whose students are majoring in the oral interpretation of
literature. The group has given
many classic readings on the
Washington campus.
Today's program of "Under
Milkwood" is sponsored by the
Special Events committee and is
the first exchange feature to be
brought to UBC under the North
West College Association.
Through membership in this organization Special Events hope
to bring many such presentations
to the campus.
The drama begins today in
Ihe auditorium at 12:30 continuing until 2:30. Admission is 25c.
OUR PHOTOGRAPHER, when
assigned to cover groundhog
day, naturally hied himself
to Stanley Park, where
groundhogs are said to outnumber old-age pensioners
and penguins combined.
Selecting a large hole, the
photographer settled down to
wait. At 7.56 in the morning.
an animal emerged from the
hole, lept with a roar upon
the photographer, who snap-
this.
We doubt that it was really
a groundhog at all. A lemming, maybe. Page Two
THE    UBYSSEY
Wednesday, February 2, 1955
THE UBYSSEY
MEMBER, CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Authorized as second class mall, Post Office Dept., Ottawa.
Mail subscriptions $2,50 per year, Published in Vancouver throughout the university year by the Student Publications Board of the
Alma Mater Society, University of British Columbia. Editorial
opinions expressed herein are those of the editorial staff of The
Ubyssty, and not necessarily those of the Alma Mater Society or
the University. Business and advertising telephones are Alma 1280
or Alma 1231. Advertising Manager is Geoff Conway.
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF—PETER SYPNOWICH
Managing Editor—Ray Logie News  Editor—Rod Smith
Cjff Ifjitor—Jtan Whiteside Sports Editor—Ken Lamb
Copy 'Editor-—Stanley Beck       Executive Editor—Geoff Conway
Senior Editor—DOLORES BANERD
Desk and Reporters: Sandy Ross, Marie Stephen, Pat Russell,
Rusty McKenzie, Judy Thormahalen, Carol Gregory, Shelagh P.
Lindsey, Danny Goldsmith,
Sports: Bob Bergen, Peter Worthington, Neil Macdonald.
Unhealthy Govt.
Greek Letter Societies at present exert a force in student
government far beyond their numbers, and students should
be prepared to correct this situation in the coming elections.
With only one exception, this session's elected Student
Council consisted entirely of fraternity and sorority members—a 90 percent majority. Yet only 10 percent of students
on this campus belong to Greek letter societies.
It is true that the average Greek is more active in student
affairs than the non-Greek, but certainly not by a margin of
106 to one.
The strongest reason for so much Greek representation
on Student Council, however, is the fact that fraternity and
sorority members vote in a block, with few exceptions. If
tWo men—one Greek, the other not—are contesting a position, the word goes out among the fraternities and sororities,
and the Greek can be certain of a sure 400-odd votes.
This is not to say that non-Greeks should adopt the same
tactics, however. They should vote for whom they think is
the best candidate. Campaigns should not be divided into
Greeks versus non-Greeks.
But students should provide more "best" candidates who-
are not Greeks, and then they should turn out to the polls
in large number to support them.
The present stuation is unhealthy and intolerable.
A   Bigger   List
Fraternities are again endeavoring to enlist new members, and those who would join are now faced with an even
smaller number they might enter with a clear conscience.
Up to now, there have been three fraternities to boycott
the ground that their constitutions contain discriminatory
clauses:
SAYS   GERMAN   STUDENT:
German Rearmament To Secure Peace
AJ-PHA  TAT  OMICGA
KAPPA   SltiMA        SIGMA   ('III
They should be boycotted despite the fact that they con-
tewiHhe Clauses are dfthtf&Mef "by" international conventions,
and that they are trying to fight them at that level. For
these detestable clauses must remain the responsibility of
their possessors until they are either dropped or defied.
Now, however, even more fraternities must be placed on
the list beside the discriminatory trio. These are the fraternities with the "gentlemen's agreements" with their southern
chapters to maintain racial and religious discrimination.
Just how many and which fraternities have these agreements cannot be accurately determined—thanks partly to
the cover-up activities of Inter-Fraternity Council's sell-
appointed committee to investigate the agreements.
Nevertheless, the names of these fraternities are not that
closely-guarded secret. The prospective fraternity member
should be able to determine whether the fraternity of his
choice is guilty. It is his duty to do so. Then he must follow
his conscience.
GUEST   EDITORIAL
Tax Deal Unfortunate
From Thc Toronto Varsity
Thc recent announcement'from Ottawa that the Federal
Government was prepared to make a considerable concession
in its tax feud with Duplessis's Quebec has lessened the tension between these two governments. Prime Minister St.
Laurent stated that in future a deduction of up to 10 pet-
cent could be made from federal income taxes to offset provincial levies.
Previously, the limit had been 5 per cent, and Duplessis
and St. Laurent had carried on a running battle with such
epithets as "Little Caesar" and "Centralist" being hurled
back and forth between them.
Although this concession on the part of St. Laurent seems
to alleviate this battle, and will no doubt reassure many
Liberal French-Canadians as to the friendliness of the Liberal
regime to their culture, it may be an important and regretable
lurning point in Canadian history.
If the Federal Government had not made this concession
to the provincial-righters, it might have gained in time the
exclusive right to most tax fields. The voters of the Province
might have turned on.even so obsequious a leader as Premier
Duplessis if he insisted on imposing provincial taxes to add to
the federal levies, when an obvious way out would be to sign
a Dominion-Provincial Tax Agreement.
Thus tho Federal Government might well have extended
ils power and economic influence. And such an extension '
is needed, if Canada is ever to become one united and vigorous land A system of systematic aid to tfie poorer areas of
the land, a national health plan, a national economic plan
to cope with a major depression, a country-wide scheme for
civil defence—even a national scholarship scheme—may all
well have to wait unlit the day when the Federal Govern-;
merit's resources are larger and  its powers wider.
And thai clay has not been brought any closes by the
Prime-Minister's concession.
By FRANZ I. LEDERER
Frans Ledertr it a World
University Service exchange
student from Hamburg, Germany. He is studying chemistry at UBC.
The peculiarly exposed situation of the German Federal
Republic has caused a world
wide interest in the affairs of
this country. The latest controversy has arisen from the resolution of the London Conference which was followed by the
so-called Paris Treaties in October of last year. Due to these
agreements the long consider-
WritltL}HaH<t
UN Club Petitioned
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I propose that the campus
United Nations Club hold a
mock "emergency meeting" to
discuss Fir Eastern situations.
The club has proved lots of
times that in some ways it is
well ahead of the UN. For example, two years ago, it passed
a resolution to admit Red
China to the UN.
Unfortunately, nobody realized the importance of this humble resolution. As a result, the
world is only a few steps from
a world war—nay, I would call
it a "cosmic war."
I believe that not even a
million "emergency meetings"
could de-wing the Red "peace
doves" or the "Yankee eagle."
But if the representations from
Canada, U.S., Britain, the Soviet block, India, China and
Formosa attempt to explain
their cause in an unpolitical
manner, I think they could
clarify the situation much better than all the newspapers
combined.
—Aiine feejo
ed German Rearmament should
become a reality.
Whether the European integration should go as far as
to rearm Germany has been
discussed from various
points of view, but the most
embittered conflict between
those in favor and those contrary has been within the
country itself.
The politics of the German
coalitien parties in power, led
by Chancellor Adenauer's
Christian Democrats on one
side and the Social Democratic
opposition party on the other
side, coincide on one topic
which both groups have put
forth as their first principle:
that is, the preference that a
re-unification of West and East
Germany has in regard to all
other aims.
It is the confirmed opinion
of the Social Democrats, that to
tie-up the German Federal Republic in a Western Military
Alliance would induce, as a
consequence a similar reaction
in the East, making the gap
still wider and negotiations impossible,
The coalition parties argue,
however, that successful negotiations with Russia on the
basis of today are already impossible and that a new basis
would be one of strength show
ing Russia tho unity, and readiness of Western Europe to defend itself against further
Communist expansion,
In a recent article appearing in this newpaper it has
been written that Germans
want   unification   and   that
they could not be stopped to
use force to achieve it.   As
strong as the wish for unification may be, there is no
'willingness whatever among
Germans to use force to gain
it—beside,   this,  the writer
must have rather illusive imagination of the military potential of  48  million West
Germans to use arms against
a Russia of today.
The new German army will
be built upon the basis of conscription.   It is a well known
fact to the German Government that the young people
who will have to join the military service have no military
enthusiasm at all. In the past
years everything was done to,
destroy any kind of militarism
—if there was any left—and it
is an irony of history to see the
full success of these endeavors
in the most unsuitable moment.
Bearing in mind this feeling
of the people and the military'
reform plans Introduced by|
Federal Republic's Defence
Commissioner Blank, we should^
be confident in a favorable development which will not rc£
suit in a mere militarization,
but will strengthen and relrt*
force the democratic system ia
the country and will secure;
peace and freedom in Europe. •
CLASSIFIED
AUSTIN SALES AND SERVICE
(/CmSctcHzncSe
TIMTM tittf ALMA IT.      CUm tlOf
FOR RENT
2 SINGLE FURNISHED RMS
Light housekeeping, private
entrance, bath, nice view, one
block, 3 buses, shops. Ilth Ave.
West of Alma, $7 weekly. Ph.
AL. 0506M evenings.
*v *v *r
MALE STUDENT — FULL
board and room sharing laundry, near bus $55. Phone CE.
3689. Mrs. Watson.
*V *V *r
LOST
MONDAY AFTERNOON,
Electrical Engineering Bldg.
Girl's purse, containing glasses,
keys, etc. Return to lost and
found or phone YO. 1584, substantial   reward.
*V *r **tr
ETERNA WRISTWATCH
with steel expansion bracelet.
Lost outside Library if found
please contact Ross Peters AL.
3945. Reward.
GOLD SIGNET RING WITH
initials D. W. Contact Dennis
Webb at AL. 0071, or Hut 7,
Room 28. Fort Camp. Reward
offered.
*V *X* *T*
WANTED
GRADUATE AND POSTGRA-
duatc Students—Your work a
specialty with us. Also University typing of all kinds. Com
petent work, campus rates.
ELOISE STREET, AL 0655-R.
Just off the campus.
•F *r •**
TYPING,   MIMEOGRAPHING.
Electric     typewriter,     Carbon
paper and ribbons generously j
used.   Accurate work.   Mrs, F.!
M. Gow, 445H West 10th Ave
ALma 3682.
LAUNDRY PROBLEMS.' SEE
the Varsity Launderile. Up to;
9 lbs. completely processed for I
75c. Special .student rates for j
small lots. Across from Varsity ;
Theatre. AL. 2210. j
*r        *r        *r
RIDERS   WANTED   MONDAY
through   Saturday   8:30s   trom
Royal   Oik  and   Kingsway   via ;
Kingsway and 25lli Ave. Phone!
DE.   3815L.
NAVI YOU SEEN
THIS MAN?
YOU SHOULD! HE'S
DEANE LUNDY
who represents tht
NEW YORK LIFE
INSURANCE COMPANY
t '"ii1* n
We extend special services for Tuxedoes, White Dinner
Jackets and Tails ... at special Student Prices
831 Howe Street
PA. 7820
He has a modern, practical and taiy-te-own
lift insurance plan for
University of B.C.
STULENTS
For further information, call
DEANE LUNDY
587 Burraid St. MA. 7364
Same Day Service with no Extra Charge
at any of the
Shaujjhnessy Cleaners
Our Campus Office is conveniently located to serve you
* *
Dry Cleaning and up-to-date
Laundry Service
Free Delivery within the Gates
5766 University Blvd.
1 Block East of Empire Pool
AL. 0104
■. ,  +
I Applied and Pure Science
Graduates and Senior
Undergraduates
Investigate a Career in the Technical
Branches of the RCAF
• Thursday, February 3 12:30
Engineering 201
All welcome to a general meeting conducted by a
group of Senior RCAF Technical Officers.
• Thursday afternoon, Feb. 3,
Friday, February 4, all day,
Engineering 403
Personal interviews. Make appointment at meeting, or beforehand by phoning AL. 3404 or come
directly to Eng. 40.">.
Royal   Canadian   Air   Force WSehietfiay, FeBrtfary 2, 1955
TBft U&Y aSET
**v*m
mm .it.' i..»-—
MAMOOK MAM MAIMED
IN OCCUPATIONAL ACClMNT
A new twist on the "I only ran into a door knob" excuse for facial injuries turned up Wednesday.
A pretty Mamooks poster painter showed up with a
thick lip after a date with an unnamed Engineer.
"I rolled my nose up in the car window," she insisted.
■Ill        i "      ■»■*——■,'■.     1       Ul .   ■»MiW-«-_---------MM
BUILDING PUNS
(Continued from Page 1)
WHY ARE THESE two stalwart males battling to the
death, {or the love of the fair maiden? No sir! All we'll tell is
that Mussoc's annual production "Bonanza" will probably
reveal the cause, Watch this newspaper for further developments. —Brian Thomas Photo
Appreciative Audience
Lauds Symphony Debut
By MARIE STEPHEN
First concert appearance of the UBC Symphony was
greeted by a small but appreciative audience Monday night
in the auditorium.
Under the baton of conductor,
Mathys Abas, the symphony presented a versatile program of
su<*h favorites as Leroy Anderson's   "Blue  Tango."
Opening work of the evening
was light and vivacious "Promenade" by Anderson which set
the mood for the Pops night.
Guest artists included vocalists
Jake Duerksen and Rose Novak.
Miss Novak showed genuine ability in her rendition of an aria
talents in the popular duet "Tea
for Two."
One of the highlights of the
evening was. an appearance by
the Extension Choir. This fine
vocal group was at times truly
moving in a selection of spirituals and folk songs.
The latter half of the program
consisted of "Rhapsody in Blue"
featuring Vancouver pianist Norma Abernathy. Miss Abernathy
was enthusiastically received for
her interpretation of Gershwin's
jazz classic.
The orchestra was at its best
in solo numbers such as Morton
Gould's 'Pavanne." Conductor
Abas exerted firm command
over his group throughout the
concert.
The' orchestra has a small
though talented brass and woodwind section with flutist Jean
Murphy outstanding among the
musicians.
The violin section needs attention, however, partly because
it is not large enough to compete with the horn and wind
instruments and partly because
it has not enough experienced
players.
It is difficult to criticize the
group, without considering the
handicaps under which they
work.
Until better facilities are provided and an effort is made to
coordinate the orchestra under
thc music department, campus
musicians will probably continue
to withhold their fullest support.
Society Asks
More Money
Vancouver Symphony has so
far raised $24,000 towards meeting its l«>54-f).r> deficit, Robert
Philips. Business Manager, declared Thursday.
Mr. Philips, in an appeal for
funds, stated Unit $33,001) is yet
to be raised before the plans
for next season can be completed. He asked radio listenrs
who at present support the symphony in heart to do also in
kind.
In conclusion he added,
"Every dona! ion, however modest, means a step towards the
certainty that the ureal work
Irwin Hoffman and the orchestra are doing will go on Kach
dollar ue receive is one more
vole   of   confidence."
Contrary to popular belief,
Old Moosehead Ale, very popular in Eastern Canada, is not
made  from  mooseheads.
The ant is human in a number
of ways. For instance, he keeps
cows, and milks them from time
to time,
Government grant for completion. This is a new Home Management Building, where fourth
year Home Economics students
live for two weeks of the year,
and apply in practice what they
have learned in classes.
The new building would be situated on the corner of Wesbrook Crescent and University
Boulevard, and would replace
the present little-known and inadequate army hut in Fort Camp.
FUNDS RAISED
The necessary funds have already been raised, and all plans
are complete. "We would start
tomorrow, if we could," says
Miss M. Black,, head of the
School.
The *if" in this case is due
to ignorance of the Socred Government's plans for administering the Endowment Lands. When
assurance is obtained, construction will begin.
NEW WINfl PROPOSED
An addition to the Adminis
tration Building, probably at
the rear, was announced Monday. The new wing would pro
Vide increased office space, and
also house the campus branch
oi the Bank of Montreal, at present situated in the Auditorium.
In the same breath, the University announced plans for a
new bookstore, to be placed behind the bus-stop near the Engineering Building. Cost is estimated by AMS president Dick
Underhill at about $70,000. "This
UNIVERSITV BOOK STORE
Hrs. 9 a.m. • 5 p.m.  Sat. 9 a.m. to Noon
Loose-Leaf Note Books, Exercise Books and Scribblers,
Graphic Engineering Paper, Biology Paper, Loose-leaf
Refills, Fountain Pens and Ink and Drawing Instruments
Owned and Operated by
The University of B.C
Tfie Da/ Be9?ns "DFv/Tnel/ {
Orion
... light as a feather ...
soft as tho softest cashmere ...th
an exciting bouquet of new colour!
.. . Apricot, Hclio, Charcoal, Olive
Green, Chamois, Chartreuse, as well
as twelve other fashion colours.
Full-fashioned, hand-finished,
shrink-proof, moth-proof ... Ond SO
simple to care fori
At good shops' everywhere.
$6.95, $7.95, $8.95.
» <U£NAY&
is only a guess, however," he
said. %
POOL QUESTION
The controversial swimming
pool question will probably lead
to construction, but students
must make their choice at an
AMS General Meeting on St.
Patrick's Day.
If the students decide to build
in one of two ways, construction would start immediately.
Also in the initial planning
stages by Students' Council is
a new wing on Brock Hall, which
would house student club room
facilities.
Costing in the neighborhood
of $50,000, construction could
not start until 1987, when students finish paying for ihe Gymnasium.
The synod of the Presbyterian
Church of Canada has almost
raised the $200,000 necessary to
construct another Theological
College on the campus. Actual
construction has not yet reached
the planning stage, however.
A new International House,
costing $190,000, and located at
Wesbrook Crescent and University Boulevard will be built by
the Rotary International, when
negotiations are completd.
Other building plans, of a
more minor nature, ahd in only
the earliest planning stages include: a new wing on the library, a Catholic Theological
College, and improvements to
the University's heating system.
New Society Formed
For   Extra-Literate
A new society for the extra-literate is in fox mat ion <ffl
campus.
Intended for first and second year students keen 6n th*
• **■■    •"* '■"     -     .■.'♦TV   t-.i  .r__w
study of literature, the Club, as yet unnamed, has aired
attracted a hard core ot some 30 enthusiasts.
"Enthusiastic!" bubbled one,
in literary style, 'I'm just jumping!"
For a yearly fee of 78c members will have the chance to discuss anything not on the University curriculum — topics come
from the floor—at the monthly
meetings.
In addition to expounding
their views in a ten-minute talk
sometime during the year, members will have the opportunity
of submitting their own writing
to the criticism of their colleagues.
A constitution drafted and an
AMS budget secured, plans may
include a literary magazine.
The only, qualifications for
membership are a fair ability at
and a fanatic interest in English.
Nd 'dead-wood' wanted—everyone must participate.
A. E. Housman, his life history
and philosophy, his poetry and
criticism of it, will be the general topic of Thursday's semi-
organizational meeting, 8;00 in
the Faculty Club Lounge.
JHBH_____B__MB«MBHH_«_____
*•«
Applications forms for tttti
$290 Canadian Women's MM
Club scholarship are now MiV
able in the office of Dean 0*1
Room 10 in the Adminlitra'W
building.
Deadline for application* It
February 23, and appllotiltM.
forms must be accompihidOy
a brief autobiographical sfttfch;
an outline of interests and *x<
perience, and samples of Jdutti*
alistlc work.
All applicants will be interviewed by the scholarship coffi*
mittee.
Examples of work may. Ml
news stories, radio scripts, editorials, short stories and ottef
writings. ' ,'' '•
Last year's winner was Mil*
Helen Ann Donnelly, Arts 4, who
has recently become engaged lo
Mr. Jack Hutchinson of football
fame.
CAMPBI(.L
CLIANIM
Across from Varsity Theatre
AL. 2410
Discount for Students
DR. JOHN I. RqSEBOROUCH
announces the opening of his office
at
2130 Western Parkway
(behind Bank of Commerce)
For the Practice of Dentistry
Phone: Offic. AL. 3980 Residence AL. 3996-L
33
, r«*
■•g '■•'
222_20
SMART CQRSAGIS
as convenient as Your Telephone
Phone CH. 7433 Phone Cff. M
May h*w - Sherwood
FLOWERS LTD.
Delivered anywhere, C.O.D. or charge, Broadway it AlfWi
GIVE YOURSELF ROOM TO GROW..»
WITH THIS NATION-WIDE COMPANY!,
Procter & Gamble
of Canada Limited,
etffeti ?6tt an attractive management career
ivith one of Canada's largest manufacture^ ... and
its leading advertiser I
Tide, Cam_y, Ivory, Joy, Crisco, Cheer, Spfc and Span'*. . . these* are h«iis6h#td
words across Canada. They are just a few of the many nationally advertised
products of the Procter & Gamble Company of Canada, Limited.
P&G is expanding steadily, through increasing demand for its many brands, and
through the addition oT netf products. This constant growth creates niiw oppW*
.unities for aggressive young men-selected from within the orgSnizatiotf—(4
Win new advancement and executive responsibility in the Company.
Your Future May Be With P«;G
YOU can build a successful career in the management of this nation-wide
organization ... a career that offers thorough training—financial" reward—tK#*
opportunity to more ahead on your mm ability.
Right now, openings are available for university-trained men who will h_v#
degrees in Arts, Commerce, Law, Engineering or Chemistry.
We offer yon interesting careers in such important activities as ADVERTISING,
SALES MANAGEMENT, BUYING, OFFICE MANAGEMENT and FINANCE.
How to Plan Your Career with P&G
We invite you to see for yourself how Procter A Gamble can open broad nvemwe
of career opportunity to you. You may make arrangements for an immediate i_|.
Jtcrvicw with a P&G representative, by contacting ...
Gol. J. F. Maclean- Director of Personnel Service!
University of British Columbia
INTERVIEWS TO BE HELD
Monday and Tuesday, February 7th and 8th
Tbe Procter & {Gamble Company of Canada, Limited Page Four
THE   UBYSSEY
Wednesday, February 2, 1955
EASY  DOES  IT,   CHAPS
TAXING   IT   EASY   for   a
change, Thunderbird soccer
stars Ernie Kuyt, goal; Stan
Glasgow, outside, and close-
up Man Bruce Ashdown play
patsy-foot in preparation  for when these same three gentle-
Sunday's tiff with Dominion men hook up with the other
Hotel. Needless to say (then eight  to play  the last place
why the hell do we say  it) Hotelmen.
things will be a bit tougher -—Brian Thomas Photo
Pugilsts
Start
Training
By PETE WORTHINGTON
In approximately one month's
time the finals for the Intermural boxing championships of
UBC will be fought.
This annual event is Varsity's
sole contribution to the gentle
art of fistiana, and everything
from cool, calculating competence to heated, hectic hysteria
will be on display at these
championship tiffs.
Entries, which close February
23, are broken into two main
categories—junior and Senior
classes. Junior class cbnsists of
those individuals who have never before fought competively, or
won intramural titles. Senior
class or "open," includes past
Varsity "champs," plus those
with Golden Glove, or outside
amateur experience.
HELPS   SAFETY
This helps ensure the safety
angle, and avoids the misfortune of over-matches. An added
feature will be the absolute power of the referee to stop any mismatched bout and declare that
a contestant shall compete in a
higher or lower category. That
is, Jr. or Sr. of his own weight
class.
Eliminations will be held from
February 28th to March 4, with
finals of all weights due to be
held sometime around the 10th.
General training hints and
aids have been mimeographed
by the Phys. Ed. Dept., and arc-
available for the asking at the
gym. Also Don Coryell, former
U. of Washington light-heavy,
will be available to coach any
and all, regardless of experience,
on Mondays and Wednesdays at
3:30 p.m. in the boxing room of
the gym.
ALL INTERESTED
All interested in winning coveted Varsity boxing titles and
trophies, are advised to commence training at once, if not
sooner. Start by obseening tobacco: ostracising "Caf" coffee; restraining the girl-friend. Sing
bawdy songs in the shower as
well.
Weight divisions are as follows, (maximum weight,shown):
Bantam 119; feather 125; light
132: light-welter 1,'U); welter 147:
light-middle tn<>; middle 165; lt-
heavv 17K: hcnvv "
Sporti Editor—KEN LAMB
Columns   Unlimited
Dribblings  From
Over  The  Hills
By KEN LAMB
With Coley Hall and fellow proprietors having refused ice to
the Northwest Amateur Hockey League, of which UBC happens
to be a member, there is not a heck of a lot of point in looking
about this page for information to the Birds' success last night.
So, stick with it for a few more lines and learn some of those
gossipy items that have filtered their way back from over the
snow-capped Rockies.
It seems, according to the Birds' hockey team, who upheld
clear old UBC's honor fairly well in Edmonton, that a good time
was had by all. The frats were very obliging, the accommodation
was good, and there was a party Saturday night. It was quite a
party.
ANYONE GOT THE TIME?
But it would also seem all the jam was to make up for thc dill
pickle the Birds were handed when they stepped on the ice.
First of all the goal judges. These were up and coming young
lads of 14, with an affinity for flashing the red light behind the
UBC goal every time a Golden Bear hunched his shoulder. At
least so the spies say.
Now it could be these 14 year olds were clever little chappies,
■and it's a well known fact that prairie infants cut their teeth on
a puck and thus know a bit about the game. But the time-keeper,
so they say, freely admitted after the series that he'd never run
a time clock before.
And we believe him. It took 58 minutes to play the first period
Friday night. Saturday, each period was ten seconds too long.
PARDON US WHILE WE KICK
Furthermore, the Alberta lads scored in each of those ten
second appendages. It doesn't need too much arithmetical acumen
to read the final score had the time been on his toes.
However, that's the breaks, of which UBC did not have too
many.
One word of caution though. If that time-keeper commits errors
like that when thc Birds basketball team ambles eastward to meet
the court version of the Golden Bears, Alberta will find itself on
the wrong end of a rather large score.
Birds seem to be as good as the basketball team that clipped '.he
Lucht-led Bears last year at UBC. That was when the Bears had
run up a long string of victories by beating everything on the
prairies that passes for a basketball team. This year Alberta has
a won three, lost five record, which as one of their sports writers
says isn't conductive to good baskeball.
The Bears no longer have Ed Lucht. He and their number two
man, Don MacKintosh, are playing for the Edmonton Town
Mailers, an organization with its sights set on the Canadian Amateur championships, Olympics and other silverware.
As a good start, they beat the Golden Bears 84-49 a few nights
back.
JAYVEES PLAY CLOVERDALE
TONIGHT AT LORD BYNG
Dick Penn's Jayvees, struggling lo keep ahead of the
upstart Cloverdale basketball team that scrambled closer
to third place Tuesday with a surprise win over second
place Adanacs, will meet those same Cloverdale lads tonight at Lord Byng gym. Time 7:45.
What with spring com ing upon us with leaps and
bounds, and 1'luiey miles, ennuuissioner Norm dloag has announced plnyolT dales. Opening elimination fun will commence February I'i.   Four learns will lake part.
Browse at
PEOPLE'S CO-OP
BOOK STORE
337 V* Pender
BEST IN BOOKS
AQUA  ROOM
for  private   parties,   dinner
meetings, banquets, etc.
al   the
Dog House Cabaret and
Drive-In to. Ltd.
1601 W. Broadway     BA. 1310
Braves Beat Kivans
For Semis Berth
.<?>
INVASION   TICKETS
ALMOST SOLD OUT
Tickets for the return bus
trip Saturday night to Bellingham, currently selling for
$2.50 in the AMS office and
gym are almost sold out.
Students planning to go art-
asked to buy tickets as soon
as possible so more buses can
be hired.
Birds will play Western
Washington   Vikings.
Women
Netball
Team
WinsOne
The women's advent into the
volleyball field suffered only
mild success over the weekend,
but the girls showed promise
of becoming a bit better.
Playing the netball game under rules strange to the masculine athletes (note the scores),
the girls lost three of four games
on their travelling jaunt. They
were playing as a team for the
first time.
LOST TWICE
Varsity lost to CPS 31-10 and
to Everett Junior College, 32-27.
They beat Centralia Junior College 55-19.
The UBC team lost to' Victoria
66-46.
The grasshockey team was
having a better time of it meanwhile. Continuing their domination of every female grassball
team, the girls beat the Alumni
5-0.
Students
In Tourney
Six UBC students- will travel
to Victoria today to play in the
Provincial Badminton Championships.
The girls making the trip are:
Mary Jane Lewis, defending B.C.
Junior champ, Joan Von Acker-
an, past Jr. champion, and Car
Warren, former Canadian Junior Champion.
Boys going will be Pete God-
fPey, Chuck Forbers, and Tom
Meredith.
10th   AVENUE
B. A. SERVICE
10th Ave. & Discovery
GORDIE McCORQUODALE
JACK McCOLL
AL.   1136
FRANCES MURPHY
DANCE SCHOOL
BAyvLw 3425
Private Instruction
Rhumba - Tango - Samba
Fox Trot - Waltz - Jive
Old Time
Beginners • Brush Up
Advanced Courses
If no answer CEdar 6878
Alma Hall. 3878 W. Broadway
Kenyon's   Zonemen
Control   Shotmaking
Braves 58 • Kivans 50
UBC's basketballing Braves won their first 1955 game
Tuesday night at King Ed gym, and they did it just in time" to
grab a berth in the playoffs.     *	
They  beat Kivan   58-50  and
start   a   three   game   semi-final
series  with   the   strong   YMCA
club next week.
ZONE   DEFENSE
Coach Gerry Kenyon employed a zone defense for this game
and it payed off. With the great
rebound controlling of Russ
Langhout (17 points), Dave Horton, and Ron Johnston, urged
by the occasional yell from manager Frank McTaggart, the
Braves held down the sharp
shooting Kivans.
Braves held a first quarter
lead of 17-7, and though Kivans
had cut the half time lead to
eight points, Braves never had to
look back.
DIFFERENT  TEAM
They were a completely different team from the outfit that
gave YMCA 23 points on largely
unnecessary fouls Saturday
night. The Y couldn't miss from
the free throw line and the free
gratis points were one short of
the point margin by which they
beat  the Braves.
But Tuesday UBC decided to
play basketball and the idea
payed off. Gary Hill and Horton
followed the high shooting Langhout with 14 and 12 points respectively.
LONG JAUNT
Braves wil make a weekend
three game trip to the Island
to warm up for their semi-finals.
Friday night they play Victoria
Normal School, Saturday afternoon, Royal Roads, and Saturday night, Vic College.
Which is quite a warm-up.
BALLS TO BOUNCE,
SOCKS TO Stllff
It seems there will be a
basketball game and dance
Friday night in the gymnasium. UBC and Western Washington Vikings will play basketball, and the Campus Coolsters, and assorted hundreds of
sock clad couples will play
dancing.
Tickets will be 50 cents per
head, or $6 a dozen. To see
people on the campus you
haven't seen for months, come
to the party.
38 YEARS OF SERVICE
TO THE UNIVERSITY OF
BRITISH COLUMIIA.
ITS FRATERNITIES
AND SORORITIES.
THERE'S A REASON
DiSiiNCiwE
PUNNING
i
II II I' M o N
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i .  o i /1
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Vancouver, B.C.
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The combined B. Comm - C. A. Course aptitude
test. If your scholastic record is acceptable you
may take these non-technical tests FREE OF
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DETAILS FROM:
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602 Stock Exchange Building
PA.  3624
NOW!
YOUR HOWT BACK
A BRAND NEW SUN UFt PLAN WHICIfc
1
2
65.
Ventured five* to 65.
b avaflabU for mate and
li¥M ag« 15 to 50.
At 65, ihe funds con be (a) taken Is cosh} (b) meed to pavchaM
a paid-up polky for the original sum assured and the balance
taken in cash or as guaranteed income; (c) used to provide an
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hejvtre new about ihu remarkable
mem Sum Life plan, hut cad ar m*me$,
JIM BRANDON
JACK PEARSON
LARRY WRIGHT
6th Fluor, Royal Bank Building
PA. 5321
SUN LIFE OF CANADA

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