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The Ubyssey Nov 8, 1938

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 VARSITY vs.
VANOOUVER REI»
First McKechnie Oup Game
of the year
BROOKTON POINT
FRIDAY AT 2.45
Published Twice Weekly by The Publications Board of The University of British Columbia
VARSITY vs.
KNIGHTS  OF  COLUMBUS
Big- Four League Game
STADIUM
FRIDAY AT 2.30
Vol. XXI.
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1938
No. 14
NOTICES
Tuesday
Carnegie  Recordings,   Arts   103,
12.40.
V.C.U.   leoture,   Arts   200,   12.4S.
Wednesday
Cosmopolitan Club International
tea  In Women's Lower  Common room, 8.00-6.00.
English Rugby dinner, Caf., 80c,
after practice.
Monroe   Fre-Med   dinner,   Caf.,
6.00.
Outdoor   Club   meeting,   Ap.So.
287, 12.80.
Friday
Cosmopolitan   Club   hike,   Weat
Van. ferry, 0.00 a.m.
V.C.U.  Banquet,   Stanley   Park
pavilion, 6 p.m.
Saturday
V.C.U. and  I.S.C.F.  rally,  King
Ed.  High aud., 7.80 p.m.
Sunday
Cosmopolitan     Club     regular
monthly gathering.
V.O.U. fireside,  1025 W. 12, 8.80
p.m.
V.C.U.   evening    service,   Flrat
Bap tint Churoh.
S.CJH. regular weekly program,
(held In Auditorium 812,  unless otherwise stated).
Monday
New Testament, 12.30.
Tuesday
Psychology and Life, 11.80.
Vesper  Service,  4.80,   In   Union
Chapel.
Social Adjustment, 1.80.
Wednesday
Contemporary Leadership, 12.30.
Social Adjustment  (Freshettes)
1-SO.
Thursday
College   Problems,   12.30;    Dean
Bollert's  Office.
Friday
Social Reconstruction,  12.30.
Notice:  Next week  "Protestant
Belief"   on   We.* lesday,   and
will   alternate .with   "Contemporary Leadership."
MUSICAL  SOCIETY
REHEARSING FOR
SPRING PRODUCTION
Now that rehearsals have been going on for almost two weeks, work
on the Musical Society's new operetta. "Serenade," is beginning to take
a more polished form. Complete
scores and orchestrations have arrived, and are now be'ng revised and
adjusted to Society requirements by
Mr. Williams, who is in charge of
musical arrangements.
TRY-OUT  APPOINTMENTS
Try-outs for principal   parts   In
this year's production are now taking plaee, and all those Interested
are urged to make an appointment
for an  audition  immediately with
Mr.   Williams   or   Honor   Vincent,
production manager.
The   schedule   of   rehearsals    that
has   been   drawn   up    Is    as    follows:
Monday  noon,  Ap.  Science  100, men;
Tues.   noon,   Ap.    Sc.    100,    women ;
Wed.    noon,    Ap.     Sc.   100,     strings ;
Thurs.,     Aud.     207,    woodwinds    and
brass;  Fri.   noon, Ap.  Sc.  100,  ensemble   and   o'rchestra;   Sat.   noon,   auditorium,  no  orchestra.
EATS,   DANCING,
SONOS,   TONIGHT
Another of the successful Society
suppers will be held tonight (Tuesday) in the cafeteria, followed by
dancing, singing and other capers on
the stage. All members are requested to be present as details of the progress of the opera will he revealed.
NEW VOICES WANTED
FOR  VARSITY  TIME
Students in charge of "Varsity
Time" are launching a drive for new
voices. They Intend to audition
every ono on the campus, starting
immediately.
The   campus   studio   In   room   G.
on   the   top   floor    of      the     Aggie
Building   will   be   open   every   noon
hour   this   week,   In   order   that    as
many    voices   as   possible   may   ht>
tested.
Yon  niiiy  have tho voice that "Varsity   Time"   is   looking   (or   listening)
for,   so   make   a   point   of   visiting   tho
studio sometime  tills  week.
GRAMOI'IIONIC
VISIT   ROOM   G
"Varsity Time" ls also soarchln_v
for gramophone records of any and
nil descriptions. It' you have ti few
good records whieh you can spare,
get in touch with Harry Campbell in
the Pub. or  at the studio.
OPERA-GOING
HABIT FILM
CLUB'S IDEA
SATURDAY  CONCERTS
INAUGURATED
The Film Society has announced
Its Intention of presenting a series of
operatic concerts in the Auditorium
Saturday mornings. The first of
these will be given November 12 and
will start at 10.45 a.m.
THAT   OPERA-OOINO   HABIT
These concerts will be given until
the regular Metropolitan opera
broadcasts begin. Chief reason for
the presentations is to create the
opera-going habit among students.
This Is seconded by the desire to Increase the appreciation on the campus by gathering In the outer fringe
of students who are on the verge of
appreciating good music.
THREE  PRESENTATIONS
It la expected that there will   bo
three   of   these   presentations,   beginning with selections from light
operettas   by   Victor   Herbert,   Slg-
mund Romberg and Rudolf Frlml.
These will be followed by program
consisting of music from Porgy and
Bess   by   Oeorge   Gershwin   and   the
first act of Die Walkure by Wagner.
The  third  program will  probably be
Orfeo   et   Eurdylce    by    Oluck    and
Pelleas and Melisande by Debussy.
DR. WILLIAMS SPEAKS
ON BIRDS ANCIENT
AND MODERN
Dr. M. Y. Williams, head of the
U.B.C. department of Geology, speaking before the Vancouver Institute
In the University theatre Saturday
night gave an interesting and illuminating address on the subject,
"Birds, Ancient and Modern."1
INDISCRIMINATE KILLING
OF PREDATORY BIRDS
He laid paitlcular stress on the
Indiscriminate killing of many predatory birds such as hawks, owls,
eagles and osprey which do far more
good than harm. While these birds
do occasionally raid chicken yards,
lt is the exception rather than the
rule.
This is far outweighted by their
killing of the weaker birds ln the
game flocks, doing away with the
weak and diseased ones. Their value
to the farm is inestimable. They
destroy insects and larva which
would otherwise -work great havoc
on the crops. This has been evidenced in regions where hunters have
Indiscriminately shot them ln the
mistaken idea that they were useless.
COLORED SLIDES
ILLUSTRATING   LECTURE
Dr. Williams illustrated his lecture with colored slides ranging from
the prehistoric birds, larger than
our ostrich, with teeth and quite fully developed members, down to the
present species of our Canadian
woods  and  streams.
He said that in Canada and the
United States alone there were 735
species.
LOCALE OF CARNEGIE
CONCERi IS CHANGED
Owing to a previous reservation,
today's Carnegie recital presenting
The Symphony No. 2 in D Major by
Jean Sibelius has been moved to Arts
103. It will begin at 12:40 sharp.
On Thursday, November 10, there
will be a special record recital designed to create n partial familiarity
with next Sunday's program of the
Vancouver Symphony Orchestra. The
recital will feature Till Enlenspiegel's
Merry Pranks. "In the Old Roguish
Style. In Rondo Form." by Richard
Strauss, and will end with a few selections from the "Enigma" Variations
on an Original Theme by Sir Ed-
vard   Elgar.   Arts   100  at   12.40.
NOTICE
TO
STUDENTS
Friday,
Nove
mbcr   11th,   has
heen   proclalme
1   Remembrance
Day.    The
Uni
vcrslty    will    be
closed   on
that
day.
L.
S.   KLINCK,
President.
A-TISKET A-TASKET
BROCK MEMORIAL CAMPAIGN
RECEIVES ANOTHER SETBACK
"Prof" Orchard
Tightens Up On
Dumb  Drivers
"Professor" W. Orchard has Issued
an ultimatum for drivers.
There will be no more checking up
of speed zones, stop signs, or hand
signals.
Instead, erring motorists will be
presented tickets—In other words
'pinched*. In this fashion, he hopes
to look after the safety of other
people.
"Anyone who does not co-operate
and abide by all the rules and regulations will be pinched," said the
Provincial representative. "I have
no other alternative."
SOME   DRIVERS  ARE  DUMB.
"Students as a whole," Const. Orchard added, "are good, but there ls
the odd dumb driver."
—Photo by Ted Underhiil
MOO! . . . and the music went round and round. The Campbell's V
comin', and so is the Arts-Aggie. Herein displayed you see Barrel Braldwood, voeal President of the Artsmen's Undergrad. Society, In a little
eholr practice with Rosalind, the Aggie priae pet of the common-room,
while Jack Orey, president of the Aggies, winds up on the trumpet to
Join In the chorus preparatory to the coming Commodore razzle-dazzle
on November 17.
LAVAL STUDENTS OPPOSED
TO CONSCRIPTION BY LAW
MASS DEMONSTRATION IN QUEBEC OPPOSES CANADIAN
PARTICIPATION IN BUROPEAN WARS
By M. N. DAVIES, Speolal Correspondent
QUEBEC CITY, Nov. 7 (CUP)—Conscription Law and Canadian participation in European wars was emphatically opposed
in a mass demonstration of the student body of Laval University
here Saturday night. Speaking in the Palais Montcalm before a
crowd of 1500 students and Quobec citizens, more than n dozen
speakers from three universities Stressed the necessity of absolute
neutrality of Canada and the pressing need for a Canadian foreign
policy defined by the Canadian Parliament.
The following resolution was pnssed: "Students of Laval
University declare themselves opposed to all Canadian participation in European wars and demand that the Canadian government
declare officially the absolute neutrality of Canada. Students of
Laval demand the repeal of the conscription law still in the statutes-. The students of Laval demand that the Canadian government proclaim a national holiday for December 11th of each year
on  tlie anniversary  of  the  passing of the  Westminster  Statute."
■STUDENTS OPPOSE
PARTICIPATION IN WAR.
Speakers stressed the fact that
there was three thousand miles of
ocean as Canada's safeguard ln case
of war and that even If attacked, the
United States will defend Canada as
Roosevelt said last summer. The
British Oovernment has no right to
influence Canada, as this country ls
equal with England. Students refuse
to fight ln an Imperial war not of
Interest to Canada as Canada is no
longer a British Colony, or a Dominion, but an autonomous country tn
the British Commonwealth of Nations," they said, "and if they must
die young, students prefer to die on
Canadian soil."
CANADA FIOHTS FOR
CANADA  ONLY.
"Laval students desire peace and
a foreign policy essentially Canadian.
We will not fight for anybody except
Canada," said Jean Beaudoin. „
Lloyd Mackeen, unofficial delegate
from McOlll, said: "The majority of
English-Canadian youth oppose Canadian participation ln an Imperialistic war but we must distinguish
three viewpoints, one, isolationist,
two, the group, ln favour of collective
security against aggressor nations,
p.nd finally, we have a small Imperialistic group."
REGIONAL CONFERENCE
SUGGESTED.
The meeting recommended a regional conference for English and
French students to discuss common
Interests, and, as students and Canadians, to discuss Canada's position in
case of  war.
Daniel Johnson, president of the
student society of the University of
Montreal, declared: "Students of the
University of Montreal are proud to
congratulate students of Laval on
this undertaking which they have
dared at this opportune moment. The
speakers tonight have over-ridden
petty politics. I think English speaking Canadian University students are
with us at heart, and we students of
tlie University of Montreal are with
you 'en plein coeur'." he stated.
NO UTOPIAN IDEAS.
(      The speech of Marcel Carbotte was
ENGINEERING HEAD
TO SPEAK TONIGHT
J. B. Challles, L.L.D., M.E.I.C,
president of the Engineering Institute of Canada, will address the next
meeting of the Vancouver Branch of
the E.I.C. at the Aztec Room of the
Hotel Oeorgla tonight at 8.30.
STATUS  OF THE ENGINEER.
He will speak on "The Status of
tlie   Engineer."
Mr. Fred Newell and Mr. L. Austin
Wright who have accompanied Dr.
Challles to Vancouver, will also address  the  meeting.
The public and especially engineers
are cordially invited. Refreshments
will be served.
STOP PRESS
S-ilurd
game wii
when   Ih
;iy s (
s disa
•   Mig
'auadiaii 'football
Mowed lasl night
Knur   League   ac
cepted   Varsity's  protest.
The game will  be replayed under a new schedule.
Memorial  Committee  Seeking  Permission
Construct Semi-Permanent Building
to
By JAOK MAIR
The student campaign for the construction of a unit of the
Brock Memorial Union Building received another setback when
the opinion was expressed by the Brock Memorial Committee, at
a special meeting last night, that it is very doubtful if the Board
of Covernors will grant the $25,000 for the Memorial.
CANNOT CHANGE BUDGET
It was disclosed that, under two sections of the University
Aot, it is impossible for the Board to change their budget
without the approval of the Lieutenant Governor-in-Oounoil.
However,  the Committee  added its support   to   tho   student
petition, by suggesting that the Board make the grant.
 ■ SBM1-PS.RMANE.NT BUILDING
The suggestion was also put for-
200 STUDENTS
UNABLE TO
ATTEND U.B.C.
A.M.S. DETERMINED TO
PROVIDE      NEEDED
ACCOMMODATION
In a brief address given at the
Cairn Ceremony, last Friday, Carson
McOulre, president of the Alma Mater Society, expressed the determination of the Student Council to provide for adequate accommodation
and instruction of every student In
this uplverslty.
The first part of McOulre's address,
which -was delivered before about a
hundred students, was a summary of
past events ln the Student Campaign.
MUST reduce; fees
Highlights of the address were
the statements that: "The only
possible solution to the fee raise,
which, based on statistics of increases during the paat years, has
prevented between 800 and 300 students from attending the University thla year, is for the Government
to mako a special grant for the
present year which will permit the
Board of Governors to reduce the
January fee payments by $28.00"
and that: "The Alma Mater Society is determined that the University of British Columbia must provide the accommodation and adequate instruction to every qualified young person In thla province."
(Continued on Page Three)
See LAVAL
U. B. C. PROFESSORS
ADDRESS ANNUAL
PEACE CONFERENCE
The   annual   Peace   Conference   of
the    League    of    Nations    Society    of
Canada,  the  Vancouver  Branch  will
be  held Saturday,  November 12, 1038.
DR. W. I. JENNINGS TO SPEAK
The   program   will   start   with   a
luncheon   ln   the   ballroom   of   the
Hotel    Georgia    at    12:30    p.m.    at
which Dr. W. Ivor Jennings, of the
University   of  London   and   at   present   visiting   profsesor   at   U.B.C.
will speak. He will take as h!s subject "The Future of the League of
Nations."
The afternoon session beginning at
2:15   at   the    same   hotel    features   a
lecture   by   Dr.   A.   F.   B.    Clark   entitled   "Twenty  Yeara  After."
PROFESSOR SOWARD AT U.B.C.
At 8:00 p.m. In the auditorium of
The University of British Columbia
the conference will continue with an
address by Professor F. H. Soward
of the Department of History, "The
Outlook   in  International  Affairs."
"NO DECISION" IS
LAW DEBATE RESULT
It was impossible to come to a decision at the recent Law Society de-
hate on the question "Should lawyers
engage in  politics."
After   heated   and   lively   <1Ihcuh-
slon by both the affirmative under
Deluny,    and    the    negative    under
Davis, It was decided that the lawyer   should   use   hist   own   personal
discretion on  the question.
"Future   plans   of   the   Law  Society
Include   a   mock   trial   which   will   be
of great interest to tho student body
as   a   whole,"   stated   Bernard   Reed,
president of the society.
ward  that  permission  be  granted
to build a semi-permanent building;
similar In construction to the Arta
and Auditorium buildings.
The    Committee    then    authorlased
Itself to go ahead with the construction of such a building when and If
the Board gives Us permission.
Reviewing   the   Memorial   flnan
ces„   tbe  Committee   reported   the
fund to date to be something over
940,000 in cash and bonds on hand.
Additional  funds,  placed  and  collective,  will bring the sum to approximately $03,000, which together
with the 90,000 voted by the Aim*
Mater  Sooiety  on  Ootober  8th of
this year bring the total available
fund to about 988,000.
The   finances   are   actually  In  the
handa of General  Odium   and   Miss
Jamieson of the Board of Governors,
it was disclosed at the meeting.
Evan apRoberts and Carson McOulre represented the Alma Mater
Society at the meeting last night.
UNIVERSITY WOMEN TO
HAVE TWO NEW
SCHOLARSHIPS
Two   associations     for    University
Women  are each  offering a scholarship open for women only.
TRAVELLING   SCHOLARSHIP
The Confederation of University
Women ls starting a travelling scholarship of $1200 which ts open to all
women holding a degree from a Canadian University. The award ls
based on character, Intellectual
achievement and promise. Preference
will be given to those candidates
who have completed one or more
years of graduate work with a definite course of study or research ln
view. As far as possible the principle of granting the scholarship alternately to students engaged ln scientific research and those engaged
in literary, history or philosophical
studies, will be observed.
STUDENTS IN SCIENTIFIC
RESEARCH   PREFERRED
Tho American Association of University Women is offering an international fellowship of $1500. This
will enable the holder to carry on a
year's research in some country other than her own daring the academic
year 1939-40. In this scholarship
preference will be given to students
engaged in scientific research. Candidates have published the results
of previous independent research
work.
PLAYER'S CLUB
INAUGURATES PLAY
READING  GROUPS
Inaugurating a brief series of play-
reading groups, the Players' Club
will audition two of the plays submitted for tho Club prize tomorrow
at  3.30  in  Arts  100.
Wednesday's program will consist
of two plays, "Graham Wafers" by
Bob McDougall and Pat Keatley;
and "That Dumb Douk" by Norman
Beattie. Both are one-act comedies.
The parts will be taken by various
memb-ra of tho Thespians' play-reading   committee.
It is expect eil that Prof. F.G.C.
Wood will be piesent with his caustic comment as well as constructive
criticism, ho a largo turn-out is expected, not only of Thespians, but
of   anyone   Interested. Two
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 8,  1938
THE  UBYSSEY
Issued twice weekly by the Students' Publication Board of the Alma Mater
Society of the University of British Columbia.
Office: 208 Auditorium Building ... Phone Point Orey 206
Campus Subscriptions, $1.60 Mall Subscriptions, $2.00
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
Dorothy  Cummings
SENIOR EDITORS
Tuesday
Jack Mair
Friday
Robert King
Advertising  Office
Standard Publishing Co., 1037 Pender Street West, Vancouver, B.C.
Telephone: SEYMOUR 4484
All advertising handled exclusively by Standard Publishing Co.
OAIRN CEREMONY
At last Friday's Cairn Ceremony, students were very conspicuously absent. The performance seemed almost futile hefore
such  u  small  audience.
When a hundred students turn out to take part in a ceremony whieh is the centre of U.B.C.'s tradition, something- is
decidedly wrong. Does tradition mean nothing to this University?
In the universities of Kastern Canada, tradition is the focusing point of campus life. Traditional ceremonies are numerous,
popular, and well attended. Here at our own University we have
but one such ceremony, and only one student in twenty-seven
attends   it.
Whim our Council members try to keep alive the traditional
'varsity spirit whieh is so important to tis nt the present time,
it speaks ill of the student  body to  give so  little support.
LIBRARY
Four times in the last week the main door of the library has
had to be closed because ol: damage done by the students. The
last time the door was broken when a student rushed into the
nearest compartment, whirled the door around at a terrific rate
just for the fun of seeing it turn and then stopped it with a jerk.
The result was that the supports of the door collapsed under the
strain and it was still closed on Monday.
This is the major example of the rough house tactics of a
small proportion of the students who make the library noisy by
their ill considered noisy ways. Although the reading room is
comparatively quiet there can be heard distinctive yells of students
entering the building, or relaxing in the basement. It must be
remembered that any noise made in the library can be heard
above in the reading room.
A great deal has been said about those who wish to study
and those who wish to gossip in the library, but surely it woiikl
not be difficult to get into the habit of remaining absolutely quiet
from the minute you enter the library building until you depart.
PHRATERES CO-ED
THURSDAY NIGHT
Thursday is the night when the
girls will sing "I fork out all the
change, just like the other Phrateres
do."
It's   the   Phrateres   Co-ed,   to   be'
held in  the Aztec Ballroom of the
Hotel Oeorgla, with music by Stan
Patton  and his  orchestra.
In charge of the arrangements are
Biddy    McNeill.     Ruth     Hutchinson,
Betty     Thomas     and     Pat     Chutter.
Lending their patronage to the affair
are Mrs. «L. S. Kllnck, Mrs. L. Killam
and  Dean  M.  L.  Bollert. Tickets  will
be  on  sale   outside   the  Lower  Common Room all this week.
COSMOPOLITAN CLUB
TO HOLD PEACE TEA
NOTICE
A regular moeting of the British
Columbia Academy of Sciences will
be held at the University of British
Columbia, Room 200, Science Building, at 8.15 p.m. on Thursday, November   10th.
The subject i»i "The Modern Attack  on Syphilis."
Speakers  will  be:
Dr. C, E. Dolman, Director, Provincial Board of Health Laboratories.
Dr. D. H. Williams, Dlclsion of
Venereal Disease Control, Provincial
Board of Health.
Dr. K. F. Brandon, City Epidemiologist, Vancouver,  B.C.
NOTICE
LOST—Black loose-leaf with term
notes. Finder please return to Bill
McLellan or to A.M.S. office immediately.
The Cosmopolitan Club will hold
a colorful "Peace Tea." ln the women's lower common room, on Wednesday, November 9, from 3.30-5.00
p.m.
The affair is being held In co-operation with the inter-club committee
for Peace Week on the Campus.
Thero will be several waitresses In
national costumes representing tho
various peoples making their cultural contributions to Canada in literature, in handicrafts, in music, in
nrt.  and  in   friendliness.
Admission is free and everybody
is  welcome.
A meeting of the Club will be held
at the home of Dr. C. W. Topping,
4613 W. 6th Avenue, on Sunday, November 13, at 4 p.m. Rabbi Samuel
Cass will speak on the subject of
"Jewish   Culture."
The club is also holding u hike up
Hollyburn Ridge for members and
their friends on Friday, November
11. Everyone ls to meet at the West
Vancouver ferry at 9 a.m.
FILM   NOTICE
There    will   be   a   Aim-reviewers'
meeting Tuesday,  Nov.  8, at  12.30,
In  Arts  304.     All   those  Interested
are especially asked to attend.
R. H. Mallow, society photographer, for fine portraits, phono Trin.
:U57.
GET VALUE
IN PRINTING
for the activities
of your—
SORORITIES
FRATERNITIES
SOCIAL
and
OLUB  FUNCTIONS
THE
CLARKE & STUART
CO. LIMITED
Stationers  and  Printers
550   SEYMOUR   STREET
VANCOUVER.  B.C.
ASSISTANT FORESTER
TO SPEAK ON FIRE
J. Turnon, assistant district forester for Vancouver district, will address the Forestry Club on the subject of the Forbes Landing Fire, today ut 12.40 In Ap. Sc. 100.
The meeting will be open, and
everybody interested will be welcome.
NOTICE
Export German coaching will be
given to students by Alphonse Oes-
terlo of Karlsruhe, Oermany. He
may bo reached through the Art's
letter  rack or at Pt. Grey 37,
LOST
Man's Laval wrist watch in Science
building wash room on Friday noon.
finder  please  return  to A.M.S.  office.
The   Hotel   Vancouver
presents
MART KENNY
tit   the   Spanish   ('rill
3 Have a  real
| HOME-COOKED   MEAL
1 with Mr. anil Mrs. Thomson at
f THE   GABLES   INN
MMIHIMMMIIMIMmIIIIXMIHIIMIIMIIIIIIIMMIIM Hill I
COUNCIL PUBLISHES RULES
FOR  STUDENT  FUNCTIONS
AU organizations buying in the name of the Alma Mater
Sooiety please take notice of these regulations.
RULES ANO REGULATIONS FOR PROCEDURE
OF THE ALMA MATER SOCIETY
1. ALMA MATER SOCIETY FUNCTIONS)
(a) At the commencement of each academic year the office staff of
the Alma Mater Society shall prepare a list of traditional ceremonies and major A.M.S. functions, shall tentatively book the
necessary premises for these functions, and shall prepare a memorandum for the Council member or Executive officer in charge
of each function, lt being understood that these provisions do not
relieve Council members, Executives and Managers from the
responsibility of arranging and conducting any function.
(b) The Presidents of M.U.S., W.U.S. and the Secretary of the Students'
Council shall form a committee to prepare a schedule of major and
minor functions of the Alma Mater Society based upon the recommendations submitted to It by the executives and office staff of the
Society, and further shall submit its report and all amendments
thereto to the Students' Council  for  adoption.
(c) The above committee shall be responsible for the observation of the
traditional ceremonies and courtesies expected of the Students'
Council, and further, shall direct the various subsidiary organizations of the A.M.S. as to the preparation of complimentary lists
and tho mailing of Invitations to the various functions.
2. ALMA MATER SOCIETY BUDGETS i
(a) Before the close of each academic year the various executives and
managers together with the executives and managers selected for
the next academic year, shall present to their Council representative
their tentative  budgets for the  next academic year.
(b) These Council representatives together with their successors shall
prepare departmental budgets which shall be submitted to the
Alma Mater Society office together with the original budgets submitted  as in  (a).
At the commencement of each academic year tho Treasurer of the
Society shall present to tho Students' Council a tentative budget
for that year.
At the commencement of each academic year tho office staff shall
prepare copies of all budgets submitted and corrections thereto.
Each Alma Mater Society organization, with the approval of the
Society's President and Treasurer, shall be empowered to expend
monies provided for in the corrected budget submitted until such
time as the budgets are finally passed by Council, lt being understood that no expenditures may be made until a budget Is submitted.
The budget of the Society shall be preparod by the Treasurer from
the final estimates of the proposed expenditures of the Undergraduate societies, the L.S.E., the Athletic Associations Including the
Men's Athlotlc Directorate and the student Publications, and shall
be presented In the fourth week of the Fall term to the Students'
Council for adoption.  (Article IV.,  Par. 3 of the Code).
(g) The said estimates shall be In the hands of the Treasurer before
the third week of the Fall term. (Article IV., 4 of the Code).
(h) Any student organization under the Society may spend money for
the purposes designated on its budget up to the specified amount
but shall not spend monies which are not presented tn the budget
except by special permission ln writing, first had and obtained
from the Students' Council. (Article IV., 5 of the Code).
ALMA MATER  SOCIETY  ACTIVITIES:
(a) Permission to hold any event not provided for In Section No. 1 of
the "Rules and Regulations", or to make trips, must be obtained at
least two weeks before the event or trip ls scheduled to take place.
(b) For each event or trip the executive or manager In charge shall
submit an estimate of expected receipts and expenditures to the
Alma Mater Society office at least ten days before the event or
trip  ls scheduled  to  take place.
The said estimate shall be approvod by the department concerned—
Undergraduate Society, Literary and Scientific Executive, the Men's
Athletic Directorate, the Womon's Athletic Association, or the
Publications Board—and shall be submitted to the Students' Council
for ratification, it being understood that the Council representative
for the Executive body and the President and Treasurer of the
Alma Mater Society may authorize proceeding under the estimates
until such time as the regular Students' Council meeting adopts the
said  estimates.
Upon authorization and/or adoption of the estimates of the event
or trip as In paragraph (c) the executive or manager In charge may
extend monies ln the manner therein provided, to the amount
specified ln the budget, providing that changes may be authorized
by the officers specified ln paragraph (c), to be later adopted by
the Students' Council.
For any expenditure of funds of the Alma Mater Society for any
purpose whatsoever other than by motion of the Alma Mater
Society or the Students' Council, and other than by provisions of
the Constitution, By-Laws and Code of the Alma Mater Society, as
under the budget system hereinbefore set forth, shall be the
procedure:
I. The executive or manager of any event, function, or activity
shall submit to the Accountant of the Alma Mater Society a
signed  order on  the  regular order form  of  the  Society.
Continuued on Page 3
See  A.M.S.
(c)
(d)
(e)
(f)
(c)
(d)
(e)
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TTUT338 Tuesday, November 8, 1938
THE    UBYSSEY
Three
U.B.C.   VETS  TO  MINGLE
TRAGEDY, GAYETY NOV. 11
MEMORIAL. SERVICE IN SCIENCE BUILDING,   DANCE
TO  FOLLOW  IN   HOTEL VANCOUVER
By ALAN MORLEY
Students of the University of B.C. are often unaware that their connection with the World War ls a proud and intimate one. This year it will
be marked on November 11 by two events which, ln their very contrast,
symbolize the odd mingling of sublime tragedy and gay comradeship of
that great conflict.
First of these is the solemn mem-"
orial service to be held Armistice Day
morning ln the entrance hall of the
Science Building by members of the
106th (Western Universities) Battalion. The second ls the Armistice Ball
the same evening ln Hotel Vancouver.
The University of B.C. Contingent
of the Canadian Officers Training
Corps was organized ln October, 1914.
It was then the "McOlll College"
Contingent, but soon passed under
the name of the U.B.O, and continues to be the U.B.C. unit of the
national mllltla to this day.
VALUABLE OFFICER MATERIAL
Its first contribution to the ranks
of the overseas forces was a draft of
30 men to Joint the "Universities
Companies Reinforcing the Princess
Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry,"
but it was soon realized that University men were too valuable as officer
material to be assigned to the ranks.
So in September, 1015, Major F. F.
Wesbrook, president of the new
U.B.C, was placed ln command of
the Contingent, which numbered 379
studenta, nearly all the males enrolled at the University, and lt settled  down   to  Its  real  work.
Besides training officers, the
U.B.C. contingent contributed one
company to the Western Universities Battalion, formed in 1016.
Major R. XV. Brock, the late Dean
of Applied Science, was recalled
from the front to take position of
second in command of the battalion. "D" Company, the U.B.C. unit,
was 300 strong, largest contribution
of any of the four western universities.
ROYAL  AIR FORCE  PILOTS
However, in England the battalion
was broken up, and the men used as
officers In other units, after suitable
training, or assigned as pilots to the
Royal Air Force.
From this time on the unit continued to furnish officers and officer
material partially trained for the
various Canadian  units, chiefly artil
lery  and  air  force,  until  the  end  of
the war.
697 CADETS, 131  DECORATIONS
In all, 697 cadets from the unit
served overseas, 78 laid down their
lives ln performance of their duty,
and 131 decorations and awards were
granted them. Including 1 O.B.E.,
4 D.S.O.'s, 47 M.C.'s, a bars to the
M.C, 1 second bar to the M.C, 3
D.F.C's, 1 D.C.M., 1 M.S.M., 29 mentions ln dispatches, 2 Croix de Guerre, 1 Order of the Crown of Italy,
1 Oroce dl Ouerra, and 1 Silver
Medal for Military Gallantry (U.S.).
This    short   sketch    of   a   gallant
unit's    wartime   service    gives    some
Idea  of what  the khaki cord  on  the
undergraduate gown commemorates.
On  Friday  these  78  dead  U.B.C.
undergraduates   will   live   again   in
the memories of those who attend
the service in the Science building.
That  number should Include every
undergraduate—but It will not. The
merories of the young are short.
TWENTIETH  ANNIVERSARY
MARKED  BY  BALL
This year, too, the comradeship
and gaiety of the war will be remembered at the Armistice Ball,
where present members of the U.B.C.
Contingent joined with the veterans'
association of the Western Universities to be hosts to the graduates and
students who attend the first celebration in seven years where the militia
of the Vancouver Garrison and the
veterans of the Canadian Legion will
meet those who gather with their, to
mark the twentieth anniversary of
the end of a struggle ln which the
University of B.C. played no Inconsiderable part.
TOTEM  NOTICE
All Freshmen Proofs must be in
the hands of Artona by Thursday,
November 10th, 1938, ir the owner is
to appear in the Totem.
A meeting of the complete Totem
Staff will bo held on Wednesday ln
Arts 108 at 12.45 p.m.
Toronto tea-drinkers shot imbibing on their own campus! In Toronto
as at U.B.C. a contest Is underway to discover unusual angles of tea
drinkers. Valuable rash prizes of $2.50 a week will be awarded for ten consecutive weeks. At the end of that time there will be three grand prizes
ot $35, $10 and $5 for  the three best pictures  turned tn.
Oct your snaps In by Thursday noon, November 10, to the Pub office.
I'i hit  your  name  and  address on  the  back.
ALONG
By PROXY
Some of my more consistent readers might remember the column a
few weeks ago in which I reminded
both studenta and Council that it
was time we had another Cairn
Ceremony. Council members now tell
me that the Ceremony hadn't been
forgotten ,as I had supposed, but was
merely postponed for various reasons.
Whatever those reasons might have
been, they undoubtedly had very little significance. It Is possible, for Instance, that the Ceremony was postponed ln order that lt might be publicized sufficiently to assure good- attendance. Less than one-tenth of the
student body know whether or not
lt was well attended.
For only one-tenth of the student
body — or less — was present at the
Ceremony last Friday noon. I once
said that forgetting the Cairn Ceremony was lnecusable. But falling to
attend It ls worse than Inexcusable.
It ls a direct Insult to university
trained intelligence.
There's only one reason, of course,
for all these things that are so easily
beefed about. That reason is lack of
Spirit. Or call lt Interest, allveness,
awareness, or what you will. There
1;  a definite lack of something.
This column has, from time to
time, attempted to stimulate interest
ln various ceremonies and functions.
It has spoken much of that much-
spoken-of thing, College Spirit. And
I'll be run oft the campus before I
give up.
There are all sorts of people ln
attendance at this university. There
are many who don't care about campus life ln any of its forms. There
are many who come here to study,
and feel that anything else is a waste
of  time.
But there are also many who don't
come here merely to study. It ls from
these that we should expect support
of all extra-scholastic affairs. And lt
ir: often among these that we fall to
find any trace whatever of Interest
ln traditions.
The lack, I feel, ls ln the so-called
"Cream of the Campus." The leaders
of our student body—Individuals and
groups—are usually so tied up with
their own potty affairs that they too
often ignore the call of Alma Mater.
In short—It's up to fraternities and
Rororltles. It ts an established fact
that these groups can, and invariably
do, put across a function In which
they have an Interest. If our Calm
Ceremonies and Bonfires are to be
successful, they must have the support of such important bodies of student opinion.
So—a word to Freshmen. When
Scotty spoke of Fraternity rushing ln
his last column, he made a very serious omission. He neglected to warn
the new crop to enter a fraternity
with open minds. He didn't hiht that
the parent university ls larger than
Its flock of campus organizations.
For the flrst time ln history, fraternity men are thinking of Joining
the Pep Club. Such a cataclysm will
be good for the fraternities, and more
than good for the Pep Club. The ball
has started rolling, then. It's up to
the new students to keep it roTllng.
When you join a fraternity, don't
think that you've "arrived"—or that
you have reached the peak of human
endeavor. Make your membership ln
the fraternal order a stepping-stone
to bigger things. Vou can help a fraternity, and a fraternity can help
you. But above all, try to help our
.struggling  university.
NOTICE
LOST — Green Sheaffer Lifetime
pen, In Women's Common Room or
at Bus Stand. Finder please return
lo Betty Scaling, c-o Arts Letter
Rack.
Colour Pictures
In Bigger Totem
For This Year
Having broken all existing: records
for photographing Freshmen, the
Totem authorities are now bringing
to a close their campaign for Senior
pictures, and Sclencemen photos.
Figures show that about 83% of the
Freshmen Class have been photographed, but the percentage for
Seniors and Sclencemen ts not so
encouraging.
COLOR
The Totem ls to be appreciably
larger than last year, with some sixty or seventy extra pages, and color
work throughout the book. As a consequence there is a tremendous
amount of extra work compared to
last year.
As a result the reason for the apparent rush to complete ls not as obscure as lt might at first appear. The
main cause for the tardiness ln the
appearance of the book on the campus has always been the confusion
created by a last minute effort to
obtain photographs of hundreds of
seniors.
BE  IMMORTALIZED
IN THE TOTEM
This year's book ls to include every
year on the campus. The number of
portraits required is correspondingly
greater, and the danger of late publication is virtually doubled. The
plea of the Totem editor ls, therefore, that students co-operate to the
extent of having their lovely faces
Immortalized NOW.
The Totem editor warns students
that Artona's Studio will not be on
the oampua after thla week . . . definitely. Seniors and Sclencemen
are wanted Immediately. Appointments oan be made at the Auditorium Box Offloe at noon, or at
the Ubyaaey Offloe any other time.
CAMPUS PEACE DAY
SPONSORED BY L.S.E.
The national executive of the Canadian Student Assembly has set as
its major objectives for the current
academic year a campaign for
national scholarships and the futth-
erance of efforts to obtain funds for
Far Kastern relief. The first event
of the year is the campus Peace
Day, sponsored by the L.S.E.. Executive, which Is to take place on November 9.
FACULTY   TO  SPEAK
This will take the form of a noon-
hour panel discussion in Arts 100,
when outstanding members of the
faculty will give short talks on specific phases of the peace problem.
On Nov. 18 Dr. Grant Lathe,
C.S.A. national secretary recently returned from China, will speak ln the
Auditorium here. His lecture will be
Illustrated with motion pictures
which he took on the Chinese war
front.
In preparation for these events
a meeting la called for Nov. 10, at
13.80 In Arta 106. Please see that
your club Is officially represented.
LAVAL
(Continued from Page 1)
representative of the meeting. He
said: "Our attitude tonight ls not
that of fanatical idiots drunk with
the Idea of an Utopia of a separate
French State. We are not vanquished
French, but Canadians conscious and
Jealous of the liberties which we have
acquired and which we do not wish
to sacrifice on the altar of Albion for
interests not our own.
U.S.   FRIENDSHIP   NECESSARY.
"The statesmen of our country
have no more right than thoae of
Great Britain to push us beneath the
flags of Albion, for the races which
form Canada are not ln majority
British. The only country with which
we should make a friendship ls the
United States, for our geographic
situation requires that we do. Moreover that country may be our only
protector, or our worst enemy. After
what happened ln 1914-18 anyone
who would force Canada into an
European war now would be a traitor
t(.  the  Canadian Nation."
The purpose of this column ls twofold. First It ls Intended to give more
publicity to, and definite announcement of all Engineering functions,
such as U.E.S. meetings, (which are
by far the most valuable and pointed
vocational lectures given at the University), pep meetings, S.M.U.S. meetings, intermural sports, and social
affairs. Secondly, lt Is hoped to expose for the Junior men some of the
fraternal spirit and camaraderie of
the great brotherhood of engineers
by giving news on personalities and
Interesting "faux paus," etc., by giving pep talks with applause or a kick
In the pants as the occasion merits,
and by giving the Engineer's viewpoint on campus activities.
To  accomplish  both  of   these  ends
lt ls necessary that men from all the
classes   shall   contribute   all   the   announcements   on   time  and   also   any
gossip or Jokes which they think will
make  this  column   more  representative   and   Interesting.   All   jokes   welcomed, but remember the censor!
Since  the column must be written by Monday, have your dope in
the  box  In  the  Geological  Library
by noon,  Saturday, at the latest.
The Science functions to date have
certainly   been   a   success   as   far   as
having a lot of fun and mixing with
the  profs   (who  have shown  us  time
and  time again that they  like nothing   better   than   to   forget   their   offices of dignity to become "one of the
boys"   again).   However,   due   to   lack
of support by  the second year men,
they   have  not  all   been   out   of   the
"red," a colour which  ls very popular everywhere but ln the ledger.
The second year fellows do seem to
be livening up gradually, though, for
they had a very encouraging representation at the Class Party last
Thursday, so before the year Is out
they  should   be   backing   Science  to
the hilt. Oo to it you second and
third year men. You have the majority of Science in numbers, but, so
far at least, the fourth and fifth year
men have you backed off the map
when lt comes to giving support in
the intermurals and at functions.
The second and third year men
really have something to shoot at if
they Intend to surpass the monster
pep-meet put on by the fourth year
class Thursday. It certainly ■was a
dinger! The skit was first rate and
the cake and crackers were very satisfying.
Well, boys, the quality of this column ls going to depend a lot on the
dirt YOU dig up, so be sure to have
all contributions, and please make
them plentiful, ln by noon Saturday,
and remember this ls YOUR notice
board.     Don't  hesitate  to  use  lt.
PRE-MED DINNER
Dr.  John A.  Wright will address
a   dinner   meeting   of   the   Monro
Pre-Medicai  Club  In   the  caf  at  6
p.m. on Wednesday, November 9.
All those who Intend to be present are requested to sign the notice
at the foot of the caf stairs.
SWING CLUB TO
HOLD OPEN MEETING
Mickey McMartln, drummer for
Leo Smuntan's band, will address the
Swing Club ln an open meeting to
be held in Arts 104 today noon.
Some of the latest swing records
will also be heard, announced president Frank Clark. Everyone will be
welcome.
FOUND
FOUND — Well worn brown key
case, containing seven keys and
Identification disk. Owner please call
at A. M. S. offices to claim.
AiMiSi
Continued from Page 2
il. The Accountant shall compare the said order with the budget
previously submitted and, if the order ls correct, shall prepare
an official requisition with serial number and the Alma Mater
Society of the University of British Columbia shall not be
responsible for any debts Incurred by students unless authorized
by a signed, official requisition form, the number of the
requisition  to  appear on  all  bills  presented  for  payment.
ill. In order to consolidate accounts for payment and to take
advantage of price, quality and service, the Accountant shall
order from firms or Individuals authorized by the Students'
Council unless the executive or manager presents an order to
other firms or persons countersigned by the President and/or
Treasurer of the Alma Mater Society and by the Council member superior to the executive or manager.
lv. The executive or manager of each activity, function or event
shall submit a written report ln which shall be Included recommendations for the future.
v. As soon as possible after the conclusion of each activity, function, or event the Accountant shall submit a financial statement
of all revenues and expenditures to the Treasurer and to the
Department of the Alma Mater Society concerned, and this
report shall be passed upon by Students' Council.
vl. In the interests of the Alma Mater Society the Accountant shall
at all times have the right to refuse to make purchases and
to make recommendations which shall be submitted to the
President and/or the Treasurer of the Alma Mater Society
who- may refer these matters  to the  Students' Council.
''Homo o
f the Ritz  Bui-Kor"
STAR
DAIRY
Corner
Trimble and Tenth
Point
Grey
ARMISTICE  EVE
Gala  PREVIEW
Thursday Night, November 10th
Starting- 11.15 P.M.
Big- STAGE Presentation
TREVOR PAGE and his ORCHESTRA
and other VAUDEVILLE attractions
Also on the Screen
In   Technicolor
"MEN   WITH    WINGS"
Tickets now on sale at Box  Office—50c.
ORPHEUM    THEATRE
2664  GRANVILLE
E   S
TIES
*    HOSIERY    •    ARROW SHIRTS
TIP-TOP FASHIONED SUITS
SKI-TOGS • SPORTSWEAR
BAYVIEW  9680
I   R   E
South Granville's Home of Smart
IVTeri's Wear
For FORMAL   •   STREET   •   SPORT ROUNDBALLERS DEFEAT LEAGUE LEADERS 3-1
RESULTS
Varsity 16; All-Blacks 3.
Varsity 6; North Shore Lions 7.
U.B.C. B; Meralomas 18.
Varsity 3; South Van. 1.
ARMISTICE DAY SPORT
Varsity vs. Vancouver Rep
2.45—Brockton Point
Varsity vs. Knights of Columbus
2.30—Stadium
Four
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 8,  1938
Nor tit Shore Lions Nose Out 1 Varsity
THUNDERBIRDS PROTEST
7-6 LOSS TO HILLBILLIES
By LIONEL SALT
North Shore Lions snapped Varsity's win streak at six
straight on Saturday when they downed the fighting students
7-6 at Athletic Park. The game was wide open all the way, and
only the  breaks of the game took the measure of the Blue and
Qold.
■ _	
Varsity took the lead late In the
first quarter when  Johnny  Farina
pueked up a loose ball on the Lions
twenty-live yard line and lateraled
It to Williams who streaked across
the line for a major score.  Lamb,
sent In to kick  the  convert,  compiled, but Referee Hurley ruled that
Improper    substitution    made    the
kick Illegal.
SHORE  SCORE.
North Shore retaliated ln the second quarter when they drove from
their thirty-flve yard line deep into
the student territory, and Bullock
threw a completed pass to Lucking
to the six. Powerhouse Norm Modine
carried lt over and Hindle kicked the
point  that  gave   the  Lions  the  lead
e-s.
Ooing  Into   the  fourth   quarter  of
the game the score was still 6-0 but
the student attack started rolling and
the   combined   efforts   of   Aub   Oray
and Tommy Williams carried the baU
to the  North Shore  10-yard marker.
Again   Lamb   was  brought   into  the
game,  this  time  to try for the field
goal. His kick went wide of the posts
but Lion  man was rouged trying to
bring lt out. The extra point tied the
game at 6-6.
VARSITY BOOTS IT.
The North Shore gang fought right
back,   and   pulled   off   some   brilliant
line-plunging    with     Norm     Modine
packing    the   ball    from    their   own
twenty-flve to the student thirty-flve
where   Jock   Taylor   sent   one   of   his
booming   punts   across   the   student
line. Williams, receiving the kick, was
snowed under for a rouge to give the
nod to the Lions 7-8.
Varsity hopes were revived for a
moment when Williams, on a triple
reverse ran from his own 25-yard
line to the Lions 30. With a deadline kick a cinch, and with Pearson to do the booting, a poor snap
ruined the picture and Pearson was
forced to boot short.
Freddie Smith  played a marvelous
game for  the students, but  the Varsity line, supposed to be Impregnable,
gave   way   throughout   the   game   to
the   brutal   plunges   of   Modine   and
Mauro.
MAINSTAY
IN
U.B.C. RU66ERMEN
18-5 LOSS TO
MERALOMAS
Setting a dazzling pace throughout
a wide-open flrst half, U.B.C. rugger-
men put up a grand struggle at Lower Brockton on Saturday before faltering In the face of a steady, downhill Meraloma onslaught ln the second half and going down to an 18-5
defeat af. the hands of their heavier,
more experienced opponents.
Leading 5-0 until Just before
half-time on the strength of Alan
Wallace's try which was beautifully
converted by Ormie Hall, the collegians looked set to give the Kit-
Fraternity and Sorority
Printing- and Engraving-
Our Specialty
DANCE    PROGRAMMES
INVITATIONS,   'AT   HOMES,'
LETTERHEADS   and
CHRISTMAS  CARDS
GEHRKE'S
500   Seymour   St.
CAGERS DROP
SECOND TILT
TO WESTERNS
As was expeoted Westerns beat
the University basketball team
Saturday night at the V.A.C. gym,
but aa waa not expected the blue
and gold hoopers gave the Canadian champs a real flght and after
a disastrous flrst quarter, battled
point for point with the Centre
outfit for the rest of the game, and,
only lost out 83-36.
In fact if It hadn't been for ex-
Varsity star, Art Wllloughby, this
story might have had a different
ending. The dark-haired one, playing the entire game, was red hot
and ran up a total of IB pointa mostly from long shots outside the
bucket.
Rann Mitthison was at his starry
best, and with the aid of "rookie"
Don Livingstone, led a sustained second quarter attack that brought the
"collltch" boys within three slim
points of the Westerns at the half
after the first session had left the
Varsity   7   markers   behind.
■Westerns buckled down again ln
the 3rd canto and pulled ahead another half dozen points. Wllloughby
was going "crazy" with his long
shots at this stage and although the
Varsity defense was stony, they
couldn't ptop him from looping them
In   from  way  out  yonder.
The  last quarter was  largely Varsity's   but   wretched   luck   under   the
basket   kept   them   from   making   up
the  8-polnt  deficit.
SHORTS
Besides Matthison and Livingstone,
Alee Lucas and Ry Straight turned
in clever games while the brief but
snappy showing of young Doug
Alexander was enough to Insure the
Varsity team of another new star
ln the neai future. . . . Unless the
Westerns were playing under wraps
Varsity has a good chance to end
up near the top ln the race for the
league pennant. . . . The Westerns
look the class of the loop so far
and 6  points is not  a heck of a lot.
sies a real ripping old rugger ride,
so   to   speak,   but   a   try   by   Payne
reduced   the   deficit   to   a   brace   of
points  before   the  Interval.
KITSV  KAFERS.
After resumption, the students immediately began to And the going
heavy on account of the pronounced
slope and the Lomas ran ln a try by
Campbell converted by Ooldstone to
take the lead. A field goal by the
versatile "Hump" Payne, an unconverted try by Rofe and then a 40-
yard penalty goal by Ooldstone sewed
matters up fo rthe Kitsies.
DROPKICKS . . . The flrst half
was a picnic from a Varsity point of
view . . . tlie forwards were doing
their work efficiently with PYLE,
URQUHART and SHEPHERD particularly noticeable, while the out-
fkles broke through brilliantly on
several occasions, only poor finishing
preventing more than one try . . .
ORMIE HALL ripped off some long
gains on openings unselfishly made
for him by WADDY ROBERTSON,
while BOB SMITH with two or three
-hrilling dashes down the left wing,
and IAN RICHARDS with his heady
defensive work, also caught the eye.
. . . We'll leave the second half to
your imagination.
The smiling young gent pictured
above Is Jim Harmer, one ot the
main reasons why Coaeh A. B. Carey's high-flying Thunderbirds beat
North Shore All-Blacks at the Point
Saturday. Big and faat, Jim Is one
of the most effective forwards in the
Rugby Union.
ARMISTICE DAY SPORT
Sport attractions All the bill
on Armistice Day at Varsity.
You oan take your choice of
two big events on the Student
athletic schedule. At Brockton
Point, the Blue and Oold takes
on the Vancouver Reps In the
first McKechnie Cup game of
the season; at the Stadium the
grid squad takes on the
Knights of Columbus a regular
Big Four encounter.
The Kngllsh rugger game
played at 8:48 will be the meeting of Varsity's somewhat battered "Wonder Team" and the
pick of the rest of the League.
Oardlner with a cracked shoulder, and Ranjl Mattu with
water on the knee are the cripples for the students.
The Stadium game will also
feature a crippled Varsity
team. The Students, riddled
with injuries, will take on the
Knights ut 3:30. The two teams
have already met once this
year, the students nosing out
the Irish In the dying minutes
of the game.
VARSITY SECONDS IN
6-5 VICTORY
Varsity Seconds continued their
winning ways when they edged out
the Wanderers 8-5 Saturday afternoon at Douglas Park. The score -was
not indicative of the play as the Collegians kept the Wanderers bottled
up ln their own half for the greater
part  of the  game.
The first half was scoreless as time
after time the Thunderbirds came
within inches of tries culminating
several   pretty   three   quarter   runs.
Very soon in the second half the
Varsity scrum showed their mettle In
the loose and stalwart scrumster
McLagan went over for flrst blood.
The convert was unsuccessful but
two minutes later, Varsity followed
up smartly on the klckoff and Art
Physlck scrum half dribbled over for
the aecond  unconverted  try.
Special University Tuition
Pure   and   Applied   Sciences —
flrst  year.
Advanced  Mathematics,  Mathematical   Physics, History, Philosophy,   Languages,  etc.
1470 West   5th Ave. (Cor. Gran.)
VARSITY WINS
TORRID GAME
FROM BLACKS
While   other   university   squads
were encountering defeats at various places and to varying degrees
tho  Varsity  rugby  team  managed
to keep Its unbeaten record Intact
by virtue of a 16-8 victory over the
North Shore All-Blocks.
Saturday's   game   marked   a   new
low  ln   scoring  for   the  Varsity  side
however,    and     lt    was     really    the
breaks which gave the Studes victory
over a  tough and  determined  Black
squade.
A team minus such stars as Ted
and Howie McPhee, Wilson Colledge
and Vic Moore is bound to feel the
loss but all credit must be given the
North Shore boys for the rugged
fighting game they put up against
the  Thunderbirds.
Lyman Day-Smith produced the
only score in th flrst half after one
of the few three-quarter runs of the
day, the convert being missed. In the
second half, Captain Strat Leggat
ran 36 yards through a broken field
for a try which waB converted by
Ernie Teagle to give the Birds an
8-0 lead. The All Blacks rallied valiantly to tally their three points on
a three quarter run.
Through their powerful scrum the
Blacks   controlled  play for  the  balance   of   hte   game   except   for   two
breakaways the first by Leggat who
received   a   pass   from   Jim   McCam-
mon  and   ran   50   yards   for   an   unconverted    touch.    The    final    points
came    when    Jim    Harmer    plunged
across the pay strip to clim_x a nice
effort  by  Tom   Robson.  Tod   Tremblay booted  the two extra points,
Al Oardlner, husky forward, suffered    a    broken    shoulder,    Ranjl
Mattu,   a   split  eye,   Ernie   Teagle
an injured neek and thumb to add
to    Varsity's    impressive    casualty
list.
M. A. A. MEETING
Men's Athletic Association will
hold a meeting at noon Thursday
at which the new constitution will
be up for dlsousslon. The new
Awards committee will be Introduced to the assembly.
I. Ill, ,,(11***1,(111,1, (((llll, (l„(t„„„|llll(„, , IIIHI, ,11, ,I|||MM(,
CO-ED SPORTS
By MYRNE NEVISON
, (din ml ((in mini ,«>,«« nniii,, iiiiiiii,,!, „iii, ii, «,,«, tn, ,,,11,
The hockey girls are hiding their
heads again—their coach called lt a
moral victory which counts for less
than nothing ln this hard-boiled
world whclh saw only a 3-0 defeat
for the U.B.C. co-eds at the hands
of the Pro-Rec eleven. The score Is
now three wins and two successive
losses for the senior collegians.
The girls better come to before
they tackle the "Touring Canucks"
this Saturday in an exhibition game.
A practice is called for tomorrow to
see if the forwards in five simple
lessons can learn how to score—
that ltltle detail so necessary for
winning games.
Varsity emerged distinctly the
worse for wear from a battle with
South Burnaby who literally fought
their way to a 2-0 win.
Sports Gallery. We give you . . .
Hortense Warne. The best fullback
in the city league, Hortense has
proved a boon to her hockey colleagues. Well-known for her track
activities   and   second   to   her   V.A.C.
Exclusive Camera  PORTRAITS
At   Popular  Prices
talk of
the towi
RICH- DARK, FRENCH
STYLI CHOCOLATE
PACKED WITH CRISP,
CRUNCHY ALMONDS
Soccermen In
Over South
___ i
They're at it again!
Last year Charlie Hltchens' Varsity soccermen came to be regarded
ass the giant-killers of the Vancouver
and District League. And on Saturday at Wilson Park those same Blue
ond Oold roundballers snapped out
of their recent slump with a bang
and took up where they left off last
season by defeating the league-leading South Vancouver 3-1 ln a torrid
encounter.
STUDES  SURPRISE.
Conceded little chance to upset
their hitherto-unbeaten opponents,
the students amazed onlookers by
holding their own ln every department, and giving as good as they got
at the hands of the heavy, hardhitting South Van team.
The home team opened the scoring early In the flrst half through
but before long a brilliant Blue and
Oold combination play culminated
In  Jim  Robinson  heading  a clever
Upset Win
Vancouver XI
equalizer. No further score waa registered  until   15  minutes  after  the
Interval,   when   the   league-leaders
went ahead again on goal.
BOYS, BOYS!
The campusmen proceeded to remind their opponents very forcibly of
their presence at this point, and play
got considerably too rough for comfort. But after a continuous bombardment of the home net, Doug
Todd put the students back ln the
game with a snap shot from a scramble ln front of goal.
Then with but Ave minutes left
before it was time for the boys to
pack up and go home, McLaren,
diminutive Varsity substitute centre-forward was brought down
heavily In the penalty area when
In position to shoot, and skipper
Alan Croll became the man of the
hour by sinking the winner from
the resultant penalty.
FROSH BOW TO CLUB
The Frosh, newly organized rugger team on the campus, absorbed
another defeat this week at the
hands of the Rowing Club 18-9. The
Rowing Club played three of their
flrst string men, however, with Box-
borough, Tangy Moran, and King
surpassing the efforts of the fighting
frosh.
The Frosh took the lead ln the flrst
half 8-3 but faded fast ln the closing
half to lose out 18-0. Wood and Askew with tries and Gordie Pyle with
a penalty goal were the scorers for
the  students.
LOST
A 'Continuing German' text by
Schlnnerer. Please return to Virginia
Oalloway ln Pub. Office.
INTRA-MURALS
VOLLEYBALL  SCHEDULE:
Wednesday Nov. 9, 13:30:
Sc. '39—Arts '39.
Sc.   '40—Anglicans.
Intra-mural organizer Maury Van
Vliet claims that this battle between
Science '39 and Arts '39 should be
the classic volley ball battle of the
season and if any students want to
know the fine points of the winter
pastime  should  turn   out.
After the Cross Country Race today noon the next big Item Is the
Mall Race next week. Oet out and
get ln training.
NOTICE
Weightlifters,   please   turn   in   your
$1.00 to Ted Margetts  . . . PRONTO.
Ittllllllllllll.tlMIIMtlllllllHHIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIttllHItltllltlllllfllllllll   IllllllHIHIIMIHHIIMIIHHIIIIIHHIHMIIMIIMIII-.IIIIMI
Pioneer Laundry & Dry Cleaners !
Seymour 8334 J
A  coniplt'ti'   Latin*.ry nnd  Dry  ('loaning  Servii'o |
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897
ORANVILLE
(At  Smythe)
ICE CREAM
After Theatre
Specials
Silk Hat
MARGARET FINI.AY,  Arts  '31
JACK  PARKER. Arts  '30
CROSS COUNTRY RACE TODAY 12:45, ALL OUT

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